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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Tue. Nov. 12 - 4:26 pm
Tue. 11/12/19
Umatilla Man Sentenced to 37 Months in Federal Prison for Brutal Assault of Significant Other
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/12/19 4:20 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Jared Elias Case, 26, of Umatilla, Oregon, was sentenced today to 37 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release after repeatedly assaulting his significant other.

According to court documents, on July 19, 2018, Case punched his then-significant other in the face, breaking her nose and causing other injuries. Case was charged and later convicted of fourth-degree misdemeanor assault in Umatilla County Circuit Court and a domestic abuse protection order was issued by the Umatilla Tribal Court. The protection order prohibited Case from having contact with the crime victim pending a full hearing.

One month later, on August 22, 2018, Case went to a party with the crime victim in violation of the protection order. He began drinking and started arguing with her. While she was seated in a chair, Case put his hands around her neck and strangled her until she blacked out. When she regained consciousness, she got up to leave. Case followed her outside, grabbed her by the shoulders and repeatedly punched her in the face until she again lost consciousness. Case fled, abandoning the crime victim who was lying unconscious in a driveway. He later turned himself in to the Umatilla Tribal Police Department.

On July 9, 2019, Case pleaded guilty to one count of assault by strangulation. As part of his plea agreement, Case will pay restitution his victim as ordered by the court. A restitution hearing has been scheduled for February 10, 2020.

This case was investigated by the Umatilla Tribal Police Department and FBI Portland’s Safe Trails Task Force. It was prosecuted by Jennifer Martin, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

Domestic violence is a serious violent crime that includes both physical and emotional abuse. It is frequently hidden from public view. Many survivors suffer in silence, afraid to seek help or not knowing where to turn. The traumatic effects of domestic violence also extend beyond the abused person, impacting family members and communities.

If you or someone you know are in immediate danger, please call 911.

If you need assistance or know someone who needs help, please contact the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233). Many communities throughout the country have developed support networks to assist survivors in the process of recovery.

The StrongHearts Native Helpline offers culturally specific support and advocacy for American Indian and Alaska Native survivors of domestic violence. Please call 1-844-762-8483 or visit www.strongheartshelpline.org for more information.

The Safe Trails Task Force (STTF) unites FBI and federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies in a collaborative effort to combat the growth of crime in Indian Country. STTF allows participating agencies to combine limited resources and increase investigative coordination in Indian Country to target violent crime, drugs, gangs and gaming violations.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Port of Vancouver USA extends lease with Warehouse '23
Port of Vancouver - 11/12/19 4:11 PM

For Immediate Release

November 12, 2019

 

Contact:                      bings@portvanusa.com">Heather Stebbings, Director of Communications

                                   360.823.5296 direct

                                   360.518.8590 cell

 

Port of Vancouver USA extends lease with Warehouse ’23

Restaurant and event space will remain in operation through December 31, 2020

 

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Today, the Port of Vancouver USA Board of Commissioners extended a lease agreement with Warehouse ’23 to ensure the facility’s operation through December 31, 2020. 

Warehouse ’23 opened at the port’s Terminal 1 in July 2016, taking over the space formerly occupied by the Red Lion Hotel and The Quay restaurant.  Since then, owner Mark Matthias has focused on bringing new life to this cherished spot, and the riverside location’s business has been thriving. 

“It has been a great partnership with the port to do this unusual short-term business strategy,” said Matthias.  “We look forward to being part of the Terminal 1 development in the future with an exciting new concept.”

The lease will officially extend through February 15, 2021.  This will allow Warehouse ’23 to operate at full capacity through the end of next year, with a month and a half to vacate the space.

“Warehouse ’23 has been a wonderful addition to the Vancouver waterfront,” said Julianna Marler, Port of Vancouver CEO.  “Mark’s partnership and his vision to revitalize this space has helped create the energy and excitement for the future of Terminal 1.”

In 2021, the port will begin the process of removing the building as part of the next phase of their waterfront development project.  In addition to the AC Hotel by Marriot currently underway and mixed-use development in the planning and design phase, future plans for Terminal 1 include replacing the dock, adding a public marketplace, bike and walking trails, a renovated amphitheater and more.

