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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Wed. Feb. 8 - 12:02 am
Tue. 02/07/23
Billy Lee Oatney Convicted of Murder for Second Time in the 1996 Death and Sexual Assault of Susi Larsen (Photo)
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 02/07/23 7:43 PM
2023-02/6208/161050/Billy_Oatney.png
2023-02/6208/161050/Billy_Oatney.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/6208/161050/thumb_Billy_Oatney.png

HILLSBORO, Ore . — On Tuesday, February 7, 2023, Billy Lee Oatney, age 60, was convicted of Murder in the First Degree for the 1996 death and sexual assault of Susi Larsen — for the second time. Chief Deputy District Attorney Bracken McKey and Sr. Deputy District Attorney Andrew Freeman prosecuted the case before Judge Beth Roberts. 

The victim, Susi Larsen, age 34, disappeared in August of 1996 after telling friends her plans to meet with Oatney, an acquaintance, about making jewelry for her wedding. Her body was found two weeks later near Champoeg State Park in Marion County.

Oatney was convicted for Larsen’s death in 1998 but was granted a new trial after the Oregon Court of Appeals determined Oatney’s attorney did not provide adequate representation at trial. The trial lasted three weeks. 

Following the verdict, the jury listened to further evidence of Oatney’s history, including his prior conviction of Attempted Murder in the 1980’s, where he slit the throat and stabbed the chest of a service member while serving in the U.S. Navy. Oatney served 12 years and six months of the 22-year sentence for the Attempted Murder and was released from federal supervision just months before the murder of Susi Larsen. 

The jury found that future efforts to rehabilitate Oatney would not be successful and prior sanctions have not deterred his conduct. Judge Beth Roberts used these findings to sentence Oatney to life in prison without the possibility of parole. 

“Mr. Oatney is one of the most dangerous predators our office has prosecuted,” said Chief Deputy District Attorney Bracken McKey. “Ensuring public safety and upholding justice for victims like Susi Larsen to the fullest extent is a top priority in Washington County — and our county is a safer place because of this conviction. Our hearts are with the family and friends of Miss Larsen who had to re-visit this tragic event decades later."

The Washington County District Attorney’s Office would like to thank the Oregon State Police and the many parties involved since the 1996 investigation, including Oregon State Superintendent retiree Travis Hampton, Oregon State Police Detective retiree Eric Altman, Tualatin Police Captain retiree Brad King, Tualatin Police Detective retiree Kevin Winfield, Oregon State Chief Medical Examiner retiree Larry Lewman, Milwaukie Chief of Police Luke Strait and the many scientists, both active and retired, from the Oregon State Police Forensic Laboratory.




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/6208/161050/23-0207_Billy_Lee_Oatney.pdf , 2023-02/6208/161050/Billy_Oatney.png

Portland Fire Battles Blaze in Piedmont Neighborhood (Photo)
Portland Fire & Rescue - 02/07/23 6:31 PM
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2023-02/549/161049/IMG_9337.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/549/161049/thumb_IMG_9337.jpg

Portland Fire Battles Blaze in Piedmont Neighborhood

Portland Fire crews responded to a residential fire in the Piedmont Neighborhood at 5 PM today. Rush hour traffic conditions made for some challenging road conditions to arrive on the scene. 

Upon arrival the first crew indicated there was smoke showing from the residence at the address and the officer took command and directed the crew to go interior and begin an offensive fire attack. Different assignments were given with each arriving rig. An early report from the interior fire attack crew was the fire was extinguished as a table on the inside of the home was on fire and this was addressed. What the interior crew did not know was that the fire had started in the wall and material had dropped from a wall and ignited the table. This fire in the wall was beginning to breach the siding of the house and could be seen by the command staff on the outside of the home. 

Command redirected crews to search the home, get into all levels and evaluate for fire extension, and eliminate power and gas to the structure while redirecting the interior fire attack crews to work on the fire in the wall. The walls were exposed, and all fire was eliminated quickly without the fire extending into the upper floor of the home, saving much of the livable space. 

The fire was determined to be caused by electrical wiring in the walls by the Portland Fire Investigations Unit. There were no injuries reported. Two adults will be displaced. With the time of day calling for many neighbors to be out and investigating the scene, the fire crews were able to interact and even present some safety messaging to the younger children in the neighborhood after the fire was extinguished.

Portland Fire & Rescue would like to remind all those on the road to pull over to the right and make way for emergency vehicles when they are travelling with their lights and sirens on. Stopping in the roadway does not make it any easier for the emergency vehicles to advance themselves to their destination. 

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Attached Media Files: 2023-02/549/161049/IMG_9337.jpg , 2023-02/549/161049/IMG_1044.jpg , 2023-02/549/161049/IMG_9341.jpg , 2023-02/549/161049/IMG_1048.jpg , 2023-02/549/161049/IMG_1047.jpg , 2023-02/549/161049/IMG_0177.JPG

Centennial High School to Host Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony for Newly Renovated Pool
Centennial Sch. Dist. - 02/07/23 5:37 PM

 

MEDIA ADVISORY

 

Centennial High School to Host Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony for Newly Renovated Pool

WHAT:  Centennial School District will host a ribbon-cutting ceremony for Centennial High School’s (CHS) newly and completely renovated pool. The ceremony will celebrate the completion of the pool – part of the CSD 2020 Bond.

WHEN:  Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2023 @ 4:00 p.m.

WHERE:  Centennial High School | 3505 SE 182nd Ave | Gresham, OR 97030

DETAILS: The CHS pool renovation and remodel is a voter-supported project of the CSD $65 million bond approved in May 2020. The Bond is now in its third year and has numerous projects across all schools to benefit all Centennial students and the community.

Centennial School Board directors, District leadership, former centennial students, coaches, and employees will celebrate the event. Centennial School District Superintendent James Owens – a former CHS student-athlete, competitive swimmer, and water polo player – will MC the event.

 

Coverage of the event is open to the media and greatly appreciated.  


Juvenile Arrested for Selling Drugs, Downtown Injury Shooting
Portland Police Bureau - 02/07/23 5:03 PM
On February 5, 2023, at 1:12 p.m., Central Precinct officers were dispatched to the intersection of Southwest 2nd Avenue and Southwest Morrison Street on the reports of shots being fired. Officers arrived to find community members attempting to help a man who was bleeding heavily from what appeared to be a gunshot wound to his leg. Officers and AMR paramedics applied a tourniquet to the wound in an attempt to stem the bleeding. They immediately recognized the initial tourniquet was only partially effective, so they applied a second tourniquet before the victim was transported to a local hospital for treatment.

The shooter had fled the scene before police were called. Officers established a crime scene, recorded witness statements, and collected video evidence from nearby business surveillance cameras. The Enhanced Community Safety Team responded to assume control of the investigation.

On February 6, 2023, officers with Central Precinct's Bicycle Squad observed a male selling narcotics near the intersection of Southwest 4th Avenue and Southwest Washington Street. Officers arrested the suspect for dealing, and upon taking him into custody the officers recognized him from photos and video collected the previous day as the shooter from Southwest 2nd and Southwest Morrison.

The suspect, who identified himself as a 16-year-old juvenile, was booked into the Donald E Long Juvenile Detention Center on several drug charges. The shooting investigation is ongoing. Detectives with ECST anticipate adding additional charges associated to the shooting later this week.

Anyone with information about this incident who has not yet spoken with police is asked to email crimetips@police.portlandoregon.gov and reference case #23-34257.

###PPB###

Visitation Scheduled for Gresham Firefighter Brandon Norbury
City of Gresham - 02/07/23 4:18 PM

GRESHAM, Ore. - The City of Gresham would like to announce that a public viewing for those that wish to pay their respects to Firefighter Brandon Norbury, who passed away last Friday, has been scheduled. The visitation will be on Thursday, February 9 from 3-6 p.m. at Lincoln Memorial Park and Funeral Home located at 11801 Southeast Mount Scott Boulevard, Portland. Firefighter Norbury suffered a cardiac arrest while in the line of duty and was unable to recover despite receiving emergency medical attention. 

The details for the memorial service with honors are still pending. Once the service has been scheduled, we will share that information. 

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Proposal to clarify development standards that apply to outdoor shelters heads to City Council Feb. 8; Public invited to testify in person via Zoom or at City Hall, or in writing via the Map App.
Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability - 02/07/23 3:22 PM

BPS logo and City seal with text The Bureau of Planning & Sustainability

 

NEWS RELEASE

February 7, 2023

CONTACT
Eden Dabbs
Public Information Officer, BPS
503-871-4326
bs@portlandoregon.gov">eden.dabbs@portlandoregon.gov 

 

Proposal to clarify development standards that apply to outdoor shelters heads to City Council Feb. 8 

Public invited to testify in person via Zoom or at City Hall, or in writing via the Map App. 

Portland, Ore. — On Wednesday, Feb. 8 at 2 p.m., the Portland City Council will hear public testimony on a set of technical amendments to refine the original Shelter to Housing Continuum (S2HC) code amendments, which were adopted in 2021 to expand housing and shelter options for individuals and households with extremely low incomes and address the crisis of houseless Portlanders. 

On Nov. 8, 2022, the Planning and Sustainability Commission recommended the Shelter to Housing Continuum Technical Amendments, which clarify the development standards that apply to outdoor shelters permitted by the previously adopted Zoning Code amendments.

Outdoor shelters are facilities run by public and nonprofit entities, where clients have sleeping accommodations in tents, vehicles, or small cabins rather than in buildings. Examples include the Safe Rest Villages and other alternative shelters like Dignity Village or the Kenton Women’s Village.

These key amendments change the setback, height and fence rules that outdoor shelters must meet. They also resolve a technical issue regarding the size of industrially zoned sites that can be used for outdoor shelters. The changes will also give shelter providers the flexibility they need, while ensuring that the general scale and placement of shelters is consistent with abutting properties. 

Community members are invited to testify on the proposal in person at the hearing at City Hall or via Zoom. The public can also testify in writing via the Map App or U.S. Mail. Learn more

Why this matters 

The first Shelter to Housing Continuum package (S2HC), which took effect in 2021, contained four elements:

  1. Code changes to make it easier to site shelters and associated services in various zones.
  2. Implementation of a new community service use in the Zoning Code called “outdoor shelter.” 
  3. Increased housing flexibility by allowing group living configurations more broadly. 
  4. Allows occupancy of a recreational vehicle or a tiny house on wheels on residential property.

But as the City’s Safe Rest Villages Initiative has been siting shelters, and as the Joint Office of Homeless Services (JOHS) continues to operate and open other facilities, several other zoning code barriers and unanticipated technical issues arose. 

This follow-on project was initiated to amend the zoning code to create efficient pathways for shelters to be built and operated without the need for an emergency declaration. 

 Safe Rest Villages and other shelters

Safe Rest Villages (SRV) are a type of outdoor shelter. Three SRVs have been created since S2HC passed in 2021, and several more are in the pipeline. These would not have been possible without the code changes. Neighbors and community members have shown support and enthusiasm for these small gatherings of pod-like structures, organized around communal services, including small kitchens and bathroom facilities. 

In addition, local nonprofits and the JOHS are opening and operating shelters, including St Johns Village58https://us1.campaign-archive.com/?u=dec508ef617d718cf4a8ab515&id=46fce97b58">WeShine Village, and Beacon Village.

While these kinds of facilities can’t solve the houseless problem on their own, they are an important step along the continuum of housing interventions for people experiencing houselessness. 

Learn more about the S2HC Technical Amendments Project 

About the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability

The Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability (BPS) develops creative and practical solutions to enhance Portland’s livability, preserve distinctive places and plan for a resilient future. BPS collaborates with community partners to provide comprehensive land use, neighborhood, district, economic, historic and environmental planning, and urban design; research, policy and technical services to advance green building, energy efficiency and the use of solar and renewable energy, waste prevention, composting and recycling, and a sustainable food system; and policy and actions to address climate change.


Oregon Health Policy Board (OHPB) meets for an educational Webinar February 21, via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 02/07/23 2:46 PM

February 6, 2023

Contacts:

Amy Bacher, acher2@oha.oregon.gov">amy.bacher2@oha.oregon.gov (media inquiries)

Tara Chetock, 971-304-9917, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon Health Policy Board (OHPB) meets for an educational Webinar February 21, via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board

When: February 21, 8:00 am – 9:00 am

Where: Virtual meeting. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line.

To join via Zoom:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1604515490?pwd=L0pYNWlGQ3NGWTlNeXB6V2FRQnJoQT09

+16692545252,,1604515490# US (San Jose)

+16468287666,,1604515490# US (New York)

Meeting ID: 160 451 5490

Passcode: 015530

One tap mobile

Purpose: This education session will reorient the Board to community information exchange (CIE), provide an overview of the House Bill 4150 Legislative report recommendations to support statewide CIE, and discuss connections between CIE and OHA's health equity goal.

CIE is a network of collaborative partners using a multidirectional technology platform to connect people to the services and supports they need.

  • Partners may include human and social service, healthcare, and other organizations.
  • Technology functions must include closed loop referrals, a shared resource directory, and informed consent.

To provide public comment, please submit your request for public comment at least 48 hours prior to the meeting at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/OHPB-Public-Comment

For more information and meeting materials, please visit the OHPB meeting webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/index.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • CART (Communication Access Real-time Translation)
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Tara Chetock at 971-304-9917, 711 TTY, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


UPDATE: Mill Park Neighborhood Homicide Victim Identified (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 02/07/23 2:32 PM
TyzíJuan James
TyzíJuan James
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/3056/160966/thumb_TyzJuan_James.jpg
The victim in this homicide is identified as 20-year-old Tyz’Juan James. The Medical Examiner confirmed the manner and cause of death to be homicide by gunshot wound. James' family has been notified, and they have provided the attached picture for public release.

Photograph: Tyz’Juan James

###PPB###

Original Message Below


A man is deceased after a shooting in the Mill Park Neighborhood, and Homicide Detectives are responding to investigate.

On Saturday, February 4, 2023 at 2:06a.m., East Precinct officers responded to a report of someone shot in a parking lot at Southeast Division Street and Southeast 112th Avenue. Officers arrived and found an adult male victim who was deceased at the scene. The suspect left the scene and no immediate arrests were made.

The Portland Police Homicide Unit is responding to the scene. During the investigation, Southeast Division Street is closed between Southeast 111th Avenue and Southeast 113th Avenue. Also, Southeast 112th Avenue is closed between Southeast Division Street and Southeast Lincoln Street.

If anyone has information about this case please contact Detective Mike Schmerber Michael.Schmerber@police.portlandoregon.gov 503-823-0991 or Detective Erik Kammerer Erik.Kammerer@police.portlandoregon.gov 503-823-0762 and reference case number 23-32058.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. Additional information will be released as appropriate.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: TyzíJuan James

Commission on Aging reports to council 2022 Annual Report
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/07/23 2:23 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Commission on Aging will hold a joint meeting with the Clark County Council and present a summary of its tenth year of work on Wednesday, Feb. 15, at 4:30 p.m. 

The Commission on Aging dedicated its tenth year to the topic of “Innovation through Connection," and the need to connect older adults to resources, information and to each other on a personal level. These connection challenges existed before the pandemic and will continue into the future. At each commission meeting, experts provided insights on innovative outreach/communication strategies used to provide information about programs and services to older residents, families, friends, faith communities and neighbors. 

The Feb. 15 meeting will provide the opportunity for commission members to share with the council and public what they learned. The commission will also outline its 2023 work program, which will focus on community engagement and an update to the Aging Readiness Plan that is currently in progress.

Meetings are currently held in a hybrid format with both in-person and virtual participation options. Attend in the sixth-floor Hearing Room of the Public Service Center, 1300 Franklin St., or join by phone or computer through information provided at: https://clark.wa.gov/community-planning/commission-aging-meetings.

The Commission on Aging, supported by the Clark County Council, is a nine-member volunteer group that implements the Aging Readiness Plan and provides leadership addressing needs of aging community members. For more about the commission, visit www.clark.wa.gov/aging

Commission meetings are carried on CVTV Channel 23/323 and online at www.cvtv.org. To see replay times, go to www.cvtv.org.


February 14-15 Northwest Power & Conservation Council meeting
Northwest Power and Conservation Council - 02/07/23 2:21 PM

The Northwest Power and Conservation Council will hold its Council meeting on February 14-15 by webinar.

See the agenda and how to attend


Common School Fund will send a record $72.2 million to Oregon public schools in 2023
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 02/07/23 1:59 PM

Common School Fund will send a record $72.2 million to Oregon public schools in 2023

Fund that’s supported education since statehood sends highest-ever amount to schools


SALEM, Ore. – Oregon’s K-12 public schools will receive a record $72.2 million from the Common School Fund in 2023, officials announced during today’s State Land Board meeting. 

Every one of Oregon’s 197 public school districts receives money from the Common School Fund every year. How much each district receives depends on the number of students served. In 2023, Portland Public Schools, the state’s largest district, will receive $6.4 million. Lincoln County School District will receive about $675,000. Rogue River School District will receive just over $113,000. See 2023 distributions for all Oregon school districts.

The average 2023 distribution is approximately $367,000. Baker School District, with about 1,700 students, will receive $237,422 in 2023. 

“The Common School Fund is valuable in sustaining all of our efforts across our district,” said Erin Lair, Superintendent of Baker School District, “everything from maintaining facilities to instruction.” 

The Common School Fund has supported Oregon schools since statehood, when the federal government granted our new state nearly 3.4 million acres "for the use of schools." The State Land Board was established to oversee these school lands, which generate revenue for the Fund. 

Now valued at $2.1 billion, the Common School Fund is invested by the State Treasurer and the Oregon Investment Council. The Fund earned an average 4.42 percent rate of return over the three-year period ending in 2022. 

“We’re incredibly pleased with the Common School Fund’s performance in recent years under Treasury’s management. These sustained returns will allow us to send a record-setting amount to Oregon public schools,” said State Treasurer Tobias Read. “We look forward to seeing the positive impact this will have on students across the state, from increased resources in the classroom to facility improvements.”

Annually, 3.5 percent of the Fund is distributed to schools. The 2023 distribution of $72.2 million, the highest-ever distribution, is $8 million more than the 2022 distribution of $64.2 million and $12.1 million more than the 2021 distribution of $60.1 million.

Today, approximately 772,000 acres of school lands are managed by the Department of State Lands on behalf of the Land Board. $1.38 million in net income from school land leases, sales, and other land management activities was added to the Fund in fiscal year 2022. 

“Generation after generation of Oregon students have been supported by school lands,” said DSL Director Vicki Walker. “My grandchildren now benefit from the $2.4 million going to Eugene schools in 2023, just as my children did from past Common School Fund distributions.” 

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Tina Kotek, Secretary of State Shemia Fagan and State Treasurer Tobias Read. Established by the Oregon Constitution in 1859, the Land Board oversees the state’s Common School Fund. The Department of State Lands is the Land Board’s administrative agency, managing the lands and resources that help fund Oregon’s public schools and protecting the state’s waterways and wetlands for the many benefits they provide.

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www.oregon.gov/dsl


Vancouver City Council Affirms Temporary Moratorium on Large Warehouse and Distribution Facilities
City of Vancouver - 02/07/23 1:43 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – During their Feb. 6 meeting following a public hearing, the Vancouver City Council voted on a resolution to affirm their decision on Dec. 12, 2022, to enact a six-month temporary moratorium on large warehouse and distribution facilities in Light Industrial and Heavy Industrial zoning districts.

As part of the action taken, Council approved an amendment to the Resolution to increase the minimum total square footage per project under the moratorium to 250,000 square feet from 100,000 square feet. Council also requested that staff return with an exemption for warehouses supplying storage for traded sector goods, as defined in the Clark County Comprehensive Economic Development Plan, and a bulk storage exemption for the Port of Vancouver on property owned by the Port in Vancouver. 

Because the initial moratorium was approved by ordinance, staff will return to City Council with the above changes in the form of an ordinance. The ordinance will be scheduled for a first reading at the Feb. 27 Council Meeting, to schedule a public hearing on March 6.

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DPSST Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee Meeting Cancelled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/07/23 1:23 PM

PRIVATE SECURITY/INVESTIGATOR POLICY COMMITTEE

MEETING CANCELLED

 

Notice of Meeting Cancellation

The Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training meeting scheduled for February 14th, 2023, at 1:30 p.m. has been cancelled.

The next Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee meeting date will be shared once available.

 


MESD Board Finance Committee meeting 2/9/23 at 1:00 p.m.
Multnomah ESD - 02/07/23 1:17 PM

The Multnomah Education Service District Board Finance Committee will meet at 1:00 p.m. on February 9, 2023. 
This meeting will be held virtually via Zoom.

https://multnomahesd-org.zoom.us/j/84211271609?pwd=a1QzaENVWEhNb0RybFpSTWkxWFQ1Zz09
Passcode: 848133


Los estudiantes del condado de Clatsop deben tener sus vacunas actualizadas
Clatsop County - 02/07/23 1:13 PM

Los padres deben proporcionar a las escuelas y centros de cuidado infantil los registros de vacunas de los niños

7 de febrero de 2023 (Astoria, OR) — El Departamento de Salud Pública del Condado de Clatsop les recuerda a los padres que es posible que los niños no puedan asistir a la escuela o a la guardería el miércoles 15 de febrero si sus registros muestran que le faltan vacunas.

El miércoles 15 de febrero es el Día de la Exclusión Escolar y, según la ley estatal, todos los niños en escuelas públicas y privadas, preescolares, Head Start y centros de cuidado infantil certificados deben tener documentación actualizada sobre sus vacunas o tener una exención.

"La inmunización es la mejor manera de proteger a los niños contra enfermedades prevenibles por vacunación, como la tos ferina y el sarampión", dijo Jiancheng Huang, director del departamento de salud pública. 

Hace apenas unos años, se reportaron varios casos de sarampión en el noroeste, y en el centro de Ohio se acaba de experimentar un brote grave de sarampión con más de 30 niños no vacunados hospitalizados, dijo Stacy de Assis Matthews, coordinadora de derecho escolar de la División de Salud Pública de la Autoridad de Salud de Oregón (OHA).

"También hubo casos recientes de poliomielitis en el estado de Nueva York. No queremos otro brote de enfermedad en Oregón además de COVID-19. Las vacunas son la forma más efectiva de detener la propagación del sarampión y otras enfermedades, para mantener a los niños y las comunidades escolares sanos y seguros", dijo.

Si los registros de vacunación de la escuela y el cuidado infantil de un niño no están actualizados para el 15 de febrero, el niño será enviado a casa si no tiene una exención. En 2022, el condado de Clatsop envió aproximadamente 300 cartas a padres y tutores informándoles que sus hijos necesitaban vacunas para permanecer en la escuela o en la guardería. Este año, se envió aproximadamente el mismo número de cartas de recordatorio.

Los padres que buscan vacunas para sus hijos deben comunicarse con el pediatra de su hijo o con el Departamento de Salud Pública del Condado de Clatsop al 503-325-8500, o comunicarse con 211Info llamando al 211 o visitando 211info.org

Nadie será rechazado por el Departamento de Salud Pública del Condado de Clatsop debido a la incapacidad de pagar las vacunas requeridas. Muchos farmacéuticos pueden inmunizar a niños mayores de 7 años. Los padres pueden comunicarse con la farmacia de su vecindario para obtener más detalles.

Puede encontrar información adicional sobre las vacunas escolares en el sitio web del Programa de Inmunización.

Los datos de vacunación escolar en todo el estado están disponibles en el sitio web de la OHA  , o en el nuevo Panel de Inmunización de la Ley Escolar de OHA  "Queremos asegurarnos de que la gente entienda por qué las vacunas son importantes", dijo Huang. Los enlaces a continuación proporcionan más información.

Las historias personales sobre por qué las personas en Oregón están decidiendo vacunarse se pueden ver visitando las páginas de FacebookTwitter de la OHA  . OHA también invita a las personas a unirse a la conversación y compartir por qué vacunan usando el hashtag #ORVaccinates en las redes sociales.

Como madre, la Dra. Choo habla sobre por qué vacuna a sus hijos: https://youtu.be/aDy7sseKs24

El reverendo Dr. Currie discute si hay razones legítimas para las exenciones religiosas: https://youtu.be/D6XnPm1N4iQ

Escuche cómo las poderosas conversaciones de Sarah cambiaron las opiniones de larga data de su madre sobre las vacunas: https://youtu.be/dPB2sfySwJQ




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/7074/161030/Clatsop_County_School_Students_Must_Have_Immunizations__FINAL_SP.pdf

*Press Conference Invitation to Media Outlets*
Salem Police Department - 02/07/23 1:01 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                  

DATE: February 7, 2023

 

PRESS CONFERENCE INVITATION TO MEDIA OUTLETS

Invitation | Date & Time

The Salem Police Communications Office invites members of the media to a press conference on Wednesday, February 8, at 10:00 a.m. in the station’s first-floor community room, 333 Division ST NE.

The Salem Police Department is preparing for the full deployment of its Body-worn Camera Program this month and is extending an invitation to our news partners to learn more about these devices which are becoming standard equipment for contemporary policing.

On the Panel

Salem Police Chief Trevor Womack will begin the presentation, while a review of the camera program’s implementation and the device selected will be addressed by acting-Deputy Chief Brandon Ditto of the Support Division.

Onsite

Senior Officer Cole Hughes of the Field Operations Division, participant in the vendor selection and testing phase

Duration

Thirty minutes will be allotted for the presentation, as well as an opportunity for questions from the media.

# # #


Al's Garden & Home Launches Gift and Gardentine's Day (Photo)
Als Garden & Home - 02/07/23 12:26 PM
2023-02/7094/161028/328319187_1486050198470665_4813267106863664622_n.jpg
2023-02/7094/161028/328319187_1486050198470665_4813267106863664622_n.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/7094/161028/thumb_328319187_1486050198470665_4813267106863664622_n.jpg

Al’s partners with local businesses to celebrate Valentine's Day.

 

Sherwood, OR (February 7, 2023) – Al’s Garden & Home is celebrating Gift & Gardentine’s Day, Sunday, February 12th, 11:00am – 3:00pm at all four locations.  Need a little help on choosing a sweet for your sweetie, a delight for your dear, a gift for your gardener? Come to Gift & Gardentine’s Day and find the perfect gift for the gardener in your life. Pick up something sweet as well from local bakeries and chocolatiers at all four locations. Wine will be available for tastings and purchase at our Sherwood location. One-stop shopping to impress anyone for Valentine’s Day.

 

Al’s Garden & Home is celebrating their 75th anniversary this year and continues to partner with local businesses such as Sweet Treats by George, Lux Sucré, Sprinkles of Joy, The Bard’s Chocolatier, Puddin’ River Chocolates, and Nana’s Exquisite Confections. “It’s all about bringing together local businesses to celebrate a day of love by spreading the love,” stated Jennifer Harmon, Director of Marketing of Al’s Garden & Home. 

 

ABOUT AL’S GARDEN & HOME

Al's Garden & Home Center, established in Woodburn, Oregon, is family owned-and-operated since 1948. Today, our local garden centers can be found in four locations in Oregon – Woodburn, Sherwood, Gresham, and Wilsonville. Besides offering the highest quality of plants and gardening supplies, we are also committed to providing the best service to our growing community of customers and gardening enthusiasts. For more information and a list of upcoming events, visit als-gardencenter.com. 

 

 

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Attached Media Files: 2023-02/7094/161028/328319187_1486050198470665_4813267106863664622_n.jpg

Oregon Dept. of Forestry gives grants to Forest Grove tree nursery to boost capacity
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 02/07/23 10:27 AM

FOREST GROVE, Ore. – Scholls Valley Native Nursery is one of 10 tree nurseries across the state receiving a total of $4.4 million this year to help them increase their ability to produce badly needed seedlings. The seedlings are needed to help reforest millions of acres deforested in recent years by wildfire, disease and pests. 

The money was given to ODF after passage by the Oregon Legislature in 2021 of House Bill 5006. The bill was a response to the devastating 2020 wildfires which burned a million acres of forest. In the wake of those fires, there was often a shortage of money to reforest and workers to plant seedlings. But a shortage of appropriate seedlings was also a barrier to some landowners looking to reforest. 

ODF Small Forestland Owner Assistance Unit Manager Nate Agalzoff said, “These grants are helping nurseries make strategic investments to increase their ability to grow more seedlings, which will enable them to better support reforestation needs in the future.”

Scholls Valley Native Nursery is getting $367,000.

Nurseries are using the funds to invest in everything from adding irrigation to building new greenhouses and seedbed space as well as storage facilities for storing seedling trees. Funds can also go toward:

  • equipment
  • the cost of collecting or purchasing tree seeds,
  • buying land on which to expand nursery facilities.

“While adding capacity doesn’t ensure nurseries will grow more seedlings specifically for post-wildfire reforestation, it adds overall capacity across the state for whenever seedling demand rises,” said ODF Restoration Program Project Coordinator Astrea Strawn. 

Strawn said funds must be spent before the end of this summer. 

“This makes us optimistic that landowners, especially smaller ones, will have better access to seedlings. When they do, they can promptly reforest after future tree losses to keep Oregon’s working forests working for Oregonians,” she said.

To qualify for a grant, a nursery had to have experience growing high-quality commercial conifer trees for reforestation in Oregon, including Douglas-fir, grand fir, noble fir, western redcedar, ponderosa pine and others.

“The awards were targeted to nurseries which showed interest in helping with future reforestation needs, whether from wildfires or climate change losses,” said Strawn. 

