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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Fri. Sep. 20 - 6:09 pm
Fri. 09/20/19
Anthony Curry receives true life prison sentence following human sex trafficking conviction
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/20/19 5:25 PM

September 20, 2019

Anthony Curry receives true life prison sentence following human sex trafficking conviction

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 54-year-old Anthony Curry received a true life sentence on 22 felony sex crime convictions. Four of the true life prison sentences will run consecutively following a four-day trial that was prosecuted by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office Human Trafficking Team.

Under Oregon law, Curry is ineligible for parole based on his criminal record and the court’s findings, which means he will never be released from prison.

“Anthony Curry stole my teenage years away from me. Even after I was rescued there was no way for me to be a ‘normal’ teenager. There was no way for me to live a ‘normal’ life. I tried as a teenager, and I am trying as an adult, a mother, and a wife, but there is so much damage, and I can never replace the years that are now lost to me,” the victim wrote in an impact statement, which was presented to the court.

In her impact statement, the victim described the impact Curry had on her by forcing her into the commercial sex industry.  

“Anthony Curry brainwashed me. He made me feel dirty and worthless. And it has taken me years, and the birth of my son, to understand that I am not worthless, and to begin to understand just how worthy and beautiful I really am,” her impact statement continues.

During trial, the state presented evidence that showed the victim was 15 years old at the time of the offenses. In July 2014, she was in Portland, Oregon waiting for a TriMet bus when Curry drove past her, slowed his vehicle and circled the area. Curry stopped his vehicle in the middle of the road and started talking to her.

He convinced the victim to enter his vehicle and brought her to his residence in Multnomah County.

“Human trafficking is a form of slavery, where traffickers prey on vulnerable victims submitting them to commercial sex acts with strangers in order to make money,” said Multnomah County Senior Deputy District Attorney J.R. Ujifusa, who prosecuted this case. “Individuals like Anthony Curry exploit young women into engaging in sexual acts with strangers thus placing them into dangerous situations so they can personally profit.”

In this case, Curry immediately started grooming the teen for human sex trafficking. During the investigation, law enforcement located multiple photos of the victim taken by Curry. The first photo was dated July 19, 2014.

The photos of the victim were posted to Backpage.com. Additionally, the victim testified that Curry provided her with a fake ID so they could enter local strip clubs.

The victim found herself dancing naked alongside adult women. Curry would drop her off at the club and pick her up “with his hand out waiting for that money,” Ujifusa said during closing arguments.

On September 9, 2014, law enforcement executed a search warrant at Curry’s residence where they located a heavily-highlighted and studied book titled, "The Art of Seduction.”

The book included detailed information on how to manipulate and control individuals. The book explained how to locate potential individuals who can be highly influenced.

“Anthony Curry – like many traffickers – was manipulative and preyed on any weakness he could find. We are so proud of survivors like the young woman in this case. The actions of Anthony Curry will have a lifelong effect on her, but as we’ve seen today, she is stronger now. She is a champion for other survivors,” said SDDA Ujifusa.

“Anthony Curry is a smart, sophisticated and an adaptable sexual predator. He has continuously evolved to become more dangerous through every arrest and every conviction. He had studied to become a predator to prey on the most vulnerable members of our community for more than 25 years,” said SDDA Ujifusa. “Since the 1990s, he has been looking for vulnerable children to rape, threaten, manipulate and control to get what he wants.”

Curry will have to register as a sex offender for life.

The jury acquitted Curry of one count of sodomy in the third degree.

This case was litigated by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office Human Trafficking Team, which includes two attorneys, an investigator and a victim advocate. Additionally, an attorney assigned to the MCDA gang unit is available to help prosecute cases and support the team as trafficking routinely intersects with gang violence.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the work of Beaverton Police Detective Chad Opitz, who is a task force officer on the Portland FBI Child Exploitation Task Force, for his work as lead investigator on this case.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office’s Human Trafficking Team works to protect victims utilizing a three-prong approach: (1) aggressively prosecuting those who traffic victims to sex buyers; (2) reducing demand for exploitation in all forms to include a dedicated focus on a reduction of sex buyers; and (3) ensuring adequate protection and support for victims of human trafficking.

If you are involved in sex trafficking, or know of someone who is being trafficked, call the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-373-7888 or 9-1-1.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5769/127832/PR-19-226-Anthony_Curry.pdf

News Release: WPD UPDATE ON SCHOOL TRAFFIC SAFETY ENFORCEMENT FROM SEPTEMBER 3-13, 2019
Woodburn Police - 09/20/19 4:58 PM

Friday, September 20 - Woodburn OR- The Woodburn Police Department (WPD) has completed its two week traffic safety enforcement throughout the Woodburn School District. The traffic enforcement resulted in 25 traffic stops in school zones during restricted speed zone hours of which:

  • Fourteen traffic stops were for speeding
  • Seven traffic stops were for failing to obey a traffic control device
  • Four traffic stops were for misuse of a lane

A total of 22 traffic citations were issued along with ten traffic warnings. 

While the safety enforcement period has concluded, WPD wants to remind everyone to continue driving safely in and around school zones to keep students, staff and community members safe this school year.

###

 

ORIGINAL RELEASE

Woodburn OR- The Woodburn Police Department (WPD) will conduct traffic safety enforcement during the beginning of the school year, starting Tuesday, September 3 through Friday, September 13, 2019. This will take place throughout all Woodburn School Zones. 

Officers will be focusing on enforcing speed, seatbelt usage, unlawful use of mobile devices while driving and any other unsafe driving violations.  The goal of traffic safety enforcement is to keep students, school staff and community members safe during this school season.  WPD wants to remind everyone that most school zones in Woodburn have reduced school speed zone laws of 20 miles per hour between 7:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. on all school days, and that traffic violations in these zones face enhanced fine amounts. 

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Peaceful Demonstration Events Conclude in Downtown Portland (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/20/19 3:55 PM
Jake Photo
Jake Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3056/127829/thumb_Jake_Photo.png
On Friday, September 20, 2019, a rally and permitted march occurred in downtown Portland. Several thousand participants gathered in Terry Schrunk Plaza and marched down Southwest Madison Street across the Hawthorne Bridge.

Event organizers worked with PPB demonstration liaisons to facilitate a safe and peaceful event.

There were three arrests during the march. An individual vandalized the Hawthorne Bridge and was arrested. During the arrest, the subject fought with officers; a takedown was used and pepper spray was deployed to effect the arrest. There were no injuries from this event. This subject identified himself as "Jake" (PHOTO) and he was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center for Criminal Mischief II and Resist Arrest. Several weapons were seized from his backpack (PHOTO).

Two 17-year-old juveniles were arrested for Disorderly Conduct II and Interfering with a Police Officer. They were processed and released to responsible adults and the cases are being referred to the Multnomah County District Attorney's Juvenile Division.

One participant was pepper sprayed by another participant and was treated by medical personnel during the event. The suspect who used pepper spray was not identified.

The Bureau posted updates and released two video from the Public Information Officer on its Twitter feed, which is @portlandpolice.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Jake Photo , Weapons Seized

Traffic alert / changes for Portland VA Medical Center starting September 27
VA Portland Health Care System (VAPORHCS) - 09/20/19 3:12 PM

PORTLAND, Oregon – All people who go to or travel by the VA Portland Health Care System Portland VA Medical Center located at 3710 SW U.S. Veterans Hospital Road, Portland Oregon, should be advised of traffic changes starting September 27, 2019, and lasting up to approximately five weeks due to construction work at the hospital.

During this time, traffic directly in front of the main medical center on SW U.S. Veterans Hospital Road will be one-way (see map) and drop-off/pick up locations with be altered.

  • Public bus transportation (Tri-Met, C-Tran) will drop-off/pick up passengers in front of building #103 just across from the main hospital building #100 near the flag pole.
  • Taxi, ride share services, and private vehicles will drop-off/pick up in the patient/visitor parking area in the building #102 P2 parking garage area. There will be several short-term parking spaces available (15 minutes or less).
  • VA shuttle busses, Veterans Transportation Service (VTS), and Disabled American Veterans (DAV) vehicles will still drop-off/pick up in front of the main hospital building #101 (no major change).
  • All CARE car / contracted patient transportation services will drop-off/pick up behind the main hospital building #100 parking lot #7 in their designated area.
  • All commercial delivery vehicles will unload behind the main hospital building #100 parking lot #7 in their designated loading docks.
  • U.S. Veterans Hospital Road will not be accessible via S.W. Gaines Street.
  • Bicyclists must walk bicycles on the sidewalk when traveling opposite direction of the temporary one-way traffic section along U.S Veterans Hospital Road.
  • Flaggers/traffic control personnel will be present during normal business hours to assist with traffic flow.
  • Traffic directional signage will be posted.

Construction includes demolishing sidewalks, installing the new bollards, and reconstructing a new sidewalk increasing width to better accommodate wheelchair and general patient and visitor access.  

Click HERE for printable map; click HERE to share a Facebook post; Click here for a web release.

(Visit the VAPORHCS web site at www.portland.va.gov for the documents or the VA Portland Health Care System Facebook page.)

 

 




Attached Media Files: Map of VA Portland Traffic Changes

Donors and nonprofits surpass $1.6 million goal during 24-hour giving marathon, Give More 24! (Photo)
Community Foundation for Southwest Washington - 09/20/19 3:09 PM
Journey Theater Arts Group, a participating nonprofit, performs at the Give More 24! Rally to kick off the day of giving.
Journey Theater Arts Group, a participating nonprofit, performs at the Give More 24! Rally to kick off the day of giving.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3522/127827/thumb_Give_More_24_018_6659.jpg

Vancouver, Wash., September 20, 2019Nearly 170 nonprofits that provide services to southwest Washington communities came together yesterday during a 24-hour, online giving marathon called Give More 24! The event, organized by the Community Foundation for Southwest Washington, kicked off at midnight on Thursday, September 19 and inspired thousands of people to give to local causes online at www.givemore24.org. Part of the draw was the chance for donors to double their contributions through $700,000 in matching funds, as well as the potential to help their favored organizations win one of nineteen $1,000 nonprofit prizes.

The event continued to grow in its sixth year, setting records for the number of organizations participating (169) and the number of donors making contributions (4,391). In fact, this year’s event attracted an additional 694 donors—the third largest increase in the history of Give More 24! Collective donations surpassed the event’s $1.6 million goal minutes before midnight, with a final tally of $1,658,015—a 22% increase from the 2018 result.

“The most notable and inspiring result of this year was the number of people who chose to make a difference,” said Jennifer Rhoads, President of the Community Foundation. “We’ve been seeing smaller donor increases the last couple of years, and this year our community reversed that trend by tapping into their social circles.”

This was the second year that individuals could support their favorite nonprofit by creating a personal campaign page. Called peer-to-peer fundraising, this strategy leverages existing social networks to raise funds and is becoming increasingly popular in the world of philanthropy. During this year’s Give More 24! campaign, 167 peer-to-peer fundraising champions brought 609 donors to the day, raising $73,892 for their respective causes.

Anyone from across the region and around the world could visit the Give More 24! website (givemore24.org) to make charitable gifts. In total, the website saw nearly 9,000 unique visitors over the course of the day, with the most popular hours being noon and 8 p.m. The giving day site allowed donors to filter participating organizations by cause area or location, see active matches and review nonprofit prize awards.

As an online event, most donors give from home or work, and some donations even come in from outside the area. Overall, 6,757 gifts ranging from $5 to $20,000 came in from 44 states and 4 countries, with the furthest coming from Mosman, Australia. The average gift size was $157 and donors gave an average of 1.6 gifts. Giving came primarily from southwest Washington, with nearly half of all online gifts came from Vancouver residents (3,048). Longview (829), Portland (367), Camas and Ridgefield (301 each) were the next most active cities.

Every donation made through the website was added to the fundraising totals in real-time, allowing donors to see their contribution to the larger event and watch the performance of their favorite organizations. Based on the data, many people stayed engaged with Give More 24! throughout the day, returning to see the progress and, in some cases, make additional gifts.

“The friendly competition and urgency of 24 hours creates excitement that you can see and feel,” Rhoads said. “It makes giving fun and approachable, while highlighting serious community needs and the vital nonprofits that are working hard to address them.”

Cause categories covered a full spectrum of interests, such as animal welfare, arts and culture, environment, religion, social justice and veterans. Looking at causes, those that attracted the most funds during Give More 24! were Education ($369,729), Health & Wellness ($296,612), and Poverty & Hunger ($236,246). When the event closed, Lower Columbia School Gardens was the most popular organization with 227 supporters donating. The most successful fundraiser was North County Community Food Bank (NCCFB) with $96,405 in total giving. NCCFB led the small-sized organizations in funds raised, Teach One to Lead One ($38,554) topped the medium-sized category and Our Lady of Lordes Catholic School ($65,659) led all large-sized organizations.

“Little by little, our collective giving creates a huge monetary impact, but the people inspire me most,” Rhoads said. “Nonprofit employees; donors; it’s their actions, stories and connections that make our region so special.”

This event would not be possible without the support of a generous group of business sponsors. Davidson & Associates Insurance representing PEMCO Insurance served as the presenting sponsor of Give More 24! Further financial support is provided by power sponsor Kaiser Permanente and boost sponsor Columbia Bank. Invaluable promotional support is provided through media sponsors Bicoastal Media (The Peak 98.3 FM, Real Country 93.5 FM, Rocket 107.1 FM), and newspapers The Columbian and The Daily News. For full details on Give More 24! sponsors, as well as the giving totals and leaderboards detailing which nonprofits and causes raised the most funds and donors, visit www.GiveMore24.org.

###




Attached Media Files: Journey Theater Arts Group, a participating nonprofit, performs at the Give More 24! Rally to kick off the day of giving. , Emily McCoy from presenting sponsor Davidson & Associates Insurance serves meals at a farm to table lunch that supports a Partners in Careers' veterans program. , Mark Matthias, owner of Beaches Restaurant & Bar and board chair of the Community Foundation, takes part in a donut toss competition at the Give More 24! Rally. , Timber Joey was one of many mascots and characters that joined a crowd of people attending the Give More 24! Rally. , Kristina Rasmussen-Becker of Barre 3 Felida led a goat yoga class in Battle Ground's central park to support the North County Community Food Bank's Give More 24! campaign.

Regular Session for September 26, 2019
Gervais Sch. Dist. - 09/20/19 2:38 PM

REGULAR SESSION

The Gervais School District #1 School Board, Gervais, Oregon will convene in a Regular Session in the Gervais School District Conference Center on Thursday, September 26, 2019, at 6:00 p.m. The agenda for the Regular Session meeting includes, but is not limited to, the following business:

 

Reports:

  • Student Council
  • Administrators Reports
  • Financial Reports
  • Superintendent Report

 

 

Action Items:

 

  • Appoint School Board Member
  • OSBA Board of Director Nominations for Position 12
  • OSBA Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) Nominations for Position 11 & 12
  • Mutual Agreement with Frontier Charter Academy for 2020-2023

 

Discussion Items:

  • Policy First Readings

             AC:  Nondiscrimination

             AC-AR:  Discrimination Complaint Procedure

             GDCA/GDDA:  Criminal Records Check and Fingerprinting

              GCDA/GDDA-AR:  Criminal Records Check and Fingerprinting

               IGBBA:  Talented and Gifted Students-Identification

                IGBBA-AR:  Appeal Procedure for Talented and Gifted Student Identification and Placement

                IGBBC:  Talented and Gifted-Programs and Services   

               IGBBC-AR:  Complaints Regarding the Talented and Gifted Program

               IICC:  Volunteers

               JFCJ:  Weapons in School

 

 


Columbia River abandoned vessels and illegal camping sites are focus of joint cleanup action
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 09/20/19 2:14 PM

NEWS RELEASE – for immediate release

Media Contacts:

Oregon State Department of State Lands

Ken Armstrong, Communications Manager, 503-881-2623, mstrong@state.or.us">ken.armstrong@state.or.us

Oregon State Marine Board

Ashley Massey, Public Information Officer, 503-378-2623 ashley.massey@oregon.gov

Sept. 20, 2019

Columbia River abandoned vessels, illegal camping sites focus of joint cleanup 

SALEM, Ore. – A coalition of state agencies, local government, law enforcement and community action groups are engaged in cooperative action to reduce the number of abandoned boats and long-term, unpermitted camping sites on the Willamette and Columbia rivers in north Portland.

The most recent action began today in north Portland on the Columbia River when the Oregon Department of State Lands and Oregon State Marine Board jointly began clearing several abandoned/derelict vessels from the water. The vessel removal will occur throughout the weekend.

Recently in the same area, DSL partnered with the Port of Portland, city of Portland, Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, Metro and the Oregon State Police on September 10-13 to remove several unauthorized beach encampments. Over seven tons of garbage was removed during the beach cleanup.

Prior to the beach cleanup, DSL posted signage announcing emergency restrictions and notices of upcoming cleanup actions at locations in North Portland Harbor along North Marine Drive and west of the Railroad Bridge. The Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office River Patrol also posted pre-seizure notices on abandoned boats in the area for this weekend’s action.

The camping restrictions mirror recent DSL action to prohibit camping and campfires at these locations, and to prohibit all activity between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. DSL took similar action in July at Swan Island and in May in Eugene. The agency will ask the State Land Board in October for approval to initiate formal rulemaking to make permanent these new use restrictions.

“Together we are chipping away at this problem a bit at a time,” said DSL North Operations Manager Chris Castelli. “The various partners all play different roles here, and we all support each other to achieve a common goal. We’re making progress but have a long way to go.”

“The accumulation of abandoned and derelict vessels in the waterways around Portland have become a significant concern for recreational boaters in recent years,” said Josh Mulhollem, Policy and Environmental Program Manager for the Oregon State Marine Board. “Some of these vessels obstruct safe navigation, not to mention the water quality impacts. The Marine Board’s primary concern is to ensure the safety of the boating public, and these boats and other debris removal efforts support that goal.”

Recognizing the social and human aspect of the problem, the partner agencies are making every effort to coordinate and connect individuals impacted by the cleanup work with social service providers in the Portland area.

DSL and the Marine Board split the costs associated with the vessel removal, while DSL coordinated with Metro for proper solid and hazardous waste disposal, as well as personal property storage, for the cleanup of beach encampments.

As steward of state-owned lands, DSL has authority over all publicly owned submerged and submersible lands (the “beds and banks”), which include beaches and other riverfront property up to the Ordinary High Water line. The agency often cooperates with upland property owners to manage the use of such properties.

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Bev Clarno and State Treasurer Tobias Read. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon’s Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit. For more information on DSL and state-owned waterways, please visit:  Use of state-owned waterways.

The Marine Board is directly funded by boaters in the form of registration, title, and permit fees, as well as through marine fuel taxes. No lottery, general fund tax dollars or local facility parking fees support the agency or its programs. Boater-paid fees support the boating public through boating safety services (on-the-water law enforcement, training, and equipment), boating safety education, grants for the construction and maintenance of boating access facilities, and environmental protection programs. For more information about the Marine Board and its programs, visit www.boatoregon.com.

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Hieu John Phung receives probation sentence for intentionally driving his SUV inside the Lady of Lavang Church (Photo)
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/20/19 2:07 PM
2019-09/5769/127824/Hieu_John_Phung_-_Photo_5.jpg
2019-09/5769/127824/Hieu_John_Phung_-_Photo_5.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/5769/127824/thumb_Hieu_John_Phung_-_Photo_5.jpg

September 20, 2019

Hieu John Phung receives probation sentence for intentionally driving his SUV inside the Lady of Lavang Church

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 36-year-old Hieu John Phung received a 36-month probation sentence after a jury convicted him of intentionally driving his vehicle inside the Lady of Lavang Church.

“The damage done to Lady of Lavang Church was disastrous. This situation could have been deadly had anybody been inside. Thankfully, no one was hurt, but hundreds of parishioners were heartbroken to find their place of worship destroyed the day before one of their most sacred holidays,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Mariel Mota, who prosecuted this case. “The community support and collaboration we saw in the days and weeks after this event was truly uplifting, and representative of a nurturing, diverse, and engaged community we are proud to serve and represent.”

During the two-day trial, the state presented evidence that showed on December 24, 2018, Phung left his residence and drove to the Lady of Lavang Church, a Vietnamese Catholic church, located in the 5400 block of Northeast Alameda Street, in a full-size SUV and crashed through the closed gate. Phung intentionally smashed his vehicle into the exterior of the church multiple times. As a result, his vehicle entered the church, destroying the pews and doors.

The church had to spend more than $324,000 to repair the damage caused during this incident.

As Phung exited the interior of the church, he drove through another closed gate, causing more damage.

When police arrived, they located extensive damage and debris strewn about the property. Amidst the wreckage, police located a license plate, which was registered to Phung, and the front grill to his SUV.

Phung left the area before police arrived. Officers started doing an area check around the church looking for either him or the vehicle.

Several hours after the crash, Phung made two 9-1-1 calls about the incident. Law enforcement eventually located and arrested him without incident.

During the investigation, law enforcement learned Phung intentionally drove his vehicle into the church following a family dispute that had peripheral ties to the church. There was no evidence that this was a bias crime.

The jury convicted Phung of one count of criminal mischief in the first degree, one count of failure to perform the duties of a driver and one count of criminal trespass in the second degree.

As part of his sentencing, the court ordered Phung undergo a mental health evaluation and complete any treatment that may be ordered. The court also imposed 75 hours of community service, ordered that he have no contact and not enter the church while on probation, and suspended his driving privileges for one year. A hearing on restitution will be held at a later date.

Five still photos, which were entered as exhibits during trial, are being released with a copy of this press release.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the work of the Portland Police Bureau for their dedicated efforts investigating this matter.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5769/127824/PR-19-225-Hieu_John_Phung.pdf , 2019-09/5769/127824/Hieu_John_Phung_-_Photo_5.jpg , 2019-09/5769/127824/Hieu_John_Phung_-_Photo_4.jpg , 2019-09/5769/127824/Hieu_John_Phung_-_Photo_III.jpg , 2019-09/5769/127824/Hieu_John_Phung_-_Photo_II.jpg , 2019-09/5769/127824/Hieu_John_Phung_-_Photo_I.jpg

Updated Media Release Regarding the recovery of Cameron Sheldon's Body in Otis
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/20/19 12:51 PM

On September 19, 2019 the deceased subject located on property on Widow Creek Road in Otis, OR and presumed to be the remains of missing person Cameron Shelden, was examination by the Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office.  It was determined that he suffered a gunshot to the head consistent with a .45 caliber bullet.  Due to the advanced state of decomposition of the body, the OSME is continuing the examination. Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office detectives located a .45 caliber semi-automatic handgun and single .45 caliber shell casing where the body was recovered.      

Positive identification of the body is still being determined and the death investigation continues.

###

Mark Meister

Administrative Patrol Sergeant

Phone 541-265-0684

www.lincolncountysheriff.net

225 W. Olive St. Newport, OR 97365

 

 


Individual in officer-involved shooting identified
Salem Police Dept. - 09/20/19 12:25 PM

Salem, Ore. —This release is a brief update to the September 18 officer-involved shooting incident during a Polk County Interagency Narcotics Team (POINT) investigation. The incident occurred inside the Goodwill Store on Edgewater ST NW in west Salem.

Scott Gabriel Spangler, age 43, of Dallas has been identified as the individual who died during the altercation with POINT Officer Darren Buchholz of the Dallas Police Department.

According to state protocol on deadly force response, an outside agency must take on the role of lead investigative agency. The Salem Police Department has been assigned that role.  

The investigation is ongoing and no further information will be released at this time or until the case is reviewed by the Office of the Polk County District Attorney.

# # #


Tigard Police Open House
Tigard Police - 09/20/19 12:18 PM

This is going to be awesome!

On Saturday, September 21st, Tigard Police will once again open their doors and give the community a look into what it takes to provide round-the-clock police services in Tigard. This is the second open house the Tigard Police hosted. The first in 2017 brought nearly 700 visitors. On Saturday, the department expects even more.

On tap for the event will be escorted and narrated tours of the inside of the department. Visitors will see the interior working units including records, property and evidence, criminal investigations, holding cells and more. Outside their will be a special demonstration taking place in a custom tent where a virtual force response scenario will take place. This training given to police officers will help them in critical decision making at dynamic incidents. Other displays include a host of police vehicles open for inspection including an armored tactical response vehicle from Washington County. A mobile command center and traffic safety motorcycles will be there as well. The Tigard Police K-9 teams will be on-hand to greet visitors.. There will also be Tigard representatives offering recruitment information and demonstrations of the physical agility testing component required for all police officer candidates.

The event is sure to educate, inspire and entertain. Everyone is invited to this welcoming family-friendly event. Please join us at our house -Tigard Police Department, 13125 SW Hall Blvd, Tigard 97223  The event begins at 10am and continues until 1pm. There will also be ice cream treats to keep everyone refreshed.See you there!

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1798/127821/TPD_Open_House_8.5x11.pdf

Media Advisory: Amy from 99.5 The Wolf and Union Gospel Will Collect Winter Gear for Homeless
Union Gospel Mission - 09/20/19 12:04 PM

Media Advisory: Amy from 99.5 The Wolf and Union Gospel Will Collect Winter Gear for Homeless

Portland, Ore., - On September 21st between 12-2 pm Union Gospel Mission along with 99.5 The Wolf will be at AMC Theater Progress Ridge collecting winter gear to help those experiencing homelessness.

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WSU Vancouver presents bilingual hip-hop artist, producer, activist and scholar
WSU Vancouver - 09/20/19 11:58 AM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Washington State University Vancouver’s Cultural Arts and Equity Hip-Hop Series will present Olmeca from 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25 in the Dengerink Administration Building, Room 110. The event is free and open to the public.

Olmeca is a bilingual hip-hop artist, producer, activist and scholar whose work has been widely featured in national media and has earned praise from English and Spanish news outlets. He will present “DEFINE: Hip-Hop Stories of a New America.” In his presentation, Olmeca interweaves performance and dialogue as he examines U.S. art, culture and politics as they relate to marginalized communities and low-income families with access barriers. He delves into the notion of identity while challenging the idea of ‘belonging’ and what it means to be and become ‘American.’

About the Cultural Arts and Equity Hip-Hop Series

Introduced this year, the series is designed to broaden the community’s understanding of how cultural arts through hip-hop can cultivate an inclusive campus community that centers the success of historically underserved students. The series continues through the academic year, featuring workshops, talks and performances with local and global activists, scholars and artists.

About WSU Vancouver

WSU Vancouver is located at 14204 N.E. Salmon Creek Ave. in Vancouver, east of the 134th Street exit from either I-5 or I-205, or via C-TRAN bus service. Parking is available at meters and in the Blue Daily pay lot for $4/$2 after 5 p.m.

As one of six campuses of the Washington State University system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

# # #


Cowlitz County District #2 Battalion Chief Mike Zainfeld (Follow-up press release)
Kelso Police Deptartment - 09/20/19 10:41 AM

Yesterday morning, September 19, 2019, at approximately 0600 hours, Battalion Chief Mike Zainfeld unfortunately chose to take his own life after battling a job-related injury incurred by occupational stress.  Mike was on medical leave and not on duty at the time of this incident.  Mike was a 25 year veteran of Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue, including 5 years as a volunteer and 20 years as a career firefighter.

Due to the job-related nature of Mike's situation, Cowlitz 2 personnel considers this a line of duty event.  Our concern now is to honor Mike and his service as well as taking care of his family and our personnel.


BGPS offers free weekly early learning program for children up to age 5 (Photo)
Battle Ground Sch. Dist. - 09/20/19 10:35 AM
Flyer for the Let's Learn and Play Together program
Flyer for the Let's Learn and Play Together program
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/20/127816/thumb_Lets_Play_and_Learn_-_front_Page_1.jpg

Suzie Wuitschick taught first and second grades at Pleasant Valley Primary for more than 25 years before retiring in 2015. Her experience as a teacher taught her countless things about early childhood development, with one of the most enduring lessons being the important role that parents play in helping their children to be adequately prepared for the classroom learning environment. That’s why last year, Wuitschick and her grandson Chase regularly attended Battle Ground Public Schools’ weekly school readiness program, “Let’s Play and Learn Together.”

Let’s Play and Learn Together is a free, weekly drop-in program for children up to five years old. Registration is not required in order to attend. Parents and grandparents are welcome to stop by with their children to engage in a variety of fun and educational activities designed to acclimate preschoolers to the classroom learning environment and provide parents with tools to aid in their children’s development.

“I would highly recommend Let’s Play and Learn Together for anyone who has a preschooler,” Wuitschick said. “My grandson and I looked forward to attending every week. The program’s leaders do a fantastic job of sharing songs, games, and learning activities that help kids prepare for kindergarten, and it’s an excellent resource for parents and grandparents looking for activities they could do at home to follow up on the weekly lessons.”

Mike Michaud, Battle Ground Public Schools’ Director of Instructional Leadership for early childhood and primary schools, says Let’s Play and Learn emphasizes skill development in oral language and vocabulary. The program also includes Bridges pre-k curriculum to expose children to the math vocabulary and manipulatives they will see as BGPS students. The district just adopted Bridges for its new math curriculum in K-5 classrooms.

“Taking advantage of early learning opportunities helps ensure appropriate cognitive development and prepares students for academic success,” Michaud said. “School readiness activities not only help develop learning skills and prepare children for the classroom environment, but also help young children develop confidence and social skills as they interact with their peers and program leaders.”

Parent education is a key component built into the Let’s Play and Learn Together program, as parents attend and observe the modeled lessons with their children. At the end of each weekly session, instructors highlight strategies for parents to use at home to be more effective in aiding their child’s learning development.

“As an educator and a grandparent, I know that extra supports and early learning opportunities are invaluable for young children,” Wuitschick said. “Many parents simply don’t have the opportunity or the knowledge of what types of activities are good preparation for kindergarten, which is why Let’s Play and Learn Together is such a tremendous resource.”

Let’s Play and Learn Together sessions for the 2019-20 school year begin Tuesday, September 24, and will be held each week throughout the year. The program is available at the following times and locations:

  • Mondays at Daybreak Primary School from 9:30 to 11 a.m.
  • Tuesdays at Yacolt Primary School from 9:30 to 11 a.m.
  • Wednesdays at Daybreak Primary School from 1:30 to 3 p.m.
  • Thursdays at Tukes Valley Primary from 9:30 to 11 a.m.
  • Fridays at Glenwood Heights Primary from 9:30 to 11 a.m.

If you have questions about Let’s Play and Learn Together, please call (360) 885-5428.




Attached Media Files: Flyer for the Let's Learn and Play Together program

Fight at McNary High School-595 Chemawa Road North, Keizer
Keizer Police Dept. - 09/20/19 9:22 AM

Keizer Police Incident #19-3442

On September 19, 2019 at about 2:20 p.m., a Keizer Police School Resource Officer (SRO) was notified about a fight that was occurring near the gymnasium, inside the school. The officer responded and confirmed an active fight was occurring between two female students. Staff members broke up the fight, but hundreds of students had gathered to watch. Upon arriving at the fight, the SRO identified two male students he believed were involved in the incident. Upon trying to detain them for further questioning, the SRO became involved in a physical struggle with the males.

During the course of the SRO attempting to take the two males into custody, a staff member at the school requested immediate help for the SRO and several officers responded to the radio call. No injuries occurred. Both males were arrested and transported to the Marion County Juvenile Department, each charged with disorderly conduct and interfering with a peace officer.


UPDATE: CCSO Search and Rescue efforts were successful in locating an 80 year-old missing woman (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/20/19 8:36 AM
SAR Truck
SAR Truck
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/624/127811/thumb_IMG_0251.jpg

UPDATE:

We are happy to report searchers have located Akemi Takahashi.  She was found about 530 meters from where her car was located at about 8:10 a.m.  Searchers heard Akemi signaling with her whistle and then were able to get to her location.  Akemi was out in the elements all night but at this point she is making her way out with rescuers. 

Medical personnel are headed to the location and it is likely Akemi will be transported to an area hospital where she will assessed and treated for any injuries associated with her exposure to the elements overnight.

 


 

EARLIER:

On September 19, 2019 at approximately 6:50 p.m., the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office was contacted by Taka Masuda. Taka said he was picking mushrooms in the area of Trillium Lake with his friend Akemi Takahashi, 80 of Tigard.  Taka had not seen his friend Akemi since 4:40 p.m.  Akemi is an experienced mushroom picker.  She is reported to have a whistle with her but her cell phone was left in the car.  Akemi was last seen wearing an orange jacket. 

Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office search and rescue coordinators contacted Taka and established a command post at Trillium Lake Camp Ground.  Volunteer searchers from Pacific Northwest (PNW) Search and Rescue along with K-9 search teams from Mountain Wave Search and Rescue responded last night.  Teams searched the area but were unable to locate Akemi.

Currently search teams from the Washington County Sheriff’s Explorer Post and the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue and headed to the command post to help with search efforts.

[END]




Attached Media Files: SAR Truck , Search Crews , Search Crews , Akemi Takahashi

Vancouver Fire Marshal's Office receives $224k federal grant for Project Home Safe campaign
City of Vancouver - 09/20/19 8:18 AM

VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON – The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has awarded the City of Vancouver’s Fire Marshal’s Office an approximately $224,446 Fire Prevention and Safety grant.

The grant will support the Vancouver Fire Marshal’s Project Home Safe campaign to reduce the frequency and severity of residential fires through fire and life safety education and outreach. It is the fourth FEMA grant the Vancouver Fire Marshal’s Office has received since 2012 for its community risk reduction activities supporting fire and life safety.

“Project Home Safe unites zero fire ignition strategies that focus on stopping fire before it happens with reactionary fire safety education, like fire escape planning, free home safety surveys and smoke alarm installation,” said Vancouver Fire Marshal Heidi Scarpelli.

The City launched Project Home Safe in 2015. Vancouver Deputy Fire Marshals and Fire Corps volunteers go door-to-door, showing residents simple ways to reduce the risk of home fires. To date, this program has reached more than 1,700 households annually. 

FEMA’s Fire Prevention and Safety grants support projects that enhance the safety of the public and firefighters from fire and related hazards. The primary goal is to reduce injury and prevent death among high-risk populations.

###

About the Vancouver Fire Marshal’s Office:

The mission of the City of Vancouver’s Fire Marshal's Office is to protect life and property by preventing emergencies before they happen. This is done through education, enforcement of fire, building and life safety codes, investigation of fire causes and the application of adopted codes to construction projects. View a home fire prevention checklist at www.cityofvancouver.us/PreventHomeFires.  


Thu. 09/19/19
Sandy Police arrest student for social media school shooting threat
Sandy Police Dept. - 09/19/19 8:01 PM

On 09/19/19 a post was made on Tik Tok discussing a school shooting. That information was reported to federal law enforcement, who contacted the Ohio State Police. Ohio State Police determined the post was made by a user with an IP address registered to the Clackamas Education Service District. Ohio State Police contacted Clackamas County dispatch and gave information that was eventually traced to a 16 year old student at Sandy High School. Sandy Police school resource officers located, interviewed, and arrested the student for disorderly conduct in the first degree. The student was taken to the Clackamas County Juvenile Intake and Assessment Center and will eventually be released to parents. Officers determined the student did not have access to weapons and there is no information suggesting the threat was credible.