For more information on the Warehouse ’23 restaurant and event space or to book your event today, visit www.warehouse1923.com or call 360-750-7256.

 

– POV –

The Port of Vancouver USA is one of the major ports on the Pacific Coast, and its competitive strengths include available land, versatile cargo handling capabilities, vast transportation networks, a skilled labor force and an exceptional level of service to its customers and community. For more information, please visit us at www.portvanusa.com.




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/1489/129243/20191112_W23_Lease_Extension.pdf

Guns, Drugs and Stolen Property Recovered in Warrant Served by Yamhill County S.O. (Photo)
Yamhill Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/12/19 3:52 PM
Erickson
Erickson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1838/129242/thumb_ericks.jpg

This morning, at about 5:30 a.m., the Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office served a search warrant at 2715 NE Elaine Drive in the City of McMinnville.  The warrant was obtained by YCSO Sergeant Travis High and was the result of an investigation into stolen property and unlawful possession of firearms.  Due to safety concerns and the involved firearms, the Oregon State Police SWAT unit assisted in the service of the warrant.

A resident of the address, Brandon Jacob Erickson, 37, was found hiding in the basement of the residence and taken into custody on outstanding warrants.  He was lodged at the Yamhill County Correctional Facility without bail.

A search of the property yielded stolen property,methamphetamine, and 6 firearms.  One of the firearms seized appeared to be a loaded homemade shotgun, while another appeared to be a modified, short barrel shotgun.  The stolen property consisted of tools and clothing believed to be linked to a theft from the McMinnville Wilco Farm Store. 

Erickson is expected to face additional charges relating to the evidence recovered in the warrant.

“Sgt. High and his team did an outstanding job in this investigation.” said Sheriff Tim Svenson. “He ensured all variables were considered to make this operation as safe as possible.  This is a best-case scenario with a subject in custody, cases being cleared, and everyone safe.”




Attached Media Files: Erickson , guns2 , guns

Clark County Medical Examiner's Office - MEDIA RELEASE
Clark Co. WA Communications - 11/12/19 3:47 PM

The following information is in response to a media request for information regarding a recent death investigation by the Clark County Medical Examiner’s Office.

 

Date of death: 11/03/2019

Location: Vancouver, WA

 

Decedent Name: Ellis, Amanda K.         

Decedent Age:  36 Yrs               

Resident of:  Vancouver, WA

 

The opinions listed on the death certificate are as follows:

 

Cause of death: Pending

Manner of death: Pending

 

Reports and records of autopsies or postmortems shall be confidential as per RCW 68.50.105. No additional information is available for release from the Medical Examiner’s Office. Refer all other inquiries to the Washington State Patrol.

 

 

Nikki J. Costa

Operations Manager


Multnomah County Detention Center passes Oregon Jail Standards Inspection
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/12/19 3:25 PM

On October 23, 2019 a team of Oregon Jail Standards (OJS) inspectors conducted their biennial inspection of the Multnomah County Detention Center (MCDC). This inspection reviews the jails policy and procedures to ensure the jail is adhering to legal requirements and sound correctional practices.

MCDC operations were determined to be in full compliance with applicable OJS standards. MCDC is the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office maximum-security jail facility and serves as the admission and release facility for the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office. This is the second consecutive inspection the operations were determined to be fully compliant with OJS standards.

The OJS inspection team includes corrections professionals drawn from county sheriff’s offices around the state of Oregon who are certified jail inspectors. The inspectors, certified by the Oregon Jail Command Council, routinely inspect participating jails once every two years for compliance with OJS standards

The inspection includes a comprehensive review of the jail’s processes and operations. Every aspect of the jail is reviewed. This includes inmate programs, sanitation, inmate services, mental health programs, inmate management, admission and release, security and control, and jail administration.

The Oregon State Sheriff’s Association jail standards are a set of voluntary best practices for Oregon jails developed by Oregon Sheriffs to raise the bar for Oregon jails and create consistency in the operations of all county jails. These standards are continuously updated to stay current with the latest issues in corrections, reduce agency liability and ensure adults in custody are being treated appropriately.