Other nurseries which received funds include:

  • Brooks Tree Farm – Salem in Marion County $540,000
  • Drakes Crossing Nursery – Silverton in Marion County $540,000
  • PRT Growing Services – Cottage Grove and Hubbard $540,000
  • Trillium Gardens – Eugene in Lane County $531,000
  • Weyerhaeuser – Aurora and Turner in the Willamette Valley $500,000
  • Champoeg Nursery – Aurora in Marion County $458,000
  • Lava Nursery, Inc. –  Parkdale in Hood County $458,000
  • The Plantworks, LLC – Cove in Union County $276,000
  • Kintigh Nursery – Springfield in Lane County $238,000

 

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Oregon Dept. of Forestry gives grant to boost capacity at Lava tree nursery in Parkdale
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 02/07/23 10:18 AM

PARKDALE, Ore. – Lava Nursery in Parkdale is one of 10 tree nurseries across the state receiving a total of over $4.4 million this year to help them increase their ability to produce badly needed seedlings. The seedlings are needed to help reforest millions of acres deforested in recent years by wildfire, disease and pests. 

The money was given to ODF after passage by the Oregon Legislature in 2021 of House Bill 5006. The bill was a response to the devastating 2020 wildfires which burned a million acres of forest. In the wake of those fires, there was often a shortage of money to reforest and workers to plant seedlings. But a shortage of appropriate seedlings was also a barrier to some landowners looking to reforest. 

ODF Small Forestland Owner Assistance Unit Manager Nate Agalzoff said, “These grants are helping nurseries make strategic investments to increase their ability to grow more seedlings, which will enable them to better support reforestation needs in the future.”

Lava Nursery received $458,000. 

“The funding will allow Lava Nursery, Inc. to increase seedling production for the small woodland owners, helping them to meet their reforestation needs after forest fires and/or harvest operations,” said Lava’s Assistant Nursery Manager Jeff Snyder. “These funds will also allow for additional freezer storage capability for long-term storage of seedlings to ensure the best quality seedlings are available at the time of planting.”

Nurseries are using the funds to invest in everything from adding irrigation to building new greenhouses and seedbed space as well as storage facilities for storing seedling trees. Funds can also go toward:

  • equipment
  • the cost of collecting or purchasing tree seeds,
  • buying land on which to expand nursery facilities.

“While adding capacity doesn’t ensure nurseries will grow more seedlings specifically for post-wildfire reforestation, it adds overall capacity across the state for whenever seedling demand rises,” said ODF Reforestation Program Project Coordinator Astrea Strawn. 

Stawn said funds must be spent before the end of this summer. 

“This makes us optimistic that landowners, especially smaller ones, will have better access to seedlings. When they do, they can promptly reforest after future tree losses to keep Oregon’s working forests working for Oregonians,” she said.

To qualify for a grant, a nursery had to have experience growing high-quality commercial conifer trees for reforestation in Oregon, including Douglas-fir, grand fir, noble fir, western redcedar, ponderosa pine and others.

“The awards were targeted to nurseries which showed interest in helping with future reforestation needs, whether from wildfires or climate change losses,” said Strawn. 

Nurseries which received funds include:

  • Brooks Tree Farm – Salem in Marion County $540,000
  • Drakes Crossing Nursery – Silverton in Marion County $540,000
  • PRT Growing Services – Cottage Grove and Hubbard $540,000
  • Trillium Gardens – Eugene in Lane County $531,680
  • Weyerhaeuser – Aurora and Turner in the Willamette Valley $500,000
  • Champoeg Nursery – Aurora in Marion County $458,825
  • Scholls Valley Native Nursery – Forest Grove in Washington County $367,695
  • The Plantworks, LLC – Cove in Union County $276,025
  • Kintigh Nursery – Springfield in Lane County $238,301

 

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One Deceased and One Seriously Injured in Vehicle Fire in Hazel Dell
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/07/23 10:08 AM

On 2/7/2023 at approximately 8:13 am, personnel from Clark County Fire District 6 and the Clark County Sheriff’s Office (CCSO) responded to a report of a fully involved vehicle fire in the 8400 Block of NE 8th Avenue. On arrival, emergency personnel found a male outside the vehicle with significant burns. The male was emergently transported to a local trauma hospital by American Medical Response (AMR) personnel. Fire District 6 quickly extinguished the vehicle fire and discovered a deceased person was still inside the vehicle.

CCSO Major Crimes Unit and Clark County Fire Marshall’s Office are investigating. An area resident reported they believed two people were living in the van. At this time there is no information suggesting foul play.  

NE 8th Avenue between NE  82nd Street and NE 86th Street will be closed to traffic as the investigation continues.

The identities of the individuals are not being released at this time.


Clatsop County Students Must Have Immunizations Updated
Clatsop County - 02/07/23 9:44 AM

Parents must provide schools, child care facilities with kids’ vaccine records

Feb. 7, 2023 (Astoria, OR) —Clatsop County Department of Public Health reminds parents that children may not be able to attend school or child care on Wednesday, Feb. 15 if their records show missing immunizations.

Wednesday, February 15 is School Exclusion Day and under state law, all children in public and private schools, preschools, Head Start and certified child care facilities must have up-to-date documentation on their immunizations or have an exemption.

“Immunization is the best way to protect children against vaccine-preventable diseases such as whooping cough and measles,” said Jiancheng Huang, public health department director. 

Just a few years ago, several measles cases were reported in the Northwest, and Central Ohio just experienced a severe measles outbreak with more than 30 unvaccinated children hospitalized, said Stacy de Assis Matthews, school law coordinator at the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Public Health Division.

“There also were recent polio cases in New York state. We don’t want another disease outbreak in Oregon of on top of COVID-19. Immunizations are the most effective way to stop the spread of measles and other diseases, to keep kids and school communities healthy and safe,” she said.

If a child’s school and child care vaccination records are not up to date by Feb. 15, the child will be sent home if they don’t have an exemption. In 2022, Clatsop County sent approximately 300 letters to parents and guardians informing them that their children needed immunizations to stay in school or child care. This year, approximately the same number of reminder letters were mailed.

Parents seeking immunizations for their children should contact their child’s pediatrician or Clatsop County Public Health Dept. at 503-325-8500, or contact 211Info by calling 211 or visiting 211info.org

No one will be turned away from a Clatsop County Public Health Dept. because of the inability to pay for required vaccines. Many pharmacists can immunize children 7 and older. Parents can contact their neighborhood pharmacy for details.

Additional information on school immunizations can be found at the Immunization Program website.

Statewide school vaccination data is available on the OHA website, or at OHA’s new School Law Immunization Dashboard.

“We want to make sure people understand why vaccines are important,” Huang said. Links below provide more information.

Personal stories on why people in Oregon are deciding to vaccinate can be viewed by visiting OHAs Facebook and Twitter pages. OHA also invites people to join the conversation and share why they vaccinate by using the hashtag #ORVaccinates on social media.

As a parent, Dr. Choo talks about why she vaccinates her children: https://youtu.be/aDy7sseKs24

Reverend Dr. Currie discusses whether there are legitimate reasons for religious exemptions: https://youtu.be/D6XnPm1N4iQ

Hear how Sarah’s powerful conversations changed her mom’s long-held views on vaccinations: https://youtu.be/dPB2sfySwJQ

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Attached Media Files: 2023-02/7074/161020/Clatsop_County_School_Students_Must_Have_Immunizations__FINAL.pdf

Van Fire Fatality (Photo)
Clark Co. Fire Dist. 6 - 02/07/23 9:38 AM
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One person is dead and another seriously injured in a morning van fire in Hazel Dell, Washington.

Firefighters from Clark County Fire District 6 were called to the blaze shortly before 8:30 this morning. When they arrived they witnessed an older van parked on 8th avenue—fully involved by fire. District 6 Firefighters quickly doused the van and discovered there was a dead individual inside. An injured man who reportedly escaped the fire was taken to an area hospital for treatment of serious burns.

The Clark County Medical Examiner and Fire Marshal have been called to the scene and are investigating the cause of the fire. 8th avenue between 82nd and 86th streets will be closed to traffic as the investigation continues.




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/810/161019/IMG_5898.JPG , 2023-02/810/161019/IMG_5897.JPG , 2023-02/810/161019/IMG_5896.JPG , 2023-02/810/161019/IMG_5895.JPG

Mid Oregon Free Days Return to the High Desert Museum in February (Photo)
High Desert Museum - 02/07/23 9:30 AM
Visitors at Autzen Otter Exhibit, Photo by Jason Quigley
Visitors at Autzen Otter Exhibit, Photo by Jason Quigley
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BEND, OR — For the first time since winter 2020, Free Family Saturdays return to the High Desert Museum. On Saturday, February 11 and 25, visitors will get free admission to the Museum. 

“After three years, we are excited to throw open our doors for Free Family Saturdays,” said Museum Executive Director Dana Whitelaw, Ph.D. “They have always been highly popular and it’s an amazing day for witnessing the Museum’s educational mission in action.”

Along with free admission, visitors can enjoy a special Daily Schedule filled with numerous interpretive talks. Every hour from 11:00 am – 3:00 pm, there will be a Bird of Prey Encounter in the Bird of Prey Center pavilion. Visitors can meet a nonreleasable raptor in the Museum’s care and learn about their unique adaptations. Visitors can also experience nature encounters in Classroom A throughout the day. 

Visitors on Free Family Saturdays will be able to experience the Museum’s new exhibition, Creations of Spirit. Native artists commissioned for this original exhibition created artwork to be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. It includes acclaimed artists Joe Feddersen (Colville), Kelli Palmer (Wasco, Warm Springs) and H’Klumaiyat Roberta Joy Kirk (Wasco, Warm Springs, Diné). Creations of Spirit is a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of living works of art. highdesertmuseum.org/creations-of-spirit

Other temporary exhibitions include the original effort, Under the Snow. The exhibit, offered in English and Spanish, reveals the hidden world beneath the snow, called the subnivium. In this environment, animals create a matrix of tunnels to survive the winter’s frigid temperatures and hide from the predators that lurk above. The exhibit is filled with animations of animals and immerses the visitor in the winter landscape. Learn more at highdesertmuseum.org/under-the-snow.

And In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo, will be open through June 25. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, the exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the showstopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year. Learn more at highdesertmuseum.org/in-the-arena.

Winter hours are daily from 10:00 am – 4:00 pm. Learn more about all the Museum’s permanent and temporary exhibits at highdesertmuseum.org/exhibitions.

Free Family Saturdays are made possible by Mid Oregon Credit Union.

ABOUT THE MUSEUM:

The HIGH DESERT MUSEUM opened in Bend, Oregon in 1982. It brings together wildlife, cultures, art, history and the natural world to convey the wonder of North America’s High Desert. The Museum is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, is a Smithsonian Affiliate, was the 2019 recipient of the Western Museums Association’s Charles Redd Award for Exhibition Excellence and was a 2021 recipient of the National Medal for Museum and Library Service. To learn more, visit highdesertmuseum.org and follow us on FacebookInstagram and Twitter.

 

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Attached Media Files: Visitors at Autzen Otter Exhibit, Photo by Jason Quigley

Public Meeting to Discuss Brownfield Funds Awarded to Clatsop County
Clatsop County - 02/07/23 9:23 AM

Feb. 7, 2022 (Astoria, OR) — A public meeting to discuss funds awarded to Clatsop County funds by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 2022 is scheduled for 5:30 p.m. Thursday, February 23 in the Guy Boyington Building. 

One of the legacies of the Northwest region’s rich economic past is the challenge of reusing commercial and industrial properties. This grant funds assessment and planning activities related to improving brownfield properties. Brownfield properties are abandoned, idled, or underused because site redevelopment is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination. 

The public is invited to the Brownfield Assessment Program kick-off meeting 5:30 p.m. Thursday, February 23 in the Guy Boyington Building or virtually. This meeting is free and open to the public. 

Attendees will hear from the Columbia Pacific Economic Development District and Stantec Inc, who will provide project management and environmental oversight to Clatsop County. Program goals will be discussed as well as how property owners can benefit from these grant funds. 

“Beyond our County’s economic development and housing goals, we look to use the grant to maintain and improve the natural environment that makes Clatsop County a beautiful area in which to live and visit,” said Monica Steele, Clatsop County assistant county manager.

Individuals with questions about the meeting or the program can contact Sarah Lu Heath at rownfields@nworegon.org">brownfields@nworegon.org 

The Guy Boyington Building is located at 857 Commercial St. in Astoria.

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Attached Media Files: 2023-02/7074/161017/Feb_23_Brownfield_Kickoff_Mtg__FINAL.pdf

Cryptosporidium Monitoring Update: Detections from routine monitoring in the Bull Run. Customers do not need to take any additional precautions at this time.
Portland Water Bureau - 02/07/23 9:10 AM

Since 2017, the Portland Water Bureau has detected Cryptosporidium from routine monitoring of source water. The Portland Water Bureau received results from ongoing monitoring from the Bull Run Watershed intake for Cryptosporidium, a potentially disease-causing microorganism. In the 50 liters sampled each day from Jan. 29 to Feb. 1, three Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in each of the samples collected on Jan. 29, Jan. 30, and Jan. 31. Eight oocysts were detected in the sample collected on Feb. 1. Prior to these detections, Cryptosporidium was last detected from the Bull Run Watershed intake on Jan. 25, 2023.

The Bull Run watershed is Portland’s primary source of drinking water. The Portland Water Bureau does not currently treat for Cryptosporidium, but is required to do so under drinking water regulations. Portland is working to install filtration by September 2027 under a compliance schedule with the Oregon Health Authority. In the meantime, Portland Water Bureau is implementing interim measures such as watershed protection and additional monitoring to protect public health. Consultation with public health officials has concluded that at this time, customers do not need to take any additional precautions. 

Exposure to Cryptosporidium can cause cryptosporidiosis, a serious illness. Symptoms can include diarrhea, vomiting, fever and stomach pain. People with healthy immune systems recover without medical treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people with severely weakened immune systems are at risk for more serious disease. Symptoms may be more severe and could lead to serious or life-threatening illness. Examples of people with weakened immune systems include those with AIDS, those with inherited diseases that affect the immune system, and cancer and transplant patients who are taking certain immunosuppressive drugs.

The Environmental Protection Agency has estimated that a small percentage of the population could experience gastro-intestinal illness from Cryptosporidium and advises that customers who are immunocompromised and receive their drinking water from the Bull Run Watershed consult with their healthcare professional about the safety of drinking the tap water. The Portland Water Bureau and Burlington, City of Gresham, City of Sandy, City of Tualatin, Green Valley, GNR, Hideaway Hills, Lake Grove, Lorna Domestic Water, Lusted, Palatine Hill, Pleasant Home, Raleigh, Rockwood, Skyview Acres, Tualatin Valley, Two Rivers, Valley View and West Slope Water Districts receive all or part of their drinking water supply from Bull Run. To learn if your drinking water comes from Bull Run, please contact your local drinking water provider.

The public and the media are encouraged to view all sampling results posted to the City’s website at portland.gov/water/cryptoresults. The bureau will notify the media and public immediately should further test results indicate a risk to public health and precautions are necessary.

Customers with questions regarding water quality can call the Water Quality Line at 503-823-7525.

About the Portland Water Bureau

The Portland Water Bureau serves water to almost a million people in the Portland area. Portland’s water system includes two great water sources, 53 tanks and reservoirs, and 2,200 miles of pipes. With 600 employees working on everything from water treatment to customer service, the Water Bureau is committed to serving excellent water every minute of every day.




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/1240/161016/MEDIA_RELEASE_Feb_7_2023.docx

Update: Suspect from Tactical Incident Identified (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 02/07/23 9:02 AM
Recovered Handgun
Recovered Handgun
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The suspect in this incident is identified as 32-year-old Levi Jon Lapage. Lapage is charged with Attempting to Elude by Vehicle, Reckless Driving, Attempting to Elude on Foot, Burglary in the First Degree, and two counts of Identity Theft. Lapage also had a valid felony warrant from the Oregon State Parole Board for Identity Theft. Additional charges may be added as the investigation continues.

Inside the car Lapage was driving, officers found a vest with armor plating, a disassembled assault rifle, rifle rounds, a loaded drum style magazine, someone else's work identification and driver's license, and $2,985. A handgun was also recovered during Lapage's arrest.

Anyone with information about this incident who has not yet spoken with police is asked to call the non-emergency number at (503)823-3333 or email crimetips@police.portlandoregon.gov and reference case #23-34540.

Photograph: Evidence from Car
Photograph: Recovered Handgun

###PPB###

Original Message Below


Update:

Officers from the Special Emergency Reaction Team took a suspect into custody after they were located hiding in the attic of a garage. No injuries were reported during this incident.

The suspect's identity will be released after they are booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center.


###PPB###

Original Message:
On 2/6/23 at approximately 5:51 p.m. officers from the East Precinct attempted to perform a traffic stop on a no plated vehicle in the area of Southeast 92nd Avenue and Southeast Stark Street for a traffic violation.

The vehicle fled the stop and was tracked by the Portland Police Air Support Unit as it drove through East Portland, eventually being spiked by officers near the Glisan Street onramp to Interstate 205.

The suspect exited the freeway and bailed on foot from the car near Northeast 122nd Avenue and Northeast Siskiyou Street. The suspect then made entry into a home where it is believed he is barricaded inside. The residents of the home have been evacuated and are not injured. Officers currently have this house surrounded.

Due to the nature of the incident, the Special Emergency Reaction Team (SERT) was activated. Officers from SERT and negotiators from the Crisis Negotiation Team (CNT) are arriving at the scene.

Northeast 122nd Avenue is closed between Northeast Russell Street and Northeast Fremont Street.

More information will be released as this incident develops.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Recovered Handgun , Evidence From Car

Oregon Dept. of Forestry gives grants to five Marion County tree nurseries to boost capacity
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 02/07/23 8:31 AM

SALEM, Ore. – Five  tree nurseries in Marion County are among 10 across the state receiving a total of $4.4 million this year to help them increase their ability to produce badly needed seedlings. The seedlings are needed to help reforest millions of acres deforested in recent years by wildfire, disease and pests. 

The money was given to ODF after passage by the Oregon Legislature in 2021 of House Bill 5006. The bill was a response to the devastating 2020 wildfires which burned a million acres of forest. In the wake of those fires, there was often a shortage of money to reforest and workers to plant seedlings. But a 

ODF Small Forestland Owner Assistance Unit Manager Nate Agalzoff said, “These grants are helping nurseries make strategic investments to increase their ability to grow more seedlings, which will enable them to better support reforestation needs in the future.”

Brooks Tree Farm in Salem $540,000 and Drakes Crossing Nursery in Silverton are each getting $540,000

PRT Growing Services, which has nurseries in Hubbard and Cottage Grove, is also getting $540,000. Weyerhaeuser, which has tree nurseries in Aurora and Turner, is receiving $500,000. Champoeg Nursery in Aurora is getting $458,000. 

Nurseries are using the funds to invest in everything from adding irrigation to building new greenhouses and seedbed space as well as storage facilities for storing seedling trees. Funds can also go toward:

  • equipment
  • the cost of collecting or purchasing tree seeds,
  • buying land on which to expand nursery facilities.

“While adding capacity doesn’t ensure nurseries will grow more seedlings specifically for post-wildfire reforestation, it adds overall capacity across the state for whenever seedling demand rises,” said ODF Reforestation Program Project Coordinator Astrea Strawn.

Strawn said funds must be spent before the end of this summer. 

“This makes us optimistic that landowners, especially smaller ones, will have better access to seedlings. When they do, they can promptly reforest after future tree losses to keep Oregon’s working forests working for Oregonians,” she said.

To qualify for a grant, a nursery had to have experience growing high-quality commercial conifer trees for reforestation in Oregon, including Douglas-fir, grand fir, noble fir, western redcedar, ponderosa pine and others.

“The awards were targeted to nurseries which showed interest in helping with future reforestation needs, whether from wildfires or climate change losses,” said Strawn. 

Other nurseries which received funds include:

  • Trillium Gardens – Eugene in Lane County $531,000
  • Lava Nursery, Inc. – Parkdale in Hood County $458,000
  • Scholls Valley Native Nursery – Forest Grove in Washington County $367,000
  • The Plantworks, LLC – Cove in Union County $276,000
  • Kintigh Nursery – Springfield in Lane County $238,000

# # #


Oregon Dept. of Forestry gives $4.4 million in grants to boost capacity at Oregon tree nurseries
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 02/07/23 8:28 AM

SALEM, Ore. – Ten tree nurseries across the state are receiving over $4.4 million this year to help them increase their ability to produce badly needed seedlings. The seedlings are needed to help reforest millions of acres deforested in recent years by wildfire, disease and pests. 

The money was given to ODF after passage by the Oregon Legislature in 2021 of House Bill 5006. The bill was a response to the devastating 2020 wildfires which burned a million acres of forest. In the wake of those fires, there were many barriers to reforesting, including shortages of money, labor, and for some smaller landowners appropriate tree seedlings. 

ODF Small Forestland Owner Assistance Unit Manager Nate Agalzoff said, “These grants are helping nurseries make strategic investments to increase their ability to grow more seedlings, which will enable them to better support reforestation needs in the future.”

Nurseries are using the funds to invest in everything from adding irrigation to building new greenhouses and seedbed space as well as storage facilities for storing seedling trees. Funds can also go toward:

  • equipment
  • the cost of collecting or purchasing tree seeds,
  • buying land on which to expand nursery facilities.

“These grants are increasing overall capacity across the state for whenever seedling demand rises,” said ODF Reforestation Program Project Coordinator Astrea Strawn. “In the case of nurseries in Union and Hood River counties, the grants also ensure there will be capacity to provide geographically appropriate seedlings for those areas.”

Strawn said funds must be spent before the end of this summer. 

“This makes us optimistic that landowners, especially smaller ones, will have better access to seedlings. When they do, they can promptly reforest after future tree losses to keep Oregon’s working forests working for Oregonians,” she said.

“The funding will allow Lava Nursery, Inc. to increase seedling production for the small woodland owners, helping them to meet their reforestation needs after forest fires and/or harvest operations,” said Lava’s Assistant Nursery Manager Jeff Snyder. “These funds will also allow for additional freezer storage capability for long-term storage of seedlings to ensure the best quality seedlings are available at the time of planting.”

To qualify for a grant, a nursery had to have experience growing high-quality commercial conifer trees for reforestation in Oregon, including Douglas-fir, grand fir, noble fir, western redcedar, ponderosa pine and others.

“The awards were targeted to nurseries which showed interest in helping with future reforestation needs, whether from wildfires or climate change losses,” said Strawn.

Nurseries which received funds include:

  • Brooks Tree Farm – Salem in Marion County $540,000
  • Drakes Crossing Nursery – Silverton in Marion County $540,000
  • PRT Growing Services – Cottage Grove and Hubbard $540,000
  • Trillium Gardens – Eugene in Lane County $531,000
  • Weyerhaeuser – Aurora and Turner in the Willamette Valley $500,000
  • Champoeg Nursery – Aurora in Marion County $458,000
  • Lava Nursery, Inc. – Parkdale in Hood County $458,000
  • Scholls Valley Native Nursery – Forest Grove in Washington County $367,000
  • The Plantworks, LLC – Cove in Union County $276,000
  • Kintigh Nursery – Springfield in Lane County $238,000

# # #


Russian Cryptocurrency Money Launderer Pleads Guilty
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/07/23 8:00 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—On February 6, 2023, a Russian cryptocurrency money launderer previously extradited from the Netherlands to face charges in the District of Oregon pleaded guilty in federal court.

Denis Mihaqlovic Dubnikov, 30, pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering.

According to court documents, between at least August 2018 and August 2021, Dubnikov and his co-conspirators laundered the proceeds of Ryuk ransomware attacks on individuals and organizations throughout the United States and abroad. After receiving ransom payments, Ryuk actors, including Dubnikov and his co-conspirators, and others involved in the scheme engaged in various financial transactions, including international financial transactions, to conceal the nature, source, location, ownership, and control of the ransom proceeds.

Specifically, in July 2019, a United States-based company paid a 250 Bitcoin Ryuk ransom after a ransomware attack. On or about July 11, 2019, in Moscow, Russia, Dubnikov accepted 35 Bitcoin from a co-conspirator in exchange for approximately $400,000. The Bitcoin transferred to Dubnikov were directly sourced from the ransom paid by the American company. Dubnikov converted the Bitcoin to Tether and sent it to a second co-conspirator, who eventually exchanged it for Chinese Renminbi. Dubnikov’s co-conspirators laundered additional Bitcoin sourced from the original ransom payment. Dubnikov was compensated financially for his role in the scheme.

On November 2, 2021, Dubnikov was arrested in Amsterdam pursuant to a provisional arrest warrant. On August 16, 2022, he was extradited to the United States and made his initial appearance in federal court in the District of Oregon the next day.

Conspiracy to commit money laundering is punishable by up to 20 years in federal prison, three years’ supervised release, and a fine of $500,000. Dubnikov will be sentenced on April 11, 2023.

This case was investigated by the FBI and is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon. 

Dubnikov’s extradition was handled by the Justice Department’s Office of International Affairs. He was transferred to the District of Oregon by the FBI.

The Department of Justice thanks Dutch authorities for their assistance in securing the arrest and extradition of Dubnikov.

First identified in August 2018, Ryuk is a type of ransomware software that, when executed on a computer or network, encrypts files and attempts to delete any system backups. Of note, Ryuk can target storage drives contained within or physically connected to a computer, including those accessible remotely via a network connection. Ryuk has been used to target thousands of victims worldwide across a variety of sectors. In October 2020, law enforcement officials specifically identified Ryuk as an imminent and increasing cybercrime threat to hospitals and healthcare providers in the United States.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Mon. 02/06/23
Major Crash Team Responding to Hit and Run Crash in North Portland
Portland Police Bureau - 02/06/23 10:12 PM
On 2/6/23 at approximately 8:41 p.m. officers from the North Precinct responded to North Victory Boulevard underneath Interstate 5 on a report of a pedestrian struck by a vehicle.

Officers arrived and found a pedestrian in critical condition with life threatening injuries. The pedestrian is currently receiving care at an area hospital. The driver in this incident fled the scene prior to police arrival. The Major Crash Team was activated to take over the investigation.

North Victory Blvd between the Interstate 5 overpass and North Interstate Avenue will be closed for several hours as investigators from the Traffic Investigations Unit and Criminalists from the Forensic Evidence Unit process the scene.

If anyone has information about this incident, please e-mail crimetips@police.portlandoregon.gov attention Traffic Investigations Unit and reference case number 23-34659.

###PPB###

Lebanon furniture store is closed while fire crews search for potential fire. (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 02/06/23 8:38 PM
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At 11:27 today Lebanon Fire District responded to a structure fire in the Lebanon Plaza. Initial reports stated there was smoke in the building, and it was being evacuated. Crews arrived on scene with nothing showing. After further investigation, the crews could smell a strong odor of burning material. The Truck company laddered the building to investigate further. The crews shut the power off to all the HVAC units and the odor went away. After an hour of investigating, it was determined that one of the HVAC units was faulty. The Store front was turned back over to occupants. No fire was located, and no damage was done to the building.   




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/1191/161009/IMG_0526.jpg

Woodland Middle School's Drama Department presents 'Giants in the Sky,' the school's first in-person performance since 2020 (Photo)
Woodland Sch. Dist. - 02/06/23 4:30 PM
Ronda Oathes held a
Ronda Oathes held a
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Monday, February 6, 2023-Woodland, WA-Drama students at Woodland Middle School will perform the school’s first play since 2020 in March, ‘Giants in the Sky,’ a musical performance exploring the world of Giants who live above the clouds, with a cast of nearly 40 sixth through eighth graders directed by Ronda Oathes, the school’s drama and English Language Arts teacher and drama club adviser.

During the period of remote learning due to the pandemic, Oathes continued the drama club by having students record their individual parts at home, sending the video to Oathes who would then piece the parts together and release the finished performance as an online production. ‘Giants in the Sky’ will be the Drama Department’s first in-person production since remote learning as well as the school’s first-ever musical performance.

In order to prepare, Oathes held a “pre-audition” where interested students would need to sing a song and perform a small piece of choreography, “I honestly didn’t know if we had enough singers and dancers who would come out to perform,” she said. “It turns out we have some amazing talent, so we put together the real auditions and assembled our cast."

One of the leads in ‘Giants in the Sky,’ Lillia Andrews, an eighth grader, enjoys the social camaraderie that comes with putting together a production. “I really like playing a character and having fun with my friends,” she said. “I prefer musicals because we get to sing and dance as part of their performance.”

The afterschool club offers students whose busy school schedules don’t offer time for them to take drama as a class to still take part and perform. “I didn’t have time in my schedule for Ms. Oathes’ drama class, but I’ve always wanted to perform,” said Jamison Moultrie, a seventh grader. “Being able to participate in the afterschool club means I get to be in a musical, and I love musicals.”

Oathes brought drama classes and the after-school program back to Woodland Middle School in 2018. “I had wanted to offer students the opportunity to put on productions since I first started teaching in Woodland,” she said. “We continue to see increasing interest in the drama program from students with many of those in this production performing for the first time, which is great.”

Oathes teaches students the foundations of performance including improvisation, characterization and how to become comfortable playing a part in front of an audience without laughing or breaking character. “It’s important for kids to get used to speaking and presenting in front of people since these are lifeskills they will use throughout their careers,” she said. “Performing plays provides an alternative to giving speeches and ease into public speaking – students get to add creativity and present characters which can often provide comfort to those nervous about being on-stage.”

Acting and performing can present a big challenge for introverted students who often shy away from speaking in front of large groups. “I balance stage work with in-class assignments so I can reach both introverted and extroverted students,” said Oathes. “We study the history of acting starting with how basic storytelling evolved over time followed by Roman and Greek theater, Shakespearean plays, and continuing all the way to vaudeville and the development of modern performance.”