UPDATE: More Information About Shooting Released
Portland Police Bureau - 09/19/19 7:11 PM
Investigators continue to look into this afternoon's shooting incident. The incident occurred on the bike trail between Home Depot and I-5 Northbound.

A loss prevention agent was confronting a theft suspect when a community member became involved. The community member got into a confrontation with the suspect and weapons were produced. The suspect's injuries are believed to be the result of gun shots. The suspect, an adult male, is in critical condition at an area hospital.

The community member, an adult male, is cooperating with investigators.

Investigators are still processing the crime scene and encourage anyone with information or video to contact Robbery Detective Kenneth Reynolds at (503) 823-0407 or at Kenneth.reynolds@portlandoregon.gov

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

On Thursday, September 9, 2019, at 2:05 p.m., North Officers responded to a call of a theft at the Home Depot at 11633 Northeast Glenn Widing Drive. Updated information was provided that a shooting had occurred.

Officers arrived and located the suspect who was transported to an area hospital for what are believed to be non-life threatening injuries.

A customer from the store was injured in the incident and was treated for minor injuries at the scene.

This is an active investigation and officers are searching for evidence, witnesses, and video footage.

There is no on-going risk to the community related to this matter.

If anyone has information related to this matter, please call non-emergency dispatch at (503) 823-3333.

More information will be provided as it is available and appropriate for release.
The PIO is not responding to the scene.

###PPB###

Death notification (Photo)
Kelso Police Deptartment - 09/19/19 6:40 PM
2019-09/3059/127809/Zainfeld.jpg
2019-09/3059/127809/Zainfeld.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3059/127809/thumb_Zainfeld.jpg

Washington firefighters from Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue and Washington State Patrol Troopers escorted Battalion Chief Mike Zainfeld, a 20-year veteran firefighter of Cowlitz 2, to the Thurston County Coroner’s office for examination from a line of duty death Thursday afternoon.  Zainfeld leaves behind his wife Kelly and two boys, Braden (17) and Evan (16).  Details of his death have not been released.  Mike’s family has been notified.  Details of the service arrangements will be announced in the coming days.    

Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue Fire Chief Dave LaFave comments on the loss, “This hurts.  We will remember Mike, his family, and what they contributed to our organization.  They’re a big part of where we are today.  I believe Mike would want us to move forward together.  We will support each other and his family as we all get through this loss.”   

Zainfeld began with Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue in September of 1994 as a fire cadet in the first year of this program. Mike was hired full time in 2000 after completing paramedic training in Tacoma. After several years as a firefighter, he was promoted to lieutenant, captain, and lastly as battalion chief. He was active in all hazard deployments, qualified as a division supervisor, and has been on assignments in several states.  

Mike enjoyed spending time with his family, vacationing with his immediate family and his extended fire family.  Mike also enjoyed spending time with his German Shepard “Max” and he enjoyed the outdoors, fishing, flying his drone and history books. 

No further information is available.  Additional information will only be released as it is available and approved by family. 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3059/127809/Zainfeld.jpg

Two vehicle fatal crash on US 97 - Deschutes County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/19/19 5:02 PM
2019-09/1002/127807/IMG_1796.JPG
2019-09/1002/127807/IMG_1796.JPG
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Correction Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

On Thursday, September 19, 2019 at approximately 10:00 A.M.Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a motor vehicle collision on US 97 near milepost 169.

Preliminary investigation reveals that a Chevrolet Silverado Pickup, operated by Steven Hanner (35) of Lapine, was eastbound on Jackpine Loop Road.  Hanner failed to stop at the stop sign entering US 97 and turned into the path of a Commercial Motor Vehicle operated by Jeff Every (40) of Terrebonne.

Hanner sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Every was not injured in the crash.

OSP was assisted by the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, LaPine Fire and Rescue, and ODOT.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127807/IMG_1796.JPG

Fire District 3 Responds to Structure Fires in Battle Ground (Photo)
Clark Co. Fire Dist. 3 - 09/19/19 4:52 PM
2019-09/1566/127808/IMG-0219.JPG
2019-09/1566/127808/IMG-0219.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1566/127808/thumb_IMG-0219.JPG

Fire District 3 responded to a house and shop fire at 1108 SE 20th Ave, Battle Ground on September 19, 2019, at 14:32. Five engines, one water tender, one ladder truck, and four command staff responded for a total of twenty-three personnel.

Crews arrived at 14:38 to find an 1800 square foot residence with the basement involved in fire, and a separate 24’x24’ shop also involved in fire. Crews extinguished the fires by 15:01. The fires appear suspicious and are being investigated by Fire District 3 and the Battle Ground Police Department. Clark County Fire and Rescue, Vancouver Fire Department, Battle Ground Police Department, Clark Public Utilities, and American Medical Response assisted.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1566/127808/IMG-0219.JPG , 2019-09/1566/127808/IMG-0217.JPG , 2019-09/1566/127808/IMG-0216.JPG , 2019-09/1566/127808/IMG-0214.JPG

Local Red Cross Volunteers Deploy to Texas to Assist with Tropical Storm Imelda Response
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 09/19/19 4:36 PM

Five volunteers from SW Washington to help provide disaster assistance in Texas

PORTLAND, Ore., Sept. 19, 2019 – Tropical Storm Imelda has brought intense rain to the state of Texas causing severe flooding in the city of Houston and the surrounding region. To help provide support for those in need, the Red Cross Cascades Region (serving Oregon and Southwest Washington) is deploying five volunteers to assist in the response. That number could increase in the days to come as the impact of the storm becomes clearer.

The Red Cross disaster responders from Longview, Wolf Creek, Woodland and Vancouver, Washington, are making their way to the region. In coordination with government and community partners, Red Crossers will be supporting disaster relief operations in shelters and providing food, cots, blankets and other relief supplies to help people affected by the flooding.

In order to be ready to assist in the relief efforts related to these disasters, the local Red Cross Cascades Region is always looking for volunteer disaster responders. People interested in volunteering for the Red Cross as a disaster responder are encouraged to visit redcross.org/volunteer for more information.

CONNECT WITH LOVED ONES

The Red Cross has two ways to help you reconnect with loved ones. The free Red Cross Safe and Well website allows people to register and post messages to indicate that they are safe, or to search for loved ones. The site is open to the public and available in Spanish. Registrations and searches can be done on the website or by texting SAFE to 78876.

The Red Cross Emergency App “I’m Safe” button allows users to post a message to their social accounts, letting friends and family know they are out of harm’s way. The Emergency App is in English and Spanish and is available in app stores by searching for the American Red Cross or going to redcross.org/apps.

MAKE A DONATION Help people affected by disasters. Your donation enables the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from this disaster. Call 1-800-RED CROSS, visit RedCross.org or text ‘REDCROSS’ to 90999 to make a $10 donation.

About the American Red Cross The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or visit us on Twitter at @RedCrossCasc.

###


ISO and PPC Grades are In! (Photo)
Sheridan/SW Polk/West Valley Fire Districts - 09/19/19 3:47 PM
West Valley
West Valley
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/6641/127474/thumb_west_valley_ISO.jpg

Insurance Services Office (ISO)

A Guide for: Sheridan/SW Polk/West Valley Fire Protection Districts

Dear Insurance Representative,

In an effort to better serve our shared customers, the Sheridan/SW Polk/ and West Valley Fire Districts has created a guide to better inform you of the grading process and results. Typically, the Insurance Representative needs to answer two questions: 1) Which fire service protects my client’s property, and 2) What is the ISO Class Rating for my client’s property?

The process for reapplication and regrading was started by the SW Polk Fire Administration, and after two years of teamwork and persistence, we have great news. Fire Chief Fred Hertel and The Sheridan/SW Polk/West Valley Fire Districts, along with its new management team, are proud to announce that our ISO/PPC grades have potentially improved. Effective December 1, 2019, our grades will be as follows: Sheridan - 4/10, SW Polk - 5/10, West Valley - 3/10. Please see the attached maps for reference of locations and grades. The grading improvement was partially accomplished by the merging of our three organizations into one, which allows us to better serve our customers. As we continue to grow our ISO/PPC, numbers could potentially improve, which would save additional monies for our local communities.

To better understand  what the ISO/PPC numbers mean to you as an insured resident, we have provided 
a brief overview of the definitions of the (ISO) Insurance Service Office (PPC) Public Protection 
Classification Programs. The link is provided by swpolkfire.org

https://swpolkfire.org/sites/default/files/documents/services/ISO%20Guide.pdf

The (PPC) plays an important role in the underwriting process at insurance companies. In fact, most 
U.S. insurers - including the largest ones - use PPC information as part of their decision- making 
when deciding what business to write, coverages to offer or prices to charge for personal or 
commercial property insurance. Each insurance company independently determines the premiums it 
charges its policyholders. The way an insurer uses ISO's information on public fire protection may 
depend  on several things - the company's fire-loss experience, ratemaking methodology, 
underwriting guidelines, and its marketing strategy.

The recent regrade of our areas fire protection abilities were determined by ongoing research and 
loss experience analysis, PPC/ISO identified additional differentiation in fire loss experience 
within our PPC program, which resulted in the revised classifications. They based the differing 
fire loss experience on the fire suppression capabilities of each community. The new 
classifications will improve the predictive value for insurers while benefiting both commercial and 
residential property owners.

We would like to thank our community members and partners for their continued  support. We would 
also like to show our gratitude to our respective board directors and members for their guidance through this arduous task. Thank you all for your support.

FIND YOUR FIRE DISTRICT OR FIRE DEPARTMENT THAT SERVES YOU

For Polk County residents: To determine which agency provides a property’s fire service, please log onto Polk County, Oregon Web Maps (www.co.polk.or.us/ms/gis/polk-county-maps) from the list on the left, enter the address in the “Search” box, click on your address from the drop down menu and press enter. Then click the “Appraisal Report”, which will open the overview in a new tab, and scroll to “City, School Districts, and Fire Districts” section. Your fire department or district will be listed as SHERIDAN or SOUTHWEST RFPD or WEST VALLEY Fire Protection District.

For Yamhill residents: Please contact Yamhill County Appraisal District at (503) 434-7521.

If you are not located within these fire districts in Polk or Yamhill Counties, please contact the fire agency in which you reside.

FINDING ROAD MILES TO YOUR NEAREST FIRE STATION

Please log onto Google Maps (www.maps.google.com) to determine the distance between your client’s property and the nearest station in road miles using the nearest street address of one of the following fire stations: 1) Sheridan Fire District Station 190, 230 SW Mill Street Sheridan, Oregon 97378 2) SW Polk RFPD Station 130 or (Rickreall), 275 Main Street, Rickreall, Oregon 97371 3) West Valley FD Station 181, 825 NE Main Street, Willamina, Oregon 97396. 4) West Valley FD Station 182, 28480 McPherson road, Grand Ronde, Oregon 97347 5)Sheridan Fire District Station 197, 5985 Mill Creek Rd, Sheridan, Oregon 97378. 6) Salt Creek Fire Station 140, 15455 Salt Creek Road Dallas, Oregon 97338 7) Sheridan Fire District Station 198, 9255 DeJong Road, Sheridan, Oregon 97378.

ALSO, PLEASE USE OUR NEIGHBORING MUTUAL PARTNERS AS A REFERENCE:

1) Amity Fire Department, 10820 Bethel Rd, Amity, OR 97101; 2) Falls City Fire Department, 320 N Main St, Falls City, OR 97344; 3) Polk Fire District #1 Station 70, 12485 S Kings Valley Hwy, Monmouth, OR 97361 or Administration, 1800 Monmouth St, Independence, OR 97351, 4) Sheridan Fire District Station 97, 5985 Mill Creek Rd, Sheridan, OR 97378; and 5) Salem Fire Department Station 5, 1520 Glen Creek Rd NW, Salem, OR 97304.

FINDING A FIRE HYDRANT & ALTERNATIVE WATER SUPPLY

Contact the water district or property owner to determine the location of your nearest fire hydrant. Contact information for a few of the local water agencies is as follows: Rickreall Community Water Association (503) 623-2016, and Perrydale Domestic Water Association (503) 835-7221. Additional resources can be found online.

 THE ISO CLASS RATING FOR YOUR PROPERTY

 SHERIDAN/SW POLK/WEST VALLEY FIRE DISTRICTS: Effective on December 1, 2019

        ISO Class ratings:

        Within 5 Road Miles of Nearest Station and Within 1,000 Feet of a Fire Hydrant or Alternative Water Supply ............

                   Sheridan---- 4                          SW Polk---- 5                           West Valley---- 3

         Beyond 5 Road Miles .....................................................................................................................................................

                    Sheridan---- 10                        SW Polk---- 10                         West Valley----10

You may obtain ISO Property Class Ratings by calling ISO direct at: 1 (800) 888-4476.            

                   

 

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: West Valley , SW Polk , Sheridan

BLM Medford District Fire Prevention Order Rescinded (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 09/19/19 3:30 PM
Medford District Map
Medford District Map
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Medford, Ore. – The Bureau of Land Management, Medford District, will remove fire restrictions for the general public for all lands within the BLM Medford District, September 20, 2019, at 12:01 p.m. This order that is being rescinded went into effect earlier this summer to help prevent human caused wildfires.

The order specifically states “Pursuant to 43 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §9212.2 (a), the prohibitions listed in the Fire Prevention Order dated June 28, 2019 that were effective on July 1, 2019, and signed by Elizabeth Burghard, District Manager, are hereby rescinded. This removes all fire restrictions on lands administered by the BLM Medford District. This order shall go into effect at 12:01 p.m., PST, September 20, 2019.”

The official order is available online at: www.blm.gov/programs/public-safety-and-fire/fire-and-aviation/regional-info/oregon-washington/fire-restrictions

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs. 




Attached Media Files: Medford District Map

Get expert help filing for financial aid for college at WSU Vancouver
WSU Vancouver - 09/19/19 3:10 PM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Prospective college students and their parents can get expert help filing for financial aid for college in fall 2020 at College Goal Washington, a free event that helps students and families complete the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). College Goal Washington will be offered from 5 to 7 p.m. five times in October at Washington State University Vancouver. Parking is free in Orange 1 lot.

  • Oct. 3 – Undergraduate Building, Room 207
  • Oct. 8 – Undergraduate Building, Room 207
  • Oct. 16 – Undergraduate Building, Room 100
  • Oct. 21 – Undergraduate Building, Room 100
  • Oct. 30 – Undergraduate Building, Room 207

Most students need financial aid to pay for college, whether they choose a four-year university, community college, vocational or technical school. The FAFSA is the most important application for financial assistance for higher education, and should be completed in October for the best opportunity to receive the most financial aid.

Students and families who are not eligible for the FAFSA can get help filing the WASFA (Washington Application for State Financial Aid) The same October timeframe applies. Translation assistance will be available for Spanish speakers.

Guests please bring:

  • Your social security card/number or Alien registration
  • Your parent, if you are under 24 years of age
  • Your parent’s social security number, if they have one
  • Any additional financial information (child support statements, TANF or welfare information; real estate, stock or bonds investments; family business or farm information)

Prospective students can also get help completing college applications—for any college.

If you have a disability that requires special materials, services or assistance, please contact the Access Center at 360-546-9238 or van.access.center@wsu.edu as soon as possible to discuss your specific needs.

About WSU Vancouver

WSU Vancouver is located at 14204 N.E. Salmon Creek Ave. in Vancouver, east of the 134th Street exit from either I-5 or I-205, or via C-Tran bus service.

As one of six campuses of the Washington State University system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

# # #


1918 Curtiss JN-4 "Jenny" Airplane Joins Exhibits at Pearson Air Museum
Fort Vancouver National Historic Site - 09/19/19 2:16 PM

Pearson Air Museum has received a rare, newly refurbished 1918 Curtiss JN-4 “Jenny” biplane for exhibit. The airplane was acquired as a part of the museum collection through a federal contract, and restored Century Aviation from East Wenatchee, Washington.

The airplane’s paint scheme replicates an aircraft that flew from Pearson Field in the early 1920s as a part of the Army Air Service’s 321st Observation Squadron. It joins a DH-4 Liberty and a recently finished replica of a 1912 Curtiss Pusher. All three of these planes represent aircraft that flew from the field, and are now part of the museum’s permanent exhibits.

The JN-4 Jenny was the primary airplane trainer for American pilots in World War I, and nearly 15,000 were built for the war effort. Thousands were sold as military surplus after the war, and were at the center of the “barn storming” craze, when daredevil pilots demonstrated these aircraft in dangerous stunts, including flying them through barns!

“It is wonderful having a Jenny at Pearson Air Museum,” said Air Museum Manager Bob Cromwell, “This is the first time that a DH-4 and a JN-4 have been together at Pearson Field since 1927.”

A grand opening ceremony for the JN-4 Jenny will be hosted at Pearson Air Museum, 1115 E. Fifth Street, on Saturday, September 28, starting at 11 am. The public is invited to attend. There will be guest speakers and a ribbon cutting.

What: Pearson Air Museum Acquires a Newly Restored Curtiss JN-4 Jenny

Where: 1115 E. Fifth Street, Vancouver, WA 98661

When: Grand Opening Ceremony on Saturday, September 28, 2019, starting at 11 am.

Cost: Free


Road closure on Northeast Blair Road extended to Monday, Sept. 30
Clark Co. WA Communications - 09/19/19 2:09 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – A road closure on Northeast Blair Road has been extended ten days to allow crews to complete work on the roadway improvement project.

Contractor crews working for Clark County Public Works closed the roadway just southeast of the Northeast Blair Road and Northeast Zeek Road intersection on July 26. The closure was necessary to allow crews to perform soil stabilization and roadway improvements in the area. The roadway was originally scheduled to reopen on Friday, Sept. 20, but unpredictable inclement weather delayed the work.

Local access will continue to be maintained for residents along Northeast Blair Road throughout the project area. A signed detour will remain in place during the closure and will require drivers to use adjacent roads.

Drivers should expect intermittent delays while the closure is in effect.

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Lincoln City Police Department Will Participate In The National Coffee With A Cop Event (Photo)
Lincoln City Police - 09/19/19 2:02 PM
2019-09/6142/127798/coffee_with_a_cop_promo.jpg
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Come enjoy a cup of coffee with Lincoln City Police officers between 9:00 AM and 10:30 AM at the Hilltop Restaurant in Lincoln City on Wednesday, October 2nd, 2019. This is an opportunity for citizens and officers to get together informally and meet and talk with each other about general topics in Lincoln City. As part of the national “Coffee With A Cop” event, officers will be at the restaurant and will be available to speak with citizens, answer questions and interact with them in a positive, relaxed manner.

The Lincoln City Police Department would like to express our appreciation to the Hilltop Restaurant and all their staff for providing us with the venue to make this community event happen. We look forward to this opportunity for citizens to come and meet some of the officers of Lincoln City Police Department during this event.   

Submitted By:

Sergeant Jeffrey Winn




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/6142/127798/coffee_with_a_cop_promo.jpg

Pacific University News Capsule
Pacific University - 09/19/19 1:04 PM

Happy almost-Autumn from Pacific University, where we're saying hello and goodbye, and not just to summer and fall. 

Director of Athletics Ken Schumann Will Retire in June 2020

Army Colonel, Veteran Returns to College of Optometry

Pacific magazine: The Women Who Made Pacific

A sampling of coming events:

Philosophy Department Colloquium: More Than Meats the Eye
Sept. 19, 3 p.m. | Marsh Hall, Taylor Auditorium 216

Healing From the Trauma of Racism Through Co-Liberation
Sept. 20, 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. | UC, Multipurpose Room

Wilson River SOLVE River Clean-up
Sept. 21, All Day | Creamery Building, Milky Way

Netarts Bay SOLVE Beach Clean-up
Sept. 21, 8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. | CCE, Scott Hall, Room A110

Annual Corn Roast and Sidewalk Chalk Art Festival
Sept. 21, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. | Forest Grove Campus

Volleyball vs. Lewis & Clark College
Sept. 21, 6 p.m. | Stoller Center, Gym 123

National Voter Registration Day Event
Sept. 24, 11 a.m. — 3 p.m. | UC

The Right to Peace: Enhancing Campus and Community Well-being Through Forgiveness
Sept. 26, 5 p.m. | Marsh Hall, Taylor Auditorium

Boxer Handball Invitational
Sept. 27 - 28, All Day | Stoller Center Racquetball Courts

Men's Soccer vs. Willamette University
Sept. 28, 2:30 p.m. | Hanson Stadium

Women's Soccer vs. Pacific Lutheran
Sept. 29, Noon | Hanson Stadium

Visit the university calendar for more coming events. 

— pacificu.edu —

Pacific University is a diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn, as well as healthcare clinics throughout the Portland area. Pacific is currently ranked the No. 1 private research university in the Pacific Northwest and is also committed to civic engagement, sustainability and interprofessional education as part of its core teaching philosophy.


Dean Sidelinger, M.D., begins as Oregon's state health officer
Oregon Health Authority - 09/19/19 1:00 PM

September 19, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Dean Sidelinger, M.D., begins as Oregon’s state health officer

Former deputy health officer at San Diego County will be based at Oregon Public Health Division in Portland

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Dean Sidelinger, M.D., former deputy health officer at the San Diego County (Calif.) Health and Human Services Agency, is Oregon’s new state health officer.

Sidelinger takes over from Katrina Hedberg, M.D., who has served as acting state health officer since retiring May 31 after nearly 30 years of state service. He began the position, based at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division in Portland, on Monday, Sept. 16.

As Oregon’s state health officer, Sidelinger says he looks forward to "continuing to work upstream -- on policies, systems, and environmental changes, as well as programs -- that can have a long-standing impact on improving people’s health.

"Working on the social influencers on health -- from education, economic opportunities, health equity, and other areas -- will allow public health to positively influence health in a multitude of ways," he says. "The state health officer has the privilege to help ensure that Oregonians are the healthiest that they can be. I will look at what is impacting the health of residents, and work with partners to implement policies and programs to support wellness."

As San Diego County deputy public health officer, Sidelinger fulfilled the duties of the vacant public health officer position and oversaw the county’s six Public Health Services branches, including California Children’s Services; Epidemiology and Immunization Services; HIV, STD, and Hepatitis; Maternal, Child, and Family Health Services; Public Health Preparedness and Response; and Tuberculosis and Refugee Health. He also was deputy health officer for San Diego County Health and Human Services from 2007 to 2011.

Since 2012 Sidelinger has been San Diego County’s child health medical officer, providing strategic direction for agency programs affecting children and families as part of implementation of the county’s Live Well San Diego vision to build a healthy, safe and thriving community. Additionally, he spent a year, starting in January 2013, as interim Maternal, Child, and Family Health Services chief. He also has experience in academia -- he was an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of California, San Diego, from 2003 to 2007.

Sidelinger earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry and his medical degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. He has a master’s degree in education from the University of Southern California as well.

Sidelinger believes his education and training in pediatrics and public health help him take a broad view of health and incorporate the influences of family, community, and the broader region on health.

"I have spent over a decade working in a large health and social services agency, which required partnerships across government agencies and many partners throughout the community," he says. "This basis in collaboration will help me to best serve Oregonians in my new role."

# # #

Video link: https://youtu.be/asCdJmeoEy8


Sandy Police Log 09-08-19 to 09-14-19
Sandy Police Dept. - 09/19/19 12:50 PM

See Attached Bulletin

Please be advised that the Bulletin does not include all calls for service to which officers respond.  Many calls do not require that a report be written; such as:

•Traffic Stops

•Advising/Referring a Person to the Proper Agency to handle their request

•Restoring the Peace

•Premise Checks

•Welfare Checks

•Flagged Down by Citizen




Attached Media Files: Bulletin

Increased DUI enforcement this weekend (Photo)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 09/19/19 12:27 PM
2019-09/385/127794/DUI_Ad_500x500.jpg
2019-09/385/127794/DUI_Ad_500x500.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/385/127794/thumb_DUI_Ad_500x500.jpg

Vancouver, Wash. – On September 21, 2019, Vancouver, Battle Ground and Washougal Police Departments and Clark County Sheriff’s Office will have additional officers enforcing the DUI laws, in an effort to keep drunk, drugged and high drivers off the road. Officers, who are also drug recognition experts, will be among those conducting these increased DUI patrols. In addition, officers from the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis board will also be participating in this emphasis.

Alcohol and drug impaired driving is the leading contributing factor in Washington fatal crashes, with alcohol and cannabis being the most common combination of intoxicants. Getting behind the wheel intoxicated can mean a DUI, if you don’t plan ahead for sober transportation. As a reminder, Uber offers first time users a special coupon code for $25 toward their first trip. Sign up for the Uber coupon code RIDEHOMEVANC at https://get.uber.com/go/ridehomevanc.

Thanks to a grant from the Washington Traffic Safety Commission, law enforcement agencies in SW Washington have extra officers conducting DUI enforcement throughout the year to help keep our roadways safer.

If you are driving and see a suspected impaired driver, call 911.

For more information on the Vancouver Police Department’s commitment to DUI enforcement and DUI prevention tips, visit https://www.cityofvancouver.us/police/page/dui-enforcement .

 

###

 

The Vancouver Police Department is seeking applicants for Entry and Lateral Police Officers. If you are interested in a career with us, visit http://www.cityofvancouver.us/police/page/careers.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/385/127794/DUI_Ad_500x500.jpg

Wrong-Way Driver on Sunset Highway Arrested for DUII (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/19/19 12:12 PM
Beer can photo
Beer can photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1128/127793/thumb_Beer_can.jpg

On Thursday, September 19, 2019, at approximately 3:15 a.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies arrested a driver for DUII.  It was reported the driver travelled westbound down NW Sunset Highway, from SW Market Street in Portland to NW Murray Boulevard in Beaverton in the eastbound lanes.

Multiple witnesses called 9-1-1 to report the wrong-way driver, including one witness who told deputies he was almost hit while driving on the highway.

Deputies stopped the silver Ford Fusion near the intersection of NW Murray Boulevard and NW Jenkins Road after the driver drove up and down Murray several times with a flat tire.  An open can of Coors Light beer was found inside the car.

Deputies arrested 24-year-old Shelby Lee Terebesi of Beaverton on the following charges:

  • Driving under the influence of intoxicants
  • Reckless driving
  • Reckless endangering of another

Ms. Terebesi was lodged in the Washington County Jail.  Her blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was a .17.

Please remember to use a designated driver, taxi cab or ride-sharing service before drinking and getting behind the wheel.




Attached Media Files: PDF version , Beer can photo , Flat tire photo , Booking photo

Grand jury indicts two men accused of assault on-duty security guard outside KOIN Tower
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/19/19 12:10 PM

September 19, 2019

Grand jury indicts two men accused of assault on-duty security guard outside KOIN Tower

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced the filing of a single count indictment against two individuals for the alleged assault of a security guard outside the KOIN Tower in downtown Portland.

Vasily Yashchuk, 19, and Andrea Feyster, 20, are both charged with a single count of assault in the third degree.

According to the indictment, both individuals unlawfully, intentionally and knowingly, while being aided by another person, caused physical injury to another individual.

This investigation started on September 7, 2019 when Portland Police responded to an assault call at the KOIN Tower, located at 222 Southwest Columbia Street. Upon arrival, police contacted the security guard who reported that while on patrol outside the tower, a group of three individuals pulled up in a red vehicle and started making fun of him for being a security guard, according to court documents.

Surveillance video captures the security guard being punched and kicked multiple times, according to court documents. The security guard sustained injuries that included a broken nose and broken tooth, according to court documents. The suspects fled the area before police arrived.

During the investigation, law enforcement learned the identity of Yashchuk and the other potential suspects after responding to a separate disturbance that occurred after the alleged assault near the intersection of Northwest 2nd Avenue and Northwest Couch Street, according to court and other publicly available records.

According to court documents, the security guard told police that Yashchuk was one of the individuals involved in the alleged assault.

Law enforcement located and arrested Yashchuk at approximately 2:20 p.m. on September 10, 2019 in the 12200 block of Northeast Glisan Street.

Yashchuk appeared in Multnomah County Circuit Court on September 19, 2019.

As a result of the indictment, the court authorized an arrest warrant, which remains in effect, for Feyster.

Like in all criminal and civil matters, electronic copies of court documents, which are not subject to a protective order, are available to the public through the Oregon eCourt Information (OECI) system.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time pursuant to the Oregon State Professional Rules of Conduct.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime. Yashchuk and Feyster are innocent unless and until proven guilty.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5769/127792/PR-19-224-Vasily_Yashchuk_and_Andrea_Feyster.pdf

PHOTO RELEASE: Seaside and other coastal communities receive funding for tsunami signage (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/19/19 11:01 AM
2019-09/3986/127789/DSC_0375.jpg
2019-09/3986/127789/DSC_0375.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3986/127789/thumb_DSC_0375.jpg

VIDEO: https://youtu.be/Ef1hmpQ0Tic (Contact the Oregon Ofice of Emergency Management Public Information Office if you would like a copy of the video.

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

DSC_0362

City of Seaside Mayor Jay Barber (front right) walks out of the tsunami inundation zone in Seaside, Ore., Sept. 18 with participants from the community, local government, and state government to highlight new markers on the route. Funds for the signage were provided by an award from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) through the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) that was facilitated by the Oregon Office of Emergency Management and the Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. Students from the Seaside Associated Student Body, who helped motivate leaders in Seaside to work with state and federal partners to secure funding for new, prevalent tsunami evacuation markers also took part in the walk. The Oregon Office of Emergency Management and Department of Geologic Hazards and Mineral Industries have worked with a variety of coastal communities to provide new markers. (Oregon Office of Emergency Management photo by Cory Grogan)

DSC_0369

From left to right: Coastal Geomorphologist Jonathan Allan with the Department of Geology and Mineral Industries; Geologic Hazards Coordinator Althea Rizzo with the Oregon Office of Emergency Management; and Emergency Preparedness Coordinator Anne McBride with the City of Seaside pause for a photo in front of a tsunami inundation zone marker in Seaside, Ore., Sept. 19. They walked with participants from the community, local government, and state government to highlight new markers on the route provided by an award from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) through the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NomTHMP) that was facilitated by the Oregon Office of Emergency Management and the Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. Students from the Seaside Associated Student Body, who helped motivate leaders in Seaside to work with state and federal partners to secure funding for new, prevalent tsunami evacuation markers also took part in the walk. The Oregon Office of Emergency Management and Department of Geologic Hazards and Mineral Industries have worked with a variety of coastal communities to provide new markers. (Oregon Office of Emergency Management photo by Cory Grogan)

DSC_0372

Students from the Seaside Associated Student Body leap past a tsunami inundation zone marker in Seaside, Ore., Sept. 19. They walked with participants from the community, local government, and state government to highlight new markers on the route provided by an award from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) through the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) that was facilitated by the Oregon Office of Emergency Management and the Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. Students from the Seaside Associated Student Body, who helped motivate leaders in Seaside to work with state and federal partners to secure funding for new, prevalent tsunami evacuation markers also took part in the walk. The Oregon Office of Emergency Management and Department of Geologic Hazards and Mineral Industries have worked with a variety of coastal communities to provide new markers. (Oregon Office of Emergency Management photo by Cory Grogan)

DSC_0375

Students from the Seaside Associated Student Body pause for a photo after walking out the Tsunami Inundation Zone in Seaside, Ore., Sept. 19. They walked with participants from the community, local government, and state government to highlight new markers on the route provided by an award from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) through the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) that was facilitated by the Oregon Office of Emergency Management and the Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. Students from the Seaside Associated Student Body, who helped motivate leaders in Seaside to work with state and federal partners to secure funding for new, prevalent tsunami evacuation markers also took part in the walk. The Oregon Office of Emergency Management and Department of Geologic Hazards and Mineral Industries have worked with a variety of coastal communities to provide new markers. (Oregon Office of Emergency Management photo by Cory Grogan)

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3986/127789/DSC_0375.jpg , 2019-09/3986/127789/DSC_0372.jpg , 2019-09/3986/127789/DSC_0369.jpg , 2019-09/3986/127789/DSC_0362.jpg

Mill Beach health advisory issued September 19
Oregon Health Authority - 09/19/19 10:42 AM

Sept. 19, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Mill Beach health advisory issued September 19

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Mill Beach in Curry County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. Higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Mill Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Resources for Media

Beach water advisory audio and video resources


Portland area contractor cited for 13 job safety violations
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/19/19 9:45 AM

(Salem) – Oregon OSHA has cited a Portland-area custom floor coatings company for 13 serious violations – four of them repeat offenses – of workplace health and safety rules. The agency’s inspection found Specialty Coatings Inc. exposed workers to multiple hazards, including the potential for fire and severe burns, suffocation, and lung disease.

The inspection – launched in response to two separate confidential complaints – examined work operations at the company’s main office and warehouse in Tigard, and job sites in Hillsboro and Portland. Those work operations included handling flammable liquids, grinding concrete floors, and applying chemicals.

The inspection’s findings included that the company did not properly handle and store flammable liquids, raising fire and severe burn dangers; failed to provide a medical evaluation before requiring the use of a respirator, increasing the risk of suffocation or heart attack; and lacked a plan to control workers’ exposure to dust containing crystalline silica, a byproduct of concrete grinding that can cause lung disease and cancer.

Four of the 13 violations – including the breach of the medical evaluation requirement – are repeat offenses stemming from previous Oregon OSHA inspections of Specialty Coatings.

“The numerous hazards identified in this case are preventable and controllable through practical measures that are available to employers,” said Oregon OSHA Administrator Michael Wood. “There is no good reason to fail to implement them – much less to repeatedly fail to do so.”

The citation against Specialty Coatings carries a total proposed penalty of $2,855. The fine amount includes a standard penalty reduction based on the small size of the company, which employed seven people at the time of Oregon OSHA’s inspection. Altogether, the inspection found:

  • The company did not electrically bond and ground metal drums of flammable liquid with secondary containers to prevent sparks from causing a fire.
  • More than 120 gallons of flammable liquid were stored outside adequate safety storage cabinets.
  • The company failed to provide adequate notification and training about the health hazards of breathing in crystalline silica.
  • The company did not ensure that specific tasks that could expose workers to crystalline silica were understood.
  • The company failed to establish and carry out a silica exposure control plan, including descriptions of engineering controls, work practices, and respiratory protection.
  • The company did not provide an adequate fit-test for at least two employees who were required to wear tight-fitting respirators.
  • The company allowed at least one employee, who was required to wear a tight-fitting respirator, to put it on with facial hair that came between the sealing surfaces of the mask.
  • The company did not provide training to employees so they could understand the labels on hazardous chemicals they worked with.
  • A safety data sheet for at least one hazardous chemical used by employees was missing
  • The company failed to provide an adequate medical evaluation to at least one employee who used a tight-fitting, half-face respirator. This was the company’s second repeat violation of this requirement over the past two years.
  • The company did not ensure that at least two employees stored their respirators in a clean location – a repeat violation.
  • The company failed to set up and carry out a respiratory protection program, including procedures for cleaning and disinfecting respirators, and changing out expired filter cartridges. This was a repeat violation.
  • The company failed to hold effective monthly safety meetings – a repeat violation.