MESD Board Regular Session meeting 11/19 at 6:00 p.m.
Multnomah ESD - 11/12/19 3:14 PM

The Multnomah Education Service District Board of Directors will meet in Regular Session at 6:00 p.m. on November 19, 2019, in the Board Room at 11611 NE Ainsworth Circle, Portland, OR 97220. The Board will consider a supplemental budget.


Salem Police Investigating Fatal Crash on Portland Rd NE **Update**
Salem Police Dept. - 11/12/19 2:45 PM

Update

Salem Investigators have identified the victim of yesterday's fatal crash as 60 yr old Salem resident Josephine Watkins.  The victim was struck by a vehicle driven by a 19 yr old driver as she was attempting to cross Portland Rd near Wayside Terrace in a marked crosswalk.  The crosswalk is equipped with functioning warning lights but witnesses stated the lights were not activated at the time of the crash.

The cause of the crash is still under investigation.  No arrests or citations have been issued at this time.  
 

###

The Salem Police Department is currently investigating a fatal crash on Portland Rd NE at Wayside Terrace NE, which has Portland Rd closed in both directions between Hyacinth Rd and Northgate Rd NE.  This stretch of  Portland Rd is expected to be closed  for the next several hours and drivers are advised to use alternate routes. 

On November 11th, 2019 at  6:18pm officers responded to the report of a pedestrian struck while attempting to cross Portland Rd, near Wayside Terrace Ave NE.  Witnesses stated that the female pedestrian was crossing Portland Rd in a marked crosswalk when a vehicle travelling northbound on Portland Road struck the pedestrian.  Witnesses to the crash stopped and attempted life saving measures on the pedestrian, who was later prounced deceased at the scene.  The driver of the vehicle stopped and remained on scene and is cooperating with investigators.  There were no injuries to anyone in the involved vehicle. 

This crash remains under investigation and further details regarding the cause of the crash will be released as they become available.  Investigators are currently working to identify the pedestrian and notify her next of kin.

 

###


CORRECTED UPDATE -- NATIONAL STATS: Sheriff's Office leads nationwide domestic-violence warrant sweep (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/12/19 2:40 PM
Sheriff Roberts with Chief Clackamas County Deputy DA John Wentworth, Clackamas Women's Services Executive Director Melissa Erlbaum, and former A Safe Place FJC Director (now Undersheriff) Angie Brandenburg
Sheriff Roberts with Chief Clackamas County Deputy DA John Wentworth, Clackamas Women's Services Executive Director Melissa Erlbaum, and former A Safe Place FJC Director (now Undersheriff) Angie Brandenburg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-10/624/128768/thumb_ShadowboxPresentation.jpg

[More agencies reported in; updated stats and corrections below.]


UPDATE (Tuesday, Nov. 12) -- NATIONAL STATS

At this writing (Nov. 12), nationwide, the 17th Annual Family Violence Apprehension Detail included 1,154 law-enforcement personnel (and 1,188 total participants) from 355 county sheriffs' offices, police departments, probation departments, and community agencies in 32 states.

All agencies served outstanding arrest warrants -- with charges ranging from harassment to murder.

Nationwide, 784 warrants were served on Oct. 23, with 3,752 warrant attempts. In Clackamas County alone, 56 local law-enforcement members made 197 warrant attempts and 31 arrests, with a dozen local agencies working together in the effort.

The Sheriff's Office founded this national warrant sweep, and has coordinated the nationwide effort for the past 17 years. At this writing, since its founding, authorities across the U.S. have made a total of 92,220 warrant attempts and served 19,510 warrants in the 17 years of the sweep.


EARLIER (Friday, Oct. 25) -- LOCAL STATS

On Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019, the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office Domestic Violence Enhanced Response Team (DVERT) worked with agencies throughout Oregon -- as well as agencies across the country -- to arrest persons with outstanding family-violence warrants.