For Oathes, her greatest satisfaction comes from watching her students develop their newfound talents, “I really love watching the kids come out of their shell and then nailing their performances,” she said. “There’s a lot of pride that comes from watching their confidence grow to the point where they own their performances by adding quirks and mannerisms to their characters.”

How the community’s decades of support of the EP&O levy provides enriching opportunities:

Extracurricular activities including clubs, athletics, and the Woodland Middle School Drama Department are made possible thanks to the Woodland community’s decades of ongoing support through the EP&O Levy. 

The EP&O levy funds all extracurricular activities district-wide, provides technology for students, allows the district to repair and maintain its school facilities, ensures class sizes remain as small as possible, and provides academic opportunities for students at all levels. To learn more about the Replacement EP&O Levy on the ballot for Election Day on February 14 and why levy funds are critical to Woodland’s schools, visit the levy webpage: www.woodlandschools.org/levy

Interested in seeing a Giants in the Sky performance? You can buy tickets online!

The Woodland Middle School Drama Department will perform Giants in the Sky during three showings:

  • Friday, March 3 at 6 p.m.
  • Saturday, March 4 at 2 p.m.
  • Saturday, March 4 at 6 p.m.

Tickets are available for $5.00 per person to any showing and can be purchased online at: https://wa-woodland-lite.intouchreceipting.com/WMSDrama. You can also donate funds toward future drama productions using the same link.

Learn more about how Woodland Public Schools educates our students and serves the community by visiting our dedicated news webpage at www.woodlandschools.org/news/wsd 

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Attached Media Files: Ronda Oathes held a , Lillia Andrews, an eighth grader (far right), enjoys the social camaraderie that comes from performing with friends , Afterschool clubs offer opportunities for students like Jamison Moultrie, a 7th grader, (right) who can't fit drama class into his school schedule , 'Giants in the Sky' is Woodland Middle School's first musical and its first in-person performance since 2020 , 'Giants in the Sky' is Woodland Middle School's first musical and its first in-person performance since 2020

Vancouver Police Accepting Applications for Upcoming Neighbors On Watch Academy
Vancouver Police Dept. - 02/06/23 4:01 PM

Vancouver, WA – The Vancouver Police Department is seeking volunteers to join the mission of making Vancouver the safest urban city in Washington. We are currently accepting applications for our next Neighbors On Watch (NOW) training academy which runs April 20 – May 25. During the 6-week academy, participants will meet once per week and will learn a variety of skills including how to be a good witness, observation skills, CPR and more. Volunteers gain insight and knowledge of crime trends, police priorities, learn from subject matter experts and get to know and work with Vancouver Police Officers. Volunteers must be over 21 years old, live in Vancouver city limits and pass a thorough background investigation. 

NOW volunteers participate in highly visible and non-confrontational patrols throughout the city. Volunteers have assisted with assignments including recovery of stolen vehicles, implementation of the Out of State License Plate Program and responding to callouts to help locate missing people and evidence. Volunteers also assist with a variety of administrative projects that support the Backgrounds, Logistics, Training and Traffic Units. Opportunities include outreach event assistance, delivering inter-office mail, and an array of short-term and long-term projects that suit all skills and physical abilities. 

Applications for NOW Academy #23 are due by March 13, 2023. For information contact Vancouver Police Department Volunteer Coordinator Jordan Macfarlane at: dan.macfarlane@cityofvancouver.us">jordan.macfarlane@cityofvancouver.us.  

To find out more about the Neighbors On Watch program visit: Neighbors On Watch (NOW) Program | City of Vancouver, Washington, USA.

 

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Gresham Police Searching for Missing Endangered Adult (Update: New Photo) (Photo)
Gresham Police Dept - 02/06/23 3:54 PM
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RELEASE DATE:               Feb. 6, 2023
CONTACT PERSON:         On Duty PIO
CASE NUMBER:                 23-05163 

Gresham, Ore.— Gresham Police is asking for the public’s assistance in locating a missing endangered 22-year-old man who needs his medication. Wesley Ash left his home in the 17800 block of NE Davis St. on Sunday, Feb. 5, without his phone, wallet, money, or identification. Wesley went to the Rockwood Library and left at approximately 3:20 p.m. Wesley did not return home. Wesley’s family describe him as intellectually and developmentally disabled.

 

Wesley is described as a White male who is approximately 5-feet and 8-inches tall and weighs 145 pounds. He has light brown hair, and brown eyes. Wesley was last seen wearing a dark blue hooded sweatshirt, black sweatpants, and dark gray shoes.

 

Anyone who knows of Wesley Ash’s whereabouts is asked to call 911 or non-emergency police dispatch at 503.823.3333.

 

#30#




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/1278/160980/23-05163-wesley-ash-missing-endangered_-UPDATE_-.pdf , 2023-02/1278/160980/23-05163-pic1.jpg , 2023-02/1278/160980/23-5163-pic4.jpg

** Update 2/6/23 ** Large Illegal Marijuana Grow Controlled By Cartel Dismantled in Alfalfa (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/06/23 3:45 PM
Living Space
Living Space
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2/6/23 UPDATE 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

On Friday, February 3rd, 2023, the Deschutes County Illicit Marijuana Enforcement Team made an additional arrest in the case of the Alfalfa marijuana grow operated by and affiliated with a foreign Mexican drug cartel. Most laborers found working on the grow site were Mexican nationals and illegally trafficked into the United States to work in the illegal marijuana trade involuntarily. The laborers were found living in primitive wooden structures and dome tents with limited clean water sources and dumping wastewater directly into the soil.  

At the scene, Denise Elaine Johnson, of Bend, Oregon was arrested for illegally manufacturing marijuana plants and cannabinoid products. Ms. Johnson has since pled guilty to the charges in the Deschutes County Circuit Court. 

Detectives identified several additional people involved with this case as suspects.

Robert Dale Scheeler, age 30, of Houston, Texas, was one of the people identified for allegedly being responsible for facilitating the grow location and managing the operation. It was confirmed Mr. Scheeler fled the United States after the Search Warrant was executed on the Alfalfa marijuana grow. A warrant was issued for his arrest after being indicted by a Deschutes County Grand Jury and later failing to appear in court. 

In June of 2022, Mr. Scheeler was detained for this warrant by US Customs and Border Protection Agents when he attempted to re-enter the United States from Mexico through a port of entry in Texas. However, the Harris County Jail refused to house him due to ongoing COVID protocols. Ultimately, he was released into the United States.

DCIME Detectives continued to search for Mr. Scheeler and located him living in a Houston, Texas, RV park. 

On February 3rd, 2023, Robert Nicholas Scheeler was arrested by the Harris County (TX) Sheriff's Office Violent Persons Task Force / Criminal Warrants Section for the outstanding arrest warrant. Mr. Scheeler is currently held at the Harris County (TX) Sherrif's Jail pending his extradition to Deschutes County. An initial appearance will be scheduled once he returns to Oregon and is booked into the Deschutes County Jail. 

Additional arrests are forthcoming.  

The Deschutes County Illegal Marijuana Enforcement (DCIME) program is a partnership between the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, the Bend Police Department, and the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office to address illegal marijuana activity in Deschutes County.

CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:   Sgt. Kent Vander Kamp, 541-550-4869 or kentv@deschutes.org  

###

ORIGINAL PRESS RELEASE 

On Thursday, September 2nd, 2021, Detectives with the Deschutes County Illegal Marijuana Enforcement team concluded a long-term investigation involving a large-scale illicit outdoor marijuana grow near Dodds Rd and Alfalfa Market Rd in the Alfalfa community. 

On September 2nd, 2021, DCIME detectives, with the assistance of the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office SWAT Team, executed a Search Warrant on the 30-acre property and located 49 greenhouses containing 9,227 marijuana plants in various stages of growth. In addition to the plants, 2,800 pounds of processed marijuana were also found. Also concerning, two pistols and an AR-15 rifle was found within the marijuana grow operation.

During the investigation, it was determined that this particular illegal marijuana grow site was operated by and affiliated with a foreign Mexican drug cartel attempting to cultivate illegal marijuana for sale throughout the United States commercially. Most of the laborers found working on the grow site are Mexican nationals and illegally trafficked into the United States to work in the illegal marijuana trade involuntarily. The laborers were found living in primitive wooden structures and dome tents with limited clean water sources and dumping wastewater directly into the soil.  

Approximately twenty-one people were detained and later released by Detectives at the scene. Some laborers fled into the neighboring property and offered no resistance when contacted by detectives. Several suspects, both foreign and domestic, have been identified. One person was arrested at the scene and released with a citation to appear in court. Detectives expect arrests to be forthcoming once additional follow-up investigations are complete. 

The possession of small amounts of marijuana is legal for recreational use in Oregon. However, large, unlicensed marijuana operations remain illegal. Due to these operations being unregulated, they pose dangers to the public and the environment. 

The Alfalfa community and surrounding areas in Deschutes County have been struggling with consistent groundwater sources. Since the beginning of DCIME, investigators have found illegal marijuana grows diverted or stolen significant water from nearby homes, commercial farms, or directly from pumps connected to underground sources in the arid central Oregon high desert. This particular grow site used underground water and maintained a complex watering system that supplied several on-site 15,000-20,000 gallon cisterns. 

Additionally, Illegal marijuana farms, including this one, often use pesticides and insecticides that threaten residential water supplies and endanger the end user. 

Illegal marijuana grow facilities have a very high electrical demand due to the lights, fans, and other equipment used. This grow site used jerry-rigged copper wire, extension cords, and power strips as permanent exterior wiring for processing equipment, lighting, fans, etc. Overloaded electrical wiring has caused fires in other marijuana grow facilities. 

The Deschutes County Illegal Marijuana Enforcement (DCIME) program is a partnership between the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, the Bend Police Department, and the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office to address illegal marijuana activity in Deschutes County.

DCIME Detectives were assisted by the Deschutes County Central Oregon Drug Enforcement team, Bend Police Department, Redmond Police Department, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon State Police, Crook County Sheriff’s Office and the Alfalfa Fire Department, and the US Drug Enforcement Administration with the investigation, eradication, and dismantling of this site. 

CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:   Sgt. Kent Vander Kamp, 541-550-4869 or kentv@deschutes.org  

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full-service organization providing patrol, criminal investigations, corrections, civil and search and rescue. Special operations include a Marine Patrol, K-9 units, and Forest Patrol. Founded in 1916 and today directed by Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 157,000 residents in the unincorporated areas of the county. The agency has 221 authorized and funded personnel, including 175 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

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Attached Media Files: Living Space , Rifle , Bathroom , Section 2 , Section 1

Media opportunity: High school students planting trees to support recovery of the Santiam State Forest after the 2020 Labor Day fires, the work is coordinated by the State Forests Trust of Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 02/06/23 3:31 PM

What: Watch junior and senior high school students from the Career Education Technical Center in Salem plant Douglas-fir seedlings in the Fern Ridge Demonstration Area of the Santiam State Forest.  The tree planting is hosted by the State Forests Trust of Oregon and Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF).

Visuals: See 30-40 students receive hands-on training on how to plant trees.  Then they will plant trees.  Fern Ridge Demonstration Area is an area that was burned during the 2020 Labor Day fires. Students, teachers and forestry experts from ODF and the State Forests Trust will be available for interviews

People on-site available to interview: Several students; and Lorie Wigle, State Forests Trust of Oregon, Wildfire Restoration Fund Project Manager; Kyle Kaupp, ODF Santiam Unit Forester; John Walter, ODF silviculturist; Curtis Fisher, – CTEC Instructor, Residential Construction; David Fox – CTEC Instructor, Business Management; Tim Hoffman, ODF Public Affairs.

When:  Feb. 10; Time: 10 a.m.--noon

Where: Meet at the ODF Lyons Field Office, 22965 N Fork Rd SE, Lyons, OR 97358  (Just off Highway 22)—we will car pool from the office

Please send an RSVP by Feb. 8 so we can plan for safety gear and set up the carpool.  It is recommended that you drive an SUV or other higher clearance vehicle since the last part of the drive will be on gravel/dirt forest roads.  Event is rain or shine with limited shelter on site, you are advised to bring proper clothing including sturdy footwear. Hard hats will be required but no other safety gear.  ODF can provide hard hats.  RSVP to tim.l.hoffman@odf.oregon.gov.   For more information contact: Tim Hoffman, ODF public affairs, (503) 983-3761 (cell phone good for day of also)

Background: Webpages for more information:

State Forests Trust of Oregon

Oregon Department of Forestry : Restoring the Santiam State Forest : Recreation : State of Oregon

Oregon Department of Forestry : State forests : Forest resources : State of Oregon

CTEC – Career Technical Education Center – Salem Keizer Public Schools (salkeiz.k12.or.us)

 

Fast facts background:

  • The Department of Forestry will have planted over 3 million seedlings by the end of this season helping to restore the Santiam State Forest. 
  • State Forests Trust of Oregon is a non-profit organization that supports recreation and learning on state forests.  
  • After the devastating 2020 Labor Day fires, the Trust established a fund to restore recreation areas and promote education about wildfire.
  • The Fern Ridge project offers a future opportunity for education and interpretation on forest management practices. 
  • The State Forests Trust of Oregon has numerous supporters who have a strong connection to the forest and restoration because family members were engaged in replanting after the Tillamook Burn. We want to create similar opportunities on the Santiam State Forest.

 

For awareness--agenda for the day (of course news media can leave anytime):

10:00                    Meet in parking lot of ODF Lyons office.

10-10:30              Carpool to site

10:30-11              Orientation & information session for students and donors

11-11:15              Planting training 

11:15-12:30        Planting – participants

12:30-12:35        Group photo

12:35-1                Lunch 

1-1:30                  Return to ODF Lyons parking lot


Deputies Seeking Information in Armed Robbery (Photo)
Hood River Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/06/23 3:19 PM
Robbery Suspect
Robbery Suspect
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HOOD RIVER, Ore. - On Friday, February 3, 2023 at 6:05 p.m., deputies were dispatched to Marco Sports in the 1000 block of Highway 281 on the report of an armed robbery that had just occurred.  Witnesses reported that a male subject had entered the business brandishing a handgun, ordering patrons and employees to the ground in fluent Spanish.  The suspect left on foot southbound with cash that he had stolen from the business.  No one was injured in the robbery.

The suspect is described as a tall, large, Latino male, over 200 pounds, in his 20’s or 30’s, who spoke Spanish in a deep voice, with what witnesses believed may have been an accent from the State of Jalisco.  He was wearing a black Nike hoodie pulled tightly around his face with a black and white bandana, black Nike pants, and black and white Nike shoes. 

The Sheriff’s Office is asking that anyone with information in this case contact the Hood River County Sheriff’s Office Tip Line at 541 387-7077.




Attached Media Files: Robbery Suspect

Regional SkillsUSA Welding Competition Hosted by Kelso High School on February 8
Kelso Sch. Dist. - 02/06/23 2:21 PM

High demand. Skills gap. Critical need. These are just a few terms that describe the outlook of the welding workforce. With an average of 84,000 welding job openings each year, the American Welding Society projects we’ll need 336,000 new welding professionals by 2026. An increased focus on CTE (career and technical education) courses with pathways to the trades by area schools, like Kelso High School, aims to help.

Kelso High School is hosting the regional SkillsUSA Welding competition on Wednesday, February 8, from 2:00 pm to 6:00 pm. Thirty-five students from eleven high schools will compete for a chance to move onto the state welding competition. Welding contestants will participate in a variety of timed activities designed to test their skills. Competition activities include a written test, measuring gauges, oxy-fuel and plasma arc cutting processes, flux core arc welding, gas metal arc welding, gas tungsten arc welding, and shielded metal arc welding. 

Industry experts will judge the competition and hand out medals for state-bound winners. Field reps will also be onsite to meet with student competitors during wait times. This is an opportunity for students to hear firsthand about future employment opportunities in the skilled and technical welding industry. 

Regional SkillsUSA Welding Competition
Wednesday, February 8, 2023
Kelso High School Welding Area
Competition: 2:00 – 5:00 pm, Awards 5:30 – 6:00 pm 

 

PARTICIPATING SCHOOLS

  • Battle Ground High School 
  • Centralia High School
  • Evergreen High School 
  • Fort Vancouver High School 
  • Ilwaco High School
  • Kalama High School
  • Kelso High School 
  • Napavine School District 
  • Prairie High School 
  • Washougal High School 
  • White Salmon High School

 

JUDGES

  • Dan Brown - Central Welding 
  • Jeff Erskine - United Association Local 26 
  • Paul Helenberg - Mayor of Castle Rock and retired pipe fitter
  • Tony Howard - Hoffman Construction
  • Cody Jones - JH Kelly
  • CJ Murray - Air Gas
  • David Pittsley - Lower Columbia College
  • Camaron Wilkenson - United Association Local 26 

 

INDUSTRY SPONSORS

  • Air Gas
  • Central Welding
  • CK Worldwide
  • Hoffman Construction Company
  • JH Kelly
  • United Association Local 26 
  • Washington Way Market
  • Weld.com

 

Kelso School District has a long-standing tradition of excellence in education.  The CTE program offers approximately 70 on-site courses and 7 off-campus courses in partnership with industry leaders. Students can earn dual credit in 31 CTE courses. In the area of welding, the district offers the opportunity to earn five welding certifications. Kelso School District’s mission is to prepare every student for living, learning, and achieving success as a citizen of our changing world.


Clark County Medical Examiner's Office - MEDIA RELEASE
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/06/23 2:03 PM

Clark County Medical Examiner’s Office - MEDIA RELEASE      

The following information is in reference to a death investigated 

by the Clark County Medical Examiner’s Office.

 

This individual died on 1/27/2023 in Vancouver, WA

The name of the decedent: Hudyma, Roger      Age: 58 Yrs            

The decedent was a resident of (city/state):  Unknown  

 

The opinions listed on the death certificate are as follows:

Cause of death:  Blunt and sharp force head injuries 

Manner of death:  Homicide

How the injury occurred:  Injured by other person(s) 

Other significant conditions:  Severe coronary artery atherosclerosis; methamphetamine use  

Place of injury:  Motel room       

Reports and records of autopsies or postmortems shall be confidential as per RCW 68.50.105. No additional information is available for release from the Medical Examiner’s Office. Refer all other inquiries to the Clark County Sheriff’s Office. 

 

Media release issue date: Prepared 02/06/2023

Doreen Gunderson 

Operations Manager  


PPB Officer Invited to State of the Union Address (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 02/06/23 1:34 PM
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Rep. Lori Chavez-DeRemer (OR-05) has announced that she has invited Portland Police Officer Jordan Zaitz to attend the State of the Union Address as her guest. Officer Zaitz is a 19-year-veteran of PPB and currently works as a Neighborhood Response Team officer at East Precinct. In her role, she has had a tremendous impact on the community of East Precinct and was honored with PPB's Mark Zylawy Distinguished Service Medal late last year.

"It was great news to hear that Officer Zaitz had been selected for this honor," said Chief Chuck Lovell. "Officer Zaitz is a hardworking and distinguished officer who works daily to give the best customer service to everyone she encounters, regardless of who they are or how she contacts them. She shows compassion and care for victims, suspects and community members."

"Officer Jordan Zaitz embodies all of the qualities of a true community policing officer," said East Precinct Commander Erica Hurley. "She truly cares about the Portland Police Bureau, her fellow officers and the community she serves. I am honored and blessed to have her working at East Precinct."

A few years ago, Zaitz and the PPB filmed a ride-along video, which focuses on her responsibilities and experiences: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKpkUXaOegU

The announcement by Rep Chavez-DeRemer can be found here: https://chavez-deremer.house.gov/media/press-releases/portland-police-officer-jordan-zaitz-attend-sotu-chavez-deremers-guest


Photo Description: Portrait of Officer Jordan Zaitz

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2023-02/3056/160998/Officer_Zaitz.jpg

One arrested in two separate attempted carjacking incidents
Salem Police Department - 02/06/23 1:30 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                  

DATE: February 6, 2023

 

One arrested in two separate attempted carjacking incidents 

Salem, Ore. — Salem Police patrol officers today arrested a man involved in two separate incidents of assault and unlawful entry into a car.

At approximately 12:30 a.m., patrol officers responded to the report of a stabbing that occurred in the parking lot of the Mega Foods Store located at 3695 Devonshire AV NE. A person parked in the lot was approached by a man who opened the driver’s door and began stabbing the driver repeatedly. The driver fought back and was ultimately able to start his car and leave the area to get assistance. The victim, who received non-life-threatening injuries, was able to provide officers with a description of the suspect.

Then, just before 2:00 a.m., patrol officers were called to the parking lot of the Walmart Superstore at 3025 Lancaster DR NE on the report of a man attempting to enter a vehicle. The owners of the car were parked at an electric charging station in the store’s lot when the incident occurred. They immediately called police. While officers were on the scene speaking with the victims, one officer noted a man nearby who fit the description of the suspect in both incidents.

The suspect, Roberto Carlos Chacon, initially gave false information about his identity but was subsequently arrested without incident. The 34-year-old Chacon was also in possession of a knife when officers took him into custody.

Chacon is currently lodged at the Marion County Jail on second-degree assault, two counts of unlawful entry into a vehicle, and other related charges.

# # #


MESD Board Policy Committee meeting 2/7 at 12:00 p.m.
Multnomah ESD - 02/06/23 12:53 PM

The Multnomah Education Service District Board Policy Committee will meet at 12:00 p.m. on February 7, 2023. 
This meeting will be held virtually via Zoom.

https://multnomahesd-org.zoom.us/j/82423662803?pwd=NVdiZzdlSWltOWgxOVpWYzdpQ0ZCdz09
 Passcode: 169762
 


$1 Million Powerball Ticket Sold in Beaverton as Jackpot Reaches $747 Million (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 02/06/23 12:23 PM
A player chooses their Powerball numbers
A player chooses their Powerball numbers
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Salem, Ore. –  Oregon is home to another $1 million Powerball winner thanks to a ticket purchased in Beaverton on February 4, 2023. A $100,000 winner was also purchased in Cottage Grove on February 3, 2023. The Powerball jackpot is an estimated $747 million for tonight’s drawing, making it the fifth-largest Powerball jackpot in history.

Since the Powerball jackpot run up began on November 21, 2022, the Oregon Lottery has sold about $15 million in tickets. Approximately a third of those sales will be returned to state beneficiaries to support economic development, education, veteran services, state parks and more. 

Retailers who sell lottery tickets also earn commissions from the boost in ticket sales and bonus payments for lower tier wins. In this case, the retailer who sold the $1 million ticket earned a $10,000 bonus. 

Powerball is a multi-state jackpot operated by 44 states, plus the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. The largest prize won in Oregon was a $340 million jackpot in 2005. 

The Oregon Lottery recommends that you always sign the back of your ticket to ensure you can claim your prize. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Players have a year to claim their prize. 

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $15 billion for economic development, public education, outdoor school, state parks, veteran services, and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org




Attached Media Files: A player chooses their Powerball numbers

Sandy Police Investigating Custodial Interference (Photo)
Sandy Police Dept. - 02/06/23 12:02 PM
Missing poster
Missing poster
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Sandy Police received a report on January 3rd, 2023 that 5 year old Christopher Park and his mother, Alyssa Dentler O’Donnell, had been missing since the end of October 2022. Ms. O’Donnell and Christopher Park’s father are not together and had shared custody of Christopher at the time of their disappearance. Sandy Police have been investigating the disappearance of Christopher Park and Alyssa O’Donnell since the report was made and have received assistance from federal partner agencies in our investigation. We believe at this time that Christopher is with his mother. Alyssa’s vehicle was last seen heading East on US 60 in Panhandle, Texas in early November. Alyssa and Christopher have both been entered into national law enforcement databases as missing persons.  




Attached Media Files: Missing poster

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity, Health Equity, and Governance Frame Working subcommittees meet via Zoom February 13
Oregon Health Authority - 02/06/23 11:30 AM

February 6, 2023

Media contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity, Health Equity, and Governance Frame Working subcommittees meet via Zoom February 13

What: A combined Zoom meeting for the Oregon Cannabis Commission’s Patient Equity, Health Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees.

Agenda: The full agenda will be available at iscommissionhttps://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/CHRONICDISEASE/MEDICALMARIJUANAPROGRAM/Pages/Cannabis-Commission.aspx?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery">www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

When: Monday, Feb. 13, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: Zoom Meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 160 376 6913 Passcode: 697004

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission provides advice to Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission regarding Oregon Administrative Rules that govern medical cannabis as well as retail cannabis as it pertains to patients and caregivers.  Additionally, the commission is tasked with developing a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain a therapeutic and affordable option for patients and monitoring federal laws, regulations, and policies regarding cannabis.

Visit iscommissionhttps://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/CHRONICDISEASE/MEDICALMARIJUANAPROGRAM/Pages/Cannabis-Commission.aspx?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery">www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or .lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us">megan.r.lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Dr. Bennings attending 2023 State of the Union as Congresswoman Bonamici's guest (Photo)
PCC - 02/06/23 10:54 AM
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WASHINGTON D.C. – Today Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici announced that Portland Community College President Dr. Adrien Bennings will join her at the State of the Union on Tuesday.

Bonamici, a community college graduate and senior member of the House Education and Workforce Committee, has long partnered with PCC to increase access to higher education and expand career pathways. She successfully worked with Dr. Bennings to secure $910,000 of Community Project Funding for PCC’s semiconductor and advanced manufacturing workforce pathway, which will make it possible for more students to get high quality jobs in these critical fields. The funding will be used to support students through tuition scholarships, equipment, and basic needs support, as well as for the professional development of educators and faculty.

“I’m thrilled that Dr. Adrien Bennings will be my guest at the State of the Union,” said Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici. “Community colleges play an essential role in our communities, and open doors to new opportunities for individuals and families. I would not be where I am today without my time at Lane Community College, and I am grateful for Dr. Bennings’ commitment to making higher education more accessible and equitable. We have a remarkable opportunity to leverage the power of community colleges during the implementation of the CHIPS and Science Act, and I am glad to support PCC’s work to help more Oregonians access quality jobs in the semiconductor and advanced manufacturing fields. I look forward to continuing to work closely together on this effort, as well as to make higher education more accessible, address student hunger, and more.”

Dr. Bennings has served as the President of PCC since the summer of 2022, and is PCC’s first permanent female president in its history. She has taught courses in human resources development, academic development and retention, and small business development. Dr. Bennings has held progressively higher-level positions in higher education for more than 15 years. She will attend the State of the Union in person.

“I would like to thank Congresswoman Bonamici for this opportunity to be her guest for President Biden’s State of the Union Address and her tireless support for community colleges,” said Dr. Adrien Bennings, PCC president. “I’m thrilled at the opportunity to highlight the great work and collaboration that institutions like PCC provide to people from all backgrounds. Her leadership and work have enabled us to increase partnerships and expand outreach, support and training on many issues, including advanced manufacturing workforce development.”

 

About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to more than 50,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. PCC has four comprehensive campuses, 10 education centers or areas served, and approximately 200 community locations in the Portland metropolitan area. The PCC district encompasses a 1,500-square-mile area in northwest Oregon and offers two-year degrees, one-year certificate programs, short-term training, alternative education, pre-college courses and life-long learning.


Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/40/160986/Dr.-Adrien-Bennings-scaled.jpg

State Interoperability Executive Council
State of Oregon - 02/06/23 10:46 AM

The State Interoperability Executive Council (SIEC) will meet Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2023, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. The meeting will take place virtually via Microsoft Teams. A call-in option is also available. The meeting is open to the public and comments will be taken from those in attendance or who call in. 

The agenda and handouts are posted on the council’s website. Instructions for those who wish to attend over the phone are outlined in the meeting agenda.

What: State Interoperability Executive Council  

When: Tuesday, Feb. 14, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.

Where: Via Teleconference:

Microsoft Teams Link

Audio Call In: 503-446-4951 Pin: 486203846#

Who: Members of the State Interoperability Executive Council 

The SIEC was created under the State Chief Information Officer to be the statewide interoperability governing body and to serve as the primary steering group for the Oregon Statewide Interoperability Communications Plan (SCIP). The SIEC’s mission is to develop and maintain the SCIP, develop recommendations and guidelines for policy, identify technology and standards, and coordinate intergovernmental resources to facilitate statewide public safety communications interoperability.

REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION OF DISABILITIES – Reasonable accommodations, such as assistive hearing devices, sign language interpreters and materials in large print or audiotape, will be provided as needed. In order to ensure availability, please contact William Chapman at Enterprise Information Services at telephone 971-283-4607, or email SWIC.OR@das.oregon.gov at least 72 hours prior to the meeting with your request.


$1 Million Settlement Reached for Linfield University Professor Fired for Whistleblowing (Photo)
Anderson Strategic Communications - 02/06/23 10:13 AM
Prof. Pollack-Pelzner photo
Prof. Pollack-Pelzner photo
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Portland, OR: As Linfield University students return to classes today for the Spring semester, a million-dollar settlement agreement between fired Professor Daniel Pollack-Pelzner and Linfield University has been announced.  Tenured English professor Dr. Pollack-Pelzner filed the initial lawsuit against Linfield in July 2021 for unlawful whistleblower retaliation. Linfield had abruptly terminated Pollack-Pelzer’s employment in April of that year, after he repeatedly called upon university leadership to address reports by students and faculty of sexual harassment by university trustees and the president.