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers resources to help improve workplace safety and health.

The agency’s technical staff members can answer questions about rules and how to apply them:

Phone: 503-378-3272

Toll-free in Oregon: 800-922-2689

Email: tech.web@oregon.gov

Online contact form: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/Contact-Technical.aspx

Employers may also contact Oregon OSHA’s no-cost consultation services for help with safety and health programs:

Phone: 503-378-3272

Toll-free in Oregon: 800-922-2689

Field office locations and phone numbers: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/maps.aspx

Email: consult.web@oregon.gov

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 




Attached Media Files: Inspection documents

Historic cemetery and marker repair workshop in Corvallis
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 09/19/19 9:23 AM

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will offer a historic cemetery assessment and marker cleaning and repair workshop October 12.

 

The free workshop will be from 10:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m. at the Corvallis IOOF Pioneer Cemetery, 434 NW Witham Hill Drive. It will address marker assessment, cleaning, leveling and repair. The workshop is FREE, but registration is required.  Register online at the Oregon State Parks Store. https://store.oregonstateparks.org/index.cfm?do=v.dsp_item&itemId=162&eventId=167

 

Participants should bring their lunch, snacks, water to drink, a stool or folding chair to sit on, gloves to wear, a hat, sunscreen, appropriate clothing as this is a hands on workshop, comfortable shoes, a pen and note pad and camera if they want to take photos during the workshop. The workshop will take place rain or shine.

 

The workshop is presented by Dave Pinyerd and Bernadette Niederer of Historic Preservation Northwest. The cemetery is providing the site and a portion of the materials.

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries is part of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. State law established the seven-member commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. To learn about the workshop or to get more information on historic cemeteries visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


Two people die in two vehicle crash on Hwy 20 - Malheur County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/19/19 9:15 AM
2019-09/1002/127784/20190918_143108.jpg
2019-09/1002/127784/20190918_143108.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127784/thumb_20190918_143108.jpg

On Wednesday, September 18, 2019 at approximately 12:06 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle vehicle crash on Hwy 20 near mile post 219.  

Preliminary Investigation reveals that a 2006 Gulfstream Motorhome towing a Suzuki Samurai, operated by Richard Kozol (78) of Medford, was eastbound on Hwy 20 when for unknown reasons crossed into the westbound lanes on on a curve. He collided with a westbound 2011 Ford F-250 towing a 30 ft travel trailer operated by John Haynes (72) of Palo Cedro, CA.   

Kozol and Haynes sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased.

The passenger in the Gulfstream, Barbara Kozol (73) of Medford, OR, was transported to St. Alphonsus in Boise.

The passenger in the Ford F-250, Debra Townsend (67) of Palo Cedro, CA, was transported to St. Alphonsus in Ontario.

The eastbound lane of Hwy 20 was closed for approximately 4 hours.

OSP was assisted by the Malheur County Sheriff's Office, Vale Fire and Ambulance, Treasure Valley Paramedics, Ontario Fire Department, and ODOT 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127784/20190918_143108.jpg , 2019-09/1002/127784/20190918_143058.jpg

News Release: Woodburn Police Respond to Possible Cougar Sighting
Woodburn Police - 09/19/19 9:13 AM

Woodburn, OR - On Thursday September 19, at 4:55 a.m. the Woodburn Police Department (WPD) received a report of a cougar sighting from a Woodburn School District (WSD) employee. The caller reported the cougar was seen on the sidewalk of Meridian Drive heading towards Tukwilla Drive, which is a residential area. WPD Officers searched the area and were not able to locate the animal. The Woodburn Police Department Dispatch Center (METCOM) used their mass communication system to advise affected neighborhoods of the sighting and urged residents to use caution in the morning hours.

The Woodburn Police Department advised the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and surrounding law enforcement agencies as well as the Woodburn School District of the reported sighting.

Anyone who thinks they have seen this or other cougar sightings are asked to please contact WPD at 503-982-2345.

Safety Tips:

  • If you see a cougar from a distance do not attempt to approach it. Cougars will often retreat if they are given the opportunity, so leave them a way to escape.
  • If approached by one, remain calm and stand your ground maintaining direct eye contact.
  • Back away slowly, and be sure not to run. Running may trigger a chase response in cougars, which could possibly lead to an attack.
  • If you’re concerned that the cougar appears aggressive, raise your voice and speak firmly, and attempt to make yourself look larger by raising your arms clapping your hands.

                                                                                                  ###


Fire Marshal lifts countywide burn ban early
Clark Co. WA Communications - 09/19/19 9:11 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – An abundance of rain and cooler temperatures have prompted Clark County Fire Marshal Jon Dunaway to lift the ban on outdoor debris burning in unincorporated Clark County, effective 8 a.m. Friday, Sept. 20.

“It is very unusual for us to lift the annual burn ban before the end of September. But given the moisture levels of the wildfire fuels and the forecast for ongoing precipitation, it just makes sense,” said Dunaway. However, Dunaway also urges residents to be vigilant when burning and always attend a permitted fire until it is completely extinguished and cold to the touch.

At the same time the Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) will lower the Fire Danger Rating to low, opening DNR-regulated lands to rule burning.

For more information, go to www.clark.wa.gov/community-development/outdoor-burning.


Fatal Crash Investigation (Photo)
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/19/19 9:05 AM
2019-09/1505/127781/Alpine_Crash_2019_2.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1505/127781/thumb_Alpine_Crash_2019_2.jpg

On 9/18/19 around 5:45 PM, deputies with the Benton County Sheriff’s Office responded to a single vehicle crash on Alpine Road, near McFarland Road in Benton County.

A white 1992 Honda Civic was traveling east on Alpine Road.  For an unknown reason the Honda left the roadway, rolling several times and landing on the side of Alpine Road. 

A preliminary investigation indicated that Ernest Robert Hernandez, born in 1987, was the driver. Mr. Hernandez died as a result of the crash.

The last known address of Mr. Hernandez was in Albany, Oregon but may have lived recently in Alpine.

A passenger, Adrian Gabriel Molina, also born in 1987 and from Eugene, Oregon, survived the crash. No medical update is available for Mr. Molina but his injuries do not appear to be life threatening.

The accident is still under investigation.  Alcohol, marijuana and speed may have contributed to the crash. Anyone with information is asked to contact Sgt. David Iverson of the Benton County Sheriff’s Office at 541.766.6858.

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1505/127781/Alpine_Crash_2019_2.jpg , 2019-09/1505/127781/Alpine_Crash_2019_1.jpg

Oregon Guard to dedicate streets honoring WWII veterans (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 09/19/19 9:00 AM
2019-09/962/127721/162nd_headed_to_Biak.jpg
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CLACKAMAS, Ore. – The Oregon Military Department will dedicated eight roadways on Camp Withycombe on Saturday, September 21, honoring WWII veterans of the 41st Infantry Division. The roadways will proudly bear the names of:

 

• 1st Lt. Sammy E. Radow

• 1st Lt. Melvin C. Monroe

• 1st Lt. Rodney W. Orange

• Staff Sgt. Jordan W. Davis

• Staff Sgt. Frank R. Gehrman

• Staff Sgt. Leland S. “Bud” Lewis

• Sgt. Leonard C. DeWitt

• Cpl. Herbert Foster

 

Soldiers names were selected from veterans that are currently highlighted in displays within the 41st Infantry Division Armed Forces Readiness Center (41st AFRC) building. The new street signs will designate the main entrance road, road to 41st AFRC, the main north/south axis road and connecting streets.

 

The Adjutant General, Oregon, Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, and Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Raymond F. Rees are scheduled to participate in the ceremony alongside Mr. Dan Sokol, the current president of the 41st Infantry Division Association. Sokol believes that “the accomplishments of these eight men who’ve been designated, extends to all men and women who have served in and with units of the 41st Infantry Division throughout history.”

The public is welcome to attend the dedication ceremony at the Oregon Military Museum, 15300 Minuteman Way, Clackamas, Ore. 97015 on Camp Withycombe. The program scheduled for Saturday, September 21, and will begin at 1:30 p.m. Members of the community interested in attending will need to have a current photo identification in their possession for entry onto Camp Withycombe.

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/962/127721/162nd_headed_to_Biak.jpg , 2019-09/962/127721/186th_battle_for_Palawan.jpg , 2019-09/962/127721/163rd_battle_for_Jolo.jpg

Indulge your sweet tooth at the CCC community expo (Photo)
Clackamas Comm. College - 09/19/19 8:56 AM
Check out local artisans and more at the CCC community expo.
Check out local artisans and more at the CCC community expo.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/29/127780/thumb_Check_out_local_artisans_and_more_at_the_CCC_community_expo.JPG

OREGON CITY – Clackamas Community College’s Associated Student Government (ASG) is holding its bi-annual clubs, campus and community expo Oct. 2, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., on the Oregon City campus, 19600 Molalla Ave.

Enjoy sweets, treats and live music at the Willy Wonka-themed expo. Come to this free, public event and support CCC student clubs and local vendors, which may include local artists, craftspeople, public agencies and retailers.   

For questions, call Cynthia Boettcher at 503-594-1823 or email oettcher@clackamas.edu">cynthia.boettcher@clackamas.edu.

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Attached Media Files: Check out local artisans and more at the CCC community expo.

Tip of the Week for September 23 - If You See Something, Say Something (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/19/19 8:50 AM
2019-09/5490/127779/see_say_b.png
2019-09/5490/127779/see_say_b.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/5490/127779/thumb_see_say_b.png

SEE something, SAY something” Awareness Day September 25th, 2019

 On September 25th, 2019 the Oregon TITAN Fusion Center (OTFC) invites you to join us in celebrating the national “If You See Something, Say Something” (SEE/SAY) Awareness Day. The campaign is calling on citizens and its public and private sector partners around the country to lead conversations and activities, leading up to, and on September 25.

This campaign gives our partners throughout the nation and Oregon an opportunity to further promote this very crucial first line of defense against those who would seek to do harm to our communities.

As public safety officials and critical infrastructure owners and operators, you are uniquely qualified to lead this preventative effort in Oregon. As professionals and community members you see and interact with individuals in your area of responsibility that can make a difference in the prevention of criminal activity by reporting suspicious behavior all year round. Continuing education of your colleagues, local business partners, and citizens will only strengthen our collective preventative efforts.

Unusual items or situations:  A vehicle is parked in an odd location, a package/luggage is unattended, a window/door is open that is usually closed, or other out-of-the-ordinary situations occur.


Eliciting information: A person questions individuals at a level beyond curiosity about a building’s purpose, operations, security procedures and/or personnel, shift changes, etc.


Observation/surveillance: Someone pays unusual attention to facilities or buildings beyond a casual or professional interest. This includes extended loitering without explanation (particularly in concealed locations); unusual, repeated, and/or prolonged observation of a building (e.g., with binoculars or video camera); taking notes or measurements; counting paces; sketching floor plans, etc.

Some of these activities could be innocent—it's up to law enforcement to determine whether the behavior warrants investigation. The activities above are not all-inclusive but have been compiled based on studies of pre-operational aspects of both successful and thwarted terrorist events over several years.

Public safety is everyone's responsibility. If you see suspicious activity, report it to local law enforcement or a person of authority.

Describe specifically what you observed, including:

Who or what you saw;
When you saw it;
Where it occurred; and
Why it's suspicious

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff's Office - Oregon

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5490/127779/092319_If_You_See_Somtehing_Say_Something.pdf , 2019-09/5490/127779/see_say_b.png

Maurice Lucas Foundation raises more than $757,000 at ninth annual gala (Photo)
Maurice Lucas Foundation - 09/19/19 8:11 AM
David Lucas with foundation supporters Bob Quillin and Vanessa Morgan. – photo by Andie Petkus
David Lucas with foundation supporters Bob Quillin and Vanessa Morgan. – photo by Andie Petkus
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/6064/127777/thumb_Bob_Quillin_and_Vanessa_Morgan.jpeg

                                    Foundation presents Enforcer Award to the late Howard Hedinger

PORTLAND, Ore. – Like father, like son.

David Lucas, son of the late Maurice Lucas, presided over the Maurice Lucas Foundation’s ninth annual Celebration Dinner & Auction on Saturday, Sept. 7, at the Portland Hilton.

The event attracted more than 600 attendees. Through a paddle raise, silent auction and live auction, the gala raised more than $757,000 (a record for the organization). The funds will support the foundation’s after-school education, mentoring and athletic programs for under-served students at Harriet Tubman Middle School and six high schools in Portland.

Maurice Lucas was the leading scorer on the 1977 NBA champion Portland Trail Blazers and a strong supporter of local youth. He touched the lives of many through his giving ways. David Lucas, the foundation’s founder and executive director, served as the gala’s master of ceremonies. He is continuing his father’s legacy of community service.

“We created the Maurice Lucas Foundation in 2010 to honor my dad, Maurice “The Enforcer” Lucas,” David told the crowd, adding that the phrase “Like father, like son” was stitched inside his suit jacket.

The dinner featured many of the students who advanced through the foundation’s program, are now college freshmen and eligible for the foundation’s Howard Hedinger Memorial Scholarship. Two of them received Jordan Brand Wings Scholarships.

“Our students are hungry for the future, and they stand on the shoulders of so many of you in the room tonight to be able to pursue their dreams,” said David. He led a toast to the foundation with his mother, Pam (a member of the foundation board) and his brother, Maurice Lucas II.

Foundation Presents Enforcer Award to Howard Hedinger

David Lucas, along with former NBA players Bill Walton, Bobby Gross and Lionel Hollins, and current Trail Blazer Zach Collins, presented the foundation’s annual Maurice Lucas Enforcer Award to family members of the late Howard Hedinger. Hedinger was a Portland philanthropist, a friend of Maurice and a strong supporter of the foundation.

Lucas described Hedinger as “a friend who helped us to dream bigger.” Three of Hedinger’s children, Huston, Barkley and Hillary, accepted the award on his behalf.

The award is given annually to an individual who best embodies many of the characteristics that its namesake displayed both on and off the basketball court, including motivating and empowering kids. Walton, Hollins and Gross, all members of the Blazers’ 1977 championship team, are among the award’s past recipients.

The glittering array of sports stars and local dignitaries at the gala included Portland Trail Blazers coach Terry Stotts and local philanthropists Mike and Karie Richardson, Vanessa Morgan, Bob Quillin and Rick Stanley. Trail Blazer broadcaster Kevin Calabro again served as emcee.

After the gala the attendees danced into the morning hours at the After Party featuring official Blazer DJ O.G. One.

Whittier Trust served as the gala’s lead sponsor. Other sponsors included the Portland Trail Blazers, Jordan Brand, Fred Meyer Jewelers, Mercedes Benz of Portland, Mercedes Benz of Beaverton, the Hedinger Family Foundation, Columbia Distributing, B&V Philanthropy, Darkhorse Entertainment, Lossen Bros.USA, Moda Health, North American Spirits and Wine Brokerage, Pivot and Marios.

About The Maurice Lucas Foundation

The Maurice Lucas Foundation teaches youths life lessons they can use to help them realize their dreams. Its academies emphasize the importance of hard work, respect and leadership in the classroom and on the basketball court. Maurice Lucas had a storied 14-year career in professional basketball, but off the court is where he built his legacy. Maurice passed away on Oct. 31, 2010, at the age of 58. Today, the Maurice Lucas Foundation carries on his legacy by working with youth to help them realize their individual potential through education and sport. Learn more about the foundation at ml20.org.

                                                                   # # #




Attached Media Files: David Lucas with foundation supporters Bob Quillin and Vanessa Morgan. – photo by Andie Petkus , David Lucas with foundation supporters Karie and Mike Richardson of Dark Horse Comics. – photo by Andie Petkus , Joe Wiser from title sponsor Whittier Trust tells the gala attendees about his lengthy relationship with the Lucas family. – photo by Andie Petkus , Terry Stotts (left) helps auctioneer Brett Richards raise funds at the Maurice Lucas Foundation gala. – photo by Andie Petkus , David Lucas with his daughter, Nahla Lucas; mother Pam Lucas; his nephew, Lucas Tiefenthaler; and his brother, Maurice Lucas II. – photo by Andie Petkus , Foundation academy students ranging from Sixth Grade through college stand with Executive Director David Lucas and High School Program Manager Karen Barker. – photo by Naim Hasan , Following in his father’s footsteps, David Lucas served as the gala’s master of ceremonies. – photo by Andie Petkus , The award presentation included, from left: Bobby Gross, Bill Walton, Lionel Hollins, Zach Collins, Huston Hedinger, David Lucas, Barkley Hedinger and Hillary Hedinger. – photo by Andie Petkus

Missing 12-Year-Old Located
Gresham Police Dept - 09/19/19 8:04 AM

Joshua Frison has been located and is safe. Thank you for everyone's assistance in getting the word out.


Demonstration and March Planned for Friday September 20 in Downtown Portland (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/19/19 7:51 AM
Sept 20 Map
Sept 20 Map
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3056/127775/thumb_Sept_20_Area_of_Impact_Map.png
The Portland Police Bureau would like to make the public aware of a planned demonstration and march on Friday, September 20th in Downtown Portland. The intent of law enforcement is to provide a safe environment for all participants, non-participants, and community members while ensuring the peaceful exercise of the First Amendment.

The event organizers have applied for and been granted a permit for a street march, which is expected to begin at about 11:30 a.m. See attached map for anticipated area of impact. The time of the march and area impacted is dependent upon the number of participants.

The Police Bureau encourages road users to be aware of the potential for traffic interruptions and to plan for alternate routes in and around Downtown Portland.

Interruptions to TriMet are expected to be minimal due to the march. Check https://trimet.org/#alerts/ before heading out on transit, or sign up for TriMet service alerts by email or text message athttps://trimet.org/emailupdates/index.htm

The demonstration organizers are working with a demonstration liaison for this event.

The Portland Police Bureau anticipates a peaceful event and encourages participants to use sidewalks and obey traffic control devices while coming to or from the event. Additionally, any direction given by police officers or the sound truck should be followed.

The Portland Police Bureau intends to share pertinent information with the community on the day of the events through its main Twitter account: @PortlandPolice

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Sept 20 Map

Police Seek Help Locating Missing 12-Year-Old (Photo)
Gresham Police Dept - 09/19/19 1:36 AM
Joshua Frison
Joshua Frison
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1278/127774/thumb_Joshua_Frison.jpg

Gresham, Ore. – Gresham Police is asking for the public’s assistance in locating a missing 12-year-old boy. Joshua Frison was last seen today around 7:30 p.m. going to a friend’s house near 182nd Ave. and Yamhill St. Frison has brown hair, is approximately 5-feet tall and 95 lbs. He was last seen wearing a red shirt and black jogging pants.

Anyone who knows of Frison’s whereabouts is asked to call 911.




Attached Media Files: Joshua Frison

Wed. 09/18/19
Monday, September 23, 2019 Executive & Regular Board Business Agenda
Parkrose Sch. Dist. - 09/18/19 7:37 PM

The Parkrose Board of Education of School District No. 3, Multnomah County, Oregon, will convene in an Executive and Regular Board Business Meeting on Monday, September 23, 2019 in the Boardroom at the Parkrose District Office located at 10636 NE Prescott St., Portland, Oregon at the hour of 6:30 pm. The Board will hear reports from the Superintendent’s office on proposed policy changes, free/reduced rental procedure, enrollment & transfer numbers, land acknowledgment, grant update, school needs, legislative meeting update and professional development. The Board will take action on consent agenda items, board norms, board practices, goals, handbooks, site councils, budget vacancy, budget calendar and several appeals for reduced facility fees. They will report/discuss items of Board Business including: regional equity, color caucus, osba board of directors, educational foundation and give their legislative updates. Twice during each Regular Board Business meeting time is set aside to hear Citizen Comments, see policy attached to the agenda for further details. The agenda is posted on the Parkrose School District Website at https://v3.boardbook.org/Public/PublicAgenda.aspx?ak=1000205&mk=50346811.  


Trump didn't just attack California's air quality
Oregon Environmental Council - 09/18/19 5:31 PM

He went after Oregon, 13 other states and D.C.’s authority to demand Clean Car Standards; Oregonian leadership more important than ever

PORTLAND ––  President Donald Trump and the Environmental Protection Agency are attempting to undo the work of thousands of Oregonians and dozens of organizations that successfully demanded Clean Car Standards in Oregon in 2006. These standards cut climate and air pollution and save consumers at the pump. These rollbacks take the country backwards at the exact time other nations are accelerating clean technology innovations.

The Trump administration has steadfastly ignored states, tribes, business and labor voices that want the Clean Car Standards to remain in place.  Administrator Wheeler plainly stated they don’t intend to negotiate with states before finalizing their unwanted and dangerous rollback. At risk are requirements for cleaner technology that prevents air pollution and improves fuel economy as well as California’s ability to set stronger standards that other states can opt-in to. By refusing to acknowledge the authority of states granted by the Clean Air Act to adopt stronger limits on pollution from cars, President Trump is betraying the health and financial well-being of more than 118 million Americans living in clean car states – in favor of big oil and D.C. industry lobbyists.

The fourteen states plus D.C. are not the only states that will be impacted if these rights are revoked. The administration is effectively trying to strip all states of their authority under the Clean Air Act to control vehicle pollution within their own borders, now or in the future.

“These protections were so sensible and so cost-effective that in 2009 the federal government adopted them nationwide,” OEC Deputy Director Chris  Hagerbaumer wrote in 2017. “Because of proactive states like Oregon, our cars are cheaper to drive, our air is cleaner, and our tailpipes are emitting fewer greenhouse gases.”

The nation’s clean car standards and complementary fuel-economy standards have led to important technological innovations. These regulations have made them more competitive, contrary to opponents claims many years ago. 

“Today, we’re nearly three years into the Trump administration, and we can only hope the slow gears of federal bureaucracy and legislation will work in our favor as the clock runs out on this anti-environment administration

“Oregon has had to repeatedly defend itself against federal rollbacks to air, land, and water protections, and now three years later, we remain committed as ever to continue,” said Jana Gastellum, Climate Program Director. “Without federal leadership on our environmental priorities, it’s important for Oregonians to hold the federal government accountable while continuing to call on their state lawmakers and demand bold climate action.”

###

About Oregon Environmental Council: We bring Oregonians together to protect our water, air and land with healthy solutions that work for today and for future generations. Founded in 1968 by concerned Oregonians from across the state, we are a membership-based, nonpartisan nonprofit. Follow us! @oeconline | OEConline.org




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/6139/127771/20190918_Trump_California_Clean_Cars.pdf

Officer Involved Shooting in West Salem
Polk Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/18/19 5:07 PM

On 09/18/19 at about 1:03 pm the POINT Team (Polk County Inter Agency Narcotics Team) was conducting follow up to an ongoing drug investigation in the Edgewater St area of West Salem.    The team attempted to take a male into custody inside the Goodwill Store, located at 585 Edgewater St and a shot was fired during the arrest.  The involved male was deceased at the scene. The name of the deceased nor the name of involved officer will be released at this time.  

As per Polk County’s Use of Deadly Force Response Plan (SB 111 protocol), the Sheriff’s Office in consultation with the Polk County District Attorney’s Office asked the Salem Police Department if they would handle the investigation, as members of the POINT team were involved in the incident.  The POINT team is supervised by the Polk County Sheriff’s Office and consists of detectives from the Sheriff’s Office, the Dallas, Monmouth and Independence Police Departments, Oregon State Police along with prosecution support from the Polk County District Attorney’s Office.  

Any further media requests should be directed at the Salem Police Department.       


Oregonians feel climate disruption, unfinished business
Oregon Environmental Council - 09/18/19 4:34 PM

Local impacts, unmet needs heard across issue areas during legislative days at the Capitol; dozens speak their truth

SALEM -- Experts spoke to state lawmakers this week about the worsening impacts of climate disruption on our lives and our outdoors. Top of mind were lack of funding for solutions to help fight wildfires and preparing our public health systems to combat the increased health risks climate disruption brings. Southern Oregon communities, experienced with the struggle to protect their lungs from smoke, have banded together with other conservation heroes to implore lawmakers to change how we do business.

“It’s clear from this week’s hearings that climate change is already impacting every aspect of Oregonians’ lives--from how we manage wildfire risk for our electric grid, to our very health, to where new economic opportunities are being created,” said OEC Climate Program Director Jana Gastellum. “Our state needs to deliver on bold action as soon as possible. The health of Oregon businesses, families, and natural resources depend on it. We urge the legislature to connect the dots on all they're hearing and finish the job on a comprehensive approach to both cutting pollution and investing in communities to solve these challenges.”

The Oregon Legislature, in the shadow of its own environmental legacy, runs the risk of falling woefully behind other states--not doing enough to protect its own people or critical infrastructure. New York, New Mexico, Colorado, Washington and Wisconsin have all passed more protective policies this year.

Climate disruption, along with unchecked air and water pollution from dirty energy sources, is harming Oregonians, and for too long, our leaders have put off addressing climate change in a comprehensive way.

Several committees heard from experts in public health, forestry, wildfire response, emergency response, modern irrigation systems, and more, and from farmworkers who are on the front line. These experts spoke about how climate change is disrupting their lives, and businesses, and the need for research, preparedness and action.

AGRICULTURE
Oregon is the country’s 5th largest producer of fresh-market vegetables. Farmworkers spend long hours outside bringing food to the nation’s table. As annual temperatures rise for Oregon’s 87,000 farmworkers, they have become one of many frontline communities seeking safeguards and climate justice.

PUBLIC HEALTH
Public health experts warned of more pollen, more mosquitoes, and more particle pollution aggravating respiratory illnesses and increasing the risk of heart disease. Farmers and irrigators shared innovative ways to pipe irrigation water for improved resiliency, increased streamflow, and more reliable crop yields.

WILDFIRE
In some cases, climate impacts are creating hard trade-offs. In the electric power sector, for example, hot temperatures and high winds can cause power lines to arc and ignite catastrophic fires, as happened with the Camp Fire that devastated Paradise, California. The only safe choice may be to shut off power during such conditions to prevent fires or protect first responders. However, power shutoffs leave some people stranded and may require that medically fragile individuals have access to backup power.

TRANSPORTATION
Other panelists spoke of solutions ready to be deployed that can cut pollution and add to economic development. 

  • Toyota and electric vehicle industry experts updated legislators on many vehicle advances that help transition away from carbon-intensive gasoline and diesel markets, while creating new job opportunities in Oregon.

  • Michael Lord from Toyota testified to fuel cell vehicles’ long-range and quick fueling abilities. And while a representative from Ford was unable to attend, their video showing the hauling power of an all-electric F150 truck made an impression on lawmakers. 

  • Aaron Milano from Portland General Electric (PGE) shared that Oregon drivers can save $1,000 on fuel costs by driving electric and that PGE’s new grant fund (supported by the Clean Fuels Program) is helping businesses and community organizations access electric vehicles and charging.

Oregon Environmental Council tracked this week’s committee hearings and selected expert testimony that speaks to the impacts of climate change on Oregon’s economy, health, and management of critical infrastructure. Find quotes from more experts and other interesting tidbits we picked up at OEConline.org/SeptLegDays. Consider it a one-stop shop for a glimpse at this week’s climate discussions in Salem.
 

Speaker

Committee

Impact 

Kathleen Johnson, Senior Program Coordinator, Washington County Department of Health

House Interim Committee on Health Care

Sept. 16

On modernizing public health programs that must include environmental health programs to plan and prevent increased risk of diseases from warmer years. 

 

“Across the state, local health departments lack the capacity to do this type of work, currently.”

 

Only 5 of Oregon's 36 counties have climate and health adaptation plans. 

Martha Sonato, Political Director, Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroest (PCUN)

House Interim Committee on Health Care

Sept. 16

Average life expectancy of a farmworker is 49 years.

 

“Our farmworkers work in one of the toughest industries, and as a state we should be doing everything we can to institute strong protections from the effects of climate change and extreme heat. As a state we can do more.”

Karen Humelbaugh, Director, Office of Workforce Investments

Senate Interim Committee on Wildfire Prevention and Recovery

Sept. 16

On turning away half the applicants for the Oregon Youth Corps, who provide crucial wildfire prevention work to help out busy rangers responding to wildfires or other emergencies:

 

“If we were to receive additional funding there are certainly many many projects, both at the state and federal level that are there waiting, and we certainly have the interest of the young people as well.”

Michael Grant, Executive Director, Oregon Public Utility Commission

House Interim Committee on Veterans and Emergency Preparedness 

Sept. 16

On managing the electric grid under more extreme climate conditions:

 

“Traditionally, wildfire mitigation has not been a primary focus of our oversight ... That is changing.”

Commissioner Letha Tawney, Oregon Public Utility Commission

House Interim Committee on Veterans and Emergency Preparedness 

Sept. 16

On how utilities are evaluating how to shut off power to their customers during weather conditions with high risk of wildfire:

 

“They’re all understandably very concerned that they would be the one to cause the next disaster.”

Tonya Graham, City Councilor, City of Ashland; and Executive Director, GEOS Institute

Senate Interim Committee on Wildfire Prevention and Recovery

Sept. 16

On days of unhealthy air quality from wildfire smoke: 

 

“Parents struggled with how to keep their children active during the summer when they were all trapped in the house together. Anybody who’s had small children understands the intensity of that experience. My son’s soccer team, along with the football teams, had to be bused out to the coast in order to get a couple of days of practice out on an actual field and out of a gym because the smoke was so bad for so long.”

Michael Lord, Executive Engineer, Toyota Motor North America

Joint Committee on Transportation

Sept. 17

On the variety of alternative fuels, including the new fuel cell electric cars: “We all have the common goal of decarbonizing transportation … It’s actually a very heavy lift as we all know. We are here. We would like to have a continuing dialogue.” 

Les Perkins, Manager, Farmers Irrigation District, Hood River

House Interim Committee on Water

Sept. 17

“Although this was a decent water year, the Hood River was about 25% of normal in streamflow for most of the year. We were at drought levels in terms of streamflows and that’s coming at increasing frequency. So that’s becoming more the norm for us.”

 

On successful irrigation modernization in his district: “We now are able to deliver water even in a drought year reliably to our growers.”

April Snell, Executive Director, Oregon Water Resources Congress

House Interim Committee on Water

Sept. 17

“We have new functions that didn’t exist including when many of their infrastructure was built, including fish passage, safe fish screening, seismic resilience and dealing with our changing climate. All of those things are challenges with our aging infrastructure and of course there’s not enough funding to support those types of efforts.”

Miles Pengilly, Vice President, Thorn Run Partners, Forth

House Interim Committee on Energy and Environment

Sept. 18

On transportation electrification opportunities:

 

“This is not just about reducing carbon. This is a burgeoning industry that is having a lot of investment and it’s a great opportunity to bring some of that innovation and some of those jobs to the state of Oregon.”

Sean Negherbon, City Administrator, City of Myrtle Creek

House Interim Committee on Energy and Environment

Sept. 18

On being being able to advertise EV charging to travelers:

 

“We’ve always been a resting spot for travelers... We’ve always been there. But in the ‘60s the freeway bypassed us. It’s economic development to get that blue sign.” 

 

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About Oregon Environmental Council: We bring Oregonians together to protect our water, air and land with healthy solutions that work for today and for future generations. Founded in 1968 by concerned Oregonians from across the state, we are a membership-based, nonpartisan nonprofit. Follow us! @oeconline | OEConline.org




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/6139/127769/20190918_Legislative_Days_Release.pdf

SAIF returns more than $58.8 million to metro area economy
SAIF - 09/18/19 4:24 PM

Earlier this month, SAIF announced $160 million in dividends for policyholders.

Policyholders in Multnomah County will receive more than $28.8 million; Washington County policyholders will receive more than $16.2 million; and in Clackamas County, policyholders will receive nearly $13.8 million. That does not include state agencies or public universities. The checks will be mailed next month.

Read the press release for more information on this year’s dividends.


SAIF returns more than $3.9 million to Yamhill County economy
SAIF - 09/18/19 4:17 PM

Earlier this month, SAIF announced two dividends for more than 48,500 employers: a $120 million primary dividend to be paid to SAIF's policyholders, and a $40 million safety performance dividend to be paid based on each policyholder's safety results.

Policyholders in Yamhill County will receive more than $3.9 million. That does not include state agencies or public universities. The checks will be mailed next month.

Read the press release for more information on this year’s dividends.


On October 5, Historian Jim Mockford Will Present "SHIPWRECKED IN JAPAN: Lt. Broughton of the Vancouver Expedition"
Fort Vancouver National Historic Site - 09/18/19 4:17 PM

On October 5, 2019, at 1:30 pm at the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center, join historian Jim Mockford for a special presentation on the history of British Lieutenant William Robert Broughton's 1797 shipwreck in Japan. This free public program is hosted by the Friends of Fort Vancouver.

In October 1792, Captain George Vancouver sent Lt. William Robert Broughton to explore the Lower Columbia River. Over the course of that month, Broughton sailed up the river, as far east as present-day Multnomah County, Oregon. There, in view of the snowy volcano to the east, he named Mount Hood after British Viscount Samuel Hood, Admiral of the British Fleet.

Just five years after Lt. Broughton sailed from the Columbia River and returned to England from the Vancouver expedition, he charted the coast of Northeast Asia and Japan as captain of the HMS Providence. In 1797 Captain Broughton was shipwrecked at Miyako Island on an uncharted and unusual coral reef that appears like a phantom island once a year in the spring due to low tides. Miyako Island, located in the southern Ryukyu Islands, was then part of the Ryukyu Kingdom centered at Okinawa, and later became part of Japan.

In April, 2019, historian Jim Mockford travelled to Miyako Island to see the shipwreck site and learn about the story of HMS Providence from local historians. Mockford’s travels in search of Captain Broughton’s maritime adventures and history have taken him to Hawaii, Tahiti, Korea, the northernmost and southernmost Japanese Islands, and England as well as the Pacific Northwest. This lecture, titled SHIPWRECKED IN JAPAN: Lieutenant Broughton of the Vancouver Expedition, will present photographs and the story of this last exploring expedition by Captain Broughton, along with photographs of the site.

Jim Mockford is a historian who has researched the voyages of Captain George Vancouver and those of his lieutenants in the Pacific Ocean. His essays have been published in SEA HISTORY, the Oregon Historical QuarterlyMains’l Haul by the San Diego Maritime Museum, Noticias del Puerto de MontereyThe Northern Mariner/Le marin du nord, and The Early Republic and the Sea: Essays on the Naval and Maritime History of the Early United States.