Locally, they made 26 arrests during the sweep, on a variety of charges. 

Nationwide, the 17th Annual Family Violence Apprehension Detail included over 350 county sheriffs' offices, police departments, probation departments, and community agencies from 32 states. All agencies served outstanding arrest warrants -- with charges ranging from harassment to murder. 

In Clackamas County alone, by 10 p.m. Thursday, this massive enforcement effort resulted in the arrests of 26 men and women brought to the Clackamas County Jail on existing arrest warrants on a variety of charges, some of them DV-related. 

A PDF of Clackamas County mugshots and arrest charges (ranging from strangulation to assault to failure to report as a sex offender and other crimes) secured during yesterday's sweep is attached. (These figures may be updated as more agencies report in.) 

The Sheriff's Office founded this national warrant sweep and has coordinated the nationwide effort for the past 17 years. As of last year, authorities across the U.S. had made a total of 88,468 warrant attempts and served 18,726 warrants over the first 16 years of the sweep.

LOCAL PARTICIPATION STATS (2019): 

PARTICIPATING CLACKAMAS COUNTY AGENCIES:

  • Canby Police Department
  • Clackamas County Sheriff's Office
  • Clackamas County Community Corrections / Parole & Probation
  • Gladstone Police Department
  • Happy Valley Police Department
  • Lake Oswego Police Department
  • Milwaukie Police Department
  • Molalla Police Department
  • Oregon City Police Department
  • U.S. Marshals Service
  • West Linn Police Department
  • Wilsonville Police Department
  • Estacada Police Department
  • Clackamas County District Attorney’s Office

CLACKAMAS COUNTY RESULTS: 

  • 197 warrant attempts 
  • 26 arrests at this writing
  • 56 local law-enforcement members participating 

This collaborative effort helps raise awareness of the problem of family and domestic violence in our communities. It also demonstrates to offenders that they will be held accountable for their violence. 

In a pre-sweep briefing at the Public Safety Training Center, Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts spoke to law-enforcement personnel and the media, as did Clackamas County Chief Deputy District Attorney John Wentworth and survivor Ashley Bell.

Sheriff Roberts also formally recognized local officials who worked behind the scenes in support of the passage of Senate Bill 1562, which finally made domestic-violence strangulation a felony in May 2018. Roberts presented Chief Clackamas County Deputy DA John Wentworth, Clackamas Women’s Services Executive Director Melissa Erlbaum, and former A Safe Place FJC Director (now Undersheriff) Angie Brandenburg with framed shadowboxes containing a signed copy of the bill, a thank-you letter, a signing pen and a photo with Governor Kate Brown. Photos are attached.

For more information on DVERT, click here: 
http://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/dvert.html

For more information on Domestic Violence Awareness Month, click here: 
http://www.nrcdv.org/dvam/ 

To see the SWEEP invite sent to law-enforcement agencies across the country earlier this year, click here:
http://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/domesticviolence.html


EARLIER (Tuesday, Oct. 22) -- MEDIA OPPORTUNITY / DATE EMBARGOED: JOIN LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ON NATIONWIDE DOMESTIC-VIOLENCE WARRANT SWEEP THIS WEEK


IMPORTANT -- EMBARGO NOTICE: In an effort to keep wanted persons from being tipped off about our apprehension detail, we ask that media outlets NOT disseminate this information until 10 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 23.


This Wednesday, Oct. 23, law-enforcement partners across the country will join forces for the 17th-annual National Family Violence Apprehension Detail -- also known as the "DV Warrant Sweep."

The SWEEP is a day-long event, in which agencies across the United States attempt to serve outstanding family-violence warrants.

Stats for last year's SWEEP:

  • 315 agencies from 29 states participated 
  • 3,235 nationwide attempts to serve arrest warrants 
  • 821 arrests nationwide 
  • 879 law enforcement members participated 
  • Over the SWEEP's previous 16-year history, there have been 88,468 DV warrant attempts and 18,726 DV warrants served. 

The Clackamas County Sheriff's Office Domestic Violence Enhanced Response Team (DVERT) founded the SWEEP under the supervision of then-Detective Craig Roberts.