The termination touched off a national and international outcry from the academic community, including Linfield students and faculty. The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) undertook its own investigation into Pollack-Pelzner’s firing, citing issues of “academic freedom and due process” as serious concerns meriting closer examination. In April 2022, AAUP released a full report admonishing Linfield for its retaliatory termination of Pollack-Pelzner in violation of generally-accepted principles of academic freedom. Shortly after, the AAUP added Linfield University to its list of officially censured administrations—the AAUP’s first censure of any University from Oregon. (full investigative report here: https://www.aaup.org/report/academic-freedom-and-tenure-linfield-university-oregon)

The AAUP report found that, by taking leaders at the highest level at the university to task for disregarding their obligation to address serious safety issues on campus, Dr. Pollack-Pelzner was fulfilling his responsibilities as the faculty’s elected representative to the board of trustees, and his speech and conduct were protected by principles of academic freedom. Instead of taking meaningful action to address reports of harassment by trustees and the president, Linfield attempted to silence Pollack-Pelzner and, when he persisted, fired him without notice or a hearing--both preconditions for the dismissal of tenured faculty.

In the wake of Pollack-Pelzner’s retaliatory firing, several colleagues at Linfield stepped down from their roles in connection with the University as a sign of solidarity, including longtime Linfield Board of Trustee member and donor, Ronni Lacroute, Director of Linfield’s Center for Wine Education, Gregory Jones, and Anthropology and Sociology Professor Jeffrey Peterson.

Now a visiting scholar at Portland State University and scholar-in-residence at the Portland Shakespeare Project, Dr. Pollack-Pelzner is relieved to put this challenging legal dispute behind him and hopeful that his advocacy has had a positive impact.

"Everyone should be able to work and study without fear of discrimination or harassment, and everyone should be able to report their safety concerns without fear of retaliation,” Dr. Pollack Pelzner reflected. “I’m grateful for the many students, alumni, and colleagues who joined me in demanding change and refused to be silenced when Linfield failed to uphold these essential principles."

The non-confidential settlement releases Linfield University from any further legal action from Dr. Pollack-Pelzner, but does not bar him from talking about his case or the agreement reached.

"We are so proud of Dr. Pollack-Pelzner’s unwavering courage to speak truth to power and to advocate for meaningful change on behalf of his students and fellow professors at Linfield,” noted Pollack-Pelzner’s attorney Dana Sullivan,  “Ultimately, we hope his case sends a clear message that sexual harassment must not be tolerated on any campus and that institutions that seek to silence whistleblowers will be held to account."

Lawsuit specific info contact: lead attorney Dana Sullivan, Buchanan Angeli Altschul & Sullivan LLP, office: (503) 974-5023, email: dana@baaslaw.com
 




Attached Media Files: Prof. Pollack-Pelzner photo

Re-Imagined Radio celebrates the story of the Interstate Bridge
WSU Vancouver - 02/06/23 9:00 AM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Re-Imagined Radio will pay tribute to the 106-year-old Interstate Bridge in February with an episode titled “A Mighty Span.” The episode premiers Feb. 20 at 1 p.m. on KXRW-FM, Vancouver, and KXRY-FM, Portland. Subsequent broadcasts and streams will be provided by local, regional and international broadcast partners. 

The bridge—the first to connect Portland, Ore., and Vancouver, Wash., across the Columbia River—opened on Feb. 14, 1917. The episode is a dramatized live radio news report based on historical documents and other resources regarding the lift span of the bridge. Through speeches and other sounds, listeners will be able to put themselves at the bridge the day of its opening and experience some of its spectacle and pride.

The episode was written by John Barber, faculty member of the Washington State University Vancouver Creative Media and Digital Culture Program and founder of Re-Imagined Radio. “Because radio technology did not exist here at the time, the radio broadcast regarding the opening of the bridge is constructed from other historical artifacts," Barber said. To provide context, this episode explores early examples of radio news programs, including two of renown that produced dramatizations of historical news events: “The March of Time” and “You Are There.”

Re-imagined Radio premieres episodes on the third Monday of the month on KXRW-FM. In addition, every Sunday, an episode of Re-Imagined Radio is broadcast on KXRW, drawing from previously broadcast episodes. Episodes can be streamed on demand from the Re-Imagined Radio website, www.reimaginedradio.net.

Community Partners

Re-Imagined Radio draws on community voice actors, Foley artists, musicians, sound artists and engineers. Partners include KXRW-FM, KXRY-FM, Marc Rose and Holly Slocum Design

About Re-Imagined Radio

Re-Imagined Radio was begun by Barber in 2013 to celebrate radio storytelling. “We select, produce and perform classic and contemporary stories across a spectrum of radio genres, from dramas to comedies, from oral to aural histories, from documentaries to fictions, from soundscapes to sonic journeys, from radio to sound art,” Barber said. 

About WSU Vancouver

WSU Vancouver is in the homeland of Chinookan and Taidnapam peoples and the Cowlitz Indian Tribe. As one of six campuses of the WSU system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

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Sherman County Sheriff's Office Identifies Human Remains from 1989 with Othram DNA Lab and the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 02/06/23 8:14 AM
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On March 26, 1989, the remains of a skeletonized human body were discovered by a rafting group on the Sherman County side of the John Day River. On March 27, 1989, then-Sheriff Gerald Lohrey and additional Sherman County Sheriff’s Office deputies launched a jet boat at Cottonwood Bridge, approximately 13 miles east of Wasco, and recovered the incomplete skeletal remains. In addition to many long bones that had been half-buried in silt on the riverbank, a skull was collected with dental work.  

The discovery of the body made local headlines, but nothing was immediately known about the deceased. The remains were transported to the Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office (SMEO) for examination. 

An examination of the body determined that the decedent was most likely a Caucasian male, between 40 and 50 years of age at the time of death, and around 5’6” to 5’9” in living stature. Evidence of compressed lumbar vertebrae by the forensic anthropologist indicated possible arthritic changes in the bone. It was noted that several teeth in the mandible exhibited restorations. Additional searches of the area were performed on March 28 and April 8, 1989; both searches yielded additional small bones and several teeth.

Leads on the possible identification of this individual were received by the Sheriff’s Office in the following days and weeks; numerous reporting parties indicated they believed the remains to be that of David West, Jr., a man who had disappeared from Sherman County trying to cross the John Day River during a large flooding event in 1964. Mr. West, Jr. had lived on a ranch near Bridge Creek and was known to cross the John Day often. He normally went back and forth across the river to feed cattle. He and a friend had even built a makeshift cable car across the river to assist in quickly navigating the waters back and forth over the John Day. The day the John Day River flooded in 1964, Mr. West was thought to be feeding cattle near Ashwood, Oregon. A friend went to check on him and saw that the cable car had been washed away, the large tree that had held the cable was uprooted, and Mr. West’s dog was injured and agitated on the bank of the river. David West Jr. was never seen or heard from again.

In 1989, Mr. West’s dentist was consulted, but no conclusive identification was ever made.  

The remains were retained by the SMEO. In 2010, the SMEO submitted a bone sample to the University of North Texas Center for Human Identification. The sample was processed and yielded a forensic DNA profile for comparison and upload into CODIS. Unfortunately, no genetic associations to missing persons or family reference standards in the CODIS database were established.

In April 2022, the SMEO recognized the effectiveness of investigative genetic genealogy on cold unidentified remains cases and submitted an additional bone sample to Othram, a private DNA lab specializing in advanced forensic DNA testing. Othram uses an in-house whole genome sequencing technique that can provide genetic information and possible familial associations even with a low-yield sample. The analysis revealed the name of two biological relatives of David West Jr. as being genetically associated with the remains.

Both the Gilliam County Sheriff Gary Bettencourt and the Sherman County Sheriff Brad Lohrey (the son of Sheriff Gerald Lohrey) worked to contact family members; Sheriff Bettencourt collected oral swab standards from one relative, and these were submitted and tested by Othram. 

The genetic association was confirmed through DNA comparison by Othram in September 2022, and the family was notified of the positive identification.

“We are very excited that such an old case was able to be solved. It is amazing what our forensic teams can accomplish with modern technology. This was a case that was a mystery for generations here at the Sherman County Sheriff’s Office. I’m happy that the family of the deceased finally has closure.” -Sheriff Brad Lohrey, Sherman County Sheriff’s Office

Hope is why we are here.

 




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/1002/160983/West-Othram_Case.JPG

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Advisory Committee to Hold Virtual Meeting in March
Ore. Department of Veterans' Affairs - 02/06/23 8:00 AM

The next meeting of the Advisory Committee to the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs will be held Wednesday, March 1, 2023, via Zoom. The meeting begins at 9:30 a.m.

The committee is made up of veterans appointed by the governor to provide counsel on veteran issues and represent veteran concerns across Oregon. Its nine members serve in a vital advisory role to the director and staff of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

ODVA’s Reports to the Advisory Committee are available to the public on the ODVA website here: https://issuu.com/odva/stacks/38107bb40c054695831edf5634865ca4

This meeting is being held virtually. The public is invited to attend.

To attend:

Please pre-register at the following link:  https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMtceqhqTotGt1GVitnPFiJxrYVsmic7YgO

Pre-registration is required. Participants who pre-register will receive the meeting link.

Join by Zoom via Telephone: Dial 1 (253) 215-8782. When prompted, enter the meeting ID: 870 6397 1709# and password/participant ID: 654779#

When prompted, please state your first and last name.

Town Hall:

There will be a PACT Act Town Hall in which ODVA invites you to ask questions of the committee and director. This time is set aside for individuals to ask questions about the Pact Act. Community members are also invited to submit written public comments to the Committee at the following email address: odva_vaac@odva.oregon.gov.

More information can be found online at www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/advisory.aspx or to contact the Advisory Committee, please email odva_vaac@odva.oregon.gov.

Established in 1945, the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs is dedicated to serving Oregon’s diverse veteran community that spans five eras of service members. ODVA administers programs and provides special advocacy and assistance in accessing earned veteran benefits across the state. Learn about veteran benefits and services, or locate a local county or tribal veteran service office online at oregon.gov/odva.

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Stolen vehicle collides with home in Clark County (Photo)
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/06/23 1:14 AM
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On February 5th, at 8:12 in the evening, Clark County Sheriff’s Deputies were dispatched to a traffic collision at the intersection of NE 47th Street and 56th Ave in Vancouver, Washington.  It was reported that a vehicle had collided with a house at the northeast corner of the intersection.  Neighbors were immediately reporting that the occupants of the vehicle were fleeing on foot. The vehicle had crashed through the kitchen area of the home and started a fire.  A five-year-old inside the residence sustained minor injuries.  The Vancouver Fire Department responded to extinguish the fire and assess the structural integrity of the home.  Meanwhile, after a foot pursuit, deputies were able to detain the two occupants of the suspect vehicle.  The vehicle was found to be a reported stolen out of the City of Vancouver.  The suspects were determined to be juveniles, 14 and 17 years old.  The 17-year-old female was booked into the Clark County Juvenile Justice Center on charges of Driving Under the Influence, Possession of a Stolen Motor Vehicle, and Intimidating a Public Servant.




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/1172/160982/IMG_3686.jpg , 2023-02/1172/160982/IMG_3683.jpg

Sun. 02/05/23
Car into house (Photo)
Vancouver Fire Dept. - 02/05/23 10:49 PM
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On February 5th, 2023 at 20:13, Vancouver Fire Department units were dispatched to a structure fire at 4710 NE 56th Place. Enroute, fire crews were notified that a car might have been driven into a house and both the car and house were on fire.   First arriving fire crews arrived within 5 minutes of dispatch and found an unoccupied car into the first floor of a two story  house that had sustained significant structural damage.   Four engines, one truck, 2 Battalion Chiefs and a Heavy Rescue unit responded to the fire with a total of 19 personnel.  One occupant of the house was transported to PeaceHealth Southwest Hospital by AMR with non life threatening injuries.  American Red Cross has been notified of the possible need for housing assistance for the occupants of the house.   




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/5157/160981/472.jpg , 2023-02/5157/160981/47.jpg

Fatal Crash Highway 99- Marion County
Oregon State Police - 02/05/23 1:03 PM

On Saturday, February 4, 2023, at approximately 7:24 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single-vehicle crash on Highway 99 near milepost 43.

Preliminary investigation revealed a red Toyota Yaris was traveling southbound near Perkins Rd NE, when it crossed the center line, left the roadway into a ditch, and crashed into a tree.  The driver, identified as Jose Trinidad Sanchez Encizo (42) of Lebanon, was declared deceased at the scene. 

The Oregon State Police was assisted by Marion County Fire and Medics, the Oregon Department of Transportation, and the Marion County Medical Examiner’s Office. 


UPDATE: Missing Woman Found Safe (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/05/23 9:01 AM
Inthavong Located
Inthavong Located
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Detectives have located Onedonna Inthavong and she is no longer listed as a missing person. The Sheriff’s Office appreciates the public tips and calls to help verify her safety.

ORIGINAL MEDIA RELEASE:

Deputies Ask for the Public’s Help in Locating Missing Person 
February 2, 2023

Deputies at the Washington County Sheriff's Office are asking for the public’s help locating 46-year-old Onedonna Inthavong. Inthavong was last seen in downtown Portland on Wednesday, January 31, 2023. Inthavong was last seen wearing a black beanie, black/brown leather jacket, blue sweatpants, and white shoes. She also had a brown camouflage sleeping bag with her.

A photo of Inthavong was taken of her wearing a black tank top and blue skirt shortly before she was last seen.

Please contact the Washington County Sheriff's Office at 503-629-0111 or your local law enforcement agency if you know where Inthavong is or have any information.




Attached Media Files: Inthavong Located

Sat. 02/04/23
City of Gresham Announces Procession For Firefighter Brandon Norbury (Photo)
City of Gresham - 02/04/23 10:02 PM
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GRESHAM, Ore. - Firefighter Brandon Norbury, who passed away unexpectedly on February 3 in the line of duty, will be moved from the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office, 13309 Southeast 84th Avenue, Clackamas, to Lincoln Memorial Funeral Home, 11801 SE Mt. Scott Boulevard, Portland, on Sunday, February 5 at 8:00 a.m. 

The procession route:

  • Depart at 8:00 a.m.
  • Exit ME, NW on SE 84th Avenue
  • Right onto Oak Bluff Boulevard
  • Right onto Sunnybrook
  • Left rampant I205 NB 
  • Exit 16 toward Johnson Creek Boulevard 
  • Left on 92nd
  • Right onto SE Flavel
  • Continue onto Mt. Scott Boulevard
  • Right onto Mt. Scott Boulevard
  • End at 11801 SE Mt. Scott Boulevard



Attached Media Files: 2023-02/1046/160973/MicrosoftTeams-image_(64).png

Traffic #ALERT: Critical Injury Crash Being Investigated by the Major Crash Team
Portland Police Bureau - 02/04/23 6:54 PM
A crash that left one patient with critical, life-threatening injuries is being investigated by the Major Crash Team (MCT).

On Saturday, February 4, 2023 at 5:04p.m., East Precinct officers responded to a report of an injury crash on Southeast Stark Street and Southeast 146th Avenue. When they arrived with Portland Fire and Rescue and AMR, they found three people had been injured in a 2-vehicle crash. The three patients were transported to the hospital.

Doctors informed officers that one of the patients has life-threatening injuries. The Portland Police MCT is responding to investigate the crash.

During the investigation, Southeast Stark Street is closed between Southeast 145th Avenue and Southeast 147th Avenue.

If anyone has information about this incident, please e-mail crimetips@police.portlandoregon.gov attention Traffic Investigations Unit and reference case number P23-32579.

###PPB###

Fatal Crash Highway 26- Washington County
Oregon State Police - 02/04/23 4:33 PM

Correction: The passenger of the Honda CRV, identified as Mariam El Hindawi (92) of Seaside.

On Friday, February 3, 2023, at approximately 12:04 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Highway 26 at milepost 41. Preliminary investigation revealed a green Ford Ranger was traveling west on highway 26 when, for unknown reasons, it crossed the centerline and struck a white Honda CRV nearly head-on. 

The driver of the Ford Ranger, identified as Mark Leslie Kingman (69) of Brinnon, Washington, was deceased at the scene.  The driver of the Honda CRV, identified as Zeinab Muhieddine Kabbani McBoul (52) of Seaside, was transported to an area hospital with serious injuries.  The passenger of the Honda CRV, identified as Mariam, El Hindawi (92) of Seaside, Oregon, was transported to an area hospital with life-threatening injuries. After arriving at the hospital, Mariam succumbed to the injuries sustained in the crash. 

The Oregon State Police was assisted by the Washington County Sheriff’s Office, the Oregon Department of Transportation, and the Banks Fire Department.


Oregon Governor, other distinguished officials, host over 120 Oregon Army Guard Soldiers during demobilization ceremony (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 02/04/23 4:10 PM
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Clackamas, Ore.--Oregon Gov. Tina Kotek and other distinguished officials address more than 120 Soldiers in Charlie Company, 1st Squadron, 82nd Cavalry Regiment, Oregon Army National Guard, during a demobilization ceremony at the 41st Infantry Division, Armed Forces Readiness Center, Camp Withycombe, Clackamas, Ore., Feb. 4. U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, Oregon, and Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, also served as official hosts for the event. The event was held to acknowledge the Soldiers' efforts to support United States NATO Allies, while building readiness and enhancing bonds with partner nations as part of Operation Atlantic Resolve in Poland. The Soldiers first mobilized for this nearly yearlong deployment in early January 2022, and supported efforts to deter Russian aggression after the initial invasion into Ukraine on Feb. 24, 2022. This deployment was one of the largest mobilizations of Oregon National Guard Citizen-Soldiers since Operation Enduring Freedom in 2006. The event was livestreamed and may be viewed at this link. For more information on Atlantic Resolve, click here

Image 7616862: Soldiers in Charlie Company, 1st Squadron, 82nd Cavalry Regiment, Oregon Army National Guard, shake hands with distinguished guests and elected officials during a demobilization ceremony at the 41st Infantry Division, Armed Forces Readiness Center, Camp Withycombe, Clackamas, Ore., Feb. 4. Oregon Gov. Tina Kotek, U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, Oregon, and Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, served as official hosts for the event. The event was held to acknowledge the Soldiers' efforts to support United States NATO Allies, while building readiness and enhancing bonds with partner nations as part of Operation Atlantic Resolve in Poland. The Soldiers first mobilized for this nearly yearlong deployment in early January 2022, and supported efforts to deter Russian aggression after the initial invasion into Ukraine on Feb. 24, 2022. This deployment was one of the largest mobilizations of Oregon National Guard Citizen-Soldiers since Operation Enduring Freedom in 2006. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Hunter Bomar)

Image 7616863: Oregon Gov. Tina Kotek poses with Soldiers in Charlie Company, 1st Squadron, 82nd Cavalry Regiment, Oregon Army National Guard, after their demobilization ceremony at the 41st Infantry Division Armed Forces Readiness Center, Camp Withycombe, Clackamas, Ore., Feb. 4. Kotek, along with U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, Oregon, and Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, served as official hosts for the event. The event was held to acknowledge the Soldiers' efforts to support United States NATO Allies, while building readiness and enhancing bonds with partner nations as part of Operation Atlantic Resolve in Poland. The Soldiers first mobilized for this nearly yearlong deployment in early January 2022, and supported efforts to deter Russian aggression after the initial invasion into Ukraine on Feb. 24, 2022. This deployment was one of the largest mobilizations of Oregon National Guard Citizen-Soldiers since Operation Enduring Freedom in 2006. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Hunter Bomar)

Image 7616866: Oregon Gov. Tina Kotek addresses more than 120 Soldiers in Charlie Company, 1st Squadron, 82nd Cavalry Regiment, Oregon Army National Guard, during a demobilization ceremony at the 41st Infantry Division, Armed Forces Readiness Center, Camp Withycombe, Clackamas, Ore., Feb. 4. U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, Oregon, and Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, also served as official hosts for the event. The event was held to acknowledge the Soldiers' efforts to support United States NATO Allies, while building readiness and enhancing bonds with partner nations as part of Operation Atlantic Resolve in Poland. The Soldiers first mobilized for this nearly yearlong deployment in early January 2022, and supported efforts to deter Russian aggression after the initial invasion into Ukraine on Feb. 24, 2022. This deployment was one of the largest mobilizations of Oregon National Guard Citizen-Soldiers since Operation Enduring Freedom in 2006. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Hunter Bomar)




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/962/160971/7616866.jpg , 2023-02/962/160971/7616863.jpg , 2023-02/962/160971/7616862.jpg

Two Wrong Way Drunk Drivers Crash on I-5 in South Portland (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 02/04/23 4:06 PM
First Crash Suspect Vehicle
First Crash Suspect Vehicle
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Two drunk drivers are facing charges after driving the wrong way on Interstate-5 freeway in South Portland this morning.

On Saturday, February 4, 2023 at 1:07a.m., Central Precinct Officers responded to a report of someone driving southbound in the northbound lanes of I-5. As officers responded, the car crashed into another vehicle just north of the South Corbett Avenue exit. When officers arrived, they found three severely damaged vehicles. They assessed for injuries and Portland Fire & Rescue and AMR paramedics arrived to provide care. None of the patients was transported by ambulance.

Officers' investigation determined that a grey 2021 Nissan Kicks driven by Margot J. Wolfsehr, 38, of Portland, was driving southbound in the northbound lanes when she nearly crashed head-on into a white Ford Explorer with a family of 5, including 3 kids, inside. The crash happened in a curve in the freeway, but despite little warning the Ford Explorer driver was able to make an abrupt avoidance maneuver. The Nissan sideswiped the Explorer, causing them to spin to a stop and scattering debris across the freeway. The driver of another vehicle, a northbound Nissan Sentra, was unable to avoid the debris and his car was disabled after he struck a large piece of sheared-off wheel assembly.

As officers were investigating and arranging for tows, at 2:08a.m., they saw a red 2014 Toyota Prius also driving southbound in the northbound lanes. They immediately radioed for assistance, but the Prius struck a white Ford Fusion nearly head-on just south of South Corbett Avenue. The crash caused serious injuries to the driver of the Ford Fusion, including a broken leg. The adult male driver was transported to the hospital by ambulance. His injuries are not life threatening.

Officers determined that the driver of the Toyota Prius was Emely Mendoza, 23, of Salem. She was evaluated by medics but declined to be transported to the hospital.

Wolfsehr was criminally cited for DUII-alcohol, Reckless Driving, and Reckless Endangerment.

Mendoza was criminally cited for DUII-alcohol, Assault in the Third Degree, Reckless Driving, and Reckless Endangerment.

These crashes could have resulted in death and were a direct result of impaired driving. Please drive sober. If you are planning to drink or use drugs, plan ahead how you're going to get home.

Photo descriptions:
1) Crashed grey Nissan Kicks SUV with rear end propped up on jersey barrier, PPB vehicles in background with emergency lights flashing red and blue
2) View of Nissan Kicks, heavily damaged front left side, wheel assembly torn off, airbags deployed
3) Wider view of the damaged Nissan Kicks
4) Wide view of white Ford Explorer with severe damage on the left side and rear quarterpanel, wheel assembly torn off
5) Red Toyota Prius with severe damage to front left quarter panel
6) White Ford Fusion with severe damage to left front quarter panel, sheared off wheel assembly visible in the foreground

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Attached Media Files: First Crash Suspect Vehicle , First Crash Suspect Vehicle , First Crash Suspect Vehicle , Second Crash Suspect Vehicle , First Crash Victim Vehicle , Second Crash Victim Vehicle

Fatal Crash Highway 238- Jackson County
Oregon State Police - 02/04/23 11:57 AM

On Friday, February 3, 2023, at approximately 5:30 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single-vehicle crash on Highway 238 near milepost 32 just outside of Jacksonville.

Preliminary investigation revealed a green Honda Civic, was traveling east on highway 238 when the operator lost control of the vehicle negotiating a corner.  The vehicle slid off the eastbound shoulder and struck a tree before coming to rest.  The right front passenger, identified as Mynor Johan Dubon, (37) of Medford, was pronounced dead at the scene.  The driver, identified as Salvador Olivas-Espinoza (36), was transported to the hospital with life-threatening injuries.

OSP was assisted by the Oregon Department of Transportation, the Jackson County STAR Team, the Jacksonville Fire Department, and the Applegate Fire Department.


Lebanon Fire responds to attic filled with smoke
Lebanon Fire District - 02/04/23 7:53 AM

At 1851 Lebanon Fire District was dispatched for a structure fire on E Rose.  Initial reports stated that there was the smell of smoke in the house and the attic was full of smoke. Battalion Chief 31 Arrived on scene and found Light smoke coming from the eves of the house. The first arriving truck made an offensive attack utilizing their thermal imaging camera to pinpoint the exact location of the fire. The crews were able to throw salvage tarps to help protect the homeowner’s belongings and open the ceiling in the room of origin. The fire was extinguished quickly with minimal damage to the home. Once the fire was out and the smoke was cleared the homeowners were able to grab belongings and stay with family for the night. The cause of the fire was determined to be old knob and tube wiring that has failed. 


Fri. 02/03/23
*** PHOTO ADDED of Champion *** Sheriff's Detectives seek publics help with a suspicious death investigation (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/03/23 10:35 PM
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On December 9, 2022, Linn County Sheriff’s Office responded to a report of a body located in northern Millersburg. With assistance of the Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office the body was confirmed to be Richard Champion, who was reported missing to the Marion County Sheriff’s Office in September. Detectives are continuing to investigate the death of Mr. Champion as suspicious. 

If you have any information regarding Richard Champion, contact Det. Van Horn @ (503) 584-6211 / n@co.marion.or.us">jvanhorn@co.marion.or.us. You can also submit information to the Marion County Sheriff's Office by texting your tip to TIPMCSO(847411). 




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/1294/160963/Champion_picture.jpeg

Seaside Police Arrest Subject of North Coast Search (Photo)
City of Seaside - 02/03/23 9:35 PM
Labonte Wanted Notice
Labonte Wanted Notice
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Seaside, Ore. – Feb. 3, 2023 – Seaside Police and officers from the Clatsop County Sheriff’s Office and Oregon State Police arrested Jericho Wolf Labonte at approximately 7:35 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 3, 2023. He was taken into custody without incident at the Helping Hands Warming Shelter, 1530 S. Roosevelt Dr., in Seaside.­

Labonte, 35, was wanted on charges of Theft I, Endangering Another Person, Unauthorized Use of a Vehicle, and Criminal Mischief II. Additionally, Labonte is a wanted fugitive out of British Columbia and a suspect in other cases.

Earlier in the day, the United States Coast Guard responded to a mayday signal coming from the P/C Sandpiper located in the mouth of the Columbia River. During the response by boat and air, a large wave capsized the vessel and a man, later determined to be Labonte, was saved from the scene by a rescue swimmer and flown via USCG helicopter to Astoria and subsequently transferred to Columbia Memorial Hospital.

At approximately 2:54 p.m., the P/C Sandpiper was determined to be a stolen vessel out of the Port of Astoria. The Astoria Police Department attempted to locate Labonte at CMH, but he had been discharged and his location was unknown. 

Seaside Police later determined Labonte was staying at the Helping Hands Warming Shelter under an alias. Officers from the CCSO and OSP arrived and he was taken into custody on the outstanding charges and transported to Clatsop County Jail to be booked.

Seaside Fire and Rescue were on standby to assist. The SPD would like to thank all agencies and citizens who assisted in Labonte’s arrest. Questions should be directed to the appropriate law enforcement agency. 

end of release




Attached Media Files: News Release in PDF Format , Labonte Wanted Notice , US Coast Guard Rescue

**UPDATE** Gresham Firefighter Suffers Cardiac Arrest (Photo)
City of Gresham - 02/03/23 7:23 PM
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As the next of kin has been notified, we are releasing that it was Gresham Firefighter Brandon Norbury that suffered cardiac arrest and passed away today. 

 

Original message below 

GRESHAM, Ore. – It is with a heavy heart the City of Gresham shares one of our Firefighters unexpectedly passed away earlier today. As not all the next of kin have been notified at this time, we are unable to release his name.  

The firefighter suffered cardiac arrest while in the line of duty and was unable to recover despite emergency medical attention. He had been with the Gresham Fire Department since 2008, spent seven years with the Gresham Police Department prior to that, and was a veteran having served our Country as a Navy Seal as well. 

The Gresham Fire Department and City leadership are actively in communication with the family and funeral services are pending. As the City works to support the family and our firefighters that are grieving, we will not be releasing any additional information or conducting interviews at this time. 

The City of Gresham is greatly appreciative of his service. But more than that, our hearts go out to the family and friends as we mourn this tragic loss.  

 

About Gresham: 

Gresham is a welcoming community of hard-working people where tradition meets opportunity in Oregon's fourth largest city. Gresham’s residents care deeply about our roots and are committed to building a vibrant future. Today, Gresham is a dynamic and rapidly growing city with a desire to thrive. To learn more, visit www.GreshamOregon.gov or visit us on Twitter at @CityofGresham. 

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Attached Media Files: 2023-02/1046/160962/Norbury.jpeg

Marion County Grand Jury unanimously finds five Salem Police Department Officers justified in their use of deadly force
Marion Co. Dist. Attorney's Office - 02/03/23 5:11 PM

Today a Marion County Grand Jury unanimously found that five Salem Police Department Officers were justified in their use of deadly force against Michael James Compton, 27, on January 23, 2023.

 

The Grand Jury convened for two days to hear testimony from 16 witnesses, including the Oregon State Police who led the investigation.  The Grand Jury reviewed multiple video exhibits and further examined numerous pieces of evidence including photographs, scene diagrams, dispatch recordings, ballistic information, firearms, and autopsy conclusions.  The following is a factual summary of evidence found by the Grand Jury: 

 

On January 23, 2023, at 9:02 A.M., Salem Police received a 911 call regarding an attempted armed carjacking (an attempt to steal a car at gunpoint).  The incident occurred in a Walmart parking lot, located at 5250 Commercial St SE, Salem, Oregon. 