What: “SHIPWRECKED IN JAPAN: Lt. Broughton of the Vancouver Expedition” presented by historian Jim Mockford

Where: Fort Vancouver Visitor Center, 1501 E. Evergreen Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98661

When: Saturday, October 5, 2019, 1:30pm

Cost: Free


SAIF returns more than $16 million to Washington County economy
SAIF - 09/18/19 4:16 PM

Earlier this month, SAIF announced two dividends for more than 48,500 employers: a $120 million primary dividend to be paid to SAIF's policyholders, and a $40 million safety performance dividend to be paid based on each policyholder's safety results.

Policyholders in Washington County will receive more than $16 million. That does not include state agencies or public universities. The checks will be mailed next month.

Read the press release for more information on this year’s dividends.


SAIF returns nearly $29 million to Multnomah County economy
SAIF - 09/18/19 4:12 PM

Earlier this month, SAIF announced two dividends for more than 48,500 employers: a $120 million primary dividend to be paid to SAIF's policyholders, and a $40 million safety performance dividend to be paid based on each policyholder's safety results.

Policyholders in Multnomah County will receive nearly $29 million. That does not include state agencies or public universities. The checks will be mailed next month.

Read the press release for more information on this year’s dividends.


SAIF returns more than $14.5 million to Marion and Polk County economies
SAIF - 09/18/19 4:10 PM

Earlier this month, SAIF announced two dividends for more than 48,500 employers: a $120 million primary dividend to be paid to SAIF's policyholders, and a $40 million safety performance dividend to be paid based on each policyholder's safety results.

Policyholders in Marion County will receive more than $12.5 million; policyholders in Polk County will receive nearly $2 million. That does not include state agencies or public universities. The checks will be mailed next month.

Read the press release for more information on this year’s dividends.


SAIF returns nearly $1.4 million to Lincoln County economy
SAIF - 09/18/19 4:04 PM

Earlier this month, SAIF announced two dividends for more than 48,500 employers: a $120 million primary dividend to be paid to SAIF's policyholders, and a $40 million safety performance dividend to be paid based on each policyholder's safety results.

Policyholders in Lincoln County will receive nearly $1.4 million. That does not include state agencies or public universities. The checks will be mailed next month.

Read the press release for more information on this year’s dividends.


SAIF returns more than $3.3 million to Hood River and Wasco County economies
SAIF - 09/18/19 3:55 PM

Earlier this month, SAIF announced two dividends for more than 48,500 employers: a $120 million primary dividend to be paid to SAIF's policyholders, and a $40 million safety performance dividend to be paid based on each policyholder's safety results.

Policyholders in Hood River County will be receiving more than $1.7 million; Wasco County policyholders will receive more than $1.6 million. That does not include state agencies or public universities. The checks will be mailed next month.

Read the press release for more information on this year’s dividends.


Oregon Man Sentenced to 14 Months in Federal Prison for Instagram Threats Against Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/18/19 3:50 PM
Instagram post
Instagram post
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PORTLAND, Ore.—Kermit Tyler Poulson, 40, was sentenced today to 14 months in federal prison and one year of supervised release for transmitting threatening communications with the intent to extort Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler.

“Using social media to threaten violence against any person regardless of that person’s position in our community is wrong. The Portland JTTF actively investigates all threats of violence,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “Federal law enforcement will continue working with our state and local partners to respond quickly to threats. These partnerships prevent many horrific acts of violence from occurring.”

“True threats victimize individuals and undermine the foundations that make our country a place where we can disagree, debate and find common ground,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. “The FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force and our partners remain committed to keeping our shared community free of violence and intimidation.”

According to court documents, on October 9, 2018, Poulson posted multiple threatening comments on Mayor Wheeler’s personal Instagram account. Poulson threatened to firebomb the mayor’s home and office if he did not immediately fire Portland police officers recently involved in an on-duty shooting. Investigators tracked the IP address associated with the comments to a Portland residence where Poulson was staying. Poulson was present when investigators searched the property and after initially making a number of misleading statements, admitted that he alone was responsible for the comments.

On July 3, 2019, Poulson pleaded guilty to one count of transmitting threatening communications with the intent to extort Mayor Wheeler.

This case was investigated by the Portland FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) and the Portland Police Bureau (PPB). The Portland JTTF includes FBI special agents and more than a dozen state and local law enforcement officers.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release , Instagram post

SAIF returns nearly $3.6 million to Clatsop and Tillamook County economies
SAIF - 09/18/19 3:31 PM

Earlier this month, SAIF announced two dividends for more than 48,500 employers: a $120 million primary dividend to be paid to SAIF's policyholders, and a $40 million safety performance dividend to be paid based on each policyholder's safety results.

Policyholders in Clatsop County will be receiving more than $2.1 million; Tillamook County policyholders will be recieving nearly $1.5 million. That does not include universities or state agencies. The checks will be mailed next month.

Read the press release for more information on this year’s dividends.


SAIF returns nearly $13.8 million to Clackamas County economy
SAIF - 09/18/19 3:24 PM

Earlier this month, SAIF announced two dividends for more than 48,500 employers: a $120 million primary dividend to be paid to SAIF's policyholders, and a $40 million safety performance dividend to be paid based on each policyholder's safety results.

Policyholders in Clackamas County will be receiving nearly $13.8 million. That does not include universities or state agencies. The checks will be mailed next month.

Read the press release for more information on this year’s dividends.


SAIF returns more than $1.1 million to Columbia County economy
SAIF - 09/18/19 3:19 PM

Earlier this month, SAIF announced two dividends for more than 48,500 employers: a $120 million primary dividend to be paid to SAIF's policyholders, and a $40 million safety performance dividend to be paid based on each policyholder's safety results.

Policyholders in Columbia County will be receiving more than $1.1 million. That does not include universities or state agencies. The checks will be mailed next month.

Read the press release for more information on this year’s dividends.


Clatsop County Sheriff's Office Promotion (Photo)
Clatsop Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/18/19 3:15 PM
2019-09/3864/127743/Scott_#2.jpg
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The Sheriff’ Office is proud to announce the promotion of Senior Deputy Bruce Scott to Sergeant in the Criminal Division.  Sgt Scott started his career with the Sheriff’s Office on December 1st, 2010 as a deputy in the Criminal Division.  Since that time Sgt Scott has served as an instructor in several disciplines, field training officer, High Angle Team Leader and one of two Drug Recognition Experts in the Sheriff’s Office.  Sgt Scott has served as the Association President.  Sgt Scott holds and Advanced Certificate from Department of Safety Standards and Training and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice through Globe University. 

In his new duties Sgt Scott will be responsible for supervising deputies in the field, ensuring deputies have the necessary tools and resources so they can better serve our citizens and providing a positive example for others to follow.  Sgt Scott will officially take on his new duties on October 1st, 2019. 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3864/127743/Scott_#2.jpg , 2019-09/3864/127743/Scott_#1.jpg

Salem Man Charged with Transmitting Threatening Communications (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/18/19 3:07 PM
Facebook Post
Facebook Post
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PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal criminal complaint was unsealed today charging a Salem, Oregon man with threatening Social Security Administration (SSA) officials after being denied Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.

Erick Carlsen, 45, is charged with transmitting threatening communications in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 875(c).

According to the complaint, on July 24, 2019, Carlsen allegedly engaged in threatening behavior at an SSA benefits review hearing in Salem. At the hearing, Carlsen yelled at the Administrative Law Judge and threatened future physical violence. Salem police officers responded and Carlsen left without further incident. Carlsen livestreamed his actions on Facebook and later posted additional threats.

On September 11, 2019, Carlsen left a voicemail for an SSA Office of Inspector General Agent in which he said, “I’m going to go to this hearing and people are going to [expletive] pay. Do you understand? You guys are going to [expletive] pay.” The same day, Carlsen posted another threat on Facebook entitled “Why do People Go on Shooting Sprees.” In the post, Carlsen claimed that he would “…make the front page and air on every TV station” and “…make sure the whole country stands up and takes notice…”

The next day, investigators from the Federal Protective Service (FPS) interviewed Carlsen at his home in Salem. During the conversation, Carlsen was visually agitated and appeared to be preparing for a fight. Carlsen told the investigators he suffered from mental health issues that cause anger and that he does not leave his property because he is never sure what he will do. When they discussed his upcoming SSA hearing, Carlsen said that he would not bring weapons, but that he could not promise he wouldn’t hurt anyone.

A concerned citizen notified law enforcement of Carlsen’s Facebook posts and later told investigators, “I really feel like he has the potential to follow through.” On September 17, 2019, Carlsen was arrested by the Marion County Sheriff’s Office without incident.

Carlsen made his first appearance in federal court today in Portland. He will be arraigned on October 16, 2019.

This case was investigated by the SSA Office of Inspector General, FPS, FBI, Marion County Sheriff’s Office and Salem Police Department and is being prosecuted by Rachel Sowray, Special Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

A criminal complaint is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Anyone who has information about real or perceived threats of violence should call the FBI at (503) 224-4181 or submit a tip online at https://tips.fbi.gov. For immediate threats to life and safety, please call 9-1-1.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release , Facebook Post

Media Advisory: Portland Street Response Houseless Survey Results and Pilot Program Updates
Portland Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty - 09/18/19 2:14 PM

Houseless advocates, PSU researchers, City and County commissioners will come together to present and discuss survey findings as a follow up on surveys conducted in July with the houseless community. An update to the public on the status of the Portland Street Response pilot program will also be given.

Mayor Ted Wheeler, County Chair Deborah Kafoury, Multnomah County Commissioner Susheela Jayapal, and City Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty will provide remarks regarding the pilot program development. Kaia Sand, Executive Director of Street Roots, will present the initial idea of Portland Street Response, inspired by Eugene’s CAHOOTs program. Greg Townley, research director for the Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative, will present the findings from surveys conducted with the houseless community regarding the pilot program. Street Roots vendors and PSU students will also discuss their experiences conducting the surveys.

What: Portland Street Response Houseless Survey Results and Pilot Program Updates

When: September 19, 8:30am – 9:30am

Where: Multnomah County Central Library, US Bank Room
801 SW 10th Ave
Portland, OR 97205


Sandy Fire District Seeks Volunteer Firefighters (Photo)
Sandy Fire District - 09/18/19 2:11 PM
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Sandy Fire District opened recruitment for volunteer firefighters September 3, 2019 through November 1, 2019.  Application packets are available from 8:00am to 5:00 pm Monday through Friday at the Sandy Fire District’s Main Station located at 17460 Bruns Ave, Sandy.  You can also download the application from the website at www.sandyfire.org

Sandy Fire District operates three fire stations (Dover, Roslyn Lake, and Sandy) with a staff of 15 paid personnel and 50 volunteers.  Sandy Fire District protects 77 square miles serving a population of over 21,000.

The District maintains approximately 50-60 Volunteer Firefighters.  Training for new members begins January 2019.  Upon completion of the recruit academy volunteers will achieve the rank of NFPA Firefighter I, Hazmat Awareness & Operations, and Wildland Interface Firefighter.

“Our volunteers are essential to our success as an emergency services agency.  Whether you are looking for the start of a new career or want to give back to our community.” Says Division Chief Jason McKinnon. Sandy Fire District No. 72 highly values its members and works hard to bring in the best.  “If you are looking for a positive way to contribute, this is it.”

To be eligible for the volunteer program you must be at least 18 years of age, be able to pass a driving and criminal background check, complete and pass our physical agility test and written exam. 

We are looking for people who care about our community and are willing to receive in-depth training to become Firefighters.  These individuals will work hand in hand with paid staff and our existing team of dedicated volunteers and respond on every type of alarm our station receives.  We are extremely proud of the level of professionalism and expertise our volunteers demonstrate.

“Being able to commit the time the first year of training can be difficult” says Jason McKinnon, Division Chief of Professional Development.  “The first year is the toughest and requires a lot of dedication and time management.”  The Firefighter Recruit Academy consist of just under 200 hours from January to July which includes every Tuesday evening and every other Saturday.

If you have questions regarding the District, the Volunteer Program, or the application process, you are encouraged to contact Division Chief Jason McKinnon at 503-668-8093 or j.mckinnon@sandyfire.org

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Attached Media Files: Firefighting 3 , Firefighting 2 , Firefighting 1

Police Activities League of SW Washington participating in Give More 24! (Photo)
Police Activities League of SW Washington - 09/18/19 2:10 PM
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Vancouver, Wash. –On September 19, 2019, the Police Activities League of SW Washington (PAL) will be once again participating in Give More 24! Start your day at Dot Donuts (1825 SE 164th Ave #103) between 5:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m. and meet the PAL folks and a few police officers too as they raise money during this amazing 24 hour event.  20% of donuts sold will come back to PAL and Give More partner NWCAVE! There will be a giving station at Dot Donuts so it will be easy to lend your support.

If starting your morning at Dot’s doesn’t work, there will be plenty of evening events happening. Check out the PAL Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pg/PALofSWWA/events/?ref=page_internal for the full schedule or donate directly to the PAL Give More 24! Campaign at: https://www.givemore24.org/organizations/police-activities-league-of-sw-washington.

For more information about PAL visit: www.palofswwa.org.

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Attached Media Files: 2019-09/6402/127739/pal_dot.png

Milton-Freewater Man Sentenced to 10 Years in Federal Prison for Trafficking Heroin in Eastern Oregon (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/18/19 2:09 PM
Items seized from defendant and his residence
Items seized from defendant and his residence
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PORTLAND, Ore.—Adan Torres-Nieves, 45, of Milton-Freewater, Oregon, was sentenced today to 120 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release for possessing with the intent to distribute nearly four pounds of heroin in Eastern Oregon.

According to court documents, in early 2017, investigators from the Blue Mountain Narcotics Enforcement Team (BENT) began investigating Torres-Nieves who appeared to be supplying a low-level drug dealer named Carlos Cisneros-Razo. Investigators established probable cause to arrest Torres-Nieves and execute search warrants on both of his and Cisneros-Razo’s residences.

During the search of Torres-Nieves’s residence in Milton-Freewater, investigators found approximately four pounds of heroin, a pound of methamphetamine, and five pounds of cocaine; $21,046 in cash; digital scales; a stolen revolver and a camouflage ballistic vest. A second revolver was found in Torres-Nieves’ bedroom.

On May 6, 2019, Torres-Nieves pleaded guilty to one count of possession with intent to distribute heroin. During sentencing, U.S. District Court Judge Michael H. Simon ordered Torres-Nieves to forfeit two firearms seized from his residence and the $26,166 seized from his person and residence.

On October 1, 2018, Cisneros-Razo was sentenced to 60 months in prison for possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine.

This case was investigated by BENT and the FBI and prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release , Items seized from defendant and his residence , Firearm found in vehicle

Salem cultural, historic attractions and events grants available
City of Salem - 09/18/19 2:00 PM

Salem, Ore. — The City of Salem is accepting grant proposals from organizations that want to host historic, cultural, and tourism-related events in Salem. 

Grant awards of up to $2,000 are available for small events and up to $10,000 for large events hosted by nonprofit 501(c) organizations listed with the Internal Revenue Service. All events must take place within Salem city limits, be open to the public, and occur between July 1, 2020 and June 30, 2021. 

The grants are funded by the Transient Occupancy Tax, also known as a hotel tax. The grants provide marketing and promotion support for various historic and cultural facilities and events in Salem. 

 Attendance at one of these pre-application meetings is a requirement for applying:

Tuesday, October 8, 2019, 6:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Library Anderson Room B
585 Liberty Street SE, Salem, OR 97301

Thursday, October 10, 2019, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Pringle Hall
606 Church St SE, Salem, OR 97301

Applications will be available beginning October 10, 2019 both online at http://www.cityofsalem.net/Pages/cultural-and-tourism-promotion-advisory-board.aspx and by contacting the City of Salem at (503) 540-2361. Applications will be due November 15, 2019

For more information about Transient Occupancy Tax grants, please contact the City of Salem at (503)-540-2361.


Health advisory issued September 18 at Hubbard Creek Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 09/18/19 1:31 PM

Sept. 18, 2019

Health advisory issued September 18 at Hubbard Creek Beach

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Hubbard Creek Beach in Curry County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in these areas until the advisory is lifted. Higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While the advisory is in effect at Hubbard Creek Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm. Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Resources for Media

Beach water advisory audio and video resources

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us


Health advisory issued September 18 at Sunset Bay State Park Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 09/18/19 1:29 PM

Sept. 18, 2019

Health advisory issued September 18 at Sunset Bay State Park Beach

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Sunset Bay State Park Beach in Coos County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in these areas until the advisory is lifted. Higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While the advisory is in effect at Sunset Bay State Park Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Resources for Media

Beach water advisory audio and video resources

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us


City seeks volunteer to serve on Portland airport noise advisory committee
City of Vancouver - 09/18/19 1:27 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The City of Vancouver is seeking applicants to fill one vacancy on the Portland International Airport (PDX) Citizen Noise Advisory Committee. Applications must be received by 5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18.

The PDX Citizen Noise Advisory Committee is the official forum to address the community's aircraft noise concerns. Local jurisdictions and the Port of Portland appoint members of the committee to represent residential and business concerns within their jurisdiction. The City of Vancouver has two members on the committee.

The PDX Citizen Noise Advisory Committee reports, in an advisory capacity, to the General Manager for Airport Operations at PDX, through the Manager of Noise Management Office. The committee acts on behalf of local cities and counties to:

  • address community noise concerns
  • monitor and provide input on the implementation of the current PDX Noise Compatibility Plan
  • review airport noise issues and provide advice on issue resolution and follow-up action
  • enhance citizen understanding of airport noise management through the work of the committee as a whole
  • periodically brief the Port of Portland Board of Commissioners and the Vancouver City Council on the work of the committee

The committee typically meets from 5:30-8 p.m. on the second Thursday of every odd numbered month at the airport. PDX provides dinner to members starting at 5:30 p.m.

Eligible applicants must be Vancouver residents, and must be available for an interview with Vancouver City Councilmembers on Wednesday, Nov. 6.

To apply online, visit www.cityofvancouver.us/boards. To request an application or for more information, contact Michelle Bartley in the City Manager’s Office by mail at City Hall, P.O. Box 1995, Vancouver, WA 98668-1995, by email at artley@cityofvancouver.us">Michelle.Bartley@cityofvancouver.us or by calling 360-487-8607.

Visit www.cityofvancouver.us/pcnac to learn more about the PDX Citizen Noise Advisory Committee, or visit www.portofportland.com/Committees/CNAC to review past meeting agendas and summaries.

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Oregon Health Plan members in tri-counties will 'Pick a Plan' this October (Photo)
Oregon Health Authority - 09/18/19 1:14 PM
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September 18, 2019

Oregon Health Plan members in tri-counties will 'Pick a Plan' this October

Postcards from the Oregon Health Plan (OHP) will start hitting mailboxes this week to let members know an important letter will arrive in October with information about changes to the coordinated care organization (CCO) choices in their area. The postcards are a part of the Oregon Health Authority’s (OHA’s) outreach efforts and member support services for OHP members in communities with changes to their CCO choices in 2020.

CCOs are local health plans that help members use their medical, dental, and behavioral health benefits. Starting today, members will also have access to a special call center set up to support them through this transition.

"In some areas of Oregon, CCO plan choices are changing next year — and we want members to know there are resources they can access to get the help and information they need to pick the best plan for themselves and their families," said Lori Coyner, Oregon Health Authority Medicaid director.

In the Portland metro area, (Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington counties) members will be able to choose from Health Share of Oregon and Trillium Community Health Plan Inc. OHA will provide members with a guide to help them compare CCO plans and "pick the plan" that works best for them and their families.

Nearly 87 percent of Oregon’s 1 million OHP members are enrolled in CCOs. On July 9 the Oregon Health Authority announced its intent to award 15 organizations CCO contracts. Services under the new contracts will begin on January 1, 2020. The new contracts are part of OHA’s next phase of health care transformation, known as "CCO 2.0."

More than 350,000 members will have choices to make about their CCO plans this fall. An estimated 268,000 are in the tri-counties. Between October 16 and November 17, members can pick a plan online, over the phone, or in person with the help of an OHP-certified community partner.

Resources for OHP members:

  • Call 877-647-0027, a special number set up to help OHP members.
  • Go to OHP.Oregon.gov to find more information and local community partners who are trained to help support members during this transition.

Background

OHA heard from providers and members that keeping members with the providers they see now and not disrupting their care should be OHA’s main priority during this transition. OHP will suggest "matched" CCO plans for members based on the mental health and primary care providers they have seen in the past 24 months.

It is also important to OHA that members have the opportunity to make choices about which CCO will serve them when a choice is available in their area. Members do not have to keep their matched plans. Between Oct. 16 and Nov. 17, they can choose another plan online, over the phone, or in person with the help of an OHP-certified community partner.

If members like their matched plan, they don’t have to do anything. They will be automatically enrolled in that plan. If members do not like the CCO plan they are enrolled in, they will have another opportunity to change their plan between Jan. 1 and March 31, 2020.

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Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3687/127714/2.0-pick-your-plan-sp.png , 2019-09/3687/127714/2.0-pick-your-plan.png

Oregon Health Plan members in Lane County will 'Pick a Plan' this October (Photo)
Oregon Health Authority - 09/18/19 1:14 PM
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September 18, 2019

Oregon Health Plan members in Lane County will 'Pick a Plan' this October

Postcards from the Oregon Health Plan (OHP) will start hitting mailboxes this week to let members know an important letter will arrive in October with information about changes to the coordinated care organization (CCO) choices in their area. The postcards are a part of the Oregon Health Authority’s (OHA’s) outreach efforts and member support services for OHP members in communities with changes to their CCO choices in 2020.

CCOs are local health plans that help members use their medical, dental, and behavioral health benefits. Starting today, members will also have access to a special call center set up to support them through this transition.

"In some areas of Oregon, CCO plan choices are changing next year — and we want members to know there are resources they can access to get the help and information they need to pick the best plan for themselves and their families," said Lori Coyner, Oregon Health Authority Medicaid director.

In Lane County, members will be able to choose from PacificSource Community Solutions – Lane, and Trillium Community Health Plan Inc. OHA will provide members with a guide to help them compare CCO plans and "pick the plan" that works best for them and their families.

Nearly 87 percent of Oregon’s 1 million OHP members are enrolled in CCOs. On July 9 the Oregon Health Authority announced its intent to award 15 organizations CCO contracts. Services under the new contracts will begin on January 1, 2020. The new contracts are part of OHA’s next phase of health care transformation, known as "CCO 2.0."

More than 350,000 members will have choices to make about their CCO plans this fall. An estimated 71,000 are in Lane County. Between October 16 and November 17, members can pick a plan online, over the phone, or in person with the help of an OHP-certified community partner.

Resources for OHP members:

  • Call 877-647-0027, a special number set up to help OHP members.
  • Go to OHP.Oregon.gov to find more information and local community partners who are trained to help support members during this transition.

Background

OHA heard from providers and members that keeping members with the providers they see now and not disrupting their care should be OHA’s main priority during this transition. OHP will suggest "matched" CCO plans for members based on the mental health and primary care providers they have seen in the past 24 months.

It is also important to OHA that members have the opportunity to make choices about which CCO will serve them when a choice is available in their area. Members do not have to keep their matched plans. Between Oct. 16 and Nov. 17, they can choose another plan online, over the phone, or in person with the help of an OHP-certified community partner.

If members like their matched plan, they don’t have to do anything. They will be automatically enrolled in that plan. If members do not like the CCO plan they are enrolled in, they will have another opportunity to change their plan between Jan. 1 and March 31, 2020.

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Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3687/127716/2.0-pick-your-plan-sp.png , 2019-09/3687/127716/2.0-pick-your-plan.png

Connect with Battle Ground Police Officers on Coffee with a Cop Day
City of Battle Ground - 09/18/19 1:13 PM

Battle Ground police officers invite community members to join them and connect over a cup of coffee on National Coffee with a Cop Day Wednesday, October 2 from 10:00 to 11:30 am at Old Town Battle Grounds located at 316 East Main Street.

Coffee with a Cop Day provides opportunity for an open dialogue between Battle Ground police officers and the community in a friendly and informal setting.   There is no specific topic; officers want to hear from and talk with Battle Ground citizens about what matters to them.  Community members of of all ages - decaf, regular and non-coffee drinkers alike - are encouraged to attend. 

The department thanks Old Town Battle Grounds for providing a welcoming place for this year’s Coffee with a Cop.

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The City of Battle Ground, located in the heart of Clark County, WA serves 21,520 residents.  The surrounding natural beauty, access to recreation activities, and close proximity to the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area make Battle Ground a desirable place to live and has created a period of considerable growth. The City functions under a Council-Manager form of government and provides vital public services such as police, planning and development, roads, parks, utilities and others. City leaders operate under guiding principles that were created with community input through a recent visioning process. More information about the City, including a list of its guiding principles can be found at www.cityofbg.org.

 


Oregon Health Plan members in parts of Polk county will 'Pick a Plan' this October (Photo)
Oregon Health Authority - 09/18/19 1:13 PM
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September 18, 2019

Oregon Health Plan members in parts of Polk county will 'Pick a Plan' this October

Postcards from the Oregon Health Plan (OHP) will start hitting mailboxes this week to let members know an important letter will arrive in October with information about changes to the coordinated care organization (CCO) choices in their area. The postcards are a part of the Oregon Health Authority’s (OHA’s) outreach efforts and member support services for OHP members in communities with changes to their CCO choices in 2020.

CCOs are local health plans that help members use their medical, dental, and behavioral health benefits. Starting today, members will also have access to a special call center set up to support them through this transition.

"In some areas of Oregon, CCO plan choices are changing next year — and we want members to know there are resources they can access to get the help and information they need to pick the best plan for themselves and their families," said Lori Coyner, Oregon Health Authority Medicaid director.

In Polk County, members who were served by Willamette Valley Community Health that live in ZIP codes in the service areas of new CCO PacificSource Community Solutions – Marion Polk and current CCO Yamhill County Care Organization will choose between the two CCOs. OHA will provide members with a guide to help them compare CCO plans and "pick the plan" that works best for them and their families.

Nearly 87 percent of Oregon’s 1 million OHP members are enrolled in CCOs. On July 9 the Oregon Health Authority announced its intent to award 15 organizations CCO contracts. Services under the new contracts will begin on January 1, 2020. The new contracts are part of OHA’s next phase of health care transformation, known as "CCO 2.0."

More than 350,000 members will have choices to make about their CCO plans this fall. About 6,000 of them are in Polk County. Between October 16 and November 17, members can pick a plan online, over the phone, or in person with the help of an OHP-certified community partner.

Resources for OHP members:

  • Call 877-647-0027, a special number set up to help OHP members.
  • Go to OHP.Oregon.gov to find more information and local community partners who are trained to help support members during this transition.

Background

OHA heard from providers and members that keeping members with the providers they see now and not disrupting their care should be OHA’s main priority during this transition. OHP will suggest "matched" CCO plans for members based on the mental health and primary care providers they have seen in the past 24 months.

It is also important to OHA that members have the opportunity to make choices about which CCO will serve them when a choice is available in their area. Members do not have to keep their matched plans. Between Oct. 16 and Nov. 17, they can choose another plan online, over the phone, or in person with the help of an OHP-certified community partner.

If members like their matched plan, they don’t have to do anything. They will be automatically enrolled in that plan. If members do not like the CCO plan they are enrolled in, they will have another opportunity to change their plan between Jan. 1 and March 31, 2020.

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Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3687/127720/2.0-pick-your-plan-sp.png , 2019-09/3687/127720/2.0-pick-your-plan.png

Fire Destroys Garage in Washougal (Photo)
Camas-Washougal Fire Dept. - 09/18/19 1:11 PM
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2019-09/3924/127732/IMG_5495.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3924/127732/thumb_IMG_5495.jpg

At 11:00 am on September 18, Camas-Washougal Fire Department was dispatched to a report of a structure fire in the 3300 block of G Street in Washougal.  On arrival, crews found a working fire in a large detached garage.  Initial suppression attempts were unsuccessful due to the age of the structure and the heavy fire load of vehicles and equipment.  A defensive strategy was adopted and the fire was eventually extinguished from the exterior of the building.  The building suffered partial roof collapse.  Some of the contents of the building in the area of origin are likely a total loss.  Other contents suffered significant smoke and water damage.  There were no injuries reported.  

The cause of the fire is unknown at this time and is under investigation by the CWFD Fire Marshal's Office.  




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3924/127732/IMG_5495.jpg , 2019-09/3924/127732/IMG_5494.jpg , 2019-09/3924/127732/IMG_5493.jpg

Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council meets Oct. 2 in Roseburg
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 09/18/19 1:00 PM

ROSEBURG, Ore. – The Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) will meet 1 - 4 p.m. Oct. 2 at the Roseburg Public Library, Deer Creek Room, 1409 NE Diamond Lake Blvd, Roseburg. The meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes program updates and recommendations to appoint new and returning members to the Council.

View a PDF of the full agenda online.

ORTAC was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and its partners in the development and promotion of high quality non-motorized trail systems throughout Oregon.

The council is made up of seven volunteer members: one representative from each of the five congressional districts and two coastal representatives. Members are appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. The council holds quarterly meetings in different locations across the state.

For more information about ORTAC, visit the council's website

The meeting location is ADA accessible. Individuals who need special accommodations to attend should contact Jodi Bellefeuille at 503-986-0716 or ellefeuille@oregon.gov">jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov at least three days in advance.


Portland Man Sentenced to 100 Months in Federal Prison for Illegally Importing Fentanyl from China
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/18/19 12:35 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—John William Schantz, 28, of Portland, was sentenced today to 100 months in federal prison and four years’ supervised release for illegally importing fentanyl from China for the purpose of making and selling counterfeit prescription pills.

According to court documents, in November 2017, a U.S. Postal Inspection Service inspector discovered a suspicious package addressed to Schantz’s girlfriend at the U.S. Postal Service Portland Air Cargo Center. The inspector noted that the package was listed as containing a “pants zipper,” but felt like it contained a powdery substance. Agents from Homeland Security Investigations and officers from the Portland Police Bureau’s Drugs and Vice Division were called to investigate.

After finding that the package contained a white powdery substance, investigators transported it to the Oregon State Police Laboratory for further examination in a safe environment. The lab later determined the package contained approximately 102 grams of para-fluoroisobutryl fentanyl, a powerful opioid and Schedule I controlled substance. Investigators soon learned that between August and November 2017, there were 16 additional parcels shipped to Schantz’s residence. Of those, at least four were associated with known sources of controlled substances and pill manufacturing equipment.

On November 29, 2019, investigators conducted a controlled delivery of the package, now containing an inert substance, to Schantz’s residence. Investigators searched Schantz’s residence and seized two pill presses, a Ruger semi-automatic .22 caliber handgun, 245 rounds of .22 caliber ammunition, approximately 800 assorted counterfeit oxycodone and valium pills, various binding agents, die casts, digital scales and $1,142 in cash. When interviewed, Schantz admitted ordering fentanyl on the internet and having it shipped to his residence in his girlfriend’s name to avoid detection.

On July 16, 2019, Schantz pleaded guilty to one count of unlawfully importing a controlled substance.

This case was investigated by the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Interdiction Taskforce, Homeland Security Investigations, the U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the Portland Police Bureau Drugs and Vice Division. It was prosecuted by Scott M. Kerin, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

The Oregon HIDTA program was established by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) in June of 1999. In 2015 the program expanded into Idaho and was renamed the Oregon-Idaho HIDTA. The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA consists of 14 counties and the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. Counties in the HIDTA include Oregon’s Clackamas, Deschutes, Douglas, Jackson, Lane, Linn, Malheur, Marion, Multnomah, Umatilla and Washington counties, and Idaho’s Ada, Bannock and Canyon counties.

Opioid abuse affects communities across the nation. The CDC reports that in 2017, there were 70,237 drug overdose deaths in the U.S. Opioids and synthetic opioids were alone responsible for 47,600 overdose deaths or nearly 68% of all overdoses. Drug overdose is now the leading cause of injury or death in the United States.

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid 80 to 100 times more powerful than morphine and 30 to 50 times more powerful than heroin. A 3-milligram dose of fentanyl—a few grains of the substance—is enough to kill an average adult male.

If you or someone you know suffers from addiction, please call the Lines for Life substance abuse helpline at 1-800-923-4357 or visit www.linesforlife.org. Phone support is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. You can also text “RecoveryNow” to 839863 between 8am and 11pm Pacific Time daily.

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WSU Vancouver receives Insight Into Diversity 2019 Heed Award
WSU Vancouver - 09/18/19 12:13 PM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, the oldest and largest diversity-focused publication in higher education, announced today that Washington State University Vancouver received one of its 2019 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Awards. The award recognizes U.S. colleges and universities that demonstrate an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion.

“The HEED Award process consists of a comprehensive and rigorous application that includes questions relating to the recruitment and retention of students and employees—and best practices for both— continued leadership support for diversity, and other aspects of campus diversity and inclusion,” said Lenore Pearlstein, publisher of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. “We take a detailed approach to reviewing each application in deciding who will be named a HEED Award recipient. Our standards are high, and we look for institutions where diversity and inclusion are woven into the work being done every day across their campus.”

“I am very proud of the work faculty, staff and students have done to make WSU Vancouver a welcoming community that is committed to equity and inclusion. We have more work to do, but the HEED Award is evidence that we are moving in the right direction,” said WSU Vancouver Chancellor Mel Netzhammer.

Associate Vice Chancellor for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Obie Ford III said WSU Vancouver strives to infuse equity, diversity and inclusion throughout the campus fabric. “The work to institutionalize and normalize equity in our practices, policies and processes is a community effort. It is critical work that is rooted in love; and we have a lot more to do and to give. I am humbled by this national recognition of our efforts and honored that WSU Vancouver is a recipient of the HEED Award,” he said.

Ninety-two 2019 HEED Award recipients will be featured in the November 2019 issue of Insight Into Diversity magazine. Recipients include:

Adelphi University

Arkansas State University

Augustana College (IL)

Ball State University

California State University, East Bay

California State University, Fresno

California State University Northridge

California State University San Marcos

California State University, Fullerton

California State University, Los Angeles

Case Western Reserve University

Central Washington University

Clemson University

Columbia University in the City of New York

Cuyahoga Community College

Davenport University

DePaul University

East Carolina University

Eastern Washington University

El Paso County Community College District

Florida State University

Framingham State University

Georgia State University

Grand Valley State University

Greenville Technical College

Hillsborough Community College

Indiana University Bloomington

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

Kansas State University

Kent State University

Lehigh University

Louisiana State University

Maryville University

Metropolitan State University

Metropolitan State University of Denver

Millersville University

Minnesota State Colleges and Universities

Mississippi State University

North Carolina State University

Northeast Wisconsin Technical College

Northeastern University

Ohio University

Oklahoma State University

Oregon State University

Pikes Peak Community College

Princeton University

Rochester Institute of Technology

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Seminole State College of Florida

Sonoma County Junior College District

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

State University of New York College of Cortland

SUNY Buffalo State College

SUNY Old Westbury

Swarthmore College

Texas A&M University

Texas Christian University

Texas Tech University

The University of Alabama at Birmingham

The University of Tulsa

Union College, NY

University at Albany, State University of New York

University of Central Florida

University of Cincinnati

University of Colorado Boulder

University of Georgia

University of Houston

University of Houston Law Center

University of Houston-Downtown

University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

University of Kentucky

University of Louisiana at Lafayette

University of Louisville

University of Maryland School of Public Health

University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

University of Missouri-Kansas City

University of North Carolina at Greensboro

University of North Florida

University of North Texas

University of Pittsburgh of the Commonwealth System of Higher Education

University of South Carolina

University of South Florida

University of West Florida

University of West Georgia

Virginia Commonwealth University

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Washington State University Vancouver

West Virginia University

Western Michigan University

William & Mary

William Marsh Rice University

Winston Salem State University

For more information about the 2019 HEED Award, visit insightintodiversity.com.