Now-Sheriff Craig Roberts will kick off the local briefing Wednesday (Oct. 23) for the 17th annual SWEEP.

Thursday's local detail will include Clackamas County law-enforcement agencies, as well as local state and federal partners including the Oregon State Police and the U.S. Marshals Service, Oregon District.


MEDIA OPPORTUNITY:

Local media are invited to ride along with law-enforcement partners during the SWEEP.

Interested reporters can join us at the 2 p.m. briefing, held Oct. 23 at the Public Safety Training Center (12700 SE 82nd Avenue, Clackamas). During the briefing, Sheriff Roberts will address the participating agencies. Participating members are also scheduled to hear from guest speakers who will underscore the importance of the day's mission.

Media can arrange (with advance notice) to ride along with participating agencies. Contact our PIO for details by emailing sheriffpio@clackamas.us or calling 503-785-5071.

[END]

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-10/624/128768/2019SweepWarrantsServed.pdf , Sheriff Roberts with Chief Clackamas County Deputy DA John Wentworth, Clackamas Women's Services Executive Director Melissa Erlbaum, and former A Safe Place FJC Director (now Undersheriff) Angie Brandenburg , 2019-10/624/128768/RobertsWentworth.JPG , 2019-10/624/128768/ShadowBoxDetail.jpg , 2019-10/624/128768/PreSweepBriefing3.JPG , 2019-10/624/128768/PreSweepBriefing2.JPG , 2019-10/624/128768/PreSweepBriefing1.JPG

Governor's Task Force on the Outdoors meets Nov. 15 in Klamath Falls
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 11/12/19 2:23 PM

KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. – The Governor’s Task Force on the Outdoors will hold their fifth meeting of the year 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Nov. 15 at Running Y Ranch, 5500 Running Y Road, Klamath Falls. The meeting is open to the public.

On the agenda: agreeing on a process timeline, including an overview of outcomes from future meetings; refining strategic plan framework and reviewing actions; consideration of adding a fourth strategic goal; and time for public comments. View the full agenda online.

The meeting is the latest in a planned series; subsequent meetings will be held throughout Oregon. The group met for their inaugural meeting in May at Silver Falls State Park, near Silverton. 

Gov. Brown established the task force earlier this year, with the directive to explore long-term strategies for elevating outdoor recreation in the state. Task force members were appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. The governor tapped the Office of Outdoor Recreation, established in 2017 within the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD), to guide the task force.

The task force is composed of private and public sector representatives and is chaired by Commissioner Jon Blasher of the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. Cailin O'Brien-Feeney, director of the Office of Outdoor Recreation, will manage the task force. View the full membership list online: oregon.gov/orec/Pages/Governors-Task-Force.aspx.

Building on and uniting other statewide outdoor recreation efforts, the task force will deliver its final report in April 2020 on recommendations for legislation, investment of existing public and private resources, future funding, and high-level management strategies. Top recommendations will be presented to the governor, state legislature and the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.

Individuals who require special accommodations to attend the meeting should contact Carrie Lovellette, OPRD support specialist, Carrie.Lovellette@oregon.gov or 503-986-0733 at least three days in advance.


County seeks applicant for Community Action Advisory Board
Clark Co. WA Communications - 11/12/19 2:14 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The county manager is seeking an applicant to fill a vacancy on the volunteer Community Action Advisory Board. The position is for a low-income representative living in Clark County Council District 4.

The twelve-member board makes recommendations about local government funding for basic needs, self-sufficiency and housing programs. Members also advocate for services supporting low-income communities, families and persons.

Low-income representatives are defined as any person who is nominated by a group who is low-income such as tenants of a low-income housing complex or an agency that predominantly serves people who are low-income such as Council for the Homeless, Share, NAMI, etc.

Term periods are three years, with the first term ending Dec. 31, 2022. Incumbents have the opportunity for re-appointment to two additional three-year terms.

Clark County is looking to diversify the board composition and encourages people with diverse backgrounds, experiences and perspectives to apply, especially persons from historically oppressed or underserved communities.