 

At that time, Haley Lyons was driving southbound on the west side of the Walmart parking lot with her passenger, Cooper Pietrok, when a male jumped in front of their vehicle and pointed a gun at them.  He told them to “get out of the car” and “I’m going to shoot.”   Pietrok described the male (later determined to be Compton) as a white male, early 30’s, with blonde hair and a beard, wearing a baseball cap, khaki pants in a dark- possibly a Seahawks- sweatshirt.  Pietrok described the gun pointed at them as small, black, and semiautomatic.  Pietrok told Lyons to “floor it” and Compton jumped to the side of the vehicle as it quickly accelerated southbound in the parking lot. 

 

 Mr. Pietrok immediately called 911.

 

Compton returned to Commercial St and went north but walked back into the parking lot toward Planet Fitness, located at 5240 Commercial St SE, Salem, Oregon.  By that time, Lyons and Pietrok were still in the parking lot and watching Compton from a distance, and described that Compton was “zigzagging” through the parking lot looking into vehicles as he went.  When Compton saw a responding police vehicle, Pietrok saw Compton start running towards Planet Fitness. 

 

At that moment, Joan Riley, 79, was entering Planet Fitness to meet her friends for their regular workout. As Riley entered the sliding front doors carrying her car keys around her wrist, a man came up behind her, grabbed at her keys, and said “give me your keys” about three or four times.  Riley did not, but instead held on. As the man continued to pull on her keys, he also grabbed Riley’s wrist, pulling her outside.  Riley began to scream “Help!”, and several gym employees and patrons came to her aid, chasing the male (later determined to be Compton) back outside into the parking lot.  Compton was able to get the keys from Riley’s wrist.  Riley was also injured during the incident, as her right middle fingernail was bent back and was bleeding.   

 

By this time, Senior Salem Police Officer Robert Acosta, 17 years of service, had responded to the Planet Fitness parking lot and saw Riley being attacked in the entrance of the gym. Officer Acosta turned on his lights and sirens and attempted to get his patrol vehicle between Compton and people in the parking lot.  As Compton ran, he threw Riley’s keys over his shoulder. 

 

Instead of stopping, Compton fled northwest towards Commercial St Se. As he did so, Officer Acosta could see that Compton was holding something in the front pocket of his hooded sweatshirt. 

 

Officer Acosta watched and pursued Compton as Compton crossed Commercial. Compton would alternate between walking and jogging as he went north on the sidewalk towards the intersection of Barnes Ave SE and Commercial St SE. 

 

This area of Commercial St SE is a busy intersection, especially at this time of day. Commercial is the major thruway into downtown Salem from South Salem and there is significant traffic, several businesses, restaurants, at least one coffee shop as well as numerous pedestrians near this intersection.  Furthermore, there is a city bus stop approximately 20 yards west from the intersection of Commercial and Barnes. 

 

Despite traveling northbound, Officer Acosta pulled his patrol vehicle into the southbound lanes of Commercial St and stopped at a 45 degree angle, blocking those lanes next to Compton in an effort to get Compton to stop. At this time, Officer Acosta had both his lights and sirens on his marked patrol vehicle on.  Instead of stopping, Compton turned west and walked down a berm into a Napa Auto Parts parking lot, located at 5105 Commercial Street SE. 

 

At the time of his attempted stop, Officer Acosta was considering the pedestrian traffic at that busy intersection; that Compton matched the description of the armed, attempted carjacking suspect from the Walmart parking lot; and that he saw Compton attack Riley in the entrance way of Planet Fitness. 

 

Moments prior to Senior Officer Acosta trying to get Compton to stop, Salem Police Officer Reece “Dru” Mathis, 1 year of service, responded to the call of an armed carjacking.  As he was responding, he received updates over the radio regarding the Planet Fitness incident and that Compton appeared to be carrying a firearm.  Officer Mathis arrived at the intersection of Barnes and Commercial, and saw a yellow school bus at the intersection of Barnes Ave SE and Commercial St SE, directly ahead of where Compton was going.   Officer Mathis stopped his patrol SUV just south of the yellow school bus.  

 

Officer Mathis told Compton to “Stop!” and “Show me your hands!”, to which Compton replied “No.” He saw Compton walk down the berm and take cover between two vehicles in the Napa Auto Parts parking lot.  Instead of stopping, Compton pulled a small, black, semiautomatic handgun from the front of his sweatshirt, pointed it at the officers and opened fire. 

 

Officers Acosta and Mathis both returned fire from their department-issued handguns and continued to fire at Compton who ran towards the Napa Auto Parts entrance while shooting over his shoulder backwards towards Senior Officer Acosta.  Compton appeared to get hit in the leg and fell behind a white jaguar sedan[1] parked near the front of the Napa Auto parts store.  When he fell, Compton dropped his handgun. 

 

By this time, additional officers had either arrived or were arriving.  As they responded, Compton picked up his handgun, sat up, and again opened fire toward the police. 

 

Over the next 33 seconds, Compton twice more attempted to sit up and shoot police officers.  In total, five Salem Police Officers fired at Compton who never followed commands, showed his hands, dropped the gun, nor made any motions to surrender. 

 

The entire gunfire exchange, starting with Compton pointing his firearm at the officers and ending when officers stopped firing, lasted approximately 50 seconds.   In total, Officer Acosta fired 29 rounds at Compton, and Officer Mathis fired 26.

 

The other arriving Salem officers that fired their weapons at Compton were Senior Officer Justin Carney, 22 years of service; Corporal Kristy Fitzpatrick, 14 years of service and Corporal Adam Waite, 17 years of service. 

 

Senior Officer Justin Carney arrived moments after the initial rounds were fired, and he parked his patrol SUV just north of the intersection of Barnes and Commercial.   Before he was able to get out of his vehicle, Compton shot at Senior Officer Carney, resulting in a bullet directly striking his patrol car windshield. Nevertheless, Senior Officer Carney removed his department-issued AR15 rifle, got out of his vehicle and ultimately fired two rounds at Compton who by then was on the ground behind the jaguar firing at officers.   

 

Corporal Kristy Fitzpatrick also arrived from the north and took cover behind Officer Mathis’ patrol vehicle.  Corporal Fitzpatrick fired one round at Compton during the exchange. 

 

Corporal Adam Waite arrived on his department-issued motorcycle, also from the north.  As he approached, he could not see past the yellow school bus parked on Barnes, but he could hear shots being fired.  As he approached, Corporal Waite did not know if the shots were from beyond the bus, or inside the bus itself.  Once he arrived, however, he could see Compton firing at officers as Compton lay on his back from the Napa Auto Parts parking lot. Because Compton was immediately identifiable as a shooter, Corporal Waite positioned himself at the back, northwest corner of the bus and fired 9 rounds at Compton. Once Corporal Waite was sure that Compton no longer posed an immediate threat, Corporal Waite banged on the bus driver’s window and told her to leave the scene. 

 

Investigators later learned that the bus was transporting several students to school.   The children were able to see the incident and heard the gunshots.  No students were injured during this incident, and the bus was not hit.  The school bus driver testified before the grand jury. 

 

Overall, the investigation showed that Compton fired 9 times, and one unspent round matching his ammunition was recovered at the scene.   He pointed his gun at law enforcement on at least 3 separate occasions. 

 

In total, officers fired 68 rounds at Compton.  Compton was hit eighteen times in various parts of his body, including three graze wounds. Salem Police approached Compton to render aid; however, Compton quickly succumbed to his injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.  When officers approached, Compton had a small, black semiautomatic pistol between his legs, underneath his body. 

 

No pedestrians, bystanders or police officers were injured during this incident. 

 

In addition to the school bus, a local city bus was also parked on Barnes, at the bus station roughly 20 yards west from the intersection of Barnes and Commercial.  That bus captured relatively clear video of much of the incident described above and was presented for the grand jury’s consideration.  In addition, the city bus driver as well as a pedestrian from the bus stop also testified before the grand jury. 

 

The Oregon State Police led the investigation.  Assisting the Oregon State Police was the Marion County Sheriff’s Office and Keizer Police Department.   Pursuant to Marion County’s Officer Use of Deadly Force protocol, a non-involved police agency must lead these investigations. 

 

The scene was geographically large and required closure of Commercial St until the late evening of January 23, 2023.  Photographs, diagrams, and other scene evidence collected during that investigation was presented to the grand jury for their consideration. 

 

An autopsy was conducted by State Deputy Medical Examiner Rebecca Millius on January 24, 2023.  Dr. Millius determined that Compton’s cause of death was a penetrating gunshot wound of the right lateral back.   

 

Compton had the following previous convictions:

  • 2016. Clackamas County Circuit Court, 16CR63563- Convictions for Strangulation, Menacing and Assault in the Fourth Degree;
  • 2020. Clackamas County Circuit Court, 19CR78740- Conviction for Assault in the Fourth Degree and Menacing;
  • 2020.  Clackamas County Circuit Court, 19CR80349- Interfering with a Peace Officer; 
  • 2021. Clackamas County Circuit Court, 21CR24827- Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants, Assault in the Fourth Degree, Recklessly Endangering Another Person;
  • 2022- Clackamas County Circuit Court, 21CR38038- Theft in the Second Degree

 

Additionally, he had a warrant for his arrest out of Lane County Circuit Court, for charges of Criminal Driving While Suspended, Attempt to Elude a Police Officer, Driving under the Influence and Resisting Arrest. He was pending arraignment in Clackamas County Circuit Court for two counts of Criminal Mischief in the Second Degree, in 22CR59091. 

 

Compton had no prior criminal activity in Marion County, including no known contacts with the Salem Police Department.

 

The Grand Jury did not hear evidence of Compton’s criminal history.

 

The Grand Jury applied the facts of this case to the legal principles dictating circumstances when deadly physical force can be used.  Specifically, the Grand Jury found that, under the totality of the circumstances known to each peace officer, each officer reasonably determined that the use of deadly physical force was necessary as:

  • Michael Compton had committed and attempted to commit violent felonies against a person;
  • Deadly physical force was necessary to defend a peace officer and/or another person from the use or threatened imminent use of deadly physical force;
  • under the totality of the circumstances existing at the time and place, the use of such force was justified.

 

The Grand Jury further found that no reasonable alternatives, such as verbal de-escalation, waiting or using other available techniques or resources was reasonable, safe or feasible as the officers gave a verbal and visual warnings to Compton and provided him with a reasonable opportunity to comply. 

The Grand Jury's decision required reviewing all the facts and evidence available and applying them to the legal principles above.  The Grand Jury concluded that the actions of all five of the Salem Police Department Officers, Senior Officer Justin Carney, Corporal Kristy Fitzpatrick, Officer Reece Mathis, Corporal Adam Waite, and Senior Officer Robert Acosta were justified and lawful. 

 

Upon the grand jury’s determination, representatives from the Marion County District Attorney’s Office, Salem Police Department and the Salem Keizer School District met with several of the parents who had children on the school bus to provide them with a factual summary of what occurred and answer the parents’ questions about the incident.   

 

“We would like to thank the Salem Keizer School District for their collaboration to ensure that the parents of these children had the information they needed to appropriately respond to their children’s concerns.  This was a traumatizing incident for everyone involved.” said Deputy District Attorney Brendan Murphy, who co-led the investigation with Deputy District Attorney Shannon Sullivan.  

 

In addition to the childrens’ parents, the Marion County District Attorney’s Office, including their family service coordinator, also met with members of Mr. Compton’s family to explain the legal determination and answer any questions that they had. 

 

They asserted that Mr. Compton was suffering from mental health issues at the time of his death. 

 

Mr. Compton’s family expressed overwhelming frustration with the fact that their loved one had recently been in jail in two separate counties but was released before his mental health issues were stabilized.  “It’s not the police officers’ fault, I don’t blame them” his father said, but blamed the inability of parents to access mental health services for their adult children and jails that release individuals who aren’t stable and safe. 

 

Marion County District Attorney Paige Clarkson stated, "I would like to thank the Grand Jury for their careful and thorough review of this frightening and extremely dangerous situation.  While these incidents are never easy to investigate and review, this incident- with a school bus containing children- was especially traumatic.”

 

“However, the children weren’t the only victims here.  I am thankful that Ms. Riley, Ms. Lyons and Mr. Pietrok were able to go home that night. And in particular, our community owes a debt of gratitude to the five brave Officers from the Salem Police Department whose heroism that morning placed themselves in mortal danger in order to ensure the rest of us were safe.  Thank you for being willing to do that job.”  

 

“We further commend the entire investigative team, including the State Police, the Marion County Sheriff’s Office and Keizer Police Department. They continue to fulfill the important requirements of the Marion County Use of Force protocol, with skill, integrity, and transparency.  To all our Law Enforcement in Marion County: We are grateful that you continue to protect and serve."

 

The following items from the investigation can be located from the Google Drive link below:

  • Photograph of Compton’s Firearm
  • Two Scene/ Location Overviews
  • Video of the incident WARNING- GRAPHIC
  • Close up stills of Compton pointing the firearm from the Video (above). 

 

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1yGVgDxr_s2Sy6WNTNCSNYeU7nXK6PYYH?usp=share_link


 


[1] Law enforcement later learned that this vehicle was occupied, the driver leaning sideways into the passenger seat when gunfire began. 


Marion County Announces New Emergency Management Director
Marion County - 02/03/23 5:00 PM

A person in a suit and tie

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

SALEM, OR – Marion County announces Gregory Walsh as the new Emergency Management Director. 

Walsh comes to Marion County with 14 years of Emergency Management experience. He most recently held the position of Emergency Preparedness Manager for the City of Salem. While there, he was responsible for city-wide emergency planning and management of the Emergency Operations Center for emergency response coordination between city departments and external partners. 

“I am excited to take on this new role and continue to build emergency preparedness in our community,” said Walsh. “This role presents an opportunity for me to share my experience to help everyone on their worst days,” said Walsh.

The Marion County Emergency Management Director is responsible for planning, organizing, and directing the county’s all-hazards response programs. The director is responsible to deploy disaster operations during a declared emergency, disaster, or homeland security incident.

“Greg is an established leader in our community who understands the needs of Marion County’s cities and rural communities,” said Brian Nicholas, Director of Marion County Public Works. “Greg played a leading role responding to the 2018 water crisis, 2020 wildfires, 2021 ice storm, 2022 South Salem wildfire and so many other emergencies.”

Walsh began his new role as Emergency Management Director on January 23, 2023.  

“In his role with the City of Salem, Greg has been an outstanding partner to Marion County in times of need,” continued Nicholas. “I could not be more excited to see Greg assume the leadership of Marion County’s emergency management program where his energy and know-how will benefit communities throughout the county.” 

You can find more information on Emergency Management in Marion County here


*** SAGE HAS BEEN FOUND SAFE AND SOUND *** Active search for a 5 year old autistic boy is underway outside of Silverton *** PHOTO ATTACHED *** (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/03/23 4:34 PM
2023-02/1294/160953/Silverton_Boy_SAGE_IMG_0242.jpeg
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Sage has been found safe and sound and reunited with family.  

We would like to thank our community who assisted along with sheriff's deputies, Silverton Police, Woodburn Police, Silverton Fire, Salem Police, METCOM and WVCC dispatch centers and Marion County Search and Rescue.  

Additional photo just received of Sage.  

Sheriff’s deputies are searching for a 5-year-old autistic boy, by the name of Sage, who has a limited verbal ability.  He has been missing since 2:55 pm and was last seen in the area of Silver Falls Dr NE and Seminole Rd NE, outside of Silverton, Oregon.  Sage is described as a white male juvenile, 4’06”, average build with blonde hair.  He was last seen wearing a black long sleeve shirt and black pants. 

Please call 911 if you locate him and report it immediately. 

The Sheriff’s Office is being assisted by Silverton Police, Silverton Fire, Woodburn Police, Salem Police, METCOM as well as Willamette Valley Communications Center.   

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Attached Media Files: 2023-02/1294/160953/Silverton_Boy_SAGE_IMG_0242.jpeg , 2023-02/1294/160953/Silverton_Boy_Sage_IMG_0243(2).jpeg

Woodland Public Schools recognizes its Board of Directors, community members who dedicate themselves to serving Woodland students (Photo)
Woodland Sch. Dist. - 02/03/23 4:30 PM
Woodland High Schools CLC Classes filled gift baskets for each of the board members.
Woodland High Schools CLC Classes filled gift baskets for each of the board members.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/59/160947/thumb_CLC-students-from-WHS-prepared-gift-baskets-for-each-board-member.jpg

Friday, February 3, 2023-Woodland, WA-Woodland Public Schools recognized its dedicated Board of Directors, including one who will retire at the end of the year after 15 years of service, during a regular board meeting on Thursday, January 26, 2023.

Superintendent Michael Green opened the meeting by recognizing each of the board members for their dedication in helping to oversee the district’s schools. “School districts' elected boards of directors play a crucial role for our communities and our schools,” he said. “These community leaders volunteer to take on the sometimes-daunting task of helping guide school districts with their decisions affecting student learning, professional development and a myriad of other aspects of district operations.”

Green presented each board director with a special certificate recognizing their contributions, and recognized Board President Janice Watts, who, after serving 15 years, will not be able to run for reelection as she has moved outside of her member district. “Janice has dedicated more than a decade to public service, and for that we will be forever grateful,” said Green.

The Directors of Woodland Public Schools Board are:

  • Sarah Stuart, raised in Woodland and a Woodland High School graduate, earned her Bachelor’s Degree in nursing from Linfield College, and has children currently attending Woodland schools. Stuart represents District 1.
  • Janice Watts, raised in Woodland and a Woodland High School graduate, owns Letter Box, a local Woodland Business, and has four children who have attended or are currently attending Woodland’s schools. Watts continues to serve as Board President and represents District 2.
  • Jeff Wray moved to Woodland with his wife and two children 2017 and represents District 3. Wray serves as Board Vice President.
  • Trish Huddleston lives in Woodland with her two children and her partner, and she represents District 4. Huddleston serves as the Board’s Legislative Representative.
  • Tom Guthrie moved to Woodland with his wife and children in 2004. Guthrie represents District 5.

In addition to posters thanking the board made by students from each of the district’s schools and programs, students in Woodland High School’s Career-Life-College classes provided the board members with special gift baskets filled with items created by the students. 

“Our school board members help fulfill our mission statement of ensuring all of our community’s children have full access to an excellent education,” said Superintendent Green. “While we certainly appreciate our board members throughout the year, these annual recognition meetings gives us the chance to offer them at least a small amount of the recognition they truly deserve.”

Learn more about how Woodland Public Schools educates our students and serves the community by visiting our dedicated news webpage at www.woodlandschools.org/news/wsd 

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Attached Media Files: Woodland High Schools CLC Classes filled gift baskets for each of the board members. , Superintendent Michael Green recognized Board President Janice Watts for her 15 years of service , Woodland's Board Members (from left to right): Janice Watts, Jeff Wray, Sarah Stuart, Trish Huddleston, and Tom Guthrie

City seeks volunteer to serve on Clark County Arts Commission
City of Vancouver - 02/03/23 4:00 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The City of Vancouver is seeking volunteers interested in serving as the City’s representative on the Clark County Arts Commission. This appointment would expire Dec. 31, 2026. Applications must be submitted on or before March 5, 2023.

The Clark County Arts Commission is an 11-member volunteer body that works to enhance and support the growth of the local economy through collaborations among arts patrons, artists, the business community, service groups, schools and cultural groups. The commission works to expand the community’s opportunities to experience and access to art in public places. Guidelines for committee membership are set by Clark County.

Clark County Arts Commission members are artists, businesspeople and arts enthusiasts. The ideal candidate will be active in Vancouver’s arts organizations and passionate about arts advocacy within the community. Applicants must also be available for an interview with Vancouver City Councilmembers on a date to be determined. 

The Clark County Arts Commission meets at 5:30 p.m. on the first Tuesday of every month. The person appointed by Vancouver City Council to the Clark County Arts Commission will also serve on the City of Vancouver’s Culture, Arts and Heritage Commission, which is a separate advisory group that meets at least quarterly.

This news release and commission application materials are also available in Español, Русский and Tiếng ViệtInterested applicants may apply online at www.cityofvancouver.us/boards. To request an application or to get more information, contact the boards and commissions coordinator in the City Manager’s Office, P.O. Box 1995, Vancouver, WA 98668-1995, by phone at 360-487-8600, or by email at c_coordinator@cityofvancouver.us">bc_coordinator@cityofvancouver.us

For more information about the Clark County Arts Commission, visit www.cityofvancouver.us/ccac

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CENTENNIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT GOVERNING BOARD MEETING NOTICE, WEDNESDAY, February 8, 2023 AT 6:30 PM
Centennial Sch. Dist. - 02/03/23 3:59 PM

The Centennial School District Governing Board will meet in a regular session on Wednesday, February 8, 2023, at 6:30 p.m. 

The full board meeting packet is available for reference on the Centennial School District website at www.csd28j.org and can be found on the School Board page.

Board members and key staff will attend in-person at CSD's District Office - 18135 SE Brooklyn St., Portland, OR 97236. The public and guests will join virtually via the Zoom app.

To join the meeting virtually, please click on the link below.

Please click the link below to join the webinar:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87025853855?pwd=VkFJZHRxdWpsZ3ljUWVJV1EwbFBEZz09
Passcode: 249780

Or Telephone, dial:
  +1 253 215 8782 or +1 346 248 7799
Webinar ID: 870 2585 3855
Passcode: 249780


DA Mike Schmidt releases weekly cases impacted by public defense crisis
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 02/03/23 3:52 PM

February 3, 2023

 

PORTLAND, Oregon – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt released a list of cases impacted by the public defense crisis. The data set includes cases dismissed by the court as a result of the crisis.


 

In November, DA Mike Schmidt called the public defense crisis, defined by a lack of public defenders to provide counsel to defendants, an urgent threat to public safety. Individuals suspected of a crime have the constitutional right to defense counsel. Victims have a right to justice. Absent counsel, criminal prosecutions cannot lawfully move forward and issued cases are routinely dismissed over prosecutor’s objections.


 

DA Schmidt also declared that his office would publish cases impacted by the crisis each week to advance the public’s understanding of the scope of the crisis. Here is a breakdown of the types of felonies getting dismissed.


 

There were 3 cases dismissed by the court as a result of the public defense crisis between 1/27/2023 and 2/2/2023:


21-CR-54353

22-CR-13149

23-CR-01588



 

#MCDA#


 


DPSST Corrections, Police and Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled 2-16-23
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/03/23 3:08 PM

CORRECTIONS, POLICE AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICY COMMITTEE

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Special Meeting

The Corrections, Police and Telecommunications Policy Committees of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a special joint meeting at 10:00 a.m. February 16, 2023, in the Hall of Heroes Conference Hall at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST or Department) located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Shelby Wright at (503) 378-2191 or y.wright@dpsst.oregon.gov">shelby.wright@dpsst.oregon.gov.

The joint policy committee meeting will be live streamed on the DPSST Facebook page @ 

https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

Please visit the DPSST Boards and Committees webpage for a complete roster of each policy committee.

https://www.oregon.gov/dpsst/BD/Documents/Web%20Roster.pdf

 

Agenda Items

1. Introductions

2. Review of Public Comment and Policy Discussion for the Proposed Rule Changes for Oregon Administrative Rule (OAR) 259-008-0010, 259-008-0011, 259-008-0015, 259-008-0080

    Background Investigations and House Bill 2936

    Presented by Jennifer Howald

3. Next Policy Committee Meetings Scheduled

Telecommunications Policy Committee: May 3, 2023, at 9:00 a.m.

Corrections Policy Committee: May 9, 2023, at 10:00 a.m.

Police Policy Committee: May 18, 2023, at 10:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to public meeting law and it will be digitally recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by the Policy Committee members, unless permitted by a Policy Committee Chair. Remember to always state your name for the record. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


UPDATE: *Deadline Extended* City seeks applicants for Transportation and Mobility Commission
City of Vancouver - 02/03/23 2:59 PM

Vancouver, Washington – The City of Vancouver is seeking volunteers to serve on its Transportation and Mobility Commission. Applications must be submitted by February 26 (original submission date was February 5).

The volunteer Transportation and Mobility Commission is an 11-member commission that provides advice to Vancouver City Council, the City manager and City staff on a variety of transportation and mobility-related projects, programs and policies. It also provides ongoing feedback and guidance on the development of citywide transportation policy through the update of the City’s Transportation System Plan.

All commission members must live within Vancouver city limits, except up to two members who can live outside the city but within the Vancouver Urban Growth Area. The City is specifically seeking people to serve who represent the following groups:

  • Person who drives as their primary mode of transportation
  • Person with expertise or experience in transportation planning, design, engineering, maintenance or operations

Qualified applicants will be interviewed by City councilmembers on a date to be determined. Applicants who are not appointed through this process may be considered for future Transportation and Mobility Commission vacancies for up to one year from the date of their application submission. 

These vacancies are for mid-term appointments that would have the opportunity to seek out reappointment to a full, three-year term.

Commissioners include community members with a range of interests and lived and professional experiences, and includes members with different primary modes of transportation, e.g., bike, bus or car. The Transportation and Mobility Commission meets at 4 p.m. on the first Tuesday of every month and meetings are currently held as a hybrid of in-person and remote participation.

This news release and commission application materials are also available in Español, Русский and Tiếng Việt. To apply online, visit www.cityofvancouver.us/boards. Printed applications, including in other languages and formats, can be requested by contacting the Boards and Commissions Coordinator in the City Manager’s Office by mail at P.O. Box 1995, Vancouver, WA 98668-1995, by email at c_coordinator@cityofvancouver.us">bc_coordinator@cityofvancouver.us, or by calling 360-487-8600.

More information about the Transportation and Mobility Commission, including links to meeting agendas and minutes, is available online at www.cityofvancuver.us/tmc

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Christina Lynn Cordon Sentences to 108 Months in Prison for Small Business Burglaries (Photo)
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 02/03/23 2:35 PM
2023-02/6208/160946/Christina_Cordon_-_Vehicle_Findings.jpg
2023-02/6208/160946/Christina_Cordon_-_Vehicle_Findings.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/6208/160946/thumb_Christina_Cordon_-_Vehicle_Findings.jpg

HILLSBORO, Ore.— Christina Lynn Cordon, age 38, pleaded guilty to six counts of burglary in the second degree yesterday, February 2, 2023. Deputy District Attorney David Pitcher prosecuted the case before Judge Andrew Erwin. 

From March through September 2022, the defendant burglarized more than ten businesses throughout Washington County, including removing a bolted safe containing more than $1,500 and ramming a stolen vehicle into the door of a convenience store at another location. Cordon targeted small businesses, including restaurants, ice cream shops, delis, coffee shops and dry cleaners, by breaking store windows, picking locks, prying facility doors and even removing the lock at several locations. 

A witness contacted the Hillsboro Police Department after witnessing Cordon break a glass door window and enter the Copper River Restaurant in Hillsboro, Oregon. Authorities arrived as Cordon exited the parking lot in a white Honda Accord, resulting in a high-speed chase. The defendant abandoned the vehicle and fled on foot before she was quickly apprehended. Hillsboro Police located tools, bear spray and a wig inside of the vehicle. 

At the time of these offenses, the defendant, who was residing in a homeless shelter in Portland, Oregon, had three open criminal cases in Multnomah County. Cordon was granted pretrial release by the Multnomah County Circuit Court after failing to appear in court, just months before burglarizing the first of several business in Washington County. 

Judge Erwin sentenced Cordon to 108 months in prison with one year of post-prison supervision on each count. 

The Washington County District Attorney’s Office acknowledges the work of the Washington County Sheriff’s Office, the Beaverton Police Department, the Hillsboro Police Department and the Tualatin Police Department. This office also commends the witnesses and victims of the small business who aided in this investigation.

“Safety is a top priority in Washington County,” said Washington County District Attorney Kevin Barton. “Our residents and business owners deserve a safe community and with this conviction, we are sending a message to criminals who consider coming here to commit crime —  stay out.”

A restitution hearing is scheduled for April 4, 2023, at 8:30 a.m.




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/6208/160946/Christina_Cordon_-_Vehicle_Findings.jpg , 2023-02/6208/160946/Christina_Cordon_-_Mug_Shot.PNG

Detectives Searching for Man After Machete Attack
Yamhill Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/03/23 2:22 PM

On February 3, 2023 shortly after 3:00 am Yamhill County Sheriff's Deputies responded to an assault call in the 300 block of 5th Street in the city of Amity.  Responding deputies learned that a man had attacked his brother with a machete.  The victim was taken via ambulance to a local hospital and then flown to a regional trauma center by LifeFlight.  The suspect fled prior to the arrival of law enforcement, and his whereabouts are currently unknown.  

Yamhill County Sheriff's Office Detectives are seeking assistance in locating the suspect, identified as Peter Darius Huber, age 33.  Peter Huber left driving a white 2007 Toyota Highlander with Oregon plate 148 NUE.

Yamhill County Sheriff's Office received assistance by Amity Fire Department, McMinnville Fire Department, and McMinnville Police Department and our partners with Yamhill Communications during the response to this incident.

 

Update-the vehicle and subject have been located in Portland.  Once detectives have details which can be released, additional information will be sent out.




Attached Media Files: Detectives Bulletin

Drone and Canine Team Locate Theft Suspects (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/03/23 2:17 PM
Social media graphic
Social media graphic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/1128/160945/thumb_Stolen_Truck.png

On Friday, February 3, 2023, at 3:17 a.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a theft call in the 26000 block of SW Wolsborn Avenue. Deputies learned that a dark green pickup stole a flatbed trailer, and the trailer owner watched the truck drive away. 