About INSIGHT Into Diversity

INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine presents timely, thought-provoking news and feature stories on matters of diversity and inclusion across higher education and beyond. Articles include interviews with innovators and experts, as well as profiles of best practices and exemplary programs. Readers will also discover career opportunities that connect job seekers with institutions and businesses that embrace a diverse and inclusive workforce. 

About WSU Vancouver

As one of six campuses of the Washington State University system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

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PeaceHealth Southwest to offer Service of Remembrance for families grieving the loss of a child (Photo)
PeaceHealth - 09/18/19 12:00 PM
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PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center chaplains will conduct a "Service of Remembrance" Saturday, October 12, 2019 for all families grieving the loss of a child. The service will be held at 10 a.m. at Evergreen Memorial Gardens located at 1101 NE 112th Avenue in Vancouver, WA. in the Little Angels Memorial Garden.

"This is a time to remember the little ones, to support their families and any families who have experienced the death of a child," said Susan Lanford, M.Div, Director of Mission Services at PeaceHealth Southwest.

The annual service is provided by PeaceHealth Southwest Spiritual Care Services, PeaceHealth Family Birth Center, PeaceHealth Hope Bereavement Services, and Evergreen Memorial Gardens.. For more information please contact PeaceHealth Southwest Spiritual Care at 360.514.2257.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5173/127723/memorial.jpg

Advisory: Heavy rains last night lead to a stormwater and sewage overflow in NW Portland
Portland Bureau of Environmental Services - 09/18/19 10:56 AM

Sanitary Sewage Release Advisory

(this is not a combined sewer overflow [CSO] advisory)

(September 18, 2019) - Heavy rains last night overwhelmed a portion of the City’s sewer system at the 2700 block of NW Westover Road, leading to a mix of stormwater and sewage overflowing to the street from at least two manholes. In addition, the heavy rains led to a number of basement backups in nearby homes.

https://goo.gl/maps/vUsS2ouiX1CTmuCD6

The mix is estimated to be about 90 percent stormwater and 10 percent sewage. Crews responded around 9:30 p.m. and cleaned out the main sewer line as a precautionary measure in case of blockage but did not find any. The overflow stopped around 10:15 p.m.

The overflow to the street mixed with additional rain that fell overnight, further diluting and dispersing it. Warning signs were posted on the 2700 block of Westover only. Environmental Services does not advise any additional precautions.

The City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services treats an average of 70 million gallons of wastewater each day and manages a system of 2,500 miles of pipes, 2,000 green street planters and additional grey and green infrastructure.  While not common, exceptionally heavy rains can exceed the capacity of combined stormwater and sewer pipes, leading to discharges. Sewer overflows are usually preventable and are caused most often when pipes become blocked with grease, tree roots and debris.

The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with programs to protect water quality and public health, including wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration.

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Updated Media Release Regarding Missing Otis Man Cameron Shelden (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/18/19 10:48 AM
Scene area photo 2
Scene area photo 2
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/5490/127722/thumb_Scene_area_photo_2.jpg

Updated Media Release

On September 14, 2019 the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office, along with members of Lincoln County Search and Rescue, and the Lincoln City Police Department, resumed searching a property on Widow Creek Road for missing person Cameron Shelden.  Searchers utilized drone technology and dogs trained to detect human remains and excavation assistance from the Lincoln County Road Department.  The search was done with the consent of the property owner.  The team searched extensively in the large area of difficult terrain and heavy brush, but Mr. Shelden was not located. 

 

On the morning of September 17, 2019, the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office received a call from the property owner advising a deceased subject was located on the property.  Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office deputies and detectives responded to the property and were directed to a location outside of the area previously searched with the excavation equipment.  Detectives located the remains of a highly decomposed subject in dense vegetation.  The subject was presumptively identified as missing person Cameron Shelden.

 

The Lincoln County Sheriff’s requested the Oregon State Police Forensics Services Division respond for scene processing.  More forensics analysis will be conducted.  The case remains as an open death investigation.

 

###

 

Mark Meister
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

Administrative Patrol Sergeant

Phone 541-265-0684 

www.lincolncountysheriff.net

225 W. Olive St. Newport, OR 97365

 

 

 

LCSO Seeking Public Information in Missing Person Case - 09/06/19
 

On September 2nd, 2019, the Lincoln County Sheriff's Office was made aware of a missing person in the Otis area.  The complainant reported 37 year-old Cameron Ray Shelden of Otis was last seen on foot in the Widow Creek area the previous morning.

Lincoln County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue was activated and began searching for Shelden.  Search and Rescue performed a number of search operations over multiple days; utilizing ground search volunteers, specially trained K-9s, and unmanned aerial systems.  Search efforts for Shelden have been unsuccessful.  New leads are being investigated as they are received.  Anyone with information pertaining to Shelden's whereabouts area encouraged to call the Lincoln County Sheriff's Office Tip Line at (541) 265-0669.

 




Attached Media Files: Scene area photo 2 , Scene area photo 1

Ridgefield Students Earn Sweet Prizes for Library Patron of the Week Honors (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 09/18/19 10:09 AM
Rewards for the choosing by Ridgefield students who earn Library Patron of the Week honors at Sunset Ridge Intermediate and View Ridge Middle School.
Rewards for the choosing by Ridgefield students who earn Library Patron of the Week honors at Sunset Ridge Intermediate and View Ridge Middle School.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/889/127715/thumb_Sweet_Library_Prizes_2.jpg

Wednesday, September 18, 2019 – Ridgefield, WA –  Most people know it’s important to be quiet in the library.  But now good behavior in the library can earn you a sweet reward with the Library Patron of the Week program.

Tiffany Tamez, the library aide at Sunset Ridge Intermediate School and View Ridge Middle School, explained that the library expectations are pretty simple:  be quiet, show respect to all, and have no overdue books.  Students who meet those expectations are entered into a drawing for Library Patron of the Week.  Winners are drawn each week in rotation, fifth and seventh graders one week, and sixth and eighth graders the following week.  There will be new winners all school year. 

The names of the Library Patrons of the Week will be displayed on a special bulletin board in the library.  And winners can select their own prize from the big bins of candy.  (Alternate prizes are also available if a student has allergies or prefers something else.)  Students will be notified via their school email if they win.

So shhh!  Don’t be too loud.  You might just earn a sweet prize for your good behavior.

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Attached Media Files: Rewards for the choosing by Ridgefield students who earn Library Patron of the Week honors at Sunset Ridge Intermediate and View Ridge Middle School. , Bulletin board announces the Library Patron of the Week in the library that serves Sunset Ridge Intermediate and View Ridge Middle School students in Ridgefield.

CANCELED: Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee Sept. 19 meeting
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/18/19 9:29 AM

Salem, Ore. — The special-called meeting of the Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee on Thursday, Sept. 19 has been canceled. The next meeting is scheduled for Friday, October 25 in Salem.


UPDATE #2: Crash Leaves Pedestrian Fatally Injured on Northeast Portland Highway was Hit and Run
Portland Police Bureau - 09/18/19 5:59 AM
The investigation continues into this fatal hit and run crash.

The victim has been identified as 27-year-old Cristian Drae Lennon of Portland.

Officers are looking for a 1996-1998 red or maroon Chevy Blazer. This suspect vehicle should have front end damage.

Investigators want to hear from anyone who has information about this crash but has not yet been contacted by police. If you are a person with knowledge of this incident, please contact the Traffic Division at 503-823-2103.

###PPB###

###UPDATE #1 MESSAGE BELOW###
The Major Crash Team (MCT) has determined that the driver of the suspect vehicle left the scene of the crash, failing to perform the duties of a driver (hit and run). Police are still looking for the suspect and suspect vehicle.

Investigators are following up on leads and no description of the suspect vehicle is being released at this time. However, investigators are hoping to hear from anyone who has information about this crash and has not yet been contacted by police. Please contact the lead investigator Officer David Enz at 503-823-2208 or David.Enz@portlandoregon.gov and reference case number 19-319949.

The victim's identity will be released after it is confirmed and family has been notified.

This is the 48th MCT activation and 41st fatality of 2019.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###
A pedestrian has been fatally injured in the Cully neighborhood after being struck by a vehicle.

On Sunday, September 15, 2019 at 8:05p.m., North Precinct officers were dispatched to a pedestrian involved crash on Northeast Portland Highway at Northeast 45th Avenue. When they arrived they found the pedestrian lying the road unconscious. Medical arrived and determined that the person had died.

The Major Crash Team is responding to assume the investigation. Information about the vehicle involved is not being released.

Northeast Portland Highway is closed between Northeast 45th Avenue and Northeast 55th Avenue to all traffic. It will likely remain closed for several hours during the investigation.

More information will be released when appropriate to the investigation.

###PPB###

Tue. 09/17/19
Suspect In Custody
West Linn Police Dept. - 09/17/19 11:39 PM

On Tuesday September 17, 2019 at about 11:00pm, West Linn Police took 31 year old Arturo Garcia into custody. Garcia fled from a traffic stop from West Linn Police just over 24 hours earlier and was taken into custody roughly a half mile from the original traffic stop.  The West Linn Police Department would like to thank all of our neighboring agencies for their assistance, and to our citizens for their patience and confidence.  Garcia will be lodged at Clackamas County Jail later tonight on eluding and drug related charges.

 

On Monday September 16, 2019 at 10:00pm, West Linn Police conducted a traffic stop on 8th Court.  The driver of that vehicle fled on foot into the Willamette Neighborhood east of 10th Street between 4th Street and the Willamette River.  West Linn Police were unable to locate the suspect, described as a Hispanic male, approximately 6”, 250lbs.  He was last seen wearing a white T-shirt, black gym shorts and black socks.  WLPD located methamphetamines in the vehicle.  The search was ended at 1:00am.

On Tuesday, September 17, 2019 at 10:15am, a citizen reported seeing an individual matching the suspect’s description near 7th Street and 5th Avenue.  West Linn Police began searching for the suspect with the assistance of neighboring agencies k9 Units, TVF&R’s Rescue Boat and Canby’s Drone.  Willamette Primary School was placed in Lockout status as a precaution while police searched several blocks east of the school.  Units were unable to locate the suspect and ended the search at 1:00pm.

At 4:00pm, another citizen reported seeing the suspect, still wearing the white T-shirt, black gym shorts and black socks,  between 8th Street and 7th Street.  Patrol and K9 units converged and began searching the area for the suspect.  Multiple yards and wooded areas were searched, with reported sightings coming from citizens, but the suspect was not located.  After an hour of no new information or sightings of the suspect, at 8:00pm WLPD suspended the search.

The suspect is being sought for drug and eluding police charges.  There is no reason to believe he is, or was ever armed, or poses a danger to the public at this time.  We ask that citizens continue to be vigilant, lock your doors and vehicles and report any suspicious activity to the West Linn Police.


CCSO Detectives Request Public Assistance in Locating Hit and Run Vehicle (9/17/2019) (Photo)
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/17/19 6:19 PM
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CCSO Traffic Detectives have identified a make and model of a suspect vehicle in the Hit and Run collision from yesterday.  We are asking for the public's assistance in locating the vehicle involved in striking a pedestrian in the Felida area of Clark County and leaving the scene.  Based on evidence left at the scene, CCSO Detectives are looking for a 2002-2005 Ford Escape SUV or similar vehicle, with fresh passenger side damage, including missing a passenger side mirror.  The collision likely occurred around 3am, and was along a route that extends into the residential communities of Felida, Salmon Creek, and south Ridgefield.

If anyone locates a vehicle matching this description, we would ask that they contact 311 in Clark County (non-emergency line).  I've attached a photo of a like vehicle (it is not necessarily the same color, just style).

The female struck in the collision continues to recover at an area hospital with significant injuries.  She was identified as Debora A. Chillura, age 62.  Chillura is from the Portland Metro Area, and was transient at the time of the collision.

###

On 9/16/19 at 0711 hours CCSO Deputies and EMS personnel were called to the 8000 block of NW Lakeshore Avenue in the Felida area of west Clark County.  A 911 caller reported seeing a female lying in the ditch off of the roadway.  Upon arrival, it was determined that the female had been struck by a vehicle sometime earlier in the morning.  The female was transported to an area hospital with significant traumatic injuries.  Scene evidence indicates a northbound vehicle struck the female, who was walking on or near the east shoulder of the roadway.

The CCSO Traffic Unit is investigating this collision and will update this press release as details emerge.

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1172/127665/Ford_Escape_Example_2.png , 2019-09/1172/127665/Ford_Escape_example.png

Newport Woman Dies on US Hwy 20 near Newport (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/17/19 6:12 PM
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On September 17, 2019 at approximately 12:00 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) and emergency personnel responded to a report of a three vehicle crash on US Hwy 20 near milepost (MP) 4. Once on scene, it was determined the driver of the one of the vehicles, Linda C. Dodson, age 68, from Newport had been pronounced deceased at the scene.

The preliminary investigation revealed Dodson was driving a 1999 Nissan Pathfinder East on US Hwy 20 four mile east of Newport. A witness reported seeing the Pathfinder start to swerve and then it veered off the road on the south side of the shoulder. The Pathfinder went down an embankment, struck a tree, and rolled onto the passenger side of the vehicle.

Dodson was pronounced deceased at the scene. Dodson was traveling with her dog “Lucy” and Lucy was transported to the Lincoln County Animal Shelter. Lucy was transported to a local veterinarian where she was evaluated and released. Friends of Dodson retrieved Lucy to care for her.

During the course of the investigation, a separate non-injury crash occurred near the crash site and was considered a secondary crash. The second crash occurred when vehicles were slowing down for the fatal crash and one vehicle rear-ended another vehicle.  

Toledo Fire Department, Oregon Department of Transportation, Toledo Police Department, and the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Department assisted OSP. The highway was blocked or partially blocked for seven hours.  

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Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127706/hwy_20.4.jpeg

Madras Man Sentenced to 10 Years in Federal Prison for Role in Meth Distribution Conspiracy, Bank Robbery
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/17/19 5:08 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—Tyler Wayne Fuller, 30, of Madras, Oregon, was sentenced today to 10 years in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for his role in a Central Oregon methamphetamine distribution conspiracy and for robbing a Madras bank.

According to court documents, Fuller is the son of career criminal and known drug dealer Ronald Wayne Thrasher, 49, also of Madras. By age 28, Fuller had his own extensive criminal history and had spent the majority of his adulthood incarcerated. In December 2016, after Fuller was released from federal prison, Thrasher began giving his son methamphetamine to sell. Within a month, Thrasher was supplying and Fuller was distributing quarter and half-pound quantities of methamphetamine throughout Central Oregon.

In February 2017, Fuller’s volatile relationship with his father led to a confrontation. Armed with a pistol, Fuller unsuccessfully attempted to rob his father of his methamphetamine supply. The resulting estrangement left Fuller without a supplier and illicit income. Now homeless, he continued selling drugs obtained from his father’s customers. In August 2017, Fuller robbed a U.S. Bank in Madras, collecting $517 in cash.

During sentencing, U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane ordered Fuller to pay $517 in restitution to U.S. Bank and forfeit any property or proceeds derived from his drug trafficking activities.

On April 25, 2018, Fuller pleaded guilty to one count each of conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute fifty or more grams of methamphetamine and bank robbery.

Thrasher was convicted at trial in August 2019 for purchasing and transporting methamphetamine for distribution and being a felon in possession of a firearm. He will be sentenced on February 4, 2020.

Fuller is the first of 11 defendants to be sentenced for their involvement in his father’s drug trafficking conspiracy. One defendant, Russell Marvin Jones, 53, of Gresham, Oregon, was convicted at trial alongside his father. Nine others pleaded guilty. All are scheduled to be sentenced in the next six months before Judge McShane.

This case was investigated by Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE), the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) and the Oregon State Police. It was prosecuted Frank R. Papagni Jr. and Judi Harper, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon, with the assistance of the Jefferson, Crook and Deschutes County District Attorney’s Offices.

The case was brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Lincoln County Felon Sentenced to 20 Years in Prison for Dealing Drugs and Illegally Possessing a Firearm
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/17/19 4:57 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—Jon Michael Walsh, 46, of Neskowin, Oregon, was sentenced today to 20 years in federal prison and 10 years’ supervised release for possessing with intent to distribute methamphetamine and heroin and illegally possessing a firearm as a convicted felon.

According to court documents, in February 2018, Walsh was on post-prison supervision for a 2015 federal firearms conviction, when probation officers conducted a routine search of his vehicle outside a community center and found a stolen loaded pistol and concealed packages of methamphetamine and heroin.

During a subsequent search of Walsh’s Neskowin residence, officers found additional distribution quantities of methamphetamine and heroin. Walsh later admitted to buying and selling methamphetamine and heroin in Lincoln and surrounding coastal counties to support his own methamphetamine addiction.

U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane also ordered Walsh to forfeit the stolen pistol and any property derived from his drug trafficking activities.

On March 8, 2019, Walsh pleaded guilty to one count each of possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine, possession with intent to distribute heroin and felon in possession of a firearm. Walsh admitted to dealing methamphetamine and heroin while possessing the loaded pistol to protect himself and drug supplies.

Walsh previously served nine years in federal prison for distributing methamphetamine while in possession of a firearm after being sentenced in June 1998.

This case was investigated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Oregon State Police, Tillamook County Sheriff’s Office and the Lincoln City Police Department. It was prosecuted by Frank R. Papagni, Jr., Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, and Michelle Branam, Lincoln County District Attorney.

The case was brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

PPB Arrests Subject for Assault, Asks for Public's Help with Information (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/17/19 4:11 PM
Jeffries Photo
Jeffries Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3056/127703/thumb_Jeffries_Photo.jpg
On Saturday, September 14, 2019, at 6:38 p.m., Central Precinct officers responded to an injury accident call near the 3100 block of Southeast Holgate Boulevard. Officers arrived and determined this incident involved a possible vehicle theft. The suspect crashed the vehicle and fled on foot.

Two victims were injured during the incident and were treated at nearby hospitals. One victim, an adult male, sustained non-life threatening injuries and was treated and released. The other victim, an adult male, remains at an area hospital for serious, but what are believed to be non-life threatening, injuries.

The Tactical Operations Division Air Support Unit provided assistance and located the suspect on a rooftop of a carport in the area. Officers located and arrested the suspect. He was identified as 30 year-old Justin Jeffries.

Jeffries was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on an Assault 2 charge. Detectives are working with the District Attorney's Office on other charges to consider.
If anyone has information or video of this incident, please contact Assault Detective Chris Traynor at (503) 823-0451 or at Christopher.traynor@portlandoregon.gov

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Jeffries Photo

Nye Beach health advisory issued September 17
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/19 4:04 PM

September 17, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Nye Beach health advisory issued September 17

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Nye Beach in Lincoln County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. Higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Nye Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Resources for Media

Check out our beach water advisory audio and video resources


Klamath County Man Sentenced to 15 Months in Federal Prison for Stealing Missing Mother's Social Security Benefits
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/17/19 4:03 PM

MEDFORD, Ore.—On Friday, September 13, 2019, Theodore Martin Kirk, 64, of Klamath County, Oregon, was sentenced to 15 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for stealing more than $30,000 in Social Security benefits dispersed in the name of his elderly mother, Nadine Kirk. Ms. Kirk has been missing since March 2010 and is presumed to be deceased.

U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane announced his intent to sentence Kirk to 15 months in federal prison at a sentencing hearing on September 6, 2019, but held off on entering the judgement to allow Kirk one week to give the location of his mother’s remains to investigators. Kirk failed to produce this information and was formally sentenced on September 13, 2019.

According to court documents and information shared during trial, in July 2015, a concerned community member contacted the Klamath County Sheriff’s Office regarding the whereabouts of Ms. Kirk as she had not been seen for multiple years. At the time of this call, Ms. Kirk would have been 98 years old. Shortly thereafter, a sheriff deputy visited the residence shared by Ms. Kirk and her son in Bonanza, Oregon. Kirk claimed his mother had left with friends to travel to California two months prior, but would not permit the deputy to enter his property to confirm his mother was not there.

In an August 2015 interview with a detective, Kirk again told law enforcement he believed his mother was in California with friends. He added that it had been "quite some time" since his mother had seen a doctor despite having suffered from multiple strokes. Kirk claimed to be suspicious of his mother’s medications and reported previously removing her from them. Further, he acknowledged that he shared a joint checking account with his mother, into which her monthly Social Security payments were deposited.

Later in August, the Social Security Administration suspended payments to the Kirk’s joint checking account based on Ms. Kirk’s unknown whereabouts. A Social Security investigator reviewed Ms. Kirk’s bank records and found that the last transaction bearing her signature was dated January 2010. From January 2010 until August 2015, over $1,000 in benefits were deposited monthly into the joint checking account and nearly every month, Theodore Kirk would withdraw the entire amount in cash. All of the withdrawals from the account occurred in Oregon, not in California where Ms. Kirk was purported to be.

In August 2017, investigators conducted a search of the Kirk property and recovered a detailed calendar kept by Theodore Kirk. Prior to 2010, the calendar included activities for both Kirk and his mother. The calendar revealed a series of strokes experienced by Ms. Kirk beginning in 2004 and continuing into the beginning of 2010, where the calendar showed she experienced two strokes in three days. Following the multiple strokes, there were no additional calendar entries for Ms. Kirk’s activities.

During sentencing, U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane ordered Kirk to pay $30,868 in restitution to the Social Security Administration.

On March 13, 2019, Kirk was convicted at trial by a federal jury in Medford on one count of theft of government funds.

This case was investigated by the Social Security Administration, Office of Inspector General with the assistance of the Klamath County Sheriff’s Office and prosecuted by Adam E. Delph and Gavin W. Bruce, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Public workshop on draft measurable outcomes in revised Western Oregon State Forest Management Plan set for September 25
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/17/19 3:35 PM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Department of Forestry is hosting a public workshop from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 25 in Salem to receive input on draft measurable outcomes as part of the Western Oregon State Forest Management Plan revision.

The plan revision area covers lands owned by the Board of Forestry west of the Cascade Mountains, including the Tillamook, Clatsop, and Santiam state forests. Forest management plans lay out a vision and strategies to achieve stated goals. Measurable outcomes represent quantifiable results of strategies used to assess progress towards achieving goals, and helps evaluate alternatives and tradeoffs. To learn more about the plan revision and RSVP for this event, visit https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/AboutODF/Pages/FMP-revision.aspx

The workshop provides an opportunity for the public to learn about how ODF intends to measure progress towards forest management goals and strategies, ask questions, and provide input for the agency to consider when preparing the draft Forest Management Plan.

The workshop will be held at Broadway Commons (Mexico Room), 1300 Broadway St. NE, Salem 97301. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at least 48 hours prior to the meeting at 503-945-7200.


PeaceHealth offers Service of Remembrance for families grieving the loss of a child
PeaceHealth - 09/17/19 3:30 PM

PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center chaplains will conduct a "Service of Remembrance" Wednesday, October 2, 2019 for all families grieving the loss of a child. The service will be held at 11 a.m. at Longview Memorial Park located at 5050 Mt. Solo Road in Longview, WA. 

"This is a time to remember the little ones, and also to support the families who have experienced the death of a child," said PeaceHealth St. John Chaplain Colette Wolfe.

The annual service is provided by PeaceHealth St. John Spiritual Care Services, PeaceHealth St. John's Birth Center, and Longview Memorial Park. For more information please contact PeaceHealth Spiritual Care at 360.414.7575.


Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee meets September 23
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/19 3:29 PM

September 17, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, ah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee meets September 23

What: The quarterly meeting of the Dental Pilot Project Advisory. The meeting will cover Dental Pilot Project #100, “Oregon Tribes Dental Health Aide Therapist Pilot Project.”

Agenda: Presentation by Donald Chi, DDS, PhD; update by project sponsor; OHA evaluation and monitoring activities; scoring methodology.

When: Sept. 23, 1-4 p.m. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 900, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference line: 888-636-3807, access code 793800.

Background: Dental Pilot Projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce, and efficacy of teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; developing new categories of dental personnel; accelerating the training of existing categories of dental personnel; or teaching new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Kowalski at 971-673-1563, 711 TTY or ah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee meets September 20
Oregon Health Authority - 09/17/19 3:20 PM

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee meets September 20

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: September 20, 9 a.m. to noon.

Where: Five Oak Building Suite 775, Transformation Training Room, 421 SW Oak St., Portland. The public also may join remotely through a webinar and listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, access code 1277166.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda, and general updates; review letter from Oregon Health Policy Board to Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee; public testimony; Transformation Quality strategy; finalize 2020 benchmarks; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-887, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Wayne Allen Edward receives 80 month prison sentence for child pornography possession
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/17/19 2:28 PM

September 17, 2019

Wayne Allen Edward receives 80 month prison sentence for child pornography possession

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 41-year-old Wayne Allen Edwards received an 80 month prison sentence following a sex crimes investigation conducted by the Portland Police Bureau’s Child Abuse Team, which resulted in the seizure of more than 400 images of child pornography.

“We work closely with our local, state and federal law enforcement partners to aggressively investigate any cybertip to identify individuals who possess, trade or distribute these appalling images,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney BJ Park, who litigated this case. “With more and more social media networks out there, we continue to rely on our partners and the community to report any type of suspicious content. The worst thing someone can do is to assume somebody else will make a report. These investigations are complex and require law enforcement to act quickly, which is why we encourage that immediate reporting, even if it is anonymously.”

This investigation started when a social media company made a cybertip about a user uploading sexually explicit images of children to his account and sending them to other users on the same platform. Law enforcement traced the user’s IP address and determined the person uploading the images was living in Portland, Oregon.

In April 2018, based on evidence gathered during the investigation, police obtained a court-authorized search warrant for Edwards and his residence. During the search, law enforcement seized various electronic devices including a smartphone that belonged to Edwards. A digital forensic examination of the phone was conducted and law enforcement determined Edwards was the exclusive owner and user of the phone.

During the search, law enforcement located more than 400 child pornography images, approximately 20 videos of prepubescent children being sexually assaulted and a file of an animal being sexually abused. Law enforcement also learned that Edwards contacted other individuals online - who claimed to be minors - and compelled them to send him naked images and other sexually explicit photos of themselves for his sexual gratification.

On August 22, 2019, Edwards appeared in Multnomah County Circuit Court and pleaded guilty to one count of encouraging child sexual abuse in the first degree, one count of attempting to use a child in a display of sexually explicit conduct and one count of encouraging sexual abuse of an animal.

By pleading guilty, Edwards admitted that he unlawfully and knowingly duplicated, disseminated, displayed and exchanged a visual recording of sexually explicit conduct involving a child while knowing and being aware of, and consciously disregarding, the fact that the creation of the material involved sexually explicit conduct involving a child; that he unlawfully and intentionally attempted to compel and induce a child to participate in and engage in sexually explicit conduct for a person to watch or record; and that he unlawfully and knowingly, for the purpose of arousing and satisfying the sexual desires of himself, or another person, possessed a visual recording of a person engaged in sexual conduct with an animal.

Upon release, Edwards will be on three years of post-prison supervision and will have to register as a sex offender.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the Portland Police Bureau’s Child Abuse Team and the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children for their dedicated efforts investigating this case.

To make a cybertip to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, please click here.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5769/127694/PR-19-223-Wayne_Allen_Edwards.pdf

(NEW NAME!) Fire Mountain Musicfest Brings Portland's Top Musical Talent to the North Oregon Coast (Photo)
Mortensen Communications - 09/17/19 1:55 PM
FireMountainMusicFest2019_LOGO
FireMountainMusicFest2019_LOGO
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/5605/127693/thumb_firemntlogo.jpg

For ten days in October, the first annual Fire Mountain Musicfest will offer a stunning display of fine Northwest musical acts at venues in Cannon Beach, Manzanita, and Nehalem.  

The festival is a collaboration between two non-profit organizations, Cannon Beach Arts Association (CBAA) and Fly Me To The Moon. The event runs from October 3 to October 13, 2019. Proceeds from the shows and workshops will benefit both organizations.

 The Fire Mountain Musicfest is named for Neahkahnie Mountain, the well-known landmark that lies between Cannon Beach and Manzanita.

Cara Mico, program director at Cannon Beach Arts Association, is committed to bringing events like this to the coast.  

“Music and art are integral to humanity and essential for wellness,” said Mico.

“By fostering creative events,” she added, “we can support our community and those that call the Oregon coast home." 

Beginning on October 3 in Cannon Beach, events will be held at multiple venues including The Chamber of Commerce, the Wine Shack, Cannon Beach Gallery, and Public Coast. 

The Manzanita and Nehalem portion of the festival runs from October 9-13.  Events include several guitar workshops in addition to performances at the NCRD Performing Arts Center, Wild Manzanita, and St. Catherine’s Church, and other venues.

Dean Mueller, longtime musician, producer, and the director of Fly Me To The Moon is responsible for the southern portion of the festival in Manzanita and Nehalem sites. 

“As a performer and producer, it is exciting to help bring this festival to the North Coast,” said Mueller.  

“The collaboration between Fly Me To The Moon and CBAA has allowed us to bring some of Oregon’s top-tier artists to the coast, and to provide support for these two great organizations."

MUSIC 

Featured artists include Curtis Salgado, 3 Leg Torso, Julie Amici and Dean Mueller, LaRhonda Steele, Brooks Robertson, Grammy winner Doug Smith, and many more.  T

WORKSHOPS

There will be a series of guitar workshops, open to musicians of all levels, taught by Brooks Robertson, award-winning fingerstyle guitarist and Berklee College of Music graduate and Grammy award winner Doug Smith.

TICKETS & PACKAGES

Ticket prices are listed on the website, and some shows are free.  There are several packages available for the Manzanita and Nehalem events. 

The Fire Mountain Music Package offers discounted prices on six of the fabulous shows included in the southern portion of the festival. Among them is the Nina Simone Tribute concert and pre-event reception on Saturday, Oct 12 at the North Coast Recreational District (NCRD) in Nehalem.

Tickets may be purchased in advance on the festival website, or at the venues. Organizers recommend purchasing tickets in advance of the shows as seating is limited for the shows. See the complete list of concerts and workshops online at For times and ticket info, go to https://www.cannonbeacharts.org/music-festival

THE ORGANIZATIONS 

 Fly Me To the Moon, co-founded by Dean Mueller, operates in affiliation with the Oregon Music Hall of Fame (OMHOF), a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit. The program brings professional, high quality, affordable live music events to retirement, assisted living, and memory care facilities, as well as community organizations offering programs to seniors.

The Cannon Beach Arts Association/Cannon Beach Gallery supports a diversity of arts and artists in and around Cannon Beach. The nonprofit has hosted a gallery since 1986 and offers workshops, events, and art camp for people of all ages and backgrounds. 

Proceeds from the music festival support our arts education program which includes Oregon Art Day in Clatsop County and summer art camp. CBAA is a 501(c)3 nonprofit with a board of nine, four part-time staff, 35 volunteers, and over two hundred local artists. 

EVENT DETAILS

Fire Mountain Musicfest
October 3 - October 13, 2019
Locations: Venues from Cannon Beach to Manzanita area
PRICE: Various;  Individual, package, some free events
Tickets: https://www.cannonbeacharts.org/music-festival 




Attached Media Files: FireMountainMusicFest2019 , FireMountainMusicFest2019_LOGO

Governor Kate Brown Holds Ceremony To Sign SB98 for Renewable Natural Gas
NW Natural - 09/17/19 1:46 PM

PORTLAND, Ore., Sept. 17, 2019 – Today, Governor Kate Brown gathered with NW Natural and other supporters to ceremoniously sign another landmark bill for the State of Oregon: Senate Bill 98 allows utilities to acquire renewable natural gas on behalf of customers and is the first of its kind in the nation.

Renewable natural gas is a zero carbon resource produced from local organic materials like food, agricultural and forestry waste, wastewater, or landfills, which can be added into the existing natural gas system.

NW Natural, a subsidiary of NW Natural Holding Company (NYSE: NWN), worked with legislators to propose SB 98 to create the path for renewable natural gas to become an increasing part of the state’s energy supply.

SB 98 outlines goals for adding as much as 30% renewable natural gas into the state’s pipeline system. There will be limits on the total amount paid for renewable natural gas that is overseen by regulators, protecting utilities and ratepayers from excessive costs as the market develops.

“Oregon has long been a place for innovation in environmental protections, and this legislation continues that tradition,” said Governor Kate Brown. “Allowing our natural gas utilities to acquire a renewable product for their customers brings us one step closer to a clean energy future.”

“We couldn’t be more pleased to lead the way on this important step in supporting our region’s move to more renewable energy, closing the loop on waste and investing in homegrown solutions that address climate change,” said David H. Anderson, president and CEO of NW Natural.

“I’m proud to have worked with NW Natural and others to shepherd through this innovative policy that carves a renewable energy path for other states to follow,” said State Senator Michael Dembrow (District 23), chair of the Senate Environment and Natural Resources Committee. “This legislation will also create new, sustainable job opportunities throughout the state as this burgeoning local industry develops.” 

“It’s essential that natural gas companies invest in renewable technologies to reduce greenhouse gas impacts and this is an important step,” said Meredith Connolly, Oregon director of Climate Solutions. “We appreciate NW Natural’s leadership to develop meaningful plans for clean energy solutions, including this piece of legislation.”

How it works

The new law sets voluntary renewable natural gas goals for Oregon’s natural gas utilities. Additionally, it:

  • Allows utility investment in the interconnection of renewable natural gas production
  • Supports targets of 15% by 2030, 20% by 2035 and 30% by 2050
  • Provides local communities a potential revenue source to turn their waste into energy

“SB 98 is a groundbreaking piece of legislation,” explains Nina Kapoor, director of State Government Affairs for the national Coalition for Renewable Natural Gas. “Several states have advanced policies in recent years to support renewable natural gas, however, the Oregon law goes further than any other by setting clear goals for renewable natural gas procurement.”

Natural gas utilities are regulated by the Public Utility Commission of Oregon and under current rules have an obligation to deliver the least-cost commodity to customers. This has been a barrier to purchasing and distributing renewable natural gas to Oregon customers, which can cost more in the same way that renewable electricity can cost more. 