Interested residents must submit an application and résumé to Rebecca Royce, Clark County Community Services, P.O. Box 5000, Vancouver, WA 98666-5000 or ebecca.royce@clark.wa.gov">rebecca.royce@clark.wa.gov.

Application information can be found at www.clark.wa.gov/community-services/community-action-advisory-board or by calling Rebecca Royce at 564.397.7863.

Application deadline is 5 pm Friday, Dec. 6.


DPSST Criminal Justice Background Investigation Workgroup Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 11/12/19 1:39 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

November 12, 2019

Contact:  Linsay Hale   
               (503) 378-2427

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Criminal Justice Background Investigation Workgroup will hold a meeting on November 19, 2019 at 10:00 a.m. in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Linsay Hale at (503) 378-2427.

Teleconference Information:

Call-In: 888-273-3658

Access Code: 4711910

Agenda Items:

  1. Issues/Discussion Points (Continued)

  Presented by Linsay Hale

  • Establishing/Defining Moral Fitness for Applicants
  • Process for Reviewing Professional Standards Cases involving Applicants
  • Fingerprint-Based Criminal History Checks: Employment vs. Certification
  • Disclosing Records from Previous Employment – CA/CO Laws

2. Next Workgroup Meeting: TBD

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by the Criminal Justice Background Investigation Workgroup members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have -disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


MHCC initiates review of disciplines and programs to improve academic experience for students
Mt. Hood Comm. College - 11/12/19 1:13 PM

GRESHAM, Ore. - Mt. Hood Community College (MHCC) has been engaged in a transparent, data-based, student-centered, equity-based revitalization process to provide students with the education they need in order to succeed.

The Academic Revitalization process was initiated at the direction of the college board of education and in compliance with accreditation requirements and reviewed 61 instructional disciplines and programs.

A team of full-time and part-time faculty, classified staff and instructional deans, developed the process and four categories in which disciplines and programs could be placed. Those categories are, Maintain, Grow, Modify or Phase Out.

Disciplines and programs were placed into the “modify” category with the exception of seven programs that fell into the “phase out” category. Those programs include, Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair, Broadcasting, Business Technology, Cosmetology, Environmental Health and Safety, Practical Nursing and Wilderness Leadership and Experiential Education. 

“The process looked at both quantitative and qualitative data including a review of enrollments over the past five years, number of degrees or certificates awarded for each program, earnings/jobs of economic value for completers, narratives from faculty, as well as the credentials relevance to its specific industry or business, to name a few,” said Dr. Alfred McQuarters, MHCC Vice President of Instruction.

Faculty and staff were informed of which category their program was placed on Friday, Nov. 8. Dr. McQuarters will work with faculty, staff and instructional administrators regarding modifications. The phase out of any program will go before the MHCC District Board of Education for consideration.

If a program is phased out, the college will work to assist students in completing their academic goals.


Sandy Police Log 11-03-19 to 11-09-19
Sandy Police Dept. - 11/12/19 1:04 PM

See Attached Bulletin

Please be advised that the Bulletin does not include all calls for service to which officers respond.  Many calls do not require that a report be written; such as:

•Traffic Stops

•Advising/Referring a Person to the Proper Agency to handle their request

•Restoring the Peace

•Premise Checks

•Welfare Checks

•Flagged Down by Citizen




Attached Media Files: Bulletin

Keizer Police Acting PIO
Keizer Police Dept. - 11/12/19 12:50 PM

From 5:00 PM today until 5:00 PM on November 15, please contact Lt. Chris Nelson for any media requests. He can be reached at NelsonC@keizer.org, 503 932 0909, or 503 856 3489.


Aloha Man Dies in Crash near Sherwood (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/12/19 12:26 PM
Ford F-350
Ford F-350
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1128/129230/thumb_Roy_Rogers_Crash_2.JPG

On Monday, November 11, 2019, Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a two-car crash on SW Roy Rogers Rd, near SW Elsner Rd. The crash happened at approximately 7:25 p.m. just north of the City of Sherwood in unincorporated Washington County.