A deputy in the area located the truck and trailer at SW Laurelview Road and SW Finnegan Hill Road. The driver of the truck tried to turn around but jackknifed the trailer and hit a stop sign. The deputy attempted to pin the truck in with his patrol car so the driver could not leave. The truck managed to get around the patrol car, but in doing so, it rammed the patrol car, causing significant damage, and hit a telephone pole. The patrol car was disabled, and the truck left the area heading east on SW Laurelview Road.

Deputies and officers from Hillsboro Police Department searched for the truck and trailer and located it at a home in the 29000 block of SW McNay Road. The vehicle was unoccupied

A canine team from Hillsboro Police Department and a drone from the Sheriff’s Office Remotely Operated Vehicle Team (ROVT) helped search for the occupants in the vehicle. While searching for the truck’s occupants, the canine team found a handgun on the ground. Deputies later learned the gun was stolen in Tillamook in 2019. 

A short time later, the drone, equipped with a thermal camera, saw a thermal image that appeared to be people hiding in some brush. The canine unit and deputies on the ground went to the area and located 36-year-old Daniel Crum of Cornelius, hiding in the bushes. Crum was arrested without incident.

After Crum was arrested, the drone found another thermal image. The canine unit and deputies on the ground went to the area and found two others: 43-year-old Nicole Gillis of Hillsboro and 44-year-old James Lee Griffith of Beaverton.

Deputies learned the truck, a 2007 Ford F250, was stolen out of The Dalles, and the license plates on the truck were stolen out of Tigard.

Crum was arrested on the listed charges and outstanding warrants.

  • Two counts of unlawful use of a motor vehicle
  • Two counts of possession of a stolen vehicle
  • Attempted assault of a peace officer
  • Attempted assault in the second degree
  • Unlawful use of a weapon
  • Three counts of criminal mischief in the first degree
  • Criminal mischief in the second degree
  • Theft in the second degree
  • Failure to perform the duties of a driver when property is damaged (hit and run)
  • Driving while suspended (misdemeanor)

Gillis and Griffith are each being charged with the following:

  • Two counts of unlawful use of a motor vehicle
  • Two counts of possession of a stolen vehicle

Crum, Gillis, and Griffith were all lodged in the Washington County jail. Additional charges are pending further investigation.

 

Link to drone video




Attached Media Files: Media Release PDF , Social media graphic

35th Annual Membership Meeting (Photo)
North Clark Historical Museum - 02/03/23 1:36 PM
Ted E. Bear, NCHM Mascot
Ted E. Bear, NCHM Mascot
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/6334/160943/thumb_Teddy_with_Valentine_from_April_via_Messenger.jpg

AMBOY, WASHINGTON – On Saturday, February 11th , North Clark Historical Museum will hold the 35th Annual Membership Meeting at 21416 NE 399th St., Amboy, WA  98601.

Focus for 2023--Preserving Local History, Cultivating the Future!

  TEAM – Together Everyone Achieves More!

Lunch will be provided from 12:30 pm to 1:30 pm, fundraiser basket raffle from Noon to 1:45 pm, and the business meeting will begin at 2:00 pm.

The 2023 Raffle Quilt made by the Chelatchie Quilters, will be revealed.  Tickets will be available for purchase.  Quilt Raffle proceeds go to the Capital Improvement Fund.

General business will be conducted, and Board Members April Reichstein and Debbie Zitt are up for reelection for a three-year term. New Board member, Dana Brown, is up for election for a three-year term.  The past year’s events and activities will be reviewed and projections for future events and exhibits will be presented.

A Citizen’s Award will be presented to Ginger Nims, Amboy Hardware and General Store.

A Volunteer Award will be presented to Dana Brown, new Board member and very active volunteer.

Bring a guest to share the fun!

For more information, please contact 360-247-5800 and leave a message or email museumnch88@gmail.com

 

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The North Clark Historical Museum was founded in 1988 and is a 501(C)3 non-profit organization governed by a Board of Directors. The doors were opened in June of 2000.  Mission Statement:   To preserve North Clark County’s natural and cultural history through collections and exhibits, and to sponsor educational programs and research opportunities for the enrichment of the public. 

 




Attached Media Files: Ted E. Bear, NCHM Mascot , 2023-02/6334/160943/NCHM_building_barn__and__windmill_cropped.jpg

Hoover Criminal Gang Member Sentenced to Federal Prison for Illegally Possessing a Firearm
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/03/23 1:26 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Hoover Criminal Gang member and Portland resident was sentenced to federal prison today for illegally possessing a firearm as a convicted felon.

Anthony Devion Bagsby, 31, was sentenced to 24 months in federal prison and 3 years’ supervised release.

According to court documents, as part of an ongoing federal racketeering investigation of the Hoover Criminal Gang, law enforcement obtained photos online of Bagsby, a convicted felon, possessing firearms. Further investigation revealed that Bagsby frequented an apartment occupied by known Hoover Criminal Gang members on Halsey Street in northeast Portland. 

On April 16, 2021, while executing a federal search warrant on the apartment, investigators arrested Bagsby and several other individuals. They found a loaded Springfield XD-40 handgun in a basket in the kitchen. Three of the rounds found in the handgun were colored blue. In the living room, investigators found several items connected to Bagsby, including prescription medication and mail. In the same area, they found an empty magazine; several dozen 9mm cartridges; four .40 caliber rounds including one blue round matching the bullets found in the loaded handgun, and a plastic bag of methamphetamine. Investigators later located text messages on Bagsby’s phone wherein he bragged about obtaining a “brand new XD 40.”

On July 20, 2021, a federal grand jury indicted Bagsby on two counts of illegally possessing a firearm as a convicted felon. On October 18, 2022, he pleaded guilty.

This case was investigated by the FBI with assistance from the Portland Police Bureau, Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, Gresham Police Department, and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. It was prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

This case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

This prosecution is the result of an Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) investigation. OCDETF identifies, disrupts, and dismantles the highest-level drug traffickers, money launderers, gangs, and transnational criminal organizations that threaten the U.S. by using a prosecutor-led, intelligence-driven, multi-agency approach that leverages the strengths of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies against criminal networks.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Bagsby Sentencing

Grant Funding Available for Tourism Projects
City of Seaside - 02/03/23 1:02 PM

Seaside, Ore. – February 3, 2023 – The City of Seaside Visitors Bureau and the City’s Tourism Advisory Committee are accepting applications for the 2023-2024 Tourism Grant Program. Up to $25,000 in grant funding is expected to be available for this coming fiscal cycle. Applications are due Friday, May 5, 2023.

A long-standing program of the City’s tourism department, grant applications are accepted annually for events or projects that further develop Seaside’s tourism economy and encourage year-round visitation, especially overnight stays in the fall, winter, and spring seasons. This grant cycle covers projects occurring July 1, 2023 through December 31, 2024. For more info and complete grant guidelines, go to SeasideOR.com/Tourism-Grant-Program.

“These funds support the community-led projects and events that have put Seaside center on the Pacific Northwest tourism map for generations,” said Joshua Heineman, director of tourism marketing for the City of Seaside.

Last year’s grant project recipients included CoastWalk Oregon (North Coast Land Conservancy), Lewis & Clark Salt Makers Return (Seaside Historical Society Museum), Halloween Happenin’s (Seaside Downtown Development Association), Fall Fun Fest (Sunset Empire Park & Recreation District), Pouring at the Coast (Seaside Chamber of Commerce), Oktoberfest (Knights of Columbus), and SandFest.

The Visitors Bureau is a department of the City of Seaside and the official destination marketing/management organization for Seaside tourism. The Seaside Welcome Center, located at the intersection of Highway 101 and Broadway, also serves as an official State Welcome Center in collaboration with Travel Oregon.

end of release




Attached Media Files: Press Release in PDF

Public comment period opens for proposed State Forest Implementation Plans
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 02/03/23 11:30 AM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Department of Forestry opens a 30-day comment period starting today on proposed Implementation Plan revisions for the Astoria, Forest Grove, Tillamook, North Cascade, West Oregon, and Western Lane (including the Veneta and Southwest units) state forest districts. 

The comment period begins Feb. 3 and ends March 6 at 5 p.m. The implementation plans are available on ODF’s website. Comments can be submitted online by using this form, by emailing odf.sfcomments@odf.oregon.gov , or by mailing comments to ODF Public Affairs, 2600 State St., Salem, OR 97310.

State forests by law must provide social, economic, and environmental benefits to Oregonians, and are managed under long-range forest management plans, mid-range implementation plans, and annual operations plans. Implementation plans describe forest management activities such as timber harvest targets, road construction and maintenance, reforestation and young stand management, recreation, aquatic habitat restoration, and protection strategies for species of concern. 

At the direction of the Board of Forestry, ODF is continuing the development of a draft Western Oregon State Forests Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) and Forest Management Plan (FMP) for Western Oregon State Forests. The HCP is currently going through the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process.  Finalization of this process and issuance of Incidental Take Permits (ITPs) is expected to occur within fiscal year 2024. Revising the current implementation plans allows the agency to continue operations during this time of transition while focusing resources on developing a new forest management plan and accompanying implementation plans required to implement the HCP.


Hood River Police Respond to Shots Fired
Hood River Police Department - 02/03/23 9:55 AM

Press Release

 

 

Date:             February 3, 2023

Topic:            Hood River Police Respond to Shots Fired

From:            Neal Holste, Chief of Police

For Release:  Immediately

 

On February 2, 2023 Hood River Police Officers responded to a call of a man who demanded Police response for what he referred to as a dangerous situation that had potential to escalate.  When Police arrived to meet with the man he explained his son, identified as Simeon Hill, 42, of Hood River, was a combat veteran with access to multiple firearms. The man also advised the officers Simeon had fired a gun in their residence shortly before Police arrived. 

 

As Officers were speaking with the father they heard several gun shots being fired from the area of Hill’s residence, located at 2510 Viento Ln.  When Officers moved in closer to the residence they could hear several more shots being fired from the residence.  Officers reported shots being fired over their head in the direction of nearby businesses. 

 

Law enforcement evacuated businesses and residences in the area of 20th & Cascade Ave. to Rand & Cascade Ave.  The Oregon State Police and Clackamas County SWAT responded to assist local law enforcement. After several hours of negotiating, Hill emerged from his residence and surrendered to Police.  Hill was taken into custody and ultimately transported to a medical facility.  Several firearms and ammunition were seized from Hill’s residence.  This case will be reviewed by the District Attorney’s Office for charges including Unlawful Use of a Weapon, Reckless Endangering and Disorderly Conduct. 

 

The Hood River Police Department would like to thank our regional law enforcement partners, which include Hood River Sheriff’s Office, Wasco County Sheriff’s Office, Bingen-White Salmon Police Department, The Dalles Police Department, Skamania County Sheriff’s Office, Columbia River Inter-tribal Fisheries Enforcement, Northern Oregon Regional Tactical Response Team (NORTAC), Oregon State Police, and Hood River Fire & EMS.  We would also like to thank the Hood River Public Works, Oregon Department of Transportation and the Columbia Area Transit (CAT). 


TVF&R Seeks Volunteer for its Civil Service Commission
Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue - 02/03/23 9:51 AM

Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue is seeking to fill one vacancy on its Civil Service Commission. 

The five-member commission oversees TVF&R’s civil service system to ensure uniform standards in hiring, promotion, and tenure for employees. The commission meets quarterly to address a variety of matters, including oversight of actions related to employee classification, examinations, eligibility list management, appointments, and appeals.

An ideal volunteer candidate will have the following attributes:

  • An understanding of and commitment to the general purposes of the district’s civil service rules, including providing equal opportunity to qualified persons in all aspects of employment in civil service positions and increasing effectiveness and efficiency in the administration of personnel processes.
  • Ability to make high-quality decisions based on a mixture of analysis, wisdom, experience, and judgement.
  • Is comfortable dealing with concepts and complexity.
  • A broad perspective for viewing a situation.
  • Ability to make a commitment to a four-year term as an unpaid volunteer, with attendance at quarterly evening meetings in Tigard and special meetings as needed.

For more information about this volunteer opportunity and a link to apply, visit www.tvfr.com. Applications are due by Feb. 20. Interviews for selected candidates will be scheduled for Feb. 27 or March 2. A commissioner orientation will be held in late March or early April with the first commission meeting set for April 11 at 3 p.m.


Board of Health seeks youth volunteer for Public Health Advisory Council
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/03/23 9:30 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Board of Health is seeking applicants for a volunteer position on the Public Health Advisory Council. 

The open position is for a representative from the Clark County Youth Commission or Clark County Youth House, or a representative of local area high schools or colleges. The three-year term begins as soon as the position is filled. 

The advisory council meets 5:30-7:30 pm on the fourth Tuesday of every even month via Zoom. When in-person meetings resume, they will be 6-8 pm in the main conference room on the second floor of the Center for Community Health, 1601 E Fourth Plain Blvd.

The Public Health Advisory Council uses a health equity framework to identify community health needs, and review and recommend public health policies and priorities to address the identified needs. The council may provide community forums or establish community task forces, as assigned by the Board of Health. And the council reviews and makes recommendations to Clark County Public Health and the Board of Health for the annual budget and fees. 

Clark County Public Health promotes healthy communities and environments, health equity, and disease and injury prevention. With community partners, Public Health works to promote healthier choices; ensure the safety of food and water; reduce environmental waste and contamination; and protect people from disease outbreaks through monitoring, early detection and swift response. 

Those interested in an appointment to the advisory council should submit a brief letter of interest and résumé to Michelle Pfenning, County Manager’s Office, PO Box 5000, Vancouver 98666-5000. Applications can also be emailed to michelle.pfenning@clark.wa.gov.

The application deadline is 5 pm Friday, Feb. 24. 


Oregon Health Policy Board to Meet February 7
Oregon Health Authority - 02/03/23 9:29 AM

February 3, 2023

Contacts: Amy Bacher, acher2@oha.oregon.gov">amy.bacher2@oha.oregon.gov (media inquiries)

Tara Chetock, 971-304-9917, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon Health Policy Board to Meet February 7

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board

When: February 7, 8:30 am – 12:00 pm

Where: Virtual meeting. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line.

To join via Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1611647226?pwd=UFFYbjdkSURoTWNCNWQ1Rk9DSGgvZz09

Meeting ID: 161 164 7226

Passcode: 832517

 To call in to the meeting on a mobile device, use the following number:

  +1 669 254 5252 US (San Jose), +1 646 828 7666 US (New York)

Proposed topics for the meeting agenda are listed below. The final meeting agenda and supporting materials will be posted on Oregon Health Policy Board’s (OHPB) website prior to the meeting. 

Agenda:

Agenda and meeting materials will be uploaded to the website prior to the February 7 meeting, to find materials please follow the link below:

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/OHPB-meetings.aspx

To provide public comment, please submit your request for public comment at least 48 hours prior to the meeting at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/OHPB-Public-Comment

For more information and meeting materials, please visit the OHPB meeting webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/index.aspx

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • CART (Communication Access Real-time Translation)
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Tara Chetock at 971-304-9917, 711 TTY, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Board on Public Safety Standards and Training & Policy Committee Vacancies
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/03/23 8:41 AM

2023 Board on Public Safety Standards and Training

 & Policy Committee

Open Vacancies – Recruitment

 

The Board on Public Safety Standards & Training (BPSST) and established Policy Committees have open vacancies looking to be filled. The current vacancies are as follows:

 

BPSST: All Board applications must be submitted through Workday.com

  • Two Representatives of the Private Security Industry
  • Member representing the public (Recommended by the Speaker of the House of Representatives)
  • Recommended to the Governor by the Oregon Fire Chiefs Association
  • Administrator of a Municipality recommended to the Governor by the executive body of the League of Oregon Cities
  • Representative of the Fire Service recommended to the Governor by the Oregon Fire District Directors Association
  • Representative of the Fire Service recommended to the Governor by the Oregon Volunteer Firefighters Association
  • Member who is chief of police recommended to the Governor by the Oregon Association Chiefs of Police

If interested in applying for a BPSST position, please complete the online application at Workday Board and Commission Opportunities. When applying for a BPSST position, please specifically state which vacant position you are applying for. (Please note that an account may need to be created if not already in Workday)

 

Policy Committees:

Telecommunications Policy Committee:

  • Representing telecommunicators
  • Recommended by and representing the Oregon State Police
  • Recommended by an representing a statewide association of public safety communication officers

Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee:

  • Representing the public who has never been employed or utilized as a private security provider or investigator 
  • Representing private business or governmental entity that utilizes private security services

Police Policy Committee:

  • Recommended by and representing the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association

Corrections Policy Committee:

  • Representing Non-Management Corrections Officers

Fire Policy Committee:

  • Non-Management Firefighter recommended by a statewide organization of firefighters

 

If interested in applying for a Policy Committee position, please complete and submit the Policy Committee Interest Form. This form can also be found under the ‘Boards and Committees Resources’ section of the website linked below.

To inquire about a vacancy, please visit Department of Public Safety Standards & Training : Board on Public Safety Standards & Training and Policy Committees : Boards and Committees : State of Oregon.

For further information regarding the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training or its respective Policy Committees, please contact Shelby Wright at y.wright@dpsst.oregon.gov">shelby.wright@dpsst.oregon.gov.

 

Thank you,

DPSST Board & Committees Staff


Portland Business Alliance releases findings of voter poll: Voter pessimism has leveled off but homelessness and crime remain among the biggest issues facing our region
Portland Business Alliance - 02/03/23 7:00 AM

Today, the Portland Business Alliance released the results of a recent poll conducted by DHM Research that reveals voter pessimism has declined compared to last year. The poll also shows that livability issues dominate voters’ priorities with homelessness, crime, and trust in government, in general, identified as the biggest issues facing the region. The rising costs of living and housing affordability are also on the list of issues that voters are “very concerned” about. 

Each year, the Alliance solicits voter feedback to track changes in sentiment over time and better understand the attitudes of regional voters around key areas of concern, jobs and the economy.

Among the poll’s key findings:

  • 78% of voters say that quality of life is getting worse – down from 88% in 2021.
  • 52% of voters say the Portland region is headed on the wrong track – down from 62% in 2021.
  • Four in ten voters rate their economic opportunities as poor or very poor.
  • Voters are more concerned about affordable housing (49% very concerned), and cost of living (45%) than they are about jobs.
  • 61% of voters state taxes are too high.
  • Multnomah County voters support multiple policies to address public safety and affordable housing/houselessness.
  • A majority of Portland voters (47%) oppose funding a tenant resource program with a capital gains tax, with 40% of voters showing support.
  • Portland residents are split as to whether to continue funding affordable housing bond measures whereas the rest of region leans to opposing future measures.
  • Voters outside of Portland generally feel unsafe going downtown during the day or night, most of the region’s residents feel unsafe in downtown Portland at night (69%).

"For over a decade we have asked voters about their priorities. It is crystal clear what voters in the Portland region want to see elected leaders making progress on: Urgent and decisive improvements to our unsheltered homeless crisis through transitional sheltering and housing production; and second, immediate improvements to public safety based on an efficient and accountable criminal justice system,” says Andrew Hoan, President and CEO of the Portland Business Alliance. “Lastly, regional leaders will have to start focusing on addressing our tax structure in the region or risk the inability to fund critical services that depend on the renewal of dedicated revenue streams. Portland is at a crossroads, and we need our leaders to respond with the urgency that voters are demanding.”

The Alliance contracted with DHM Research to conduct the survey of likely voters in the Portland metro region for the purposes of tracking voter opinions about the Portland region’s economy over time; assessing voters’ top priorities; and, measuring support for local governance and policy proposals. Surveys were conducted via phone and text-to-online of 500 Multnomah, Clackamas and Washington county voters, including an oversample of Portland voters (n=250), from December 8–14, 2022. Respondents were contacted by a live interviewer from a list of registered voters, and quotas set, and data weighted by age, gender, and political party to ensure a representative voter sample.

To view the complete results of the survey, click here.

 

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About DHM Research

“At DHM our purpose is to drive better decisions for our complex world. We offer organizations and leaders the confidence to act by providing trustworthy data. This includes working with individuals and organizations in the private, public, and nonprofit sectors to support smart planning, policy making, and communications. DHM is proud to be recognized as a B Corp certified company that meets rigorous standards of social and environmental performance, accountability, and transparency.”

 

About the Portland Business Alliance:
The Portland Business Alliance – Greater Portland's Chamber of Commerce – was founded in 1870 and represents the largest, most diverse business network in the region. The Alliance brings together more than 2,100 members represented by dynamic and varied employers from around the Portland region, and offers a strong source of support, information, advocacy, engagement and professional development opportunities. Grounded in its mission to create opportunity and advance well-being for all who live and work in the Greater Portland and SW Washington region, the Alliance envisions a healthy and resilient business ecosystem where we work together to increase collaboration in governance; engage community; increase civic leadership; and, advocate for a vibrant, livable region for all.


Thu. 02/02/23
Update-Family Disturbance Leads to Armed Barricaded Subject in La Center- Subject Safely Taken into Custody
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/02/23 9:15 PM

Update 2/2/2023 21:15 hours:

David D. McCandless, 57, of La Center was booked into the Clark County Jail on charges of Assault IV-DV and Reckless Endangerment. 


On 2/2/23 at around 13:40 hours, personnel from the Clark County Sheriff’s Office (CCSO) responded to a report of an assault that had just occurred on a rural property in the 34600 Block of NE 127th Avenue in La Center, WA.  A female family member called 911 to report her male relative had just assaulted an elderly family member by punching him in the face and knocking him to the ground. The caller reported she believed the subject to be drunk and possibly suicidal.

Deputies had been out to this residence the previous day, 2/1/2023, after a minor disturbance was reported. The subject was reportedly suicidal and armed with a firearm in the basement. The family did not feel that the subject was a danger to anyone and the subject spoke to deputies on the phone. The deputies offered to connect the subject with mental health resources or arrange a ride to go to the hospital to be evaluated. The subject declined. With the situation calmed and not wanting to provoke a confrontation the deputies disengaged.

On 2/2/2023, when deputies arrived on the scene they had the above information from the previous day. They contacted the family by phone. Some of the family was coming out of the residence down the driveway to speak with the deputies when the subject came out from a detached barn and shot off a round from a revolver-style handgun into the yard. The deputies reported that the shot appeared to impact a tractor in the yard. The deputies got the two family members safely to cover. Concerned that the subject could go back into the house, the deputies got a team together and went into the main residence to get an elderly male out of the home to safety. The elderly male was safely evacuated. 

CCSO deputies contained the residence and launched an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS). The UAS team located the subject standing outside the barn. The subject was walking around the property and shot off another round, possibly toward the UAS. Eventually, the subject went back into the barn. 

The Southwest Washington Regional Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) Team was activated due to the presence of a firearm and the shots fired by the subject. A Search Warrant was applied for and granted by a judge to enter the barn to arrest the subject.

During this process, the subject was able to exit the barn and break the containment which was set around the barn. The subject moved into a wooded area around the property and attempted to conceal himself in some brush near a creek. The Sheriff’s Office UAS was able to keep watch of the subject while the SWAT team assembled an arrest team and devised a plan to safely take the subject into custody. The subject was contained in a wooded area for some time before surrendering to SWAT operators.

The subject was arrested without incident. There is no ongoing threat to the area. Names and charges will be sent in a future update.


Historic cemeteries commission welcomes new members
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 02/02/23 4:36 PM

Two commissioners have been appointed to the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries byLisa Sumption, director of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, which houses the Oregon Historic Cemeteries.

Peggy Drake of Sutherlin was appointed to represent the southern Oregon area. She is a 4th generation resident of Sutherlin, Oregon. Peggy worked in banking and volunteered for several community organizations. She currently serves as secretary on the board of Fair Oaks Cemetery. Her experience working with a small, operating cemetery organization will inform the work of the commission and her community connects will help people access the history cemetery program services. 

Johnny Edwards of McMinnville was appointed to represent the Willamette Valley. He is an active member within the fraternity of Freemasons and has duties related to the archives and history of that organization in Oregon. In 2017, he was assigned the to be sexton and caretaker of the McMinnville and Lafayette Masonic Cemeteries and he has cared for the cemetery and organized its records. He is now part of a larger committee to support the care of Masonic cemeteries throughout the state. His cemetery, research and record management experience will bring useful resources to the commission and his connection to cemeteries throughout the state with provide direction and outreach for the commission’s work.

State law established the seven-member Commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving, and maintaining their appearances. Grants are available now for the Oregon Historic Cemeteries Grant. 

“We are grateful to have such enthusiastic and skilled people join the commission,” notes Kuri Gill, commission coordinator. “They will be a benefit to our historic cemeteries.” The new commissioners join: Milo Reed, chair, from Portland; Sarah Silbernagel, vice-chair, from Pendleton; Lisa Sears, from Cloverdale; and Shawn Steinmetz, from la Grande. 

For more information about commission activities visit www.oregonheritage.org, contact coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685, or by e-mail at i.gill@oprd.oregon.gov">kuri.gill@oprd.oregon.gov


Washougal School District Cuts Ribbon on Student-Run Food Truck, Teaches Job Readiness Skills (Photo)
Washougal Sch. Dist. - 02/02/23 4:31 PM
Students in the Culinary Arts program at Washougal High School help to plan and run the food truck.
Students in the Culinary Arts program at Washougal High School help to plan and run the food truck.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/28/160927/thumb_IMG_3550.JPG

WASHOUGAL, Wash., February 2, 2022 - On February 2, 2023, Washougal School District celebrated the opening of Shoug Shack, the district’s first ever student-run food truck with an official ribbon cutting ceremony. Students in Career & Technical Education programs at Washougal High School applied classroom learning to solve real world problems by planning and preparing this student-run food truck. Washougal School District is an emerging leader in Career & Technical Education, supporting 16 national career clusters available for students to explore meaningful job readiness skills.

“This student-run food cart is one example of our dedication to bring job-readiness skills to classroom learning. Preparing students with knowledge and experience relevant to their future careers best serves our students and our community,” said Washougal School District Superintendent Mary Templeton.

Washougal School District Superintendent Mary Templeton, Career & Technical Education Director Margaret Rice, and Mayor David Stuebe delivered opening remarks and cut the ribbon on the new food truck. The food truck is a culmination of classroom learning for students in Career & Technical Education programs at Washougal High School including Digital Photography, Social Media Marketing and Culinary Arts.

“Washougal School District creates opportunities for students to build confidence in starting, running, and marketing a business selling real products. Our Career & Technical Education programs introduce students to industry standards and professional settings,” said Margaret Rice, Director of Career & Technical Education for the Washougal School District. The Shoug Shack opens the door for students to gain experience within the Hospitality & Tourism industries such as working in commercial kitchens, and now a food truck, before graduating high school.

Mayor David Stuebe proclaimed February as Career & Technical Education month in Washougal during the event. “Career and Technical Education is offering a path to success in the 21st century economy while helping to address the urgent need for skilled labor in high-demand industries, and it is enabling numerous Washougal students to secure gainful employment and lead productive, fulfilling lives,” said Stuebe.

Students learned business management, restaurant operation, and teamwork skills through this hands-on project. Riley Harding, Washougal High School student in the Culinary Arts program, was one of 23 students involved in applying classroom learning to plan and operate this new food truck. "We have been developing and testing our chili recipes in preparation for the launch. All of the recipes, including the mulled cider were developed by students," said Harding. "Having the food truck is an opportunity for us to gain real business experience in the culinary industry. It lets us put our classroom skills to work in a real business and gives us a leg up when heading out into the world of work." 

Culinary Arts students served chili and refreshments out of the newly dedicated food truck immediately following the ribbon cutting. Following the ribbon cutting, the Shoug Shack will be used as an extension of the Advanced Culinary Classroom where, on occasion, students will create and serve meals in collaboration with WSD Culinary Services during lunchtimes at all district schools. Students will also have opportunities in the future to serve items out of the food truck at community events.


Washougal School District knows, nurtures, and challenges all students to rise. The Shoug Shack project was made possible thanks to partnerships with industry professionals Lori Reed at Reed Creative, Jeff Hartup at Valleyhoo, and Washougal High School graduate Luke Flock.  To learn more about Career & Technical Education programs at Washougal School District, visit http://www.washougal.k12.wa.us/cte/.




Attached Media Files: Students in the Culinary Arts program at Washougal High School help to plan and run the food truck. , Left to right: Cory Chase, Mayor David Stuebe , Jim Cooper, Angela Hancock, Chuck Carpenter, Cory Chase, Mary Templeton, Margaret Rice, Sadie McKenzie, and Mayor David Steube , Shoug Shack food truck

Deputies Ask for the Public's Help in Locating Missing Person (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/02/23 4:17 PM
Social Media Graphic
Social Media Graphic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/1128/160925/thumb_Onedonna_INTHAVONG_-_AGE_46_(1).png

Deputies at the Washington County Sheriff's Office are asking for the public’s help locating 46-year-old Onedonna Inthavong. Inthavong was last seen in downtown Portland on Wednesday, January 31, 2023. Inthavong was last seen wearing a black beanie, black/brown leather jacket, blue sweatpants, and white shoes. She also had a brown camouflage sleeping bag with her.

A photo of Inthavong was taken of her wearing a black tank top and blue skirt shortly before she was last seen.

Please contact the Washington County Sheriff's Office at 503-629-0111 or your local law enforcement agency if you know where Inthavong is or have any information.