The market for renewable natural gas is fairly new but growing quickly. There are about 100 projects nationwide, and that’s expected to increase by 50% over the next year. Renewable natural gas is being prioritized as a main energy source for space heating in places like SeaTac Airport, and is being used in fleets like UPS and Waste Management. UPS recently made the largest commitment yet to use it for 40% of its total ground fuel purchases by 2025.

What is Renewable natural gas?

Renewable natural gas is a zero carbon resource produced from local, organic materials like food, agricultural and forestry waste, wastewater, or landfills. As these materials decompose, they produce methane. That methane can be captured, conditioned to pipeline quality and delivered in the existing pipeline system to vehicles, and homes and businesses where it can be used in existing appliances and equipment. This closes the loop on waste and provides a renewable energy option for the natural gas system, in the same way that wind and solar are used to generate renewable electricity.

How much renewable natural gas is possible?

Last year, the Oregon Department of Energy released its first inventory of technical potential and estimated there are enough sources statewide to produce nearly 50 billion cubic feet (BCF) of renewable natural gas. That’s equivalent to the total amount of natural gas used by all Oregon residential customers today. Read the study.

Does NW Natural currently have renewable natural gas on its system?

Soon. We plan to begin accepting homegrown renewable natural gas onto our pipeline system through several projects by 2020.

We’re working with the City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services, operator of the City of Portland’s Columbia Boulevard Wastewater Treatment Plant. Some of the renewable natural gas generated here will be used as fuel for City vehicles, while the remainder will be injected onto NW Natural’s system.

We’re also working with the Metropolitan Wastewater Management Commission, a partnership of the cities of Eugene and Springfield and Lane County, to bring renewable natural gas onto the system, generated from methane produced during the wastewater treatment process.

Enabling the way for hydrogen

Senate Bill 98 will support all forms of renewable natural gas including renewable hydrogen, which is made from excess wind, solar and hydro power. Renewable hydrogen can be used for the transportation system, industrial use, or blended into the natural gas pipeline system.

 

ABOUT NW NATURAL HOLDINGS
Northwest Natural Holding Company, (NYSE: NWN) (NW Natural Holdings), is headquartered in Portland, Oregon, and through its subsidiaries has been doing business for 160 years in the Pacific Northwest. It owns NW Natural Gas Company (NW Natural), NW Natural Water Company, LLC (NW Natural Water), and other business interests and activities.

NW Natural is a local distribution company that currently provides natural gas service to approximately two million people in more than 140 communities through more than 750,000 meters in Oregon and Southwest Washington with one of the most modern pipeline systems in the nation. NW Natural consistently leads the industry with high J.D. Power & Associates customer satisfaction scores.

NW Natural has 20 Bcf of storage in Oregon with 4 Bcf supporting renewables. NW Natural Holdings’ subsidiaries own and operate 35 Bcf of underground gas storage capacity.

NW Natural Water currently provides water distribution service to approximately 45,000 people through 17,700 connections. To date, NW Natural Water has acquired seven water distribution utilities and a wastewater company with several additional acquisitions pending. Upon closing current outstanding transactions, cumulatively, NW Natural Water expects to have invested $70 million and serve nearly 47,000 people through approximately 18,300 connections in the Pacific Northwest. Additional information regarding our water business is available at nwnaturalwater.com.

Additional information is available at nwnaturalholdings.com.

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Pacific Power renewable energy customers are national leaders again
Pacific Power - 09/17/19 1:39 PM

Contact:

Tom Gauntt

503-813-7291

Tom.Gauntt@pacificorp.com

 


Pacific Power renewable energy customers are national leaders again
Blue Sky is a top 5 utility green power program for 17th straight year

 

PORTLAND, Ore.—Pacific Power’s Blue Sky customers are among the nation’s most devoted promoters of renewable energy as the program has once again received national recognition for its leadership and impact. For the 17th year, the Energy Department’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory ranked Blue Sky—which includes Pacific Power and Rocky Mountain Power customers—in the top five utility green power programs in the entire country.

 

For 2019, Blue Sky ranks second for total number of participating customers and third for total renewable energy sales through a voluntary program. For full report go to: nrel.gov/analysis/green-power.html.

 

The Blue Sky program provides a convenient way for Pacific Power customers to support renewable energy. More than 73,700 customers in Oregon, Washington and California participate in the program, which has generated more than 8 million megawatt-hours of renewable energy from wind, solar, biomass, and geothermal projects, reducing their emissions footprint by nearly 6 million tons of CO2 through our six states. Pacific Power Blue Sky customers have also supported more than 120 community-based renewable energy projects.

 

 “Our Blue Sky customers are living examples of a virtuous cycle” said Berit Kling, program manager. “Customers enthusiastically support the continued growth of renewable energy and by doing so help fund green projects in local communities. But it all starts with customers and their own green power goals. We are happy to help them achieve those goals through Blue Sky, which combines all those personal aspirations and makes a big difference both locally and globally.”

 

Local renewable projects include a micro-hydro project at Wallowa Lake State Park, a large solar array at a Portland community center and solar panels at the Glide Fire Dept. in Douglas County.

 

The Blue Sky program provides an easy and convenient way for Pacific Power customers to support renewable energy in the region beyond the company’s cost-effective renewable resource investments to serve all customers. Blue Sky is Green-e Energy certified by the non-profit Center for Resource Solutions and customers can participate in the program for as little as $1.95 each month. For more information or to sign up, visit pacificpower.net/bluesky or call toll free at 800-769-3717.


FEMA awards Hood River County $554,000 in fire department grants
Hood River Fire & EMS - 09/17/19 1:35 PM

Hood River (OR) — The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is awarding $554,509 to Hood River County fire agencies. The regional grant will assist county agencies in purchasing 89 Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) with spare bottles and masks.

Hood River County's grant was the single largest in Oregon during this year's round of federal assistance to the Firefighters Grant (AFG) Program. The AFG program, created by Congress in 2001 and now administered by FEMA, is a part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Through the AFG program, FEMA will pay for 90 percent of the equipment costs with the county agencies responsible for the remainder.

“It is essential that we provide our firefighters with the equipment they need to stay safe,” said Chief Leonard Damian, Hood River Fire & EMS.  The grant will be used to replace aging SCBA equipment that is over 15 years old.” 


Fourth Grade Students Receive Free Admission to Fort Vancouver National Historic Site for a Year
Fort Vancouver National Historic Site - 09/17/19 1:32 PM

The Every Kid Outdoors annual pass provides fourth grade students, along with their families, friends and classmates, free access to Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, along with more than 2,000 other federal recreation areas for a year. The Every Kid Outdoors Program encourages fourth graders to explore, learn, and recreate in spectacular settings, including national parks, wildlife refuges, marine sanctuaries, and forests.

“There is so much to discover at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site,” said Chief of Interpretation Aaron Ochoa. “Visits on class trips or family vacations to explore the fascinating history and roots of our community will provide lifelong memories.”

The National Park Foundation, the official nonprofit partner of the National Park Service, is expanding the impact of the Every Kid Outdoors initiative through its Open Outdoors for Kids program connecting 4th grade students to Fort Vancouver National Historic Site with funding support for field trips this year.

To obtain the free pass, fourth grade students visit the Every Kid Outdoors website, participate in a short educational activity, and download a voucher. The voucher is valid for multiple use between September 1, 2019 and August 31, 2020 to correspond to the traditional school year. The voucher may be exchanged for a plastic keepsake pass at participating federal lands. At Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, plastic passes can be obtained at the Visitor Center and at the reconstructed fort.

The voucher or pass grants free entry for fourth graders, all children under 16 in the group and up to three accompanying adults (or an entire car for drive-in parks) to most federally managed lands and waters. The pass does not cover expanded amenity fees such as camping or boat rides. 

The great outdoors make a great classroom. Fourth grade educators are encouraged to take advantage of the wide range of educational programs and tools associated with the Every Kid Outdoors program. Educational activities, field trip options, information and tools in English and Spanish, and the ability to print vouchers for passes for students are all available on the website. 

The Every Kid Outdoors Program was established by Congress in 2019. It replaces the Every Kid in a Park Program which was launched in 2015. It is an interagency collaboration between the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Reclamation, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and U.S. Forest Service.
 


DSL director approves extension of Jordan Cove permit approval
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 09/17/19 12:55 PM

NEWS RELEASE – for immediate release

Media Contact:

Ken Armstrong, Communications Manager, 503-881-2623, mstrong@state.or.us">ken.armstrong@state.or.us

Sept. 17, 2019

DSL extends Jordan Cove Removal-Fill permit decision date after request from applicant

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon Department of State Lands Director Vicki Walker last week approved extending the deadline for the Removal-Fill permit decision on the Jordan Cove LNG application to Jan. 31, 2020, based on a Sept. 13 letter from the applicant requesting the extension. The agency had been scheduled to decide on the permit on Sept. 20, 2019.

Jordan Cove LNG also agreed to submit by Oct. 20 a second set of responses to questions surrounding substantive and technical issues that are not yet resolved. On Sept. 4, DSL received and is reviewing the applicant’s first set of responses. This request represents the second extension given by DSL on this application (File 60697-RF), the first being given on March 5.

For more information on the Jordan Cove Energy Project, visit the DSL Jordan Cove web site.

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Bev Clarno and State Treasurer Tobias Read. The agency administers diverse natural and fiscal resources, many of which generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. DSL also administers Oregon’s Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit.

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www.oregon.gov/dsl


Yard Debris Burning allowed in Lincoln County effective Thursday, September 19
Newport Fire Department - 09/17/19 12:08 PM

Lincoln County Fire Defense Board

TO:    All Media

Tuesday, September 17, 2019

For Immediate Release

Yard Debris Burning allowed in Lincoln County effective Thursday, September 19

The Lincoln County Fire Defense Board, and the nine fire protection agencies are opening burn 
season Thursday, September 19, 2019. With our recent rain and forecasted precipitation, the risk of 
fire spread has decreased and is expected to remain at a low level.

This summer’s weather was not as dry as the previous 2 summers. This kept fuel moisture levels 
higher and moderated fire danger throughout our region. We thank the public for adhering to the 
burn regulations this summer. Their cooperation, along with the quick response of all of our 
Lincoln County firefighters helped keep wildfires to a minimum.

Many Lincoln County fire agencies require a permit to burn yard debris (also known as open burning. 
We encourage the public to contact their local fire agency for specific regulations regarding 
burning of yard debris. Below is contact information for all Lincoln County Fire Agencies:

North Lincoln Fire & Rescue           Depoe Bay Fire District                  Newport Fire 
Dept./N.R.F.P.D

541-996-2233                                     541-764-2202                                   
541-265-9461

Seal Rock Fire District                     Central OR Coast Fire Dist.           Yachats Rural 
Fire Prot. Dist.

541-563-4441                                     541-563-3121                                   
541-547-3266

Siletz Valley Fire District                  Toledo Fire Dept./E.L.C.R.F.P.D    Oregon Dept. of 
Forestry (Toledo Unit)

541-444-2043                                     541-336-3311                                   
541-336-2273

Robert Murphy

Fire Chief, Newport Fire Department Lincoln County Fire Defense Board Chief 
r.murphy@newportoregon.gov

245 NW 10TH ST, NEWPORT OR 97365 – (541)-265-9461 – FAX (541) 265-9463

 

 

 


Fairview on the Green Festival (Photo)
City of Fairview - 09/17/19 12:04 PM
Fairview on the Green Logo (JPG)
Fairview on the Green Logo (JPG)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/2060/127685/thumb_Fairview_Logo_Final.jpg

The City of Fairview is proud to announce the 2019 Fairview on the Green festival. This will be the 13th year of this annual event and community tradition. The festival is Saturday, September 28, 2019 in Fairview Community Park. It will kick off at 12:00 PM with the popular free Kids zone, artisan and food vendors, free entertainment, beer garden, and more. The Kids zone and vendors will close at 6:00 PM, but the musical entertainment and beer garden will continue until 7:00 PM. This year's musical guests are Wild Heart and Remedy.

Wild Heart will take the stage first, from 1:00 PM to 3:30 PM. This energetic band will start the afternoon off right with their lively eclectic mix of country, rock, pop and blues.

Remedy will perform from 4:15 PM to 6:45 PM. This high energy, five piece, dance band will have you groovin' into the night with the songs from artists like Pat Benatar, Aerosmith, Joan Jett, Van Halen, Earth Wind and Fire, Cool and the Gang, to name a few.

Admission is free and all are welcome. For more information on this signature event, please contact Devree Leymaster with the City of Fairview. She can be reached at 503-674-6224 or by email d@ci.fairview.or.us?subject=Fairview%20on%20the%20Green%20Festival">leymasterd@ci.fairview.or.us.

Fairview on the Green is being presented by the City of Fairview and Fairview Community Engagement Committee with sponsorship by: Allwood Recyclers Inc., Leathers Fuels, General Pacific, Inc., Chevron (223rd & Halsey), Dirt & Aggregate Interchange Inc., Five Star Storage Co., and Portland General Electric.




Attached Media Files: Fairview on the Green Poster (PDF) , Fairview on the Green Logo (JPG)

CareOregon provides funding for Central City Concern's Blackburn Center
Central City Concern - 09/17/19 11:05 AM

CareOregon, a nonprofit providing health plan services to meet the health care needs of low-income Oregonians, has donated $500,000 to Central City Concern (CCC) to support Blackburn Center clinic operations.

Blackburn Center (12121 E Burnside) is the third of three buildings in the Housing is Health initiative, a pioneering commitment from local hospitals and health organizations—including CareOregon—to provide supportive, affordable housing that included a combined $21.5M investment from those organizations. The two other Housing is Health buildings, Hazel Heights and Charlotte B. Rutherford Place, opened in late 2018.

CareOregon has taken their commitment further with their $500,000 donation to ensure the Blackburn Center clinic can provide services to residents in the East Portland community.

Eric Hunter, president and CEO of CareOregon, commented, “When we address social determinants of health, housing is paramount! Addressing this basic need for a safe and stable living environment provides members a better opportunity to thrive. This additional funding supports integrated health services to ensure Blackburn Center residents can access primary care, mental health services and addiction treatment under the same roof.”

Rachel Solotaroff, MD, CCC president and CEO said, “CareOregon insures many CCC patients, but also provides additional support so CCC can innovate and better serve the people who need help the most. They have been our valued partner for decades and we’re grateful.”

Blackburn Center is a six-story structure that combines a health care clinic with housing. The facility extends Central City Concern’s services to give more people access to primary care, recovery and mental health services, housing, and employment assistance.

CareOregon helps 300,000 Oregonians get the health care they deserve, and supports additional programs that offer housing, fresh food, job training and more.

CCC serves about 14,000 people a year through 13 Federally Qualified Health Center sites, 2,115 housing units and an Employment Access Center for jobseekers.

For more information about CareOregon, please visit careoregon.org. For more information about CCC, please visit centralcityconcern.org.


East Precinct Arrest Yields Firearms, Drugs, Stolen Property And Money (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/17/19 10:59 AM
2019-09/3056/127683/Money_Drugs_Guns.jpg
2019-09/3056/127683/Money_Drugs_Guns.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3056/127683/thumb_Money_Drugs_Guns.jpg
On Monday, September 16, 2019, officers assigned to East Precinct's Neighborhood Response Team and Street Crimes Unit were made aware of drug activity in the Brentwood-Darlington neighborhood. After performing two traffic stops and then searching a nearby residence the following was seized:

2.4 Pounds Of Methamphetamine
.75 Pounds Of Heroin
125 Xanax Pills
Almost $7,000 Actual U.S. Currency
Almost $1,400 Counterfeit U.S. Currency
2 Firearms
Over $2,000 Stolen Property Recovered

The suspects involved in this incident are 47-year-old Donald Beasley and 42-year-old Jason Blythe. Mr. Beasley was transported and lodged into the Multnomah County Detention Center on possession and delivery charges relating to the methamphetamine and heroin seized. Mr. Blythe was also lodged into the Multnomah County Detention Center on one count of delivery of heroin and one count of delivery of methamphetamine along with one count of felon in possession of a firearm and a parole violation.

An investigation is continuing regarding the firearms and stolen property that was recovered.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information about this case or any unsolved felony crime may be eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,500.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3056/127683/Money_Drugs_Guns.jpg , 2019-09/3056/127683/Property.jpg , 2019-09/3056/127683/Blythe.png , 2019-09/3056/127683/Beasley.png

BPD Catches Serial Bottle Drop Burglar (Photo)
Beaverton Police Dept. - 09/17/19 10:30 AM
Seized vehicle
Seized vehicle
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1412/127681/thumb_Hummer_After_Seizure_3.jpg

On September 5, 2019 Beaverton Police officers arrested 34-year-old Brett J McQuiston after he was found burglarizing the Beaverton Bottle Drop.

On the 5th at 11:39 p.m. Beaverton Police officers were called to the Beaverton Bottle Drop after the on-duty security guard saw Mr. McQuiston inside the location with a crowbar and a mask covering his face.  Officers arrived and detained Mr. McQuiston who they saw running from inside the location.  Officers recovered stolen money, a ski mask, gloves and a crowbar.

During a subsequent interview with Mr. McQuiston, he admitted to burglarizing the same Bottle Drop in April 2019.  Mr. McQuiston also admitted to burglarizing the Tigard Bottle Drop in June of 2019, the Redmond Bottle Drop and the Corvallis Bottle Drop.  Mr. McQuiston stated he bought a H3 Hummer with the stolen money and also lost a large sum gambling.  Mr. McQuiston’s H3 Hummer was seized as evidence in the burglaries. 

On September 16, 2019 a Washington County Grand Jury heard testimony regarding this case.  The Grand Jury indicted Mr. McQuiston with three counts of Burglary in the First Degree and three counts of Aggravated Theft in the First Degree.  Mr. McQuiston is currently in custody at Washington County Jail.  Mr. McQuiston could face additional criminal charges stemming from the burglaries in Corvallis and Redmond.  

Beaverton Police Department would like to thank the quick action of the on-duty security guard which allowed us to take Mr. McQuiston into custody and solve several outstanding cases.      

##BPD##




Attached Media Files: Seized vehicle , McQuiston mugshot

Woman drives car off cliff in Eagle Creek; multi-agency rope rescue follows; driver faces DUII charge (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/17/19 10:27 AM
2019-09/624/127680/VehicleDownCliff.JPG
2019-09/624/127680/VehicleDownCliff.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/624/127680/thumb_VehicleDownCliff.JPG

Please reference CCSO Case # 19-022002

At approximately 11:12 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 16, 2019, Clackamas County Sheriff's Office deputies were dispatched to the report of an incomplete 911 call near SE Heiple Rd and SE Samuels Rd in Eagle Creek.

The caller had offered limited information to dispatch: She reported she was in a ravine and needed help. She did not know where she was -- but was able to eventually tell dispatch that she had just left the Eagle Creek Saloon. 

Dispatch gave deputies a general location for the origin of the call. Deputies responded to the area.

They soon located tire tracks leaving the roadway.

When looking over the cliff at the side of the road, they observed a silver Nissan Xterra down in a ravine.

This was, in fact, a traffic crash.

Estacada Fire, American Medical Response and Clackamas Fire District #1 personnel responded to the scene. Life Flight was also placed on standby. 

Rescuers determined they would need to conduct a technical rope rescue to reach the vehicle and extract the driver. 

The driver was identified as Kristin Ann Madden

Once extracted from the vehicle, she was -- incredibly -- able to walk, and appeared to have suffered only minor injuries. Life Flight was canceled, and rescue personnel helped Madden reach the top of the cliff. 

Madden was transported to an area hospital for treatment. While at the hospital, the deputy continued his crash/DUII investigation. At one point, Madden told authorities she drove off the roadway due to a squirrel. She was issued a citation in lieu of custody on Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants.

Photos of the crash scene and rescue operation are attached.

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/624/127680/VehicleDownCliff.JPG , 2019-09/624/127680/RespondersAtScene2.jpg , 2019-09/624/127680/RespondersAtScene.jpg , 2019-09/624/127680/CliffCrash3.jpg , 2019-09/624/127680/CliffCrash2.jpg , 2019-09/624/127680/CliffCrash1.jpg

Two new confirmed cases of severe lung disease related to vaping products in Washington
Clark Co. WA Communications - 09/17/19 10:19 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Washington State Department of Health (DOH) has confirmed two new cases of severe lung disease linked to vaping in Spokane County. The Spokane Regional Health District reported the new confirmed cases as a patient in their teens and a patient in their twenties.

There are now three confirmed cases in Washington. All three confirmed cases reported vaping prior to illness, but a specific product, device, or additive common to all three has not yet been identified. Investigations into these cases are ongoing.

Vaping devices — also known as JUULs, e-cigarettes, e-cigs, vapes, e-hookahs, vape pens, mods, tanks, or electronic nicotine delivery systems — can contain nicotine, marijuana, or other substances like flavoring agents and chemicals. They are not currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a quit smoking aid.

In August, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the FDA launched a multi-state investigation regarding an outbreak of severe lung disease associated with using vaping devices/e-cigarette products. As of Sept. 12, the CDC has reported over 380 confirmed cases of lung illness associated with vaping in 36 states and one U.S. territory, including six deaths. While the investigation into the nationwide outbreak continues, they have not identified a definitive cause. All reported cases had a history of using vaping devices, and patients in the current investigation are reporting symptoms such as cough, shortness of breath, nausea, vomiting and/or fever.

For the latest Washington State case information, please visit the DOH tracking website.

For more detailed information on the federal investigation, please refer to the CDC web page regarding the matter.

Recommendations for the public:  

  • The healthiest option is to not vape or smoke.
  • Nicotine and marijuana are addictive and can harm the developing brain and vaping products contain other harmful chemicals.
  • These products should ALWAYS be avoided by youth, young adults, and pregnant or nursing women.
  • If you use vaping devices, monitor yourself for symptoms (e.g., cough, shortness of breath, chest pain) and promptly seek medical attention if you have concerns about your health. If you are concerned about your health after using an e-cigarette product, you can also call the Washington Poison Center at 1–800–222–1222.
  • If you do use e-cigarette or vaping products, you should not buy these products off the street and should not modify these products or add any substances to these products that are not intended by the manufacturer.
  • Adults who use vaping or other tobacco products who are attempting to quit should use evidence-based treatments, including counseling and FDA-approved medications. If you need help quitting tobacco or vaping products, contact your health care provider or access online resources to quit tobacco and/or marijuana.

Buffalo Soldier Dedication at Fort Vancouver (Photo)
The Historic Trust - 09/17/19 10:14 AM
2019-09/3818/127678/Tacoma_teens_BuffaloSoldier1.jpg
2019-09/3818/127678/Tacoma_teens_BuffaloSoldier1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3818/127678/thumb_Tacoma_teens_BuffaloSoldier1.jpg

Eagle Scout spearheads first African-American memorial in Vancouver.

VANCOUVER, WA (September 17, 2019) — The Historic Trust will host the Buffalo Soldier Dedication ceremony at the Fort Vancouver National Site on Saturday, September 21, 2019 at 11 a.m.. The memorial is located in front of the Infantry Barracks at 705 E. Barnes Street. The installation was spearheaded by Mr. Wilson Keller, a 17-year-old Eagle Scout, who recognized the importance of the Buffalo Soldiers’ contributions to the history of this nation and saw their lack of recognition at Fort Vancouver. Mr. Keller said, “I was inspired by the Buffalo Soldiers’ sacrifices and bravery after a presentation I attended. I wanted others to share that inspiration. It’s so important to represent the entirety of our armed services history and the Buffalo Soldiers from the 24th and 25th Infantries who served honorably.”

Several entities and individuals assisted with the installation including the National Park Service (NPS), The Historic Trust, The Buffalo Soldiers Moses Williams Chapter, the Community Military Appreciation Committee (CMAC), Boy Scout Troop #648, as well as private and business donors. The ceremony will be attended by public officials, the NPS, CMAC members, The Historic Trust staff, Troop #648 and Buffalo Soldier veterans. Members of Willie Morehouse’s family, who was a Buffalo Soldier who served in Vancouver, will participate in the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the first African-American memorial in the city of Vancouver.

David Pearson, The Historic Trust CEO and President states, “We are proud of Wilson, his troop, and all of the partners who made this overdue memorial a reality. The Buffalo Soldiers are an important part of U.S. history, as well as to this community’s history. Preserving and recognizing their service at Fort Vancouver is what makes this place special.”

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About The Historic Trust: The Historic Trust is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, founded in 1998, dedicated to inspiring civic pride and economic vitality through education, preservation, and celebration of our community's history. Learn more at www.thehistorictrust.org or follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/HistoricTrustWA.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3818/127678/Tacoma_teens_BuffaloSoldier1.jpg

Oregon City Public Library will be hosting Building Bridges: Conversations about Race (Photo)
City of Oregon City - 09/17/19 10:09 AM
Alexis Braly
Alexis Braly
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3842/127677/thumb_AlexisBraly_(002).jpg

Oregon City Public Library will be hosting Building Bridges: Conversations about Race, a program series meant to encourage an understanding of racism, racial identity, and how race impacts society. The topics explored will provide opportunities for participants to think critically, reflect, learn, internalize, and engage meaningfully with others in their community.

The program will take place every third Thursday from 5:00-7:00 PM September through February, and each session will focus on a different topic:

  • Oregon History (9/19/19)
  • Cultural Appropriation versus Cultural Exchange (10/17/19)
  • Race as a Social Construct (11/21/19)
  • Connecting Across Racial Difference (12/19/19)
  • Identity Development (1/16/20)
  • Microaggressions (2/20/20)

The sessions will include a presentation on the topic as well as activities that will allow participants to share and discuss the issues raised.

Our program series will be led by longtime educator, activist, and Oregon native Alexis Braly.

"The work of healing communities is something I have always been passionate about," says Braly. "My lived experience has required cross-cultural communication while straddling an African-American community on my father's side and a white-Irish community on my mother's side.

In my experience, healing begins with connection and the art of building bridges can only come from vulnerability, common language, and a passion for change. This six (6) month program looks to do all three and would not have been possible without the passion and engagement from the Oregon City community."




Attached Media Files: Alexis Braly

Salem City Club Program -- 4 DAYS IN CLINT: Conditions in a Texas Migrant Child Detention Center (Photo)
VanNatta Public Relations - 09/17/19 10:09 AM
2019-09/1853/127676/Clear_Bckgrd_Short_Color_SCC_Logo.jpg
2019-09/1853/127676/Clear_Bckgrd_Short_Color_SCC_Logo.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1853/127676/thumb_Clear_Bckgrd_Short_Color_SCC_Logo.jpg

Salem, OR (Sept. 17, 2019) - Salem City Club, a biweekly gathering of more than 100 members, will meet Sept. 26 at the Willamette Heritage Center to learn more about conditions at Clint, a Texas migrant child detention center.

4 Days in Clint is a firsthand account of what Willamette Law professor and international children’s rights expert, Warren Binford, and her associates discovered when she toured the Clint Border Patrol in June 2019. Over the course of four days and through interviews with approximately 70 children, the team realized that hundreds of children were unlawfully warehoused by the U.S. government in a state of filth, hunger, and sickness without any meaningful adult care. Professor Binford will explain the legal framework that applies to migrant children in custody, highlighting both the legal violations by the U.S. government, as well as the legal loopholes that are behind the current situation. She will also suggest ways that the average U.S. resident can help to close the loopholes.

Warren Binford is the Director of the Clinical Law Program at Willamette University. An internationally recognized children’s rights expert, Professor Binford was invited by legal counsel in Flores v. Barr to help conduct a series of site inspections of especially concerning government facilities where migrant children have been detained since 2017. Professor Binford was selected as both a Fulbright Scholar in 2012 and the inaugural Fulbright Canada-Palix Foundation Distinguished Visiting Chair in Brain Science, and Child and Family Health and Wellness in 2015. She holds a B.A., summa cum laude with distinction, and an Ed.M., from Boston University and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

The program will begin Thursday, Sept. 26, at 12 p.m. at the Willamette Heritage Center at 1313 Mill Street St. SE. Registration fees are $10 for non-members. Lunch for members and non-members is $17 or $16 if payment is made with check or cash. Register online at SalemCityClub.com.

 

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Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1853/127676/Clear_Bckgrd_Short_Color_SCC_Logo.jpg

Bus Crash in Manzanita loaded with Army National Guard Members (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/17/19 10:06 AM
2019-09/1002/127675/rilea.jpg
2019-09/1002/127675/rilea.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127675/thumb_rilea.jpg

 On September 16, 2019 at approximately 7:00 AM, Oregon State Police (OSP) and emergency personnel responded to a non-injury bus crash on US Hwy 101 in Manzanita. The bus was occupied by 46 Army National Guard members from the HHC 1-186 IN from Medford. The Tillamook County District Attorney’s Office will review the case for charges of Driving under the Influence and 46 counts of Reckless Endangering against the driver.

The preliminary investigation revealed the bus had departed from Camp Rilea and was en route to Portland. The driver, Kenneth Alexander, age 44, from Vancouver, Washington missed the turn onto US Hwy 26 outside of Seaside. The driver assured the passengers he knew the route to Portland and continued southbound on US Hwy 101. The passengers grew concerned over the driver using his cell phone and showing signs of impairment and at the same time the driver lost control of the bus and crashed into the sidewalk.

The driver was transported to local hospital for evaluation. No other injuries were reported. OSP was assisted by Manzanita Police Department, and the Tillamook County District Attorney’s Office. The City of Manzanita opened City Hall to the members of the National Guard until another bus arrived.

 

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Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127675/rilea.jpg , 2019-09/1002/127675/rilea.2.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon August 2019 News Release
Oregon Employment Department - 09/17/19 10:00 AM

Oregon’s Unemployment Rate Remains at 4.0 Percent in August  

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 4.0 percent in August, the same as in June and July. The U.S. unemployment rate was 3.7 percent during each of the most recent three months of June, July, and August.

Oregon’s unemployment rate has been between 4.0 percent and 4.4 percent for 34 consecutive months dating back to November 2016. This sustained stretch of low unemployment is unprecedented in comparable records dating back to 1976. In the 40 years prior to 2016, Oregon’s unemployment rate was never below 4.7 percent.

In August, Oregon’s total nonfarm payroll employment added 900 jobs, following a gain of 2,400 jobs in July. Monthly gains for August were strongest in leisure and hospitality (+1,600 jobs) and professional and business services (+1,100). These gains were offset by job losses in several industries: wholesale trade (-900 jobs); other services (-900); retail trade (-700); and health care and social assistance (-600).

Recent employment growth has slowed from the rapid expansion over the prior several years. In the first eight months of 2019, total nonfarm employment gains averaged 1,000 jobs per month. This was a marked slowdown from the average gain of 3,000 jobs per month in 2018. So far in 2019, several industries have cut jobs, with information down the most in percentage terms (-2,000 jobs, or -5.7%). Several other major industries shed jobs in that time: finance and insurance ( 1,200 jobs, or  2.1%); leisure and hospitality (-2,600 jobs, or -1.2%); and retail trade (-2,200 jobs, or  1.0%). These losses were offset by job growth over the past eight months in education and health services (6,400 jobs, or 2.2%); professional and business services (4,200 jobs, or 1.7%); and manufacturing (3,100 jobs, or 1.6%).

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the August county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, September 24th, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for September on Tuesday, October 15th.

Notes: 
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources. 

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month’s release incorporates the January, February and March 2019 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

The PDF version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.
 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/930/127674/employment_in_Oregon_--_August_2019_--_press_release.pdf

Extreme Playground Makeover at South Ridge Elementary School (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 09/17/19 9:25 AM
The lines by the basketball goals at South Ridge Elementary School are much easier to see thanks to the work of volunteers.
The lines by the basketball goals at South Ridge Elementary School are much easier to see thanks to the work of volunteers.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/889/127673/thumb_Playground_Makeover_#3.jpg

Tuesday, September 17, 2019 – Ridgefield, WA – Have you ever wanted to be on a makeover show to magically transform your home?  The South Ridge Elementary School playground had a similar makeover thanks to some wonderful volunteers. 

Last year, some of the PTO members realized that the playground lines and activities were getting very worn.  With the traffic of many little feet and the challenging northwest weather, some of the lines on the asphalt had eroded completely away.  So for the beginning of the new school year, they organized a paint party.

Lisa Hernandez’ business, Hernandez Quality Painting, donated the colorful paint.  Anne Lamping got approval and organized the event.  With the help of Joanne and Stephen Cloud, Hailey Heath, Nick Hunziker, and Amber Nelsen, they spent hours cleaning the surfaces, prepping them, and painting new lines for basketball goals, hopscotch, and tic-tac-toe. 

The next project is to repaint the colorful map of the United States.  So look forward to more Extreme Playground Makeover pictures to come!

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Attached Media Files: The lines by the basketball goals at South Ridge Elementary School are much easier to see thanks to the work of volunteers. , Hopscotch squares at South Ridge Elementary School's playground went from barely visible to bright with the help of volunteers. , Volunteers lead a playground makeover at South Ridge Elementary School in Ridgefield.

Consider Youth Preparedness this Third Week of National Preparedness Month
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/17/19 9:22 AM

September is National Preparedness Month. In this third week (Sept. 16-22), FEMA focuses on youth preparedness. In partnership with OEM, FEMA Region X has ideas and tips on how to prepare youth, families, and educators for when a disaster occurs in Oregon.

What:   Information from FEMA Region X on different ways youth can be prepared for disasters

Why:    To increase family and community planning for disasters

Who:    Oregon Office of Emergency Management; FEMA Region X

When:   Sept. 16 -22, 2019

 On camera or in person interviews can be scheduled in Salem, OR. To schedule or for more information, contact David L. Yost at 425-487-4610 or by email at 10-newsdesk@femadhs.gov">fema-r10-newsdesk@femadhs.gov.

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Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Student Loan Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 09/17/19 9:00 AM
TT - Student Loan Scams - GRAPHIC - September 17, 2019
TT - Student Loan Scams - GRAPHIC - September 17, 2019
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3585/127645/thumb_Slide1.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against student loan scams.

Oregon and Washington college kids are packing up and heading back to class in the next couple weeks. That means more tuition, more books, and more bills. For many folks, the only way to get that education is to take out big loans, either through the federal government or private lenders.

When you get to the point where you have to start paying off those loans, our friends at the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) have a warning about fraudsters who say they are only too happy to help.

The catch? You either have to pay an upfront fee or a monthly fee. They might claim that your fee will go towards your debt, but if you end up doing business with a scam artist, he will just take your money for himself. He will do nothing at all to help you with your loan – or give you minimal services that you could have gotten for free.