The driver of a yellow 2001 BMW convertible crashed head-on into a black 2004 Ford F-350 pickup truck. The truck landed on its side, trapping the driver inside. The man driving the BMW suffered serious, life-threatening injuries and was transported to a local trauma hospital by LifeFlight. He later died from his injuries at the hospital. The driver of the truck was removed from the truck and taken to the hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

SW Roy Rogers Road was closed for more than five hours. The Crash Analysis Reconstruction Team (CART) is investigating the crash. At this time, it doesn’t appear that speed or impairment were factors in the crash.




Attached Media Files: PDF version , Ford F-350 , BMW Convertible

Grand jury indicts man with attempted murder, kidnapping following August 27, 2019 carjacking and shooting
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 11/12/19 11:24 AM

November 12, 2019

Grand jury indicts man with attempted murder, kidnapping following August 27, 2019 carjacking and shooting

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced the filing of a 25-count indictment against 22-year-old Carlos Batista for allegedly stealing a person’s vehicle, kidnapping the vehicle’s owner and driving him to Mt. Tabor Park where he then attempted to murder two other people.

Batista is charged with two counts of attempted murder in the first degree with a firearm, two counts of attempted murder in the second degree with a firearm, two counts of attempted assault in the first degree with a firearm, eight counts of unlawful use of a weapon, one count of criminal mischief in the first degree with a firearm, one count of kidnapping in the first degree with a firearm, one count of kidnapping in the second degree with a firearm, two counts of coercion with a firearm, one count of robbery in the first degree with a firearm, one count of robbery in the second degree with a firearm, one count of being a felon in possession of a firearm, one count of unauthorized use of a vehicle with a firearm, possession of a stolen vehicle with a firearm, and one count of theft in the first degree with a firearm.

This investigation started on August 27, 2019 when Portland Police responded to Mt. Tabor Park after receiving information about a shooting. Officers arrived on scene and found evidence of gunfire along with three people with information about the situation.

According to the indictment, Batista, a person previously convicted of a felony, used a firearm to steal a person’s vehicle and that in the process of doing so, he kidnapped that person and took him from one location to another and that he threatened to physically harm the vehicle’s owner.

According to information previously released by the Portland Police Bureau, the carjacking occurred at the Barbur Boulevard Transit Center in southwest Portland and that the victim was bound with restraints and driven to Mt. Tabor Park. The shooting occurred after two individuals in the park saw the kidnapping victim outside of his stolen vehicle and asked what was going on.

The indictment alleges Batista unlawfully and intentionally attempted to cause the deaths of the two people in the park by shooting at least eight bullets. The indictment also alleges that during the shooting Batista caused more than $1,000 in damage to property belonging to the two people in the park.

After the shooting, Batista fled the area in the vehicle he had allegedly stolen from southwest Portland, according to information previously released by police.

Law enforcement located and arrested Batista in Thurston County, Washington. He was extradited to Oregon and appeared in Multnomah County Circuit Court on November 12, 2019.

Like in all criminal and civil matters, electronic copies of court documents, which are not subject to a protective order, are available to the public through the Oregon eCourt Information (OECI) system.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time pursuant to the Oregon Rules of Professional Conduct.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime. Batista is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/5769/129229/PR-19-259-Carlos_Batista.pdf

PGE bringing first electric school buses to the region
PGE - 11/12/19 11:06 AM

$2 million in funding to increase access to healthier air for kids and neighborhoods

PORTLAND, Ore. — Today, Portland General Electric Company (NYSE: POR) announced the launch of its electric school bus program that will help up to four school districts in the region start their transition to transportation that is cleaner, quieter and more cost-effective to operate.

Funded by the sale of Oregon Clean Fuels Program credits, PGE will return the value of the credits to local communities by providing funding and technical assistance for these school districts to adopt electric school buses.

“Transportation is the largest source of carbon emissions in the state, making an electrified transportation system critical to a low-carbon future,” said John McFarland, PGE vice president and chief customer officer. “PGE is committed to supporting an electric transportation system that serves everyone, and this program extends the benefits to students and the neighborhoods where they live.”