Attached Media Files: Media Release PDF , Social Media Graphic

Marion County Judge Orders a Man With Five DUIIs to Serve Nearly a Year in Jail
Marion Co. Dist. Attorney's Office - 02/02/23 3:57 PM

For Immediate Release on February 2, 2023       

On January 30, 2023, Marion County Circuit Court, Judge Sean E. Armstrong, sentenced Luis Pineda-Castro to 364 days in the Marion jail after pleading guilty to five separate counts of Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants (DUII). 

Mr. Pineda-Castro was also sentenced to five years of probation. The terms of his probation include requirements that he enter into and successfully complete an alcohol treatment program, and that he must attend a Victim Impact Panel where he will hear from individuals whose lives have been adversely impacted by drunk drivers. Additionally, Mr. Pineda-Castro is prohibited from using or possessing any alcohol or controlled substances, and he cannot enter any bars or taverns. Should Mr. Pineda-Castro be found in violation of the terms of his probation, he faces an additional 364 days of jail. Judge Armstrong also suspended Mr. Pineda-Castro’s Oregon driver’s license for life.

The five counts of DUII spanned from 2018 to 2022. In Oregon, a person is presumptively guilty of DUII if they are found to be driving with .08% blood alcohol content (BAC). In his five DUII incidents, Mr. Pineda-Castro’s BAC tested in a range of .18% to .31%.

Mr. Pineda-Castro evaded the court system for four years by being arrested for DUII, given a release agreement and a court date, and then failing to appear at his court dates. He failed to appear in court nine times while his cases remained open. From 2018 through 2021, he was cited four times for DUII. In 2022, his latest incident of DUII, he was held on bail Marion County with a public safety override, the reason being he was as an extreme risk to the community and people on the roads.


Harper's Playground: Brick & Paver Purchase Deadline Extended to February 21 for Inclusive Park (Photo)
Harper's Playground - 02/02/23 3:54 PM
CHAMPS @ Marshall Park Construction Site
CHAMPS @ Marshall Park Construction Site
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-12/7138/159669/thumb_Construction.jpeg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: February 2, 2023

CONTACT: G Cody QJ Goldberg, Harper’s Playground Co-Founder & Chief Play Officer, (503)730-5445, cody@harpersplayground.org

Deadline Extended to February 21 for Brick & Paver Purchases for Inclusive Park
Help build Marshall Park & leave your mark! Add your name, business or message to the park.

Vancouver, Washington Harper's Playground continues to fundraise for the reimagined Chelsea Anderson Memorial Play Station (CHAMPS) at Marshall Park, and is less than $400,000 shy of its $3.2 million goal. The nonprofit seeks community support in the form of buying a recognition brick or paver

Due to popular demand, the deadline for purchase has been extended to Tuesday, February 21. There's still time to make your name, business, message or quote a meaningful part of the park. Honor or memorialize a loved one. Inspire the next generation. Quantities are limited.

“We're thrilled with the community support received thus far, and look forward to the final funding coming in the form of personalized bricks & pavers. The space becomes so much more meaningful when community members own it and take part in it. The playground will be filled with special messages from people on these bricks & pavers.” —Harper’s Playground Co-Founder & Chief Play Officer G Cody QJ Goldberg

In partnership with the City of Vancouver and local firms Pence Contractors and AKS Engineering & Forestry, Harper's Playground is honored to lead the design and building of CHAMPS @ Marshall Park, which is currently under construction and halfway to completion. The project broke ground on July 11, 2022, at a community ceremony and is slated to open late spring of 2023, pending full funding.

The 53,143 square feet/1.22-acre playground addresses the City’s goal to expand accessible, public, outdoor play spaces. It will retain the Chelsea Anderson Memorial and honor and enhance the fire department theme throughout.

Explorable and accessible play areas will meet the social, emotional, and physical needs of people of all ages and abilities. Wheelchair accessible equipment, including the following elements, will foster intergenerational exchange and collaboration:

  • Washington’s first wheelchair swing!
  • The largest “Harper’s Hill” ever built with 360° views and seating at the top
  • An Integration Carousel, or merry go round
  • A Wheel Play Zone, or skate park
  • An elevated sand area
  • A bona fide fire engine with original interactive levers and buttons to play with
  • A log fort, “Mobius Climber,” swings, musical instruments
  • Smooth winding paths and sloping hills
  • Custom bronze sculptures of native animals such as turtles and beavers

Including CHAMPS @ Marshall Park, Harper's Playground has a total of four projects in various stages in Vancouver, Washington. The organization serves as design consultant on a new inclusive playground at Esther Short Park—also opening this spring—and is currently assisting Vancouver Public Schools in building two playgrounds in its model.

Incorporated in 2012, Harper’s Playground, Inc. is a 501(c)3 nonprofit based in Portland, Oregon, which inspires vital communities by creating inviting playgrounds for people of ALL abilities. Founded in 2010 by local parents on a mission to create a more equitable world for their daughters, one of whom uses wheels to get around, the organization designed, funded, and built the original Harper’s Playground at Arbor Lodge Park in Portland, Ore.—the first inclusive, nature-infused play space in the region, now celebrating its tenth anniversary. Harper’s Playground has inspired, empowered, consulted or partnered to design and build playgrounds globally, including in Tokyo, Japan. For more information, visit harpersplayground.org, or connect on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and Twitter.
 

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Attached Media Files: CHAMPS @ Marshall Park Construction Site , Purchase a Recognition Brick or Paver , Gateway Discovery Park , Original Harper's Playground at Arbor Lodge Park , Giving Thermometer , Purchase a brick or paver by January 31. , Purchase a Brick or Paver

SAIF delivering free ag safety seminars in Mt. Angel next week
SAIF - 02/02/23 3:43 PM

What: SAIF will be presenting free, half-day seminars on agricultural safety and health. On Tuesday, February 7, the seminar will be in English; the Wednesday, February 8, seminar will be in Spanish. 

Who should attend: The seminars are designed primarily for people working in agriculture but are open to anyone interested in ag safety and health—they don't have to be insured by SAIF.

When: Tuesday, February 7, in English; Wednesday, February 8, in Spanish. Both seminars run from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and lunch is included.

Where: The Mt. Angel Community Festhalle, located at 500 S. Wilco Highway.    

More information: Below and at www.saif.com/agseminars. Photos from previous seminars are available by request.


SAIF BRINGS BACK FREE IN-PERSON FARM SAFETY TRAININGS

SAIF will be touring the state in the next few months to offer free farm safety sessions. 

The 29 free ag safety seminars will be in 17 cities across Oregon. The first will be in Ontario on October 25, and they'll continue through March. Nine of the seminars will be presented entirely in Spanish. 

SAIF has put the seminars on for the last 29 years, helping Oregon’s farm owners, managers, and workers stay safe in one of the most hazardous industries. SAIF offered online webinars the last two years in lieu of in-person events. 

“We are excited to get back on the road to offer these critical safety trainings this year,” said Courtney Merriott, senior safety management consultant at SAIF and one of the seminar presenters. “Being able to get out into the ag community is more effective as we look at reducing hazards in this industry.” 

This year's seminars will focus on four topics: ag hacks and ag myth busters; coexisting with agricultural chemicals; balancing the effects of heat and the effects of OSHA’s new heat rule; and first responders on the farm.

SAIF will also host online webinars in December and March in both English and Spanish. 

The seminars are designed primarily for people working in agriculture but are open to anyone interested in ag safety and health—they don't have to be insured by SAIF.

In-person seminars will be held in Bandon, Boring, Central Point, Corvallis, Eugene, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Klamath Falls, La Grande, Madras, Milton-Freewater, Mt. Angel, Ontario, Salem, The Dalles, and Wilsonville.

Spanish seminars will be held in Central Point, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Madras, Mt. Angel, Salem, The Dalles, and Wilsonville.

All will run from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and lunch will be provided.

Employers with small ag businesses who attend the seminar, or watch the webinars, will meet OSHA's instructional requirement—one of four requirements that exempt small agricultural operations from random OSHA inspections.

Three hours of technical and one hour of business continuing education credits are available from the Landscape Contractors Board. Four producer continuing education credit hours for licensed insurance agents are approved by the Department of Consumer and Business Services.

More information—including registration details—can be found at www.saif.com/agseminars.

About SAIF

SAIF is Oregon's not-for-profit workers' compensation insurance company. Since 1914, we've been taking care of injured workers, helping people get back to work, and striving to make Oregon the safest and healthiest place to work. For more information, visit the About SAIF page on saif.com.


BLM waives day use fees in observance of Washington's Birthday
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 02/02/23 3:36 PM

REVISED STORY - CORRECTION: September fee-free day for National Public Lands Day is Sep. 23


PORTLAND, Ore, — In honor of George Washington’s birthday and to increase recreational access to public land, the Bureau of Land Management is waiving recreation standard amenity and day-use fees for visitors on Feb. 20, 2023. The BLM invites the public to visit the unique and diverse natural landscapes and visitor facilities on BLM-managed lands to celebrate the life of the first U.S. President George Washington.

This marks the second of the BLM’s fee-free days of 2023. Fee-free days refer to the waiver of standard amenity fees and day-use fees, such as visitor centers, picnic/day use areas, and National Conservation Lands units where fees are charged. Expanded amenity fees and other fees, like group day use, overnight camping, cabin rentals, and individual special recreation permits, will remain in effect unless the authorized officer determines it is appropriate to waive them.

BLM’s public lands offer spectacular beauty in the colder months. Find a map of BLM’s top recreation locations in the snow, rain, or ice here:
https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/766c58075f574db2b52f3d2e13b75bb8


Winter recreation on public lands

Be prepared:

  • Know before you go. Check with local offices for current conditions, including closures and travel restrictions.
  • Make sure tires have adequate traction for road conditions.
  • Ensure that a friend or family member is aware of your adventure plans.
  • Ensure you have the 10 essentials before venturing out: navigation tools (map, GPS, personal locator beacon), headlamp, sun protection (sunglasses and sunscreen, especially against snow glare!), first aid kit, knife/gear repair kit, fire essentials (fire starter, matches, lighter, etc.), shelter (i.e., an emergency blanket that folds up extremely small), extra food, extra water (beyond the minimum expectation), and extra clothes (layer up!).


Recommendations on where to go with snow (NOTE: these locations may or may not have fees): 

  • Burns: Steens Mountain offers an array of winter recreation opportunities, including snowmobiling, snowshoeing, and skiing. Individual permits must be obtained through the Burns District Office.
  • Lakeview: Gerber Recreation Site is popular for ice fishing and open year-round for camping. The paved roads are not plowed but remain clear of snow most winters. Wood River Wetland offers hiking, dog walking, bird watching, hunting, and (when there’s enough snow) snowshoeing. Be aware that the parking area is not plowed in the winter, so parking is not always available.
  • Medford: Cross country skiing and snowshoeing are available at the Cascade Siskiyou National Monument and Table Mountain Winter Play Area.
  • Washington State: Split Rock Recreation Site at Palmer Lake offers ice fishing (or regular fishing if there is no ice). Visitors can also hike on the Similkameen Rail Trail from Oroville to the Enloe Dam or on the Cowiche Canyon Trail (where there is usually little to no snow). The Yakima River Canyon Recreation Site is a great location for winter camping. If winter is mild, the Juniper Dunes Off-Highway Vehicle Area is a good option for recreation, and if the winter is cold, the Fishtrap Recreation Area offers ice fishing and cross-country skiing.

Recommendations on where to go with little to no snow (NOTE: these locations may or may not have fees):  

  • Northwest Oregon: The West Eugene Wetlands offer disc golf, the Sandy Ridge Trail System offers mountain biking, Shotgun Creek Recreation Site is open to off-highway vehicles, and the Wildwood Recreation Site has an underwater salmon viewing chamber.
  • Medford: Sites such as the Upper and Lower Table Rocks, Cathedral Hills, and Mountain of the Rogue offer winter hiking and tend to be free of snow.

In 2023, BLM will waive recreation standard amenity and day use fees for visitors on: 

  • January 16 (Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.)
  • February 20 (Washington’s Birthday)
  • June 19 (Juneteenth National Independence Day)
  • August 4 (Great American Outdoors Day)
  • September 23 (National Public Lands Day)
  • November 11 (Veterans Day)

For more information about the BLM’s recreation fee program, please visit https: //www.blm.gov/programs/recreation/permits-and-fees.


-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 western states, including Alaska, on behalf of the American people. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Our mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.

 


Lake Oswego Public Library launches Community Visioning Process
City of Lake Oswego - 02/02/23 2:43 PM

The Lake Oswego Public Library is embarking on a community visioning process to shape the future of the library for generations to come.

The goals of visioning process are to:

  • Create a shared community vision for the future of Lake Oswego Public Library
  • Understand resident’s current and future needs for library services, facilities, and amenities
  • Determine the Library’s role to address community challenges and meet emerging needs

From now through May, the visioning process will cast a broad net to engage the Lake Oswego community. These robust and inclusive engagement efforts will include: internal and external stakeholder interviews, online community survey, in-person community forums, focus groups, and passive information gathering points through Lake Oswego.

“We are looking for your ideas to help create the future of our Lake Oswego Public Library. I am excited for this opportunity for our community, Library team, City Council, Library Advisory Board, and all our invaluable partners to collectively shape the future of our Library as a continued essential resource for Lake Oswego. This is your time to Shape Your Library, Create Our Future!” shares Melissa Kelly, Library Director.

To optimize a robust and inclusive engagement process, the Library is working with BerryDunn, an industry-leading consulting firm. The consultant team will provide depth and breadth of expertise with a national and local frame of reference. In collaboration with Library staff, the consultant team will facilitate broad-based and inclusive community conversations about the needs of the Library’s service-area residents, the roles of the Library in serving its community, and the resources necessary to meet the community’s future vision for library services.

This work is in support of the Lake Oswego City Council goal to determine the long-term needs of the Lake Oswego Public Library, as well as 2021 Community Survey results in support of expanding library amenities, services, and facilities in the future.

For more information about this process, a list of upcoming outreach events, and to share your thoughts and vision for the future in our online survey, please visit www.LakeOswego.city/library or email LibraryVisioning@lakeoswego.city.

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Attached Media Files: NEWS RELEASE 020223 Lake Oswego Public Library launches Community Visioning Process

State issues order to revoke licenses of Lake Oswego investment adviser (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 02/02/23 2:19 PM
2023-02/1073/160919/DFR_Logo.jpg
2023-02/1073/160919/DFR_Logo.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/1073/160919/thumb_DFR_Logo.jpg

SALEM – The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation (DFR) has issued an order to revoke the investment adviser and insurance licenses of David D. Swanson, Sr., a Lake Oswego-based investment adviser, effective March 1, 2023, for violations of the state’s securities and insurance laws arising out of Swanson’s unlawful sale of promissory notes to his clients. Swanson did not tell his clients he was borrowing the money to pay other clients. The delay in the effective date of the revocation allows for an orderly wind-down of his business. Swanson has also been under a cease-and-desist order since 2020.

The division’s order will permanently revoke the investment adviser representative and state investment adviser licenses of Swanson and his company, Swanson Financial Services, Inc., as well as Swanson’s resident insurance producer and resident insurance consultant licenses. The order also assessed civil penalties of up to $160,000 against Swanson and his companies.

The division’s investigation found that Swanson, acting through another of his companies, SF Commercial, LLC, sold promissory notes totaling more than $1.5 million to five clients ages 64 to 77 years old in 2018 and 2019. The clients’ investments ranged from $50,000 to $755,000. As an investment adviser, Swanson was prohibited from borrowing money from his clients. Swanson and his companies also failed to make meaningful disclosures about the true nature and purpose of the investments, including that the money invested by some clients would be used to pay back other clients. Swanson eventually paid back those loans.

“We will not stand for anyone taking advantage of others, especially our vulnerable populations,” said DFR Administrator TK Keen. “Investment advisers must put their clients’ needs and interests ahead of their own. If you have questions about your financial adviser, or believe you may have been taken advantage of in an investment scheme, you can contact our consumer advocates for help.”

The division’s consumer advocates can be reached at 888-877-4894 (toll-free). The division’s consumer advocate webpage also has information about how to file a complaint, check licenses, find resources, or contact an advocate.

DFR has resources available for people who need help with financial services, student loans, payday loans, choosing a financial professional, and more. There are also tips on how to manage finances, find loan help, get out of debt, and more on our financial help page.

The division – part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services – regulates, among others, financial service institutions (including banks and credit unions), investment services, and insurance companies to make sure they are licensed properly and following the law.

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About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dfr.oregon.gov and www.dcbs.oregon.gov.​​




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/1073/160919/DFR_Logo.jpg

Ridgefield High School students can earn dual credits in welding (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 02/02/23 2:14 PM
Students at Ridgefield High School can earn high school and college welding credits
Students at Ridgefield High School can earn high school and college welding credits
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/889/160918/thumb_5.png

Thanks to a partnership with Lower Columbia College, Ridgefield High School students interested in welding can simultaneously earn both high school and college credits. The Career, College and Technical Education (CCTE) Dual Credit welding program is designed to guide local students into high-skill, high-wage careers with local industries, all without having to leave the RHS campus or complete additional coursework. 

To successfully complete the program, students must enroll in welding courses at RHS, apply to LCC, and pass the welding course sequence with a grade of ‘B’ or better. In addition to earning both high school and college credits, students who successfully complete the program will also receive a welding certification.

"CCTE classes help prepare students for life beyond high school,” said Tiffany Gould, Ridgefield School District’s Director of CCTE. “Regardless of whether they’re planning to continue their education at a college or technical school, or to enter the workforce right out of high school, these classes provide Ridgefield students with the skills required to be successful.”

Dual credit applies to CCTE courses, which then transfer to college programs. Once a student finishes high school, they can apply their credits to one of Lower Columbia College's professional-technical programs. Credits earned at LCC can be transferred to any two-year institution or community college in Washington, as well as some four-year colleges

Students interested in pursuing the welding dual credit program should: 

  • Talk to their high school counselor to learn about eligibility and necessary steps
  • Enroll in welding classes at your high school and apply to LCC 
  • Earn a ‘B’ or better grade in the welding course sequence

Research has shown that dual credit programs (also known as dual enrollment or concurrent enrollment) that allow students to earn college and high school credits while still in high school increase the likelihood they will not only graduate high school, but also increases the likelihood that they will attend college and earn a postsecondary degree or certificate.  

Every February, the Career and Technical Education (CTE) community celebrates CTE Month to raise awareness of the role that CTE has in preparing learners for college and career success. No matter the subject, the goal of CTE courses is to provide students with skills that can translate to job opportunities. 




Attached Media Files: Students at Ridgefield High School can earn high school and college welding credits , A student works on a welding project

Marion County Justice Court to Celebrate "Day of Love" on Valentines Day, Officiating Marriages All Day†
Marion County - 02/02/23 2:04 PM

SALEM, Ore. – Feb. 2, 2023 – Justice of the Peace Justin Kidd announces that the Marion County Justice Court will celebrate a "Day of Love" on February 14, 2023, by officiating marriages all day.    

During the event, the Court will offer "loaner flowers" -- a bouquet and boutonnieres for couples to borrow. The court will provide cupcakes for the happy couple, and clerks will play the "Wedding March" for anybody who wants it while they walk down the courtroom aisle. The event is intended to make the day special for all couples, including couples with modest means.    

Judge Kidd and the Justice Court perform marriages throughout the year -- about 120 ceremonies in 2022. Many couples choose Valentine's Day for their ceremony to make their anniversary extra memorable. The second most popular day is Halloween, when some couples come dressed in costumes.   

Judge Kidd performs marriages in English and Spanish.   

"Offering weddings in Spanish is important," he said, "because courts are here to serve the entire community."   

Over the spring and summer, he spends many Saturdays in Woodburn and Aurora officiating Spanish language ceremonies. About half of his marriages are in Spanish. 

Access to justice is an important personal issue to Judge Kidd.  

"Regardless of your economic status, the state should recognize the equal dignity of your marriage," Kidd said. "We're looking forward to celebrating every couple on this Day of Love with flowers, cupcakes, and music."   

Judge Kidd has reached out to community partners, including Arches and Church at the Park to make sure all couples know they are welcome at the event. 

The court has a limited number of slots for the Day of Love. Interested couples will need to get a marriage license from their county clerk, and they will need to call 503.576.7200 for an appointment. 

About the Marion County Justice Court: The Marion County Justice Court hears small claims, landlord-tenant claims, and violations (like traffic tickets). Justice Courts are The People's Courts, designed to administer speedy and accessible justice. Most cases at Justice Court are pro-se, meaning that people represent themselves without lawyers. The judge at the Justice Court is known as the Justice of the Peace. Justices of the Peace have been part of Oregon's judicial system since before Oregon was a state.   

About Judge Kidd: Justin Kidd received his BA in Spanish from the University of Denver, a Masters in Public Management from Carnegie Mellon University, and his JD from the University of California, Berkeley. After law school, he served as an Assistant Attorney General with the Oregon Department of Justice. He's a "people person " who would much prefer being in the courtroom than writing a brief. He's a foster and adoptive parent, so foster care issues are close to his heart.




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/6147/160917/Valentines_day_at_the_Justice_Court.pdf

Pacific Power announces new grants focused on community enhancement and the environment
Pacific Power - 02/02/23 2:00 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Hotline: 503-813-6018

 

Pacific Power announces new grants focused on community enhancement and the environment 

Funding helps local community organizations working to strengthen livability 

in the Willamette Valley

 

SALEM, Ore. (Feb. 2, 2023)Every day, organizations throughout the Willamette Valley are putting their hearts into projects and programs to nurture our local communities and care for the environment. These efforts weave together to create a stronger, more resilient future for the region. 

 

The Pacific Power Foundation, a nonprofit arm of Pacific Power, is donating more than $164,000 in new grant funding across the three states it serves to support organizations committed to community enhancement and environmental respect. From improving access to affordable housing and workforce training to restoring watersheds and caring for neighborhood trees that bring environmental benefits to urban areas, this round of grants will underwrite a wide range of efforts that meet critical needs and improve local livability. 

 

“We are inspired by these organizations, in towns large and small, that are working hard to lift up people in their communities and take care of the environment,” said Adam Kohler, Pacific Power regional business manager. “It is an honor to support this indispensable work, while helping to boost the growth and vitality of the communities we serve.” 

 

This round of grants, focused on community enhancement and environmental respect, is one of the four grant cycles offered by the foundation annually.

 

The following five grants totaling $33,500 were given to local Willamette Valley organizations:

 

Canyon Senior Center to support scholarships and grants for youth programs in the North Santiam Canyon.

 

City of Aumsville to create a service memorial next to city hall that honors all service members past, present and future. 

 

Hunters of Color for support a mentorship program to increase BIPOC participation in outdoor activities through culturally inclusive hunting opportunities and community building. 

 

Rural Development Initiatives to help foster Main Street Economic Vitality Hubs in Oregon through training workshops, technical assistance and coaching. 

 

Young Roots Oregon for the ParentingRoots Development Program that offers culturally specific, essential parenting, health and life-skill courses to young and teen parents.

 

 

About the Pacific Power Foundation:

The Pacific Power Foundation is part of the PacifiCorp Foundation, one of the largest utility-endowed foundations in the United States. The foundation was created by PacifiCorp, an electric utility serving 

2 million customers in six Western states as Rocky Mountain Power (Utah, Wyoming, and Idaho) and Pacific Power (Oregon, Washington, and California). The foundation’s mission, through charitable investments, is to support the growth and vitality of the communities served by Rocky Mountain Power and Pacific Power. Since it started in 1988, the PacifiCorp Foundation has awarded more than $60 million to nonprofit organizations. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/foundation.

 

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Pacific Power announces new grants focused on community enhancement and the environment
Pacific Power - 02/02/23 1:46 PM

Media Hotline: 503-813-6018

 

 

Pacific Power announces new grants focused on community enhancement and the environment 

Funding helps local community organizations working to strengthen livability 

in the greater Portland area

 

PORTLAND, Ore. (Feb. 2, 2023)Every day, organizations across the greater Portland area are putting their hearts into projects and programs to nurture our local communities and care for the environment. These efforts weave together to create a stronger, more resilient future for the region. 

 

The Pacific Power Foundation, a nonprofit arm of Pacific Power, is donating more than $164,000 in new grant funding across the three states it serves to support organizations committed to community enhancement and environmental respect. From improving access to affordable housing and workforce training to restoring watersheds and caring for neighborhood trees that bring environmental benefits to urban areas, this round of grants will underwrite a wide range of efforts that meet critical needs and improve local livability. 

 

“We are inspired by these organizations, in towns large and small, that are working hard to lift up people in their communities and take care of the environment,” said Bob Gravely, Pacific Power regional business manager. “It is an honor to support this indispensable work, while helping to boost the growth and vitality of the communities we serve.” 

 

This round of grants, focused on community enhancement and environmental respect, ione of the four grant cycles offered by the foundation annually.

 

The following 12 grants totaling $33,500 were given to Portland-area organizations:

 

1000 Friends of Oregon to support efforts to prioritize affordable housing in proximity to transit, walkable and bikeable neighborhoods through the Housing for Oregonians Made Easy (HOME) initiative.

 

Alder Commons for supplies and labor to build shelving and expand inventory for the community center’s multicultural and multigenerational library.

 

Columbia Insight for an educational series about recognizing and protecting biodiversity in the Columbia River Gorge. 

 

Constructing Hope to support the pre-apprenticeship program that provides construction training and support for 100 unemployed Oregonians who are predominately people of color.

 

Free Geek for programs that collect, reuse and recycle computers and other technology devices and provide them to low-income people in the Portland area. 

 

Friends of Trees to support projects that bring community members together with volunteer leaders to learn how to prune young street trees to help them thrive and provide environmental benefits to Northeast Portland neighborhoods for years to come. 

 

Junior Achievement of Oregon & SW Washington to provide students from low-to-moderate income homes across Oregon with Junior Achievement in-class programs that help build financial and career skills. 

 

Lloyd EcoDistrict for emergency preparedness workshops, training and supplies to help create a more resilient neighborhood.

 

Oregon Tradeswomen to support training, job placement and career support to help women build careers in skilled trades. 

 

Proud Ground for education and counseling to help low-income homebuyers purchase their first home.

 

ReBuilding Center to help fund 30 free, home-repair classes serving over 300 low-income homeowners, helping them retain their homes and remain in their neighborhood.

 

Taking Ownership PDX for renovating and reviving black-owned homes, enabling homeowners to age in place, generate wealth and deflect neighborhood gentrification. 

 

 

 

About the Pacific Power Foundation:

The Pacific Power Foundation is part of the PacifiCorp Foundation, one of the largest utility-endowed foundations in the United States. The foundation was created by PacifiCorp, an electric utility serving 

2 million customers in six Western states as Rocky Mountain Power (Utah, Wyoming, and Idaho) and Pacific Power (Oregon, Washington, and California). The foundation’s mission, through charitable investments, is to support the growth and vitality of the communities served by Rocky Mountain Power and Pacific Power. Since it started in 1988, the PacifiCorp Foundation has awarded more than $60 million to nonprofit organizations. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/foundation.

 

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Pacific Power announces new grants focused on community enhancement and the environment
Pacific Power - 02/02/23 1:43 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Hotline: 503-813-6018

 

 

Pacific Power announces new grants focused on community enhancement and the environment 

Funding helps local community organizations working to strengthen livability 

on the northern Oregon Coast

 

ASTORIA, Ore. (Feb. 2, 2023)Every day, organizations on the northern Oregon Coast are putting their hearts into projects and programs to nurture our local communities and care for the environment. These efforts weave together to create a stronger, more resilient future for the region. 

 

The Pacific Power Foundation, a nonprofit arm of Pacific Power, is donating more than $164,000 in new grant funding across the three states it serves to support organizations committed to community enhancement and environmental respect. From improving access to affordable housing and workforce training to restoring watersheds and caring for neighborhood trees that bring environmental benefits to urban areas, this round of grants will underwrite a wide range of efforts that meet critical needs and improve local livability. 

 

“We are inspired by these organizations, in towns large and small, that are working hard to lift up people in their communities and take care of the environment,” said Alisa Dunlap, Pacific Power regional business manager. “It is an honor to support this indispensable work, while helping to boost the growth and vitality of the communities we serve.” 

 

This round of grants, focused on community enhancement and environmental respect, is one of the four grant cycles offered by the foundation annually.

 

The following grants totaling $7,500 were given to northern Oregon Coast organizations:

 

Sunset Park and Recreation Foundation to support childcare offerings by installing sensory paths in the recreation center to help young children learn their alphabet, numbers, shapes and colors through movement. 

 

Wildlife Center of the North Coast to help renovate facilities and attend to maintenance that was delayed by the COVID pandemic. 

 

 

 

 

About the Pacific Power Foundation:

The Pacific Power Foundation is part of the PacifiCorp Foundation, one of the largest utility-endowed foundations in the United States. The foundation was created by PacifiCorp, an electric utility serving 

2 million customers in six Western states as Rocky Mountain Power (Utah, Wyoming, and Idaho) and Pacific Power (Oregon, Washington, and California). The foundation’s mission, through charitable investments, is to support the growth and vitality of the communities served by Rocky Mountain Power and Pacific Power. Since it started in 1988, the PacifiCorp Foundation has awarded more than $60 million to nonprofit organizations. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/foundation.

 

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City Seeking Public Review and Comment on Draft HOME-ARP Plan for Homelessness Assistance
City of Vancouver - 02/02/23 1:36 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The City of Vancouver welcomes the community to review and provide input on the 2023 allocation of approximately $2,496,110 in Home Investment Partnerships Program American Rescue Plan (HOME-ARP) funding. 