Here are some tips from the FTC on how avoid student loan repayment scams:

  • There is nothing that a company can offer that you cannot do for yourself for free.
  • Avoid any offer that promises quick loan forgiveness, especially if the person contacting you really has no idea as to the specifics of your debt situation. Many scammers will promise to get rid of your debt fast, but in reality, they can’t help you.
  • Never pay an upfront fee. In this situation, the FTC says it is illegal for companies to charge you a fee for a service in advance.
  • Neither a logo nor an official-looking website means that the company is real or trustworthy. Many scammers will use lookalike logos or even use a real Department of Education seal to make their companies look more legitimate.

If you have been victimized by an online scam, report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

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Attached Media Files: TT - Student Loan Scams - AUDIO - September 17, 2019 , TT - Student Loan Scams - GRAPHIC - September 17, 2019

Council Listening Session seeks community input on housing
City of Gresham - 09/17/19 9:00 AM

GRESHAM, Ore. – Gresham City Council will report the final recommendations from the Gresham Housing Task Force, answer questions and gather input from the community at this listening session event. Everyone is welcome on Tuesday, September 24, from 6:30-8 p.m. at the St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, 17405 NE Glisan St. 

The event is hosted by City Councilors Janine Gladfelter, Eddy Morales and David Widmark. A brief presentation on the City’s work on housing will be followed by interactive, small group discussions. Issues discussed will include: 

  • How can the City help residents find, and stay in, their home? 

  • What can the City do to build new housing? 

  • How will new state rules affect Gresham? 

  • The Metro affordable housing bond 

At the Listening Session, free light refreshments will be available. Children are welcome, and free childcare will be offered. Translation services are available: request in advance by September 19 to Elizabeth Coffey at eth.Coffey@GreshamOregon.gov" target="_blank">Elizabeth.Coffey@GreshamOregon.gov or 503-618-2247. 

Two Council Listening Sessions were held earlier in 2019 on the topics of homelessness and public safety. More information at www.GreshamOregon.gov/Council-Listening-Sessions.  


PGE and City of Beaverton announce new electric vehicle charging station (Photo)
PGE - 09/17/19 7:30 AM
Electric Avenue Network Map
Electric Avenue Network Map
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/101/127661/thumb_Electric_Avenue_Locations_Map_2019.jpg

In celebration of National Drive Electric Week, Portland General Electric and the City of Beaverton announced plans to build a new electric vehicle charging station at Beaverton Town Square. This EV charging station will bring affordable fast-charging to Beaverton residents and expand public access to electric transportation across the region.

Transportation is the largest source of carbon emissions in Oregon, furthering the need for an electrified transportation system to combat climate change. The Electric Avenue Network is a key element to achieve emissions reduction as it aims to remove barriers preventing drivers from switching to an EV.

“Beaverton is committed to a more resilient, sustainable future and the adoption of EVs to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels and the deployment of EV charging infrastructure is critical to achieve this goal,” said Beaverton Mayor Denny Doyle. “We’re grateful to PGE for partnering with our city to bring this public charging station to the area as it will improve the health of our community, our economy and our environment.”

To further support PGE and the city’s goals to improve air quality and provide a more sustainable way of life for Oregonians, all community charging sites in the Electric Avenue Network are powered by 100% clean renewable energy.

“This new EV charging site is part of our ongoing work to invest in charging infrastructure to reduce carbon emissions and support electric transportation,” said Maria Pope, president and CEO of PGE. “Our partnership with the Beaverton City Council and Mayor Doyle is an example of how working together accelerates Oregon’s transition to a clean energy future.”

The Beaverton Electric Avenue, located on the corner of Southwest Canyon Road and Southwest Broadway Street, is highly visible and accessible from major throughways. This charging station will feature six chargers, four fast chargers and two Level 2 chargers, allowing up to six electric cars to charge simultaneously.

Beaverton joins the cities of Milwaukie, Hillsboro, Portland and Wilsonville as the latest location in the Electric Avenue Network.

For more information, please visit portlandgeneral.com/electricavenue.

About Portland General Electric Company: Portland General Electric (NYSE: POR) is a fully integrated energy company based in Portland, Oregon, serving approximately 888,000 customers in 51 cities. For 130 years, PGE has been delivering safe, affordable and reliable energy to Oregonians. Together with its customers, PGE has the No. 1 voluntary renewable energy program in the U.S. With 3,000 employees across the state, PGE is committed to helping its customers and the communities it serves build a clean energy future. For more information, visit portlandgeneral.com/cleanvision.

About Beaverton: The city of Beaverton is home to more than 97,000 residents and is Oregon’s sixth largest city. Beaverton is a friendly, active and responsive city well-known for our exceptional community services and amenities, helping Beaverton residents enjoy a high quality of life. To learn more, visit beavertonoregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: Electric Avenue Network Map

Mon. 09/16/19
Head-On Collision in Woodland Kills Female
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/16/19 4:41 PM

On 9/15/2019 at 3:53pm EMS and CCSO deputies were dispatched to a two-vehicle head-on collision in the 2500 block of NE Cedar Creek Road.  The collision was located in north Clark County, about 5 miles east of Woodland. 

Upon arrival, first responders located two vehicles blocking the roadway.  Initial assessment revealed that the driver and sole occupant of one vehicle was deceased.

Based on scene evidence and a statement by the other involved driver, deputies learned the following:

Lisa Griffith, age 51 and a resident of the Amboy area, was driving westbound on NE Cedar Creek Road in a 2002 Honda Civic.  Daniel Heup, age 54 and a Ridgefield resident, was driving eastbound on NE Cedar Creek Road in a 2016 Ford F350 pickup.  Scene evidence corroborates Heup's statement that the Civic crossed over the centerline in a shallow curve and collided with the F350 head-on in the eastbound lane. 

Griffith was killed in the collision.  Heup was transported to an area hospital with minor injuries.  Heup has been very cooperative with the investigation.

The CCSO Traffic Unit is investigating this collision, and is looking into all proximate causes to the collision, as well as an explanation as to why Griffith crossed the centerline of the roadway.

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Portland Street Response Houseless Survey Results and Pilot Program Updates
Portland Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty - 09/16/19 4:31 PM

Houseless advocates, PSU researchers, City and County commissioners will come together to present and discuss survey findings as a follow up on surveys conducted in July with the houseless community. An update to the public on the status of the Portland Street Response pilot program will also be given.

Mayor Ted Wheeler, County Chair Deborah Kafoury, Multnomah County Commissioner Susheela Jayapal, and City Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty will provide remarks regarding the pilot program development. Kaia Sand, Executive Director of Street Roots, will present the initial idea of Portland Street Response, inspired by Eugene’s CAHOOTs program. Greg Townley, research director for the Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative, will present the findings from surveys conducted with the houseless community regarding the pilot program. Street Roots vendors and PSU students will also discuss their experiences conducting the surveys.

Members of Street Roots, Sisters of the Road, Right 2 Survive, Street Books, the Portland State Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative, the Mapping Action Collective, Yellow Brick Road, and Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty’s staff went out in teams and interviewed a total of 184 houseless people between July 16-18.

Teams engaged people experiencing houselessness in discussions about what the Portland Street Response pilot should look like, including who the first responders should be, how they should approach individuals in crisis, what types of services and resources they should bring with them, and what types of training they should have. Following the interviews, responses were analyzed and summarized into a report to provide guidance for this important initiative based directly on the needs and experiences of unhoused people.

“Centering the voices of those who are often left out of these public safety policy conversations is the most powerful part about this experience,” said Greg Townley, research director for the Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative. 

Survey respondents had powerful examples of both positive and negative interactions with first responders ranging from “compassionate, supportive” to “horrible, embarrassing, degrading.”

A thread that weaves through all the responses to the survey is a call to be treated humanely. For example, regardless of whether respondents answered that their experiences with first responders were positive or negative, many experienced being treated rudely rather than with politeness and respect.

“Our community values the right of every human to have access to the services and assistance they need,” Mayor Ted Wheeler said. “We also believe those services can be delivered in a compassionate and understanding way using the Portland Street Response model.” 

“Multnomah County is working to open a new, first-of-its kind behavioral health resource center in downtown Portland. We’ll be ready to work hand-in-hand with our partners as they find a more compassionate way to do street outreach,” said Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury. “And we're hoping that includes state and federal contributions. We have been waiting a long time for them to pull their weight and help the hundreds of people who’ve been forced to endure their mental health challenges on our streets. Local governments can't solve this problem alone.”

What was made clear in the survey responses was that a response outside of police is needed.

The question then is “If not police, then who?” The most common response was “mental health professionals.” Numerous respondents also noted the importance of social workers for referring people to housing and health services; peer support specialists and/or people with lived experience; and, to a lesser extent, EMTs and firefighters.

“When over half of all arrests in the city are of houseless individuals, and 9-1-1 calls reporting ‘unwanted persons’ have increased drastically over the past 6 years, there’s no doubt something needs to be done to address this issue. I’m looking forward to seeing the draft recommendations come out of months of work between so many stakeholders,” said Commissioner Hardesty.

These responders should make the unhoused community feel safe through a variety of measures. The top suggestions included an assurance to not run checks for outstanding warrants, not to bring weapons and to bring food and water. 

Hardesty continues, “The listening sessions and surveys with the houseless community are critical as we continue collaborating on the creation of the pilot program. Getting the right first responder to the right incident means we need to talk to the people who will interact with these first responders.”

The survey work and results come out of the Community Engagement workgroup, one of the five workgroups assembled to collaborate on the Portland Street Response pilot program. The stakeholder group has met monthly since early summer and has involved over 30 stakeholders from City, County, and service providers.

In addition to the houseless survey, the Community Engagement workgroup sent surveys to the business and neighborhood communities and engaged in listening sessions with the houseless community and service providers.

“The breadth of community engagement conducted by the work group is important,” says Multnomah County Commissioner Susheela Jayapal. She continues, “The team has engaged with the houseless community, with service providers, and with businesses who make the calls that Portland Street Response will be responding to. The service provider session I attended yielded great information and ideas, and also made clear how complex the issues we’re addressing are. It’s critical that we continue this engagement as we shape the pilot.”

The workgroup will continue taking feedback from the public on the design of the pilot program.

 

Please send media RSVPs to Lokyee Au at Lokyee.au@portlandoregon.gov

 

When: September 19, 8:30am – 9:30am

Where: Multnomah County Central Library
US Bank Room
801 SW 10th Ave
Portland, OR 97205


Two vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 101 - Coos County
Oregon State Police - 09/16/19 4:24 PM

On Monday, September 16, 2019 at approximately 10:10 A.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a report of a two vehicle serious injury crash on Hwy 101 near milepost 241. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a blue Saab, operated by Rena Clemons (56) of Coos Bay, was northbound on Hwy 101 when she lost control of the vehicle and crossed the center line as she was negotiating a curve in the roadway.   She collided with a southbound green Ford Taurus operated by Michael Puschel (68) of Coos Bay.

Clemons sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Puschel and his passenger, Toni Puschel (67) of Coos Bay, were transported to Bay Area Hospital with serious injuries.

OSP was assisted by the Coos County Sheriff's Office, Millington Fire Department, Sumner Fire Department, Green Acres Fire Department, Bay Cities Ambulance, and ODOT


Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington to Honor Chief Danielle Outlaw and Carmen Rubio as 2019 Women of Distinction on September 24, 2019 (Photos) (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington - 09/16/19 4:15 PM
WofD Cover
WofD Cover
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/6250/127453/thumb_WofD19.jpg

Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington to Honor Chief Danielle Outlaw and Carmen Rubio as 2019 Women of Distinction on September 24, 2019

PORTLAND, Ore. – Tuesday, September 17, 2019 – Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington (GSOSW) announced today the honorees for the 2019 Marie Lamfrom Women of Distinction Awards on September 24, at the Portland Hilton Hotel. The distinguished recipients, Danielle Outlaw, Chief of Police, Portland Police Bureau and Carmen Rubio, Executive Director, Latino Network, will be honored for demonstrating courageous leadership, serving as role models for girls and women, and working to make the world a better place.

“Both of this year’s honorees serve in critical leadership positions, working collaboratively with others to make our communities a better place,” says Karen Hill, Chief Executive Officer for Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington. “Chief Danielle Outlaw and Carmen Rubio exemplify just what Girl Scouts hopes to inspire in all girls: the courage to take action, make a difference and be the leaders our world requires. We’re pleased to recognize these extraordinary women.”

Who: Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington—alums, business and community leaders, donors, elected officials, funders, Girl Scouts, media, staff, volunteers and Marie Lamfrom Women of Distinction (including past honorees Governor Barbara Roberts, Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum and Justice Adrienne Nelson)

What: 2019 Women of Distinction Luncheon

When: Tuesday, September 24, 2019, from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Where: The Portland Hilton, 921 SW 6th Ave, Portland, Oregon 97204

Tickets: To purchase tickets, please visit: www.girlscoutsosw.org/luncheon

Sponsorship | Questions: For information on sponsoring the 2019 Women of Distinction Luncheon or other event questions, please contact Shannon Spencer at (503) 977-6843 or sspencer@girlscoutsosw.org

Media:  This is a private, ticketed event. Interested media must R.S.V.P. by email to: communications@girlscoutsosw.org.

“It is deeply humbling to be recognized as a role model for girls and young women by an organization that is helping build many of the leaders of tomorrow,” says Chief Danielle Outlaw.

“I am humbled to be receiving this award from the Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington and to be included in the esteemed company of Chief Outlaw,” says Carmen Rubio. “The values I carry for myself as a leader truly align with the mission of Girl Scouts – to lift up the confidence and courage of our young leaders so that they can help make our communities thrive.”

The event will feature remarks from local Gold Award Girl Scout, Quinn McElroy-Fuchs. Completed in 2018, Quinn’s Gold Award entitled “Operation Tooth Fairy” provided dental care information and over 1,200 tooth care kits to low-income families in the Greater Portland area. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the highest award for Girl Scouts in grades 9-12, and is the standout achievement of girls who develop meaningful, sustainable solutions to challenges in their communities and the world.

Proceeds from the Women of Distinction Luncheon allow GSOSW to enhance and expand Girl Scout program opportunities in key areas, including civic engagement, financial literacy, STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), and outdoor leadership for more than 14,500 girls throughout Oregon and SW Washington.

About The Marie Lamfrom Women of Distinction Award

The award is named in honor of Marie Lamfrom, who served as a troop leader for a special needs troop at Shriners Hospitals in Portland for 35 years. She served on the Girl Scout council’s board of directors and received the highest award a Girl Scout adult can receive, the Thanks Badge. Lamfrom co-founded the company that would become Columbia Sportswear.

About the 2019 Women of Distinction Honorees

Today, the Marie Lamfrom Women of Distinction Award celebrates women who demonstrate courageous leadership, serve as role models for girls and women and work to make the world a better place.

Danielle Outlaw, Chief of Police, Portland Police Bureau

After 20 years of service with the Oakland, California, Police Department, Chief Danielle Outlaw was sworn in as Chief of Police of the Portland Police Bureau on October 2, 2017. She is the first African-American woman to hold this position. Outlaw’s TEDx Talk – Humanity in Authority – dispels the belief that the two concepts are contrary in nature and explains how the two concepts can, and should, co-exist. She has also presented on topics including Race and Policing, Women in Law Enforcement, De-escalation and Investigation of Use of Force, Building Community Relationships after Controversy and Video Recording in Policing and Early Intervention Systems. Outlaw has received numerous awards, including the Police Executive Research Forum’s Gary P. Hayes Award and the Cascadia Behavioral Healthcare Culture of Caring Award for Community Relations and Civic Engagement. Currently, Chief Outlaw serves as a Board Member for Boys & Girls Clubs of the Portland Metropolitan Area, a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police Human and Civil Rights Committee and is also an active member of the National Organization of Black Law Executives. Chief Outlaw earned a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from the University of San Francisco and a Master of Business Administration from Pepperdine University. She is also a graduate of the Police Executive Research Forum Senior Management Institute of Police, the Major Cities Chiefs Association Police Executive Leadership Institute and the FBI National Executive Institute.

Carmen Rubio, Executive Director, Latino Network

Carmen Rubio joined Latino Network as the Executive Director in 2009, where she and her team work to advance the Latino community in education, leadership, and civic engagement in Oregon. During this time she has led the organization’s growth from a staff of less than ten to one of 115 staff, with three offices serving Portland, Gresham and Hillsboro. Prior to her time at Latino Network, Rubio served on staff for former Multnomah County Commissioner Serena Cruz Walsh, former Portland Mayor Tom Potter, and Portland City Commissioner Nick Fish, and worked as a campaign manager and field director for two county races and one city race. She is a recipient of the Portland Business Journal’s 2018 Women of Influence award, and she has been recognized in Portland Monthly’s 2013 50 Most Influential People. She received the Hispanic Chamber’s BRAVO Award for Leadership and the Center for Women’s Leadership Nonprofit Leadership Award. Rubio earned a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from University of Oregon and enrolled for two years of graduate studies at the University of Washington’s School of Communications. She earned a certificate from the Center for Juvenile Justice Reform at Georgetown University. Rubio currently serves as a governor-appointed member of the State of Oregon’s Higher Education Coordinating Commission, and serves on the boards of the Coalition of Communities of Color, the University of Oregon Alumni Association, and Oregon Shakespeare Festival. She is a 2015 Marshall Memorial Fellow, an American Leadership Forum of Oregon Fellow, and a member of the International Women’s Forum. Rubio earned a B.A. in Political Science from University of Oregon. She also studied from 2000-2002 at the University of Washington, Graduate School of Communications (did not complete program). In 2015 she earned a certificate from the Center for Juvenile Justice Reform at Georgetown University.

About Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington

In partnership with more than 8,000 adult members, Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington prepares 14,500 girls in grades K-12 for a lifetime of leadership, adventure and success. GSOSW’s programs in civic engagement, financial literacy, the outdoors and STEM serve girls in 35 counties in Oregon, and Clark, Klickitat and Skamania counties in Southwest Washington. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.




Attached Media Files: 2019 Women of Distinction Press Release , WofD Cover , WofD Social Graphic , Chief Danielle Outlaw , Carmen Rubio , Quinn McElroy-Fuchs

Committee for Family Forestlands meets Sept. 19 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/16/19 4:09 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet Thursday, Sept. 19 from 10 a.m. to noon in Salem. The meeting will be in the Sun Pass Room of Building D on the campus of the Oregon Department of Forestry, 2600 State Street.  Among updates the committee will receive are ones about:

  • Private Forest Division
  • Wildfire
  • Process for committee recommendations and charter review
  • 2019-2020 work plan

The meeting is open to the public. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting after approval of the minutes. The meeting space is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by calling Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. You can find more information at  https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/CFF.aspx

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Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet September 23 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 09/16/19 3:30 PM

September 16, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program Contact: Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet September 23 in Portland

What: Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce

When: Monday, September 23, 2019, 1 p.m.-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building (PSOB), 800 NE Oregon St., Portland, Oregon

Agenda: Welcome, taskforce purpose and outcomes, agenda review, introductions, background on formation of the taskforce, principles for guidelines, key components for inclusion in the guidelines, next steps and summary

For more information, please visit the Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Task Force website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Lisa Bui at 971-673-3397, 711 TTY, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.u, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Update: Clark County Homicide Investigation
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/16/19 3:21 PM

On 09/15/19 after 8pm, deputies were called to 19408 SE 42nd circle on the report of a disturbance with a weapon. A male was located in the residence deceased.  A 47 year old female, Stephanie Westby, was detained.   After consultation with the Clark County Prosecutors Office, Westby was booked into the Clark County Jail on one count of Murder 1st degree. 

 

This investigation continues.

 

Anyone with information related to this investigation or associated parties please contact Detective Justin Messman at 360 397 2120 or Justin.Messman@clark.wa.gov


Industry and community leaders join forces with the Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Center to host 'Manufacturing Day'
NW Regional ESD: Washington Co. - 09/16/19 3:03 PM

PHOTO: https://www.pcc.edu/news/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2018/10/ByteSized4662_RoboticsTeam-1.jpg
PHOTO: https://www.pcc.edu/news/wp-content/uploads/sites/33/2018/10/M80_Millturn-1.jpg

SCAPPOOSE, Ore. – Regional industry, education, and workforce development partners are collaborating to host “Manufacturing Day” as part of the Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Center (OMIC) initiative in Columbia County.

The second annual event, which is part of the national MFG Day effort, will feature live demonstrations of 3D printing, laser cutting, and virtual welding, as well as engaging hands-on activities. This event provides regional students and community members an opportunity to learn about the world of advanced manufacturing at a world-class R&D facility and will include exhibitor booths for more than 25 local companies and educational institutions, including Mitsubishi Materials, Selway Machine Tool, Silver Eagle Manufacturing and Walter Tools.

“We are going to have the opportunity to share the world of manufacturing with as many as 300 high school students at OMIC R&D,” said Craig Campbell, executive director of OMIC R&D. “It is truly exciting to see the eyes of these bright young minds light up as they see the world of the possible.” 

Manufacturing Day will be open to the public from 3-6 p.m, on Friday, Oct. 4 at the OMIC Research and Development Center (33701 Charles T. Parker Way). Earlier in the day, from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., a steady stream of students from a variety of K-12 partners will visit and partake in the activities.

The event showcases the vision and programs of OMIC, including plans for its workforce training center led by Portland Community College, while regional manufacturing partners will describe their companies’ work and career opportunities. Special guests will include Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici and Oregon State Senator Betsy Johnson.

Manufacturing Day is a community collaboration that is a result of the robust partnerships between OMIC R&D and PCC, and a group of cross-sector community partners. The planning committee includes representatives from St Helens and Scappoose high schools, NW STEM Hub, Northwest Regional Education Service District (NWRESD), Rightline Equipment, Oregon Aero, Rescare, and Northwest Oregon Works.

“PCC is proud to be a sponsor of this year’s event, which shines the light on the manufacturing industry, as well as education and career opportunities in Oregon,” said Andrew Lattanner, PCC’s newly appointed director of the training center. “OMIC will be transformational for Columbia County, and the future training center will provide workers with the classroom and on-the-job learning they need to fill high-demand, good paying jobs.”

The event is free and open to the public. Parking is available on site.

Last year, more than 230 local high school students met with 25 vendors and partners at interactive booths at the OMIC R&D facility.

The presenting sponsor of this year's event is Boeing, and other sponsors include, Madden Industrial Craftsman, Oregon Manufacturing Extension Partnership, Mahr, PCC Foundation, Seco Tools, Rightline, and State Sen. Betsy Johnson. Among the vendors participating in the event include Blount, Daimler, Evraz, Letica, Oregon Aero, Silver Eagle and Sport Copter. 

About OMIC Research and Development:

OMIC R&D is a world-class collaborative environment bringing together industry, higher education and government in partnership to develop new tools, techniques and technologies to address near-term manufacturing challenges through applied research and advanced technical training. For more information, visit www.OMIC.us

About the OMIC Training Center:

Portland Community College is designing a Training Center of Excellence for Advanced Manufacturing to train Oregon's next generation of the workforce. And with industry need for skilled workers at an all-time high, the arrival of the training center – part of the Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Center (OMIC) – is perfectly timed.

The training center will offer PCC a permanent home base in Columbia County. Focused on advanced manufacturing, the center will house such programs as Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) Operation, Machining, Industrial Fabrication and Mechatronics. Working in close collaboration with industry and higher education partners, PCC's training center can help close the skills gap by offering training that combines work-based experience (on-the-job training) with classroom and lab instruction, in an innovative apprenticeship model. Students can complete an apprenticeship program, and/or an associate degree or certificate leading to an advanced degree. Emphasis will be placed on craftsmanship, professionalism, and placing graduates into high-wage, high-demand advanced manufacturing jobs – a sector whose future looks very bright in Oregon.


PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center declares end to temporary limited access
PeaceHealth - 09/16/19 2:50 PM

PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center security officers limited access to the facility at 11:35 a.m. this morning in response to concerning comments made by a patient. Public entrances to the Medical Center were either closed or were monitored by a security officer while the incident was investigated. In cooperation with local law enforcement, the limited access period was ended at 1:13 p.m. and normal Medical Center operations were resumed. There was no interruption in patient care.PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center is located at 400 NE Mother Joseph Place in Vancouver, WA.


 


Computer Science at Sunset Ridge Intermediate and View Ridge Middle School (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 09/16/19 2:43 PM
The Earth Dance assignment at Sunset Ridge Intermediate School's computer science class challenges fifth grade students to figure out how to program different characters to dance.
The Earth Dance assignment at Sunset Ridge Intermediate School's computer science class challenges fifth grade students to figure out how to program different characters to dance.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/889/127654/thumb_Earth_Dance.jpg

Monday, September 16, 2019 – Ridgefield, WA –  Students stream into the computer lab and check out their Chromebooks from a cabinet in the back.  Two big screens in the front of the room show a cartoon of a sprite and some characters who look like they’re made of rocks.  Sunset Ridge Intermediate School teacher, Nam Nguyen, goes to stand by a laptop at the front of the room. 

“Listen up!  Today we’re going to be working on a project called Earth Dance,” he says.  The kids all turn to watch.  The cartoon animates with the sprite moving around, then the rock people follow in the same movement. 

Nguyen continues, “Today, you will be playing—programming—Splash as your primary sprite and the Rock People as your secondary.  Your first objective is to have Splash demonstrate her dance move to the Rock People.  Then the Rock People are going to mimic the dance move.  You’re going to mimic—copy—the code so things are moving together.  That’s the beginning.  That’s the bare bones of the program.”

These students aren’t seventh or eighth graders; they’re in the fifth grade.  And they’re programming in block coding, a system that lets students select and order blocks of code to complete tasks.  Nguyen said the students adapt to it very quickly. 

“Because of development and how intimidating computer science can be, a lot of students worried about whether they were just going to sit here and code the whole time, line code,” he said.  Instead, they’re engaged in creative tasks, working with other students at their tables to drag and drop code blocks, finding the right pieces to solve a logic puzzle.

Nguyen explains that the visual code blocks are all composed in Python, one of the top computer programming languages worldwide.  “It’s one of the most innovative methods of introducing young students to Python,” he explained, “because every line of code or every block that students are using in the program at the fifth and sixth grade level is the exact same code that is used in Python.” 

The computer science electives at Sunset Ridge Intermediate School and View Ridge Middle School are popular and fill up quickly, so classes are designed for students to enter the courses at any given stage or grade level without a lot of prerequisites.  And challenges are built into each exercise so students can work at their own levels. 

Soon the students are pointing at each other’s laptops as they discuss ways to change the code, or to try the challenge level of making the characters dance without tilting.  It’s a different kind of screen time, the kind of work that lies behind every video game or app.  But it looks like the students are having fun—and the characters are all dancing. 

###




Attached Media Files: The Earth Dance assignment at Sunset Ridge Intermediate School's computer science class challenges fifth grade students to figure out how to program different characters to dance. , Fifth graders at Sunset Ridge intermediate School learn to select blocks of programming code to create a sequence in computer science class. , Sunset Ridge Intermediate School teacher, Nam Nguyen, shows fifth graders the dance animation sequence during a programming assignment in his computer science class.

Two Arrested, Charged After Officer-Involved Shooting
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/16/19 2:22 PM

HILLSBORO, Ore.- On September 14, 2019, officers with the Hillsboro Police Department responded to the Extended Stay America located at 10665 Northeast Eider Court in Hillsboro to investigate a call of suspicious circumstances.  Officers arrested Elliot Satour Carr and Nicola Elizabeth Kostov, also known as Peacelynn Butterfly Perilloux, as a result of their investigation and lodged them at the Washington County Jail. 

They will be arraigned on the charges listed below at the Law Enforcement Center at 3 p.m. on September 16, 2019.

Mr. Carr has been charged with:

  • Unlawful use of a weapon
  • Felon in possession of a firearm
  • Unauthorized use of a vehicle
  • Identity theft

Ms. Kostov has been charged with:

  • First-degree burglary
  • Unauthorized use of a vehicle
  • Identity theft

One officer discharged a weapon during the incident.  The Washington County Major Crimes Team is investigating the officer-involved shooting.  We will have no further information available while this investigation is ongoing.

See previous press release from the Hillsboro Police Department here: http://www.flashalert.net/news.html?id=1408


Arson investigation of the Gleneden Beach Christian Church fire leads to felony arrest, Gleneden Beach, Or. (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/16/19 2:17 PM
Savariego
Savariego
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/5490/127646/thumb_Savariego.jpg

On September 15th, 2019 at approximately 1:53 PM, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Deputies were dispatched to a commercial structure fire at the Gleneden Beach Christian Church located at 7185 Church Avenue in Gleneden Beach.  Initial reports indicated there were flames coming from the roof of the church and that the fire was spreading rapidly.  The structure was confirmed as unoccupied.

Deputies and personnel from Depoe Bay Fire District, North Lincoln Fire and Rescue, Newport Fire Department, Pacific West Ambulance and the Oregon State Police responded to the scene.  Fire personnel worked diligently to attack the fire which took over three hours to extinguish.  Fire personnel were able to save a large portion of the structure.  There were no injuries reported. 

There were suspicious circumstances surrounding the cause of the fire and the Lincoln County Fire Investigation Team was called to the scene.  This team is comprised of members from the Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Office, North Lincoln Fire and Rescue, Newport Fire Department, Toledo Fire Department, and the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office.  Through the course of the investigation, it was determined that the fire was intentionally set.  Deputies, with the assistance of the Toledo Police Department, contacted the suspect in the case, Jordan Savariego age 29, who is transient. Mr. Savariego was subsequently taken into custody without incident.

Mr. Savariego’s charges include Arson, Burglary, Criminal Trespass and Criminal Mischief.  His bail is $357,500.

This is an active case and is still under investigation.

###

Respectfully submitted by

Rick Ballentine

Patrol Sergeant

Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

541-265-4277




Attached Media Files: Savariego

Price Foundation Awards $6,200 Grant to the Free Clinic of Southwest Washington (Photo)
Free Clinic of SW Washington - 09/16/19 2:14 PM
Bill Lockwood, Board President, and Ann Wheelock, Executive Director at the Free Clinic of Southwest Washington graciously accept a $6,200 grant check from Kay Dalke-Sheadel, Executive Director of the Price Foundation. The grant will supply medications to
Bill Lockwood, Board President, and Ann Wheelock, Executive Director at the Free Clinic of Southwest Washington graciously accept a $6,200 grant check from Kay Dalke-Sheadel, Executive Director of the Price Foundation. The grant will supply medications to
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1594/127652/thumb_Price_Foundation_Check_Presentation.jpg

The Free Clinic of Southwest Washington has received a $6,200 grant from the Price Foundation. The grant will supply medications to help the Free Clinic’s volunteers care for low-income uninsured and underinsured patients.

Medications are an essential part of treatment for most Free Clinic medical and dental patients. They need antibiotics, insulin, and other medicines to help with their care plan. Since 2009, the Free Clinic’s on-site dispensary has filled 8,000-10,000 prescriptions annually at no cost to patients.

“This gift will make a real difference in the lives of our patients as they recover from illnesses or injuries,” says Ann Wheelock, Free Clinic Executive Director. “Medications are expensive and many of our patients do not have the means to pay for them out of pocket. We’re so grateful to the Price Foundation for their caring support.”

 

About the Free Clinic:

The Free Clinic of Southwest Washington provides free, compassionate, quality health care to children and adults who are otherwise unable to obtain such services. The Free Clinic offers medical, dental, vision and specialty care services from more than 500 volunteer professionals. The Free Clinic is funded by the local community, and all donations stay in Southwest Washington. For more information about the Free Clinic of Southwest Washington, visit our website: freeclinics.org.

 

About the Price Foundation:

The Price Foundation was founded to improve education, health and historic preservation in Clark and Cowlitz County by recognizing unfulfilled needs and funding projects that make a difference.

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: Bill Lockwood, Board President, and Ann Wheelock, Executive Director at the Free Clinic of Southwest Washington graciously accept a $6,200 grant check from Kay Dalke-Sheadel, Executive Director of the Price Foundation. The grant will supply medications to

Revolutionary Mini-Pitch for Youth Soccer to be Unveiled at Reynolds Middle School
Reynolds Sch. Dist. - 09/16/19 1:53 PM

Revolutionary Mini-Pitch for Youth Soccer to be Unveiled at Reynolds Middle School

Reynolds School District, the W.J. Silverstein Family Trust, Musco Lighting, and the U.S. Soccer Foundation will unveil a new mini-pitch at Reynolds Middle School to increase access to soccer for more Portland-area families.

The mini-pitch is part of the next generation of pitches that was designed by the U.S. Soccer Foundation and Musco Lighting to provide increased benefits to the community, including lighting to dramatically increase the number of hours kids and adults can use the space, benches to watch the play unfold, lockable storage for equipment, and other enhancements.

The unveiling event, which is free and open to the public, will include soccer activities, music, refreshments, and giveaways. adidas team members will also be on hand to volunteer at the community celebration.

WHO:

  • Dr. Danna Diaz, Superintendent of Schools
  • Brian Cooper, Mayor of Fairview
  • Scott Harden, Mayor of Wood Village
  • Stacy Talus, Principal, Reynolds Middle School
  • Joe Crookham, President, Musco Lighting
  • Ed Foster-Simeon, President & CEO, U.S. Soccer Foundation

Special guests include local area coaches and players from Active Children Portland, East County Recreation, and PlayEast!

WHERE:

Reynolds Middle School

1200 NE 201st Ave.

Fairview, Ore.

 

WHEN:

Wednesday, September 18 ?", 4:00 PM – 6:30PM

The formal program, including the opening of the pitch, short remarks, and a ceremonial first kick will begin at 5 p.m., Sept. 18.

 

VISUALS:

Local girls and boys taking ceremonial first kick followed by inaugural scrimmages on the new mini-pitch.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Stephanie Field, Director of Communications, Reynolds School District

communications@rsd7.net; 503-491-3428

 

Jennifer Arnold, U.S. Soccer Foundation

nold@ussoccerfoundation.org">jarnold@ussoccerfoundation.org; 202-872-6662

 

Eduardo Zamarripa, Musco Lighting

do.tamezzamarripa@musco.com">eduardo.tamezzamarripa@musco.com; 641-670-1608


Trees, apples and cider! Vancouver celebrates the Old Apple Tree Oct. 5
City of Vancouver - 09/16/19 1:41 PM

VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON -- Strongly rooted in our community, Vancouver’s legendary Old Apple Tree turns 193 this year. 

Come celebrate at the annual Old Apple Tree Festival, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, at the Old Apple Tree Park, 112 S.E. Columbia Way, directly east of the Interstate 5 Bridge within the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site.

The family-friendly, free event offers live music, tree care workshops, Vancouver Land Bridge tours, kids’ hands-on arts and crafts, and food for purchase.

Urban Abundance will again be hosting a free apple pressing station. The public is encouraged to bring clean apples and containers to participate.

Also returning this year is the popular hard cider garden and a taste marketplace featuring food samples, hosted by Slow Food Southwest Washington. Local musical groups, The Juleps and River Twain, will be providing live music.

The City of Vancouver’s Urban Forestry Commission will be giving away a limited number of tree cuttings from the Old Apple Tree during the festival.