These American Rescue Plan (ARP) funds are administered through the HOME Investment Partnerships Program to benefit qualifying individuals and families who are experiencing homelessness, at risk of homelessness, or in other vulnerable populations. The types of activities that can be undertaken with this funding include: 

  1. development and support of affordable housing, 
  2. tenant-based rental assistance, 
  3. supportive services; and 
  4. acquisition and development of non-congregate shelter.

Funding priorities are based on community need as expressed through the consultation process with community partners. Current priorities include supportive services and housing for people who are experiencing homelessness.

The HOME-ARP Draft Allocation Plan is a substantial amendment to the 2021 Action Plan and can be reviewed here. The community is invited to submit comment via e-mail to g@cityofvancouver.us">cdbg@cityofvancouver.us until 5 p.m. on Friday, March 3, 2023. The community is also invited to attend our public hearing at City Hall on Monday, Feb. 27, 2023 at 6:30 p.m. during the regularly scheduled City Council Meeting.  

For more information, please contact Samantha Whitley in the Economic Prosperity and Housing Department at g@cityofvancouver.us">cdbg@cityofvancouver.us | 360-487-7952.

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OHCS to join the Governor's newly established Housing Production Advisory Council
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 02/02/23 1:34 PM

SALEM, Ore. — Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) to join Governor Tina Kotek’s 25-member Housing Production Advisory Council (HPAC) that will play a pivotal role in meeting the state’s housing production targets. Governor Kotek’s Executive Order NO. 23-04 established a production target of 36,000 homes per year for the next ten years. Currently the state is recruiting a diverse membership to join the statewide Housing Production Council.   

“This moment in time requires us to act with urgency and humanity to pursue solutions that meet the moment to address this housing crisis,” said Director Andrea Bell. “Housing is intersectional to everything. Economic justice, closing the racial wealth gap, improving public health outcomes and meeting our climate goals are dependent upon us, collectively, addressing this crisis.”  

“Governor Kotek’s commitment to solving the affordable housing crisis emboldens our pursuit of solutions that matter most to the people of Oregon in real ways. At the local, state and federal levels we must take every action necessary to work towards ensuring everyone has access to a safe and affordable place to call home. That is our commitment and collective responsibility.” 

HPAC’s main function is to recommend an action plan that includes concrete executive actions, policies and investments needed to meet the production target. People interested in the opportunity to help shape the state’s housing policies, are encouraged to apply to join the HPAC

About Oregon Housing and Community Services

Oregon Housing and Community Services provides resources for Oregonians to reduce poverty and increase access to stable housing. Our intentional focus on both housing and community services allows us to serve Oregonians holistically across the housing continuum, including preventing and ending homelessness, assisting with utilities, providing housing stability support, financing multifamily affordable housing and encouraging homeownership.

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Portland Police Memorial Vandalized (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 02/02/23 1:08 PM
2023-02/3056/160908/Police_Memorial.jpeg
2023-02/3056/160908/Police_Memorial.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/3056/160908/thumb_Police_Memorial.jpeg
On Wednesday, February 1, 2023, Portland Police took a criminal report regarding significant vandalism to the Portland Police Memorial on Waterfront Park. The vandalism occurred sometime on the night of Tuesday, January 31, 2023; each of the names of fallen officers was etched off.
The Police Memorial was first conceived in 1974 by the Portland Police Historical Society and became a reality in 1994 when it was dedicated by President George Bush.

The Memorial commemorates the Portland Police Officers who gave their lives in the performance of their official duties. There are currently 29 Portland Police members honored on the wall that range from the first killed in 1867 to the last in 2002. The names also are on the National Police Memorial in Washington, D.C.

"This is a senseless, destructive and intentional act," said Chief Lovell. "This memorial honors heroes—people who had the courage to give their lives while serving the City of Portland. No amount of destruction can erase their legacy. My heart goes out to the families and loved ones of the people named on the memorial. There are spouses, children, grandchildren and more who suffered greatly by the loss of their loved one. To see a cowardly act such as this done in an attempt to dishonor that memory is disgraceful."

The Police Historical Society is the gatekeeper for the memorial. For more information on the Historical Society, visit: http://portlandpolicemuseum.com/memorial--fallen-officers.html


Photo descriptions:
Police Memorial: photo from prior Police Memorial Ceremony of nameplates with roses
Police Memorial Vandalism to nameplates


###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2023-02/3056/160908/Police_Memorial.jpeg , 2023-02/3056/160908/Police_Memorial_pre_vandalism.JPG

UPDATE #2: Victim of Downtown Stabbing Identified
Portland Police Bureau - 02/02/23 1:08 PM
The victim of the downtown stabbing Tuesday is identified as Jonathan D. Bennett, 34. His family has been notified of his death, and is requesting privacy as they grieve their loss. They are declining media interview requests at this time.

The medical examiner determined that Bennett died of homicide by stabbing.

###PPB###

Original Messages Below

A man has been arrested for the January 31st Downtown stabbing that left another man dead.

After conducting their initial investigation, homicide detectives arrested the previously detained individual, identified as 25-year-old Jonathan Grall. Grall was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on one count of Murder in the Second Degree and one count of Unlawful Use of a Weapon.

More information will be released as the investigation allows.

###PPB###


On Tuesday, January 31st, at 10:57 p.m., officers from the Central Precinct responded to stabbing call in the 1200 block of Southwest Park Avenue. Officers arrived to find an adult male suffering from an apparent stab wound. Paramedics arrived to treat the victim but the male died at the scene. One person has been detained as a result of the investigation.

The Portland Police Homicide Unit has responded to investigate. If anyone has information about this incident, they are asked to please contact Detective Meghan Burkeen at Meghan.Burkeen@police.portlandoregon.gov 503-823-2092 or Detective Brian Sims at Brian.Sims@police.portlandoregon.gov 503-823-4033 and reference case number 23-29300.

During the investigation, Southwest Park Avenue and Southwest 9th Avenue will be closed between Southwest Main Street and Southwest Jefferson Street. The identity of the victim will be released after they are positively identified, the Medical Examiner has confirmed cause of death, and after family members have been notified.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be released when appropriate.

###PPB###

Ribbon Cutting Ceremony for New Clatsop County Jail (Photo)
Clatsop Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/02/23 12:15 PM
New Clatsop County Jail
New Clatsop County Jail
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/3864/160905/thumb_New_Jail_Ribbon_Cutting.jpg

The Clatsop County Sheriff’s Office invites the community to celebrate the completion of the new Clatsop County Jail.  A ribbon-cutting ceremony will be held Friday, February 10th, 2023, at 1 pm to commemorate the completion of the facility.

The new jail project began after voters approved a $20 million-dollar jail bond in 2018. DLR Group provided architectural and engineering services while Emerick Construction Co. served as the general contractor. Cornerstone Management Group represented the County during the process.

The new Clatsop County Jail is located at 1250 SE 19th St., Warrenton Oregon, directly across from the Clatsop County Animal Shelter.  Please join us at the ribbon cutting to celebrate and tour the facility.




Attached Media Files: New Clatsop County Jail

A20-489 Death Investigation - Subject Identification (Photo)
Cowlitz Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/02/23 11:34 AM
Jade Feigert photo
Jade Feigert photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/1503/160901/thumb_Feigert_Namus_photo.jpg

A20-489

Death Investigation

February 2, 2023

 

 

In February 2020, human skeletal remains were found by a longshoreman at the Weyerhaeuser dock in Longview, Washington. Detectives with the Cowlitz County Sheriff’s Office and members of the Cowlitz County Coroner’s Office searched the area and found a nearly complete skeleton buried in thick blackberry bushes. The skeleton was collected, and the scene was processed. The skeletal remains were sent to the King County Medical Examiner’s Office for a full forensic examination. The examination showed no signs of trauma, and the cause of death is unknown. A forensic odontologist made a dental record for comparison with the National Missing Person’s Database. Anthropological analysis suggested that the skeletal remains belonged to an adult Caucasian or Hispanic male. 

In November of 2021, Detectives began working with Othram, a private DNA lab that specializes in advanced forensic DNA testing. Using Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing® and genetic genealogy, they were able to identify potential family members of the unidentified subject. Detectives contacted the family and learned that they had a missing family member. Jade David Feigert was 22 years old and living in Columbia County, OR when he went missing in February 2017. Feigert was last seen when he was dropped off in Kelso, WA by his mother. 

 Detectives worked with Feigert’s mother, Monica Feigert, and sent her DNA profile, which she had from a consumer DNA testing company to Othram. Othram compared the DNA and determined that it was a match to a mother/son relationship. Detectives also contacted Feigert’s father, Michael Smith, who lives in Texas.

 Detectives had also worked with the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs). NamUs is a nationwide tracking system for missing and unidentified subjects. The Cowlitz County Sheriff’s Office had entered the characteristics of the remains into NamUs. The Columbia County Sheriff’s Office had entered Feigert’s information into NamUs when his family had reported him missing in March of 2021. After Othram led Detectives to Feigert, NamUs had a Forensic Odontologist compare the dental records of the two subjects and determined that they matched.

Cowlitz County detectives notified Monica Feigert and Michael Smith of the positive identification. The Cowlitz County Coroner’s Office will work with the family to turn over Jade’s remains. 

 There is no indication that Jade Feigert died as a result of a crime and the investigation will be closed.

 Attached is a photo of Feigert that was provided by the family when they reported him missing.

 The family is requesting privacy at this time and does not wish to be contacted by the media.

 

 




Attached Media Files: Press Release , Jade Feigert photo

Governor Tina Kotek to host demobilization ceremony to welcome home Citizen-Soldiers from Poland
Oregon Military Department - 02/02/23 11:30 AM

MEDIA ADVISORY

February 2, 2023


 

CONTACT

Lt. Col. Stephen Bomar

stephen.s.bomar.mil@army.mil

503-990-9508

 

Governor Tina Kotek to host demobilization ceremony to welcome home Citizen-Soldiers from Poland

 

What: Oregon Governor Tina Kotek, U.S. Senator Ron Wyden along with Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, are scheduled to serve as the official hosts for a demobilization ceremony welcoming home more than 120 members of the Oregon Army National Guard Charlie Company, 1st Squadron, 82nd Cavalry Regiment. The event is to acknowledge the unit’s efforts supporting United States NATO Allies while building readiness and enhancing bonds with partner nations as part of Operation Atlantic Resolve in Poland.  It is also to recognize the sacrifice and support from loved ones, family, friends, co-workers, and employers, which make the mission a success. The unit was mobilized for this deployment in early January of 2022. The event will be livestreamed via YouTube link: https://www.youtube.com/live/ubB_dHG1nBs?feature=share

For more information on Atlantic resolve click here:https://www.europeafrica.army.mil/AtlanticResolve/

 

Where: RSVP by replying to omar.mil@army.mil/">Stephen.s.Bomar.mil@army.mil

When:  Saturday, February 4, at 10:00 a.m. 

 


02/02/2023-- Water Obstruction:† McKenzie River 1/4 mile downstream from the Olallie boat launch (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/02/23 11:29 AM
2023-02/6111/160900/McKenzie_River_Obstruction_Olallie.jpg
2023-02/6111/160900/McKenzie_River_Obstruction_Olallie.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/6111/160900/thumb_McKenzie_River_Obstruction_Olallie.jpg

The Lane County Sheriff’s Office is advising the public of a water obstruction on the McKenzie River approximately ¼ mile downstream from Olallie boat launch.   

Due to a tree down across the river, the channel is completely blocked and is not safely navigable. 

For the most current information on water obstructions and safety tips, please review the information provided by the Oregon State Marine Board at www.oregon.gov/osmb




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/6111/160900/McKenzie_River_Obstruction_Olallie.jpg

Don't leave tax dollars on the table; learn about property tax exemptions at Feb. 16 event
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/02/23 11:23 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Assessor’s office property tax exemption specialists will be available to answer questions and enroll property owners in the county’s property tax relief program at an upcoming public event.

The Tax Exemption Program for senior citizens and people with disabilities can reduce property tax liability for qualifying homeowners. Eligibility is based on age or disability, home ownership and residence and income. Participants are not required to repay the taxes, and their homes are not subject to property liens. 

Exemption specialists will be on hand from 10 am to 3 pm Thursday, Feb. 16 at the Battle Ground Community Center, 922 E. Main St. 

To schedule an appointment for the event, call 564.397.2391 or email eduction@clark.wa.gov">taxreduction@clark.wa.gov. Walk-ins also are welcome. Homeowners interesting in attending should bring photo ID, federal tax return, W-2 and/or 1099, and any deduction documentation.  

Learn more about the program and apply online at https://assessor-property-tax-exemption-program-clarkcountywa.hub.arcgis.com/


Discover local jobs and career opportunities at the BGPS Industry Fair on Feb. 16 (Photo)
Battle Ground Public Schools - 02/02/23 10:52 AM
2023-02/20/160896/BGPS_Industry_Fair_-_021722_-_01.JPG
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Attend the upcoming Battle Ground Public Schools Industry Fair on Thursday, Feb. 16, to learn about apprenticeships and jobs in health care, education, manufacturing, technology, construction, finance, hospitality, retail, transportation and more. Some employers may be hiring so bring your resume. 

Who: 

  • Everyone is welcome. This event serves students, families and the community.
  • Child care will be available at the event.
  • More than 80 employers from a variety of industries will be available to answer questions.

When

  • Thursday, Feb. 16, 2023
  • Resume workshop in the Battle Ground High School career center from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Industry Fair from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Where: 

  • Battle Ground High School, 300 West Main St., Battle Ground, WA

This year’s Industry Fair is sponsored by Battle Ground Public Schools in partnership with Goodwill Industries of the Columbia-Willamette, WorkSource Southwest Washington and Next Success.
 

Join us for an educational evening at Battle Ground High School to learn about the many career opportunities in our region.




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/20/160896/2-16_BG_IndustryFair_Poster2022-students.pdf , 2023-02/20/160896/BGPS_Industry_Fair_-_021722_-_01.JPG

Science on Tap -- How Do Scientists See Black Holes? (Photo)
Via Productions - 02/02/23 10:00 AM
2022-12/4849/159636/blackhole_sq.png
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Date: Thursday, February 16th, 2023

Time: 7 pm

Location: Register on Zoom

Tickets: $5-$15 suggested donation (Support us on Patreon or make a one-time donation here)

Event Website: https://www.scienceontaporwa.org/events/online_feb_16_blackholes/

Light can’t escape from black holes, how do we know where they are and what they’re doing? Black holes formed from dying massive stars are the densest things in the universe. They have ten to 100 times the mass of the Sun crammed into a space that is only tens of miles across. There are also supermassive black holes at the centers of most galaxies (including our own Milky Way galaxy), that are millions to billions of times more massive than the Sun.

Black holes get their name because their gravity is so strong that not even light can escape, so they look black to us. However, we still know where lots of them are. Scientists can find and study black holes from effects they have on the space environment around them. In this talk, astronomer Dr. Abbie Stevens tells us about the ways of finding black holes and learning more about their extreme physics.

Dr. Abbie Stevens is an NSF Astronomy & Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellow at Michigan State University and the University of Michigan. She studies black holes and neutron stars by looking at X-ray light coming from stars they’re eating. Alongside this research, Abbie is involved in X-ray space telescopes, science advising on creative projects, open-source software development, astronomy data science, science literacy education, and mental health initiatives in academia.

Auto-generated captioning available.

Recorded live shows are available to Patreon members about a week later.


Science on Tap is a science lecture series where you can sit back, drink a pint, and enjoy learning. Listen to experts talk about the science in your neighborhood and around the world. You don't have to be a science geek to have fun--all you need is a thirst for knowledge! For more information on this event or about Science on Tap, visit Science on Tap OR WA.




Attached Media Files: 2022-12/4849/159636/blackhole_sq.png

Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee meets Feb. 15
Oregon Health Authority - 02/02/23 8:59 AM

February 2, 2023

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee meets Feb. 15

What: A public meeting of the Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee.

Agenda:  Program updates; legislative bill review; exemptions/rules update; emergency preparedness/response/incident overviews.

When: Wednesday, Feb. 15, 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Teams Meeting: Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 971-277-2343; Passcode: 749 557 401#

Background: Per Oregon Revised Statute, the Radiation Advisory Committee (RAC) is comprised of eight members representative of Radiation Protection Services (RPS) registrants and licensees who use radiation devices/sources. RAC members advise RPS staff on radiation use and safety, including budgetary and administrative rule matters.

###

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Patty Thompson at 503-509-2622, or at icia.A.Thompson@dhsoha.state.or.us">Patricia.A.Thompson@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Health Care Workforce Committee to meet February 8, 2023, via Zoom meeting
Oregon Health Authority - 02/02/23 8:59 AM

February 2, 2023

Contact:

Amy Bacher, acher2@oha.oregon.gov">Amy.Bacher2@oha.oregon.gov (media inquiries)

Jaime Taylor 503-689-7926 jaime.taylor@dhsoha.state.or.us  (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Care Workforce Committee to meet February 8, 2023, via Zoom meeting

What: A public meeting of the Health Care Workforce Committee

When: Wednesday, February 8, 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Public comment will be taken at 9:05-9:15 a.m.

Where: Virtual Meeting. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line.

To join via Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1603934523?pwd=dFEyKzFYMGY1c1cyMHpYd0ZxeU1ndz09

To join via audio:

+1 669 254 5252 US (San Jose) Meeting ID: 160 393 4523  Passcode: 660661

Agenda: Convene HCWF Meeting, Public Comment, Review of Member Survey Results; Discussion, Adjourn, Next Meeting – March 8, 2023

For more information, please visit the Workforce Committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/hpa/hp-hcw/pages/index.aspx

The Workforce Committee welcomes hearing from community members on the matters discussed by the committee and its other bodies, and other topics the public wishes the committee to consider.  If you wish to offer public comment, we appreciate you letting Marc Overbeck know in advance of the meeting, at c.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us">marc.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us. Advance notice is not required in order to offer public comment at the meeting.  

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jaime Taylor at 503.689.7926, 711 TTY, jaime.taylor@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Cannabis Commission's Health Equity Subcommittee sets Feb. 8 Zoom meeting
Oregon Health Authority - 02/02/23 8:58 AM

February 2, 2023

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Health Equity Subcommittee sets Feb. 8 Zoom meeting

What: A public Zoom meeting of the Health Equity Subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD. The full agenda will be available at www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

When: Wednesday, Feb. 8, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: Zoom Meeting. Members of the public can join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 161 147 5011 Passcode: 681007.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission provides advice to Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission regarding Oregon Administrative Rules that govern medical cannabis as well as retail cannabis as it pertains to patients and caregivers. Additionally, the commission is tasked with developing a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain a therapeutic and affordable option for patients and monitoring federal laws, regulations, and policies regarding cannabis.

Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or .lockwood@state.or.us">megan.r.lockwood@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Tip of the Week for February 6, 2023 - Natural Gas Safety (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/02/23 8:17 AM
Tip of the Week Image
Tip of the Week Image
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TIP OF THE WEEK          
 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 

Date:         February 2, 2023 

Contact:     Sheriff Curtis L. Landers
                 (541) 265-0652
                 lcsheriff@co.lincoln.or.us

NATURAL GAS SAFETY
 

Natural gas is often used in commercial and residential settings. Some uses include heating homes or powering appliances such as stoves and grills. In some areas, natural gas is piped directly into your home similar to water and electricity. As with any plumbing system, leaks can happen. Some households also use generators or other natural gas-powered appliances during power outages or emergencies. There are some ways to keep you safer if you use natural gas at home or at work. 

Natural gas can displace the air in a confined space which can cause:

  • Headaches
  • Nausea
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning
  • Suffocation

In its original state, natural gas is odorless, colorless, and extremely flammable. Gas companies add a chemical called mercaptan, or methanethiol, to make natural gas smell like rotten eggs. If it smelled like fresh baked cookies, that gas leak may not alert you to the problem, but instead leave you looking for dessert when you should be evacuating the building. 

If you hear or smell a natural gas leak, there are some steps you should take:

  • Do not use your cell phone, landline telephone, or other electronic devices.
  • Do not light matches, use lighters, or generate any sparks.
  • Do not use any electrical switches, even turning the lights off could create a spark inside the switch.
  • Evacuate everyone from the area.
  • Call 911 from a phone in an another area or building away from the leak.
  • Contact your natural gas provider.

If you smell natural gas or hear the hissing sound of a gas leak, it’s always safest to leave the area immediately and contact your gas company. After a natural disaster, such as an earthquake, it could be several days or longer before they are able to reach your home. DO NOT turn off your natural gas unless you smell gas, hear the sound of gas escaping, or see other signs of a leak. Only turn it off if it is safe to do so.

Always have an emergency plan, evacuation meeting point, and ensure all household members know what to do if there is a gas leak. Check with your natural gas service provider to see if they have additional safety information and resources. 

 

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

 

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Attached Media Files: Tip of the Week - PDF , Tip of the Week - Word Doc , Tip of the Week Image

CCC Announces New Director of Public Policy (Photo)
Central City Concern - 02/02/23 8:00 AM
CCC's new Director of Public Policy Brooke Goldberg
CCC's new Director of Public Policy Brooke Goldberg
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Brooke brings deep bench strength in public policy and government affairs 

February 2, 2023, Portland, OR – Central City Concern (CCC) is excited to announce its new Director of Public Policy, Brooke Goldberg. Brooke will assume her new role on February 7, 2023.   

Goldberg comes to CCC most recently from the private sector where she served as a social impact and policy consultant to a Fortune 100 client. She brings over a decade of government affairs and nonprofit experience to this role, with broad experience in the intersection of federal and state programs. She is recognized as a leading advocate for her long-standing work on behalf of military spouses and families. During her time in Washington, D.C. she advanced executive orders, legislation and policy changes for military veteran families related to healthcare, workforce development and professional licensures, and compensation and benefits. She also stood up the Prescription Medicine programs at Stop the Addiction Fatality Epidemic (S.A.F.E.) Project, where she was responsible for connecting communities with answers to the over prescription of opioids, increasing awareness of alternatives in pain management, as well as supporting increased research in prevention and treatment.   

Goldberg moved back to Portland in 2019 and has worked in campaigns and at the Oregon state legislature. Most recently, she has worked on skilling and reskilling initiatives with Google as a consultant. She earned both her Juris Doctor and Bachelor of Arts from the University of Oregon.  

“I’m most excited about being able to apply my experience and passion for people in a program that directly helps my neighbors and community,” says CCC’s New Director of Public Policy Brooke Goldberg. “CCC has an approach that recognizes the humanity in each of us - our differences, our strengths, and works to connect clients with a network of support that honors where they are in life and the struggles they’re facing. I’m excited to be a part of that.” 

“We’re thrilled to have Brooke join the CCC team.” says Sean Hubert, CCC’s Vice President and Chief Strategy Officer. “We’re facing a linked public health crisis that spans behavioral health, housing, and homelessness here in Oregon and our region is navigating the same long-term versus temporary solutions debate that’s dominant up and down the west coast.  Brooke’s depth and breadth of experience is exactly what we need to support our policymakers in making the right choices for our communities.”  

In 2016, Goldberg was named to 2016 HillVets 100 List: America’s Most Influential Veterans. She has also been a Member of Top Lobbyist Team in The Hill magazine for three consecutive years. 

About CCC     

Located in Portland, Oregon, Central City Concern (CCC) provides a comprehensive continuum of affordable housing options integrated with direct social services including health care, recovery and employment. Founded in 1979, CCC has a staff of over 1,000 and an annual operating budget of $100 million. CCC serves more than 13,000 individuals annually. Up to 30,000 people across the tri-county region are affected annually by homelessness.     




Attached Media Files: CCC's new Director of Public Policy Brooke Goldberg

County seeks community needs survey responses from residents
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/02/23 7:28 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Community Services is asking residents who are low-income to complete a survey to help determine what resources and services are needed in the community. The survey, which can be completed online or on paper, will take approximately 15 minutes. It is strictly confidential.

The survey will be available now through April 14. 

An online version is available at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/2023CNASurvey in English, Spanish, Russian and Vietnamese.

Paper copies in English, Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese and Chuukese are available from human services providers such as agencies that offer housing, food, health services and employment assistance.

If you are unable to obtain a paper copy from a service provider, please contact Rebecca Royce at (546) 397-7863 or ebecca.royce@clark.wa.gov">rebecca.royce@clark.wa.gov.

Community Services is required to conduct a needs survey every three years. The results will help Clark County and the Community Action Advisory Board prioritize services with Community Services Block Grant funds. Furthermore, gathering this information helps inform the kinds of resources and services needed in Clark County to support and improve the lives of people who are economically disadvantaged.


CCHM Speaker Series "Defending Democracy: Founding of League of Women Voters in Clark County" (Photo)
Clark County Historical Museum - 02/02/23 6:00 AM
Mar2023 Speaker Series Banner
Mar2023 Speaker Series Banner
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Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Historical Museum continues its 2023 Speaker Series on Thursday, March 2, with “Defending Democracy: Founding of League of Women Voters in Clark County.” The event will occur in person at the Clark County Historical Museum (1511 Main Street, Vancouver, WA 98660). Doors open at 5 p.m. and the event begins at 7 p.m.

On the heels of the ratification of the 19th Amendment which gave women the right to vote in 1920, feisty Ruth Karr McKee gathered Vancouver's key women activists to found the League of Women Voters of Clark County (LWVCC). Join LWVCC members, Elizabeth Backstrom and Tracy Reilly Kelly, as they explore this astonishing advocate, as well as what the early League did for progressive, non-partisan action. Their discussion will cover 1920 up to the early World War II years. 

“Women are often forgotten when history is written,” said Reilly Kelly. “Ruth Karr McKee was an electric educator who is just thrilling to research! Thanks to newspapers.com, pairing her story with those of the dynamic early dames of the League of Women Voters is an adventure waiting to be found.”

Tracy Reilly Kelly retired as Program Manager of Community Education at Clark College. Initially a history major, Tracy received her BA in Human Services from Evergreen State College and an MS in Teaching Health Education at Portland State University. In 2008, Tracy was honored as a Woman of Achievement by the YWCA of Clark County and Clark College. She currently teaches at Clark part-time.

Elizabeth Backstrom is the Director of Grants and Contracts for YWCA Spokane, working remotely and enjoying life in Vancouver. She majored in journalism at Western Washington University and earned an MPA at Eastern Washington University. She enjoys reading, writing, and history. As a night owl, she gets through the day on coffee, humor, and sheer determination. She joined the LWVCC in August 2021 because of a longtime passion for voting rights and a belief that with enough effort, democracy can work for everyone.

The CCHM Speaker Series is sponsored by the Clark County Historic Preservation Commission and League of Women Voters of Clark County. General admission is $5; seniors and students are $4; children under 18 are $3; and the evening is free for CCHM members, veterans, and active-duty military personnel. 

Attendees are encouraged to arrive early, as seating is limited.

For more information, contact the museum at 360-993-5679 or outreach@cchmuseum.org.

######
 




Attached Media Files: Mar 2023 Speaker Series PR , Mar2023 Speaker Series Banner

Clark County Sheriff's Office Seeks Public's Assistance in Shooting Incident
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/02/23 4:51 AM

On February 2, 2023, just before 01:40am, Clark County Sheriff’s Deputies responded with assistance from the Vancouver Police Department to a report of a shooting near the Pebble Creek Garden Apartments located at 5313 NE 66th Ave in Vancouver, Clark County, WA. The caller reported having caught two subjects prowling vehicles in the parking lot of the apartment complex. The caller confronted the two subjects, who were described as wearing all black clothing and ski masks, riding skateboards. The caller had followed the subjects out of the complex, onto NE 66th Ave, where the two suspects each produced a firearm and shot at the caller. 

A Vancouver Police K9 responded to the scene and conducted a search for the suspects, with the assistance of small Unmanned Aircraft Systems. The suspects were not located. There were no injuries reported in this incident. Deputies located a fired cartridge casing on the sidewalk along the east side of NE 66th Ave at about the 5300 block. 

This case is being actively investigated and the Clark County Sheriff’s Office is seeking the public’s assistance. Anyone who may have witnessed the incident and/or has possible video evidence of the incident or suspects is requested to contact Deputy Hulsey by phone or email: (564) 208-2375; en.hulsey@clark.wa.gov">ben.hulsey@clark.wa.gov 


Lebanon Firefighters Respond to Blaze (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 02/02/23 12:06 AM
Firefighters Extinguishing Hotspots
Firefighters Extinguishing Hotspots
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Lebanon Firefighters responded to a fire located in a mechanics shop on Airway Road Wednesday evening. Reports from initial dispatch was that there were three occupants inside the building when it caught fire. The Battalion Chief arrived to find a 40x60 steel building with heavy black smoke from the eves. The IC contacted a female resident in the driveway and was told there was only a single occupant in the building attempting to extinguish the fire. The IC made contact and had the occupant evacuate the building so arriving firefighters could continue extinguishment. Firefighters quickly deployed hose lines and began looking for the fire using a thermal imaging camera. Firefighters found multiple hotspots using the TIC and removed insulation in the roof area and walls extinguishing the fire. The IC radioed the fire under control and firefighters began the salvage and overhaul mode of operations. Firefighters were on scene approximately an hour before turning the building back over to the occupants. No injuries were reported, and the cause is still under investigation.

The Lebanon Fire District was assisted at the scene by Lebanon Police Department and CPI, while Albany Fire Department helped cover additional 911 calls for the citizens of Lebanon.

Lebanon Firefighters would like to remind its citizens not to attempt extinguishing a out of control fire, but to call 911 quickly. 




Attached Media Files: Firefighters Extinguishing Hotspots , Firefighters using TIC , 2023-02/1191/160883/Airway_1.jpg