Planted in 1826 at Fort Vancouver, Vancouver’s venerable Old Apple Tree is the oldest apple tree in the Northwest and considered the matriarch of Washington State’s apple industry. Despite floods, winds, drought, ice and snow, the tree has survived and continues to produce some fruit.

The Old Apple Tree Festival is presented by the Urban Forestry Commission in partnership with the City of Vancouver’s Urban Forestry, a Public Works Department program; Bartlett Tree Care; Slow Food Southwest Washington; and the National Park Service.

For more information about the Old Apple Tree Festival and Vancouver’s efforts to enhance the community’s trees and the benefits they bring to residents and businesses, please call Urban Forestry at 360-487-8308 or visit www.cityofvancouver.us/urbanforestry.

###


Andrew Heininge receives 25 year prison sentence following lengthy child sex crimes investigation
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/16/19 12:34 PM

Andrew Heininge receives 25 year prison sentence following lengthy child sex crimes investigation

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 36-year-old Andrew Heininge received a 25 year prison sentence for committing numerous sex crimes against two children over a two year period in Multnomah and Clackamas County.

“The resolution of this case will come as an incredible relief to the victims and their family,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Amber Kinney, who litigated this case. “Mr. Heininge caused considerable harm to these children. The state supports this fair and just resolution as it holds Mr. Heininge accountable for his actions and protects his victims from any further trauma that they could have been exposed to during trial. We are very proud of the victims for coming forward and making these disclosures.”  

Heininge appeared in Multnomah County Circuit Court on Monday and pleaded guilty to one count of rape in the first degree, one count of sodomy in the first degree, one count of using a minor in the commission of a controlled substance offense and three counts of sexual abuse in the first degree and no contest to one count of sexual abuse in the first degree. These charges were a result of a grand jury indictment that was returned in Multnomah County Circuit Court on January 29, 2018.

Heininge also pleaded guilty to two counts of rape in the first degree and two counts of sexual abuse in the first degree. These charges were a result of a grand jury indictment that was returned in Clackamas County Circuit Court on July 20, 2017.

By pleading guilty in the Clackamas County case, Heininge admits that on more than one occasion between May 2015 and July 2017, he unlawfully and knowingly engaged in sexual intercourse with a child, who was under the age of 16 and that he sexually abused that same child by unlawfully and knowingly touching a sexual or intimate part of her body.

By pleading guilty in the Multnomah County case, Heininge admitted that in 2016, he unlawfully and knowingly engaged in sexual intercourse with the same child victim from the Clackamas County case; that he engaged in sexual conduct with the child and that he sexually abused her over an eight month period; that in 2017 he unlawfully and knowingly used the child to help manufacture marijuana. He also stipulated there is enough evidence in this case that had it gone to trial, a jury or judge could have convicted him of sexually abusing a second female child who was under the age of 14.                   

Upon his release, Heininge will be on 45 months of post-prison supervision.

He will have to register as a sex offender and has been ordered to not have any contact with either victim.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team is responsible for reviewing and coordinating child abuse and neglect cases in Multnomah County. The team also handles all child homicides, felony child physical abuse cases, felony child abandonment cases, custodial interference cases, and felony sex crimes where the victim is currently under the age of 18 and where the perpetrator is determined not to be a stranger to the child.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, the Clackamas County District Attorney’s Office, the Multnomah County Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team, the staff at Children's Center in Clackamas County and CARES Northwest in Multnomah County for their dedicated efforts investigating this matter and Clackamas County Deputy District Attorney Stacey Borgman for litigating the Clackamas County component to this case.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5769/127644/PR-19-147-Andrew_Heininge.pdf

Tide Creek Structure Fire in Rainier
Columbia River Fire & Rescue - 09/16/19 11:58 AM

PRESS RELEASE

Contacts:
            Jennifer Motherway, Recruitment & Retention Coordinator/Public Information Officer

Date: September 16, 2019

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Tide Creek Road Structure Fire in Rainier

On Sunday, September 15, 2019, at 7:54pm Columbia River Fire and Rescue responded to a structure fire in the 30100 block of Tide Creek Road in Rainier. There were multiple 911 calls reporting the fire.

The single occupant was home at the time of the fire and was able to get out unharmed.

The cause of the fire is suspected arson, however the specifics of the fire are under investigation. The home was a total loss, the estimated damage is unknown at this time.

We had to go to Trojan to fill our water tender as there were no usable fire hydrants or other water sources nearby. At the same time of the structure fire, we also had a brush fire as a result of an illegal burn which also took resources away from the structure fire.

We responded with, two (2) Chief Officers, twelve (12) Firefighters, Career and Volunteer, one (1) Public Information Officer, two (2) fire engines, three (3) water tenders, and one (1) medic. Columbia County Sheriff along with Columbia River PUD and Oregon State Police were on scene as well.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/6080/127643/Tide_Creek_Structure_Fire_9.15.19.pdf

Nathan Scates convicted of assault, sentenced to prison for racially-motivated crime
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 09/16/19 11:52 AM

September 16, 2019

Nathan Scates convicted of assault, sentenced to prison for racially-motivated crime

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 38-year-old Nathan Scates, a private security guard who assaulted one person and pepper sprayed two others during a racially-motivated incident, pleaded guilty and received an 86 month prison sentence.

“The racial animus Nathan Scates displayed during this particular incident was horrible,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Melissa Marrero, who litigated this case. “These types of crimes can have an enormous impact on a victim, that person’s family and friends and our entire community. We are fortunate that the Oregon legislature recognizes the seriousness of these crimes and allows the state to prosecute conduct and behavior that is motivated by prejudice when it is directed towards one or several other protected classes.”

This investigation started on August 10, 2018 when Portland Police responded to a disturbance in the 1500 block of Southwest Harbor Way in Portland, Oregon. During the investigation, according to court documents, Scates, while wearing his security guard uniform, approached a family and started calling them “terrorists” and told them “to go back to your country” because they were wearing hijabs. The family was on a public dock when Scates – having no legal right to do so - confronted them, and began using hate speech.  

Police spoke with two individuals who confirmed seeing the racially-motivated incident on the family. The witnesses told police that Scates then directed his attention on them when they attempted to intervene and that he started yelling racial slurs at them based on his perception of their race.

One of the witnesses took out a phone to record the incident. According to court documents, Scates pulled a collapsible baton from his duty belt and hit the witness in the hand while continuing to use homophobic and xenophobic hate speech. While the assault victim separated from Scates, he hit her in the hand for a second time, which caused her phone to fall into the Willamette River. As a result of the assault, she suffered a broken hand.

While off the dock and near a gate to a condominium complex, court documents state that Scates pulled out mace and used it unlawfully on two other individuals, neither of whom had any prior interaction with Scates and who had just come across the altercation as they were walking and as Scates fled the crime scene.

On Monday, Scates pleaded guilty to one count of attempted assault in the second degree, one count of felony assault in the fourth degree and two counts of intimidation in the second degree.

By pleading guilty, Scates admitted that he unlawfully and intentionally attempted to cause physical injury by using a dangerous weapon; that he unlawfully and recklessly caused physical injury while in the presence of a minor child; that he unlawfully and knowingly, because of his perception of the race and national origin of the crime victim, subjected her to offensive physical contact; that he unlawfully and knowingly, with intent, because of his perception of the crime victim’s religion, caused substantial inconvenience by interfering with her right to be in a public location.

The minor child was a family member of Scates.  

Upon his release, Scates will be on 34 months of post-prison supervision.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office was an active participant of the Oregon Attorney General’s Hate Crimes Task Force and helped draft the language that was in Senate Bill 577. The new law, which went into effect on July 15, 2019, renamed the crime of “intimidation” to “bias crime,” added gender identity to the list of protected categories and removed the requirement that two or more people commit the crime in order to make it a felony in certain circumstances.

All potential bias crime cases, whether they are a felony or misdemeanor, are reviewed by the Violent Crimes Unit within the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office. If a misdemeanor bias crimes case is issued, the felony-level attorney will retain the case.

If you have been the victim of a bias crime assault or you are witnessing one, immediately call 9-1-1. If you have been the victim of a different bias crime and the suspect is no longer present, call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

This case was issued and litigated before July 25, 2019, which is when Oregon’s new bias crime law went into effect. As a result, the crimes Scates was convicted of should be referred to as “intimidation in the second degree.”

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes Portland Police Bureau Detective Jeff Sharp for his dedicated efforts investigating this matter. 

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5769/127642/PR-19-222-Nathan_Scates.pdf

Amy from 99.5 The Wolf and Union Gospel Will Collect Winter Gear for Homeless (Photo)
Union Gospel Mission - 09/16/19 11:49 AM
AMC Theater Drop-Off
AMC Theater Drop-Off
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/706/127641/thumb_amc-dropoff.jpg

For Immediate Release                                                Contact: Courtney Dodds

September 16, 2019                                                     503-274-4483

                                                                                     971-275-2334 (cell)

Amy from 99.5 The Wolf and Union Gospel Will Collect Winter Gear for Homeless

Portland, Ore., - On September 21st between 12-2pm Union Gospel Mission along with 99.5 The Wolf will be at AMC Theater Progress Ridge collecting winter gear to help those experiencing homelessness.

Bring your donations to AMC Theater Progress Ridge at 12345 SW Horizon Blvd on September 21st, from noon to 2 pm. Items needed: winter coats, sleeping bags, new underwear, water-resistant boots and warm gear. Financial donations are also needed.

Donations will be distributed during Union Gospel Mission’s annual Operation Overcoat street fair on September 28th. Operation Overcoat is an annual event that not only provides those in need with winter survival items but builds relationships and connects people to needed services for long-term change. All while having fun!

If you would like to learn more about Operation Overcoat and Union Gospel Mission visit www.ugmportland.org.

About Union Gospel Mission: Union Gospel Mission’s purpose is “Feeding the hungry, restoring the addict and loving our neighbor.” Union Gospel Mission has been serving Portland since 1927. Union Gospel Mission provides meals and care for those experiencing homelessness and operates LifeChange -- a transformative recovery program for men, women and children. Contact Union Gospel Mission at 503-274-4483 or ugmportland.org and @ugmpdx.

# # #




Attached Media Files: AMC Theater Drop-Off

Assault Being Investigated as Potential Bias Crime, Request For Information From Public
Portland Police Bureau - 09/16/19 11:13 AM
Portland Police detectives are requesting help from the public as they investigate a potential bias crime that was reported in downtown Portland last week.

On Thursday, September 12, 2019 at 2:30a.m., Central Precinct Officers were dispatched to a report of an assault in a parking lot in the 300 Block of West Burnside Street. When they arrived they located three victims who said they had been assaulted by a group that had left. Officers attempted to locate the suspects but they had already left the area.

Upon investigating, the officers learned one of the victims was transgender and there were elements of the crime that possibly met the criteria for a Bias Crime. Officers notified the Bias Crime Detail and the case is now assigned to a detective.

Investigators are requesting that if anyone was a witness to this incident and has not spoken to police, has information about it, or video evidence, to contact Detective Shaye Samora at Shaye.Samora@portlandoregon.gov or 503-823-0416 and reference Case #19-314989.

The Bureau investigates all reports of bias-motivated crimes and encourages any member of our community who is the victim of such a crime to contact law enforcement. Under Oregon law, bias crimes are defined as any criminal act that targets a victim based on the suspect's perception of the victim's race, color, religion, sexual orientation, disability, gender identity or national origin. Detectives work to determine whether or not bias elements are present during the reported crime that align with Oregon law as defined in the Oregon Revised Statutes (ORS):

ORS 166.165 -- Bias crime in the First Degree - https://www.oregonlaws.org/ors/166.165
ORS 166.155 -- Bias crime in the Second Degree - https://www.oregonlaws.org/ors/166.155

If you have been the victim of a bias crime assault or you are witnessing one, immediately call 9-1-1. If you have been the victim of a different bias crime and the suspect is no longer present, such as vandalism or graffiti, please call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

To learn more about bias crime investigations and reported bias/hate crime statistics within the City of Portland, please visit https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/77066

Additionally, the City of Portland is a partner in Portland United Against Hate, which is a community initiated partnership of Community Based Organizations, Neighborhood Associations, concerned communities and the City. To learn more, please visit https://www.portlandoregon.gov/oni/72583

### PPB ###

County schedules open house to begin Shoreline Master Program update
Clark Co. WA Communications - 09/16/19 10:55 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Shoreline Master Programs (SMP) are local land-use policies and regulations that guide use of shorelines. SMPs are based on state guidelines and tailored to the specific needs of the community.

Clark County is undertaking a periodic review of its SMP, as required by the Washington State Shoreline Management Act (SMA).

Residents can learn more about the update at an upcoming open house on Wednesday, Sept. 25 at Clark County Fire & Rescue Dollar’s Corner Station, 21609 NE 72nd Ave., Battle Ground. Doors open at 5:30 pm with a presentation at 6 pm.

If you are unable to attend in person, you can participate in an online open house via the project website link below. The online open house will be available until Monday, Oct. 7, 2019.

For more information, visit https://www.clark.wa.gov/smp2020.

The SMA requires each SMP be reviewed and revised, if needed, on an eight-year schedule established by the State Legislature. The review ensures the SMP stays current with changes in laws and rules, remains consistent with other Clark County plans and regulations, and is responsive to changed circumstances, new information and improved data.

The Department of Ecology SMA webpage may be found here: https://ecology.wa.gov/Water-Shorelines/Shoreline-coastal-management/Shoreline-coastal-planning/Shoreline-Management-Act-SMA.


PPB Seeks Public's Input on Directives (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/16/19 10:05 AM
2019-09/3056/127637/Manual.jpg
2019-09/3056/127637/Manual.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3056/127637/thumb_Manual.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau directs member action through the establishment of policy, procedure, and rule, as found within Directives. The Bureau is in the process of reviewing all of its Directives and seeks public comments.

Currently, the Bureau is asking for the community's feedback regarding the following Directive:

2nd Universal Review- 9/16/19 -- 10/16/19
Directive 640.18 Case Management

Community members are encouraged to read these Directives at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/59757 and follow the link at the bottom of the draft to provide comments. This webpage also enables community members to sign up for email notifications when new or revised directives are posted.


###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3056/127637/Manual.jpg

Give More 24! Rally Jumpstarts A Day of Donations (Photo)
Community Foundation for Southwest Washington - 09/16/19 9:56 AM
Miss Washington, Abbie Kondel, grew up in Clark County, Washington.
Miss Washington, Abbie Kondel, grew up in Clark County, Washington.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/3522/127636/thumb_Kondel_Abbie_-_Miss_Washington.jpg

Fun-filled variety show features two Miss America 2020 contestants

Vancouver, Wash., September 13, 2019—Give More 24!, southwest Washington’s largest online giving marathon, is scheduled for Thursday, September 19. The event runs from midnight to midnight and encourages local residents to give something more to local causes at the same time.

The Community Foundation for Southwest Washington organizes the regional event, and will jumpstart the giving day with a Give More 24! Rally at Esther Short Park from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.

This all-ages event is open to the public and offers complimentary coffee and doughnuts to go along with an array of activities revolving around charitable giving.

Give More 24! Ambassadors Abbie Kondel, Miss Washington 2019, and Katelynne Cox, Miss District of Columbia 2019, will join the festivities to share the importance of charitable giving and show how a bit of friendly competition can amplify good causes.

“I know I’ve benefitted from the generosity and care of others, and I think the same goes for everyone,” Cox said. “This is why, whether with money or time, giving back to your community is so important. It helps people and resourceful organizations grow, improving all our lives.”

Both women are from Clark County and will compete on stage this winter for Miss America 2020. Mallory Hagan, spokesperson for the Miss America Organization, explained that women are allowed to join local and state competitions where they live and work.

“While it's not impossible that, in the past, two contestants have competed on the Miss America stage from the same hometown, it is certainly a rarity,” said Hagan. “We are excited to see how Katelynne and Abbie use their individual titles to make a difference, and it’s wonderful that they’re inspiring those from Clark County to do the same by supporting local causes."  

A surprise performance by students from the Journey Theater Arts Group will raise spirits to start the morning. Local dignitaries and business owners from surrounding cities will also compete in a one-of-a-kind doughnut hole eating contest. Attendees can also get competitive during a dance contest and fitness session led by award-winning trainer, Sherri McMillan. The top two contestants, as chosen by the audience and judges, will walk away with Fitbit fitness watches. Attendees also have a shot at other prizes, including Apple AirPods and Apple iPad Minis, through a variety of games and drawings taking place during the event.

Leaders from some of the 170 nonprofits involved in Give More 24! will also be on hand to represent their organizations and encourage giving. A list of the participating nonprofits and details about matching funds and nonprofit prizes can be found at www.givemore24.org. The full listing of more than 40 community events taking place on September 19, and spanning from Portland, Ore. to Longview, Wash., can be found at www.givemore24.org/info/events.

This event would not be possible without the support of a generous group of business sponsors that are listed online. Notable support comes from Presenting Sponsor, Davidson & Associates Insurance representing PEMCO Insurance, and Power Sponsor, Kaiser Permanente. Further financial support is provided by Columbia Bank, as well as invaluable promotion from Media Sponsors like Bicoastal Media (The Peak 98.3 FM, Real Country 93.5 FM, Rocket 107.1 FM), The Columbian and The Daily News.

QUICK FACTS:

  • Who: Anyone can support local causes with a minimum donation of $5
  • What: Give More 24! is a 24-hour, online giving marathon benefitting more than 170 nonprofits
  • When: September 19, 2019 from 12:00 a.m. to 11:59:59 p.m.
  • Where: Donate at home, at work or while on vacation by visiting givemore24.org

About the Community Foundation for Southwest Washington

Established in 1984, the Community Foundation helps southwest Washingtonians build a more vibrant community by inspiring investments in local philanthropy. The Foundation launched Give More 24! with the hope of benefitting the entire nonprofit sector through exciting and accessible giving. Governed by an esteemed volunteer board, the foundation offers benefits and services to donors, nonprofits and the community at large. Learn more at cfsww.org.

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Attached Media Files: Miss Washington, Abbie Kondel, grew up in Clark County, Washington. , Miss District of Columbia, Katelynne Cox, grew up in Clark County, Washington. , A dance class and contest will raise heart rates again this year, and surprise guest are always welcome. Last year, a pack of inflatable dinosaurs from Beaches Restaurant & Bar joined in the fun. , Hundreds of donors and nonprofit employees joined together in Esther Short Park last year to celebrate the start of Give More 24! with games, prizes and entertainment. The morning rally returns this year on Thursday, September 19 from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.

Department of Revenue seeks input on Corporate Activity Tax rules
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 09/16/19 9:49 AM

The Oregon Department of Revenue (DOR) will host a series of meetings across the state over the next three weeks to seek input from business taxpayers and tax preparers about the administrative rules for Oregon’s new Corporate Activity Tax.

Traveling across Oregon, rule writers will sit down to hear the concerns, questions and suggestions of those affected by the rules.

The first of those meetings is planned for 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, September 17, at the Newport Recreation Center in Newport. The full meeting schedule includes stops in Corvallis, Beaverton, Medford, Grants Pass, Eugene, Bend, Redmond, Hermiston, Boardman, Portland and Salem.

“We believe business taxpayers and tax preparers can provide valuable input as we move through the rule-making process,” said Nia Ray, director of the Oregon Department of Revenue. “By touring the state, we hope more of the business community will be able to join the conversation.”

House Bill 3427 created Oregon’s Corporate Activity Tax and grants DOR the responsibility of writing rules to implement it.

The Corporate Activity Tax imposes a $250 tax on the first $1 million of gross receipts after subtractions and 0.57% tax on gross receipts greater than $1 million after subtractions, beginning January 1. It is expected to generate $1 billion a year to boost funding for public schools.

Throughout each meeting on the tour, department representatives will ensure two-way conversations and do their best to answer questions from attendees. They’ll also seek input from attendees to help guide the rule-making process.

Issues expected to be discussed at the series of meetings include:Who must register.

  • When and how businesses register.
  • Who must file and who must pay the tax.
  • Annual returns based on calendar year activity.
  • How commercial activity is defined.
  • Exemptions for charitable organizations.
  • Exclusions for groceries, subcontractors, wholesalers and others.
  • What counts toward the 35% subtraction.
  • How estimated payments will be calculated.
  • When estimated payments are due.

More information about the Corporate Activity Tax, including a list of frequently asked questions, is available on the Department of Revenue’s website.

Those who are unable to attend but want to provide input may email questions or comments to cat.help.dor@oregon.gov.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.


Industry and community leaders join forces with the Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Center to host 'Manufacturing Day' (Photo)
PCC - 09/16/19 9:03 AM
2019-09/40/127634/ByteSized4662_RoboticsTeam-1.jpg
2019-09/40/127634/ByteSized4662_RoboticsTeam-1.jpg
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SCAPPOOSE, Ore. – Regional industry, education, and workforce development partners are collaborating to host “Manufacturing Day” as part of the Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Center (OMIC) initiative in Columbia County.

The second annual event, which is part of the national MFG Day effort, will feature live demonstrations of 3D printing, laser cutting, and virtual welding, as well as engaging hands-on activities. This event provides regional students and community members an opportunity to learn about the world of advanced manufacturing at a world-class R&D facility and will include exhibitor booths for more than 25 local companies and educational institutions, including Mitsubishi Materials, Selway Machine Tool, Silver Eagle Manufacturing and Walter Tools.

“We are going to have the opportunity to share the world of manufacturing with as many as 300 high school students at OMIC R&D,” said Craig Campbell, executive director of OMIC R&D. “It is truly exciting to see the eyes of these bright young minds light up as they see the world of the possible.” 

Manufacturing Day will be open to the public from 3-6 p.m, on Friday, Oct. 4 at the OMIC Research and Development Center (33701 Charles T. Parker Way). Earlier in the day, from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., a steady stream of students from a variety of K-12 partners will visit and partake in the activities.

The event showcases the vision and programs of OMIC, including plans for its workforce training center led by Portland Community College, while regional manufacturing partners will describe their companies’ work and career opportunities. Special guests will include Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici and Oregon State Senator Betsy Johnson.

Manufacturing Day is a community collaboration that is a result of the robust partnerships between OMIC R&D and PCC, and a group of cross-sector community partners. The planning committee includes representatives from St Helens and Scappoose high schools, NW STEM Hub, Northwest Regional Education Service District (NWRESD), Rightline Equipment, Oregon Aero, Rescare, and Northwest Oregon Works.

“PCC is proud to be a sponsor of this year’s event, which shines the light on the manufacturing industry, as well as education and career opportunities in Oregon,” said Andrew Lattanner, PCC’s newly appointed director of the training center. “OMIC will be transformational for Columbia County, and the future training center will provide workers with the classroom and on-the-job learning they need to fill high-demand, good paying jobs.”

The event is free and open to the public. Parking is available on site.

Last year, more than 230 local high school students met with 25 vendors and partners at interactive booths at the OMIC R&D facility.

The presenting sponsor of this year's event is Boeing, and other sponsors include, Madden Industrial Craftsman, Oregon Manufacturing Extension Partnership, Mahr, PCC Foundation, Seco Tools, Rightline, and State Sen. Betsy Johnson. Among the vendors participating in the event include Blount, Daimler, Evraz, Letica, Oregon Aero, Silver Eagle and Sport Copter. 

About OMIC Research and Development:

OMIC R&D is a world-class collaborative environment bringing together industry, higher education and government in partnership to develop new tools, techniques and technologies to address near-term manufacturing challenges through applied research and advanced technical training. For more information, visit www.OMIC.us

About the OMIC Training Center:

Portland Community College is designing a Training Center of Excellence for Advanced Manufacturing to train Oregon's next generation of the workforce. And with industry need for skilled workers at an all-time high, the arrival of the training center – part of the Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Center (OMIC) – is perfectly timed.

The training center will offer PCC a permanent home base in Columbia County. Focused on advanced manufacturing, the center will house such programs as Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) Operation, Machining, Industrial Fabrication and Mechatronics. Working in close collaboration with industry and higher education partners, PCC's training center can help close the skills gap by offering training that combines work-based experience (on-the-job training) with classroom and lab instruction, in an innovative apprenticeship model. Students can complete an apprenticeship program, and/or an associate degree or certificate leading to an advanced degree. Emphasis will be placed on craftsmanship, professionalism, and placing graduates into high-wage, high-demand advanced manufacturing jobs – a sector whose future looks very bright in Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/40/127634/ByteSized4662_RoboticsTeam-1.jpg , 2019-09/40/127634/M80_Millturn-1.jpg

DSL hosting public meeting on Elliott in Portland Sept. 24
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 09/16/19 8:31 AM

NEWS RELEASE – for immediate release

Media Contact:

Ken Armstrong, Communications Manager, 503-881-2623, mstrong@state.or.us">ken.armstrong@state.or.us

Sept. 16, 2019

DSL to host evening public meeting on the Elliott State Research Forest in Portland on Sept. 24

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Department of State Lands will host a public informational meeting in Portland on Tuesday, Sept. 24 for discussions surrounding a possible proposal by Oregon State University to establish a research forest on the Elliott. Oregon State University will join DSL  to share  information about the project.

In December 2018, the State Land Board directed the agency to work collaboratively with Oregon State University’s College of Forestry as it develops a plan for transforming the Elliott State Forest into a world-class research forest. The Land Board anticipates hearing the OSU proposal at its regular meeting in December (Salem).

Meeting date/location:

Tuesday, Sept. 24

5:30 – 7 p.m.

OSU Portland Center, classroom 2047

Located in the Meier & Frank Building (second floor)

555 SW Morrison St., Portland

(Parking nearby in Alder Street Parking Garage)

The meeting will kick off with brief presentations by DSL and by OSU on topics including the history of the Elliott, what a research forest might look like, and the status of the current  planning process. It will also include an opportunity for the public to speak with DSL and OSU representatives.

Click here for the DSL Elliott State Forest web page

Click here for the OSU Elliott State Research Forest web page

Join the Elliott State Research Forest email list! DSL will provide regular updates throughout the planning process to those who sign up for our ESRF mailing list. You must sign up for the ESRF email list separately from other DSL email lists

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Bev Clarno and State Treasurer Tobias Read. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon’s Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit.

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www.oregon.gov/dsl


Reward Offered in Robert Lewis Homicide - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #19-25 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 09/16/19 8:00 AM
2019-09/5183/127590/CS_19-25_Victim_Robert_Lewis.jpg
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The Portland Police Bureau, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to solve the homicide of a Southeast Portland man.

On Wednesday April 24, 2019, at 7:07 p.m., Portland Police East Precinct officers responded to the report of a person injured in a shooting in the area of Southeast 93rd Avenue and Henry Street. Officers and medical personnel arrived and located 34-year-old Robert Lewis IV suffering from traumatic injuries.

Medical personnel determined that Lewis was deceased at the scene. The Oregon State Medical Examiner conducted an autopsy and determined that Lewis died as a result of a gunshot wound.

Officers located evidence of gunfire at the scene but did not locate any suspects in the area.

The Lewis family continues to grieve for the loss of their loved one and is asking for privacy. The family has shared photographs of Lewis to be released in the hopes that someone might have information about his death.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit https://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/support.php

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2019-09/5183/127590/CS_19-25_Victim_Robert_Lewis.jpg

Armed Driver Arrested During Weekly Illegal Street Racer Mission (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/16/19 5:55 AM
2019-09/3056/127631/Magana.png
2019-09/3056/127631/Magana.png
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This weekend, extra resources from North Precinct, the Traffic Division and our Air Support Unit patrolled North and Northeast Portland. These directed patrol were conducted on Saturday and Sunday nights and resulted in 17 traffic stops, 1 illegal firearm recovery and 1 arrest.

Suspect arrested:

- Enrique Magana, 47, unlawful possession of a firearm and possession of a loaded firearm

Three additional yet separate cases of attempting to elude a police officer will be followed up on after reviewing evidence.

The Portland Police Bureau will continue its efforts in educating community members about the dangers of speed racing. This education will be conducted on our social media platforms and through one-on-one conversations with participants. Enforcement action will also continue against individuals who are suspected of committing these types of crimes.

Irresponsible driving practices can have a deadly outcome. There have been 48 Major Crash Team activations and 41 vehicular related fatalities for 2019.

The Portland Police Traffic Division is committed to providing enforcement and raising awareness regarding traffic safety for vehicles, bicyclists and pedestrians. Each year, traffic officers respond to preventable collisions. These collisions can deeply impact those involved, their families and loved ones. Traffic officers' number one priority is to address behaviors of all road users that might lead to a collision, including speed, impairment, distraction and disobeying signals.

The Portland Police Bureau works closely with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work toward reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2019-09/3056/127631/Magana.png , 2019-09/3056/127631/Gun.png

Clark County Sheriff's Office investigates death
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/16/19 2:17 AM

Shortly after 8 pm on the evening of Sept. 15, 2019 deputies from the Clark County Sheriff's Office, as well as other partner agencies, responded to the 19400 block of SE 42nd Circle in Vancouver on a report of a disturbance with a firearm.  Responding Law Enforcment located female and male inside a residence.  The male was deceased.  The death is being investigated by the Clark County Sheriff's Office Major Crimes Unit. 

Names of the involved parties and additional informaiton will be released at a later date.


Sun. 09/15/19
More than Twin Brothers (Photo)
Prof. Firefighters of Clack. Co., IAFF Local 1159 - 09/15/19 7:25 PM
Covey Brothers 2
Covey Brothers 2
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Jacob and Joe Covey are more than twin brothers from the small town of Arlington, OR. Jacob and Joe are two brothers who share a common passion for the fire service. Jacob is a firefighter with the Professional Firefighters of Clackamas County Local 1159 while Joe works for the City of Gresham with Gresham Professional Firefighters Local 1062. Both attended fire school together at Chemeketa Community College and started their careers very close to one another at neighboring agencies. Last year the two brothers ended up responding to the same fire together due to mutual aid agreements with their respective agencies. For the first time in their careers the two brothers fought fire next to each other as brothers in battle. Recently Joe Covey was involved with a dog rescue and made the evening news. Not to be out done, Jacob Covey donned a mustache to match his brother and posed for a picture with a teddy bear. They're both driven to serve their communities but when all is said and done they still enjoy a good laugh. 




Attached Media Files: Covey Brothers 2 , Covey Brothers 1 , Joe Dog Rescue , Jacob Teddy Bear

Victim's Car Tire Shot, Suspect Arrested (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/15/19 5:34 PM
Henry Edwards Jr
Henry Edwards Jr
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Portland Police Officers arrested a suspect after he shot a victim's car tire during a domestic violence incident in the Centennial Neighborhood. Arrested was Henry F. Edwards Jr, 28 (photo).

On Sunday, September 15, 2019 at 2:36 p.m., East Precinct Officers responded to a report of a disturbance involving a male and female in the 3700 block Southeast 166th Place. As they responded they also learned that witnesses heard a sound of a gunshot. When officers arrived, witnesses pointed out a suspect vehicle leaving the scene. Officers stopped the vehicle and arrested the driver, Edwards.

During the investigation, officers determined that during an argument, Edwards fired a gun at the tire of the victim's vehicle, flattening it. They also learned he strangled the victim.

Edwards was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on Domestic Violence charges of Unlawful Use of a Weapon, Coercion, Strangulation (2 counts), Menacing, Unlawful Discharge of a Firearm (city code), Interfering with Making a Police Report, Criminal Mischief in the Second Degree, and Criminal Mischief in the Third Degree.

### PPB ###



Attached Media Files: Henry Edwards Jr

Wrong way driver on Interstate 84 results in two fatalities - Gilliam County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/15/19 5:15 PM
2019-09/1002/127625/20190915_074132.jpg
2019-09/1002/127625/20190915_074132.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127625/thumb_20190915_074132.jpg

On Sunday, September 15, 2019 at approximately 5:44 A.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on I-84 near mile post 119.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Toyota Camry, operated by Josue Amando Lopez-Munoz (29) of Prosser, WA. was traveling westbound in the eastbound lanes.  He struck a eastbound PT Cruiser operated by Anita Dugger (33) of Salem, OR.

Lopez-Munoz sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Dugger sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

A 13 year old male in the PT Cruiser was transported by air ambulance to The Dalles and later by ground to OHSU in Portland.

OSP was assisted by North Gilliam Fire Department, North Gilliam Medics, Life flight, Morrow County Sheriff's Office, Gilliam County DA, Gilliam County ME, Benton County (WA) Sheriff's Office and ODOT.




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127625/20190915_074132.jpg , 2019-09/1002/127625/20190915_074124.jpg

Two vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 228 - Linn County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/15/19 1:00 PM
2019-09/1002/127623/20190915_043752.jpg
2019-09/1002/127623/20190915_043752.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127623/thumb_20190915_043752.jpg

On Sunday, September 15, 2019 at approximately 2:44 A.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 228 near mile post 4.

Preliminary investigation reveals that a 2011 Chevy Silverado, operated by Cody Sanders (33) of Shedd OR, was traveling westbound when he crossed into the eastbound lane and struck a 2002 Honda Civic operated by Jessie Kater (F)(25) of Brownsville, OR. 

Kater sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Sanders and his two juvenile passengers were not injured in the crash.

OSP was assisted by the Linn County Sheriff's Office, Brownsville Fire Department, Lebanon Fire Department, and ODOT 




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127623/20190915_043752.jpg

Motorcyclist dies in crash on Hwy 214 - Marion County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/15/19 9:20 AM
2019-09/1002/127622/20190914_180216.jpg
2019-09/1002/127622/20190914_180216.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-09/1002/127622/thumb_20190914_180216.jpg

On Saturday, September 14, 2019 at approximately 4:46 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 214 near mile post 41.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Harley Davidson motorcycle, operated by Travis Corter (50) of Hillsboro, was eastbound in the westbound lanes passing a car.  He collided with a westbound Chevrolet Volt operated by Massoud Jourabchi (64) of Beaverton.

Corter sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Three of the five occupants of the Chevrolet Volt were transported to Salem Hospital for minor injuries. 

OSP was assisted by Mt. Angel Fire Department, Woodburn Fire Department, Woodburn Ambulance, and ODOT.  




Attached Media Files: 2019-09/1002/127622/20190914_180216.jpg

Sat. 09/14/19
Officer-Involved Shooting in Hillsboro
Hillsboro Police Dept. - 09/14/19 10:28 PM

September 14th, 2019

 OFFICER-INVOLVED SHOOTING IN HILLSBORO

Hillsboro, OR -    At 8:29 p.m. Hillsboro Police Department Officers went to the Extended Stay America at 10665 Northeast Eider Court to investigate suspicious circumstances.  At 9:12 p.m. an officer fired their weapon upon encountering subjects related to the investigation inside of a room at the Hotel.  

One subject related to the investigation was transported to a hospital with minor injuries.  No officers were injured. 

There is no current threat to public safety or road closures.  The investigation is ongoing, and no further information will be released at this time. 

A media staging area has been established at 18643 Northeast Eider Court, the Discount Tire Parking Lot.   

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Attached Media Files: Press Release .pdf