Funds will be provided in the form of a grant to pay for the incremental costs of the electric buses, along with the equipment and installation of the necessary charging infrastructure. Additionally, PGE will provide technical assistance to help schools make the transition, including site assessments, cost-benefit analysis, vehicle and charger selection support, and driver and mechanic training. In return, participating school districts will work with PGE to share their insights and learnings with other school districts interested in electrifying their bus fleets.

“The data is clear: Oregon cannot meaningfully address climate change without dramatically reducing carbon emissions from vehicles,” said Gov. Kate Brown. “Electrification of our transportation network is a key component of my climate policy agenda [oregon.gov]. State partnerships and innovative investments like this one between the Oregon Clean Fuels Program and PGE will help ensure that these new electric school buses are carrying our children into a brighter, cleaner future.”

This program is part of a larger initiative at PGE to invest its Oregon Clean Fuels Program credits in ways that help make electric transportation available to everyone. In addition to the electric school bus program, PGE established the Drive Change Fund, which will award $1.75 million in grants early next year for projects that expand access to electric transportation in the area. PGE is also increasing access to its Electric Avenue charging stations and conducting public outreach to raise awareness about the benefits of electric vehicles.

How to apply for a grant: 

School districts that overlap with PGE’s service area can apply for a School Bus Electrification Project grant. The application is available now and submissions are due Jan. 31, 2020. PGE aims to have electric school buses on the road by the beginning of the 2020-21 school year. PGE will look for diversity across the portfolio of selected participants, such as geographical location, pupil transportation business models and school district size to maximize the value of the project for the region. 

About Portland General Electric Company: Portland General Electric (NYSE: POR) is a fully integrated energy company based in Portland, Oregon, with operations across the state. The company serves approximately 892,000 customers in 51 cities, has 16 generation plants in five Oregon counties, and maintains and operates 13 public parks and recreation areas. For 130 years, PGE has been delivering safe, affordable and reliable energy to Oregonians. Together with its customers, PGE has the No. 1 voluntary renewable energy program in the U.S. PGE and its 3,000 employees are committed to helping its customers build a clean energy future. PGE, employees, retirees and the PGE Foundation donate approximately $4 million annually to support nonprofits and schools. In addition, employees and retirees log about 45,000 volunteer hours annually. For more information visit portlandgeneral.com/cleanvision.


Commission to hear about the health connection between older adults and pets
Clark Co. WA Communications - 11/12/19 10:07 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Owning a pet can be physically and mentally beneficial for people of all ages. Animals can help reduce stress, lower blood pressure, and increase social interaction and physical activity. From companionship to security, pets can provide older adults a better quality of life and improve aging in place.

Learn about the health benefits animals can provide and how to best plan for your pets at the next meeting of the Commission on Aging, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 20.

The meeting will be in the sixth-floor Hearing Room of the Public Service Center, 1300 Franklin St.

Cheri Martin and Bob Libby from the Southwest Washington Humane Society will explore how relationships with animals can impact health and well-being, especially for older adults. They will also provide information and resources on what to consider when adopting a pet and how to plan for your pets’ needs if you can no longer take care of them either short- or long-term.

The Nov. 20 discussion is the eighth meeting this year focused on healthy communities, especially for people 65 and older. Healthy communities can contribute to one’s ability to live independently, safely, and comfortably.

The Commission on Aging, supported by the Clark County Council, is a nine-member volunteer group that implements the Aging Readiness Plan and provides leadership addressing needs of aging community members. For more about the commission, please visit www.clark.wa.gov/aging.

Commission meetings are carried live on CVTV Channel 23 and online at www.cvtv.org. To see replay times, go to www.cvtv.org.


Portland-area roofing contractor fined for exposing workers to fall hazards (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 11/12/19 9:47 AM
2019-11/1073/129224/IMG_0095.JPG
2019-11/1073/129224/IMG_0095.JPG
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(Salem) – Oregon OSHA has fined West Coast Roofing and Painting Inc. more than $12,000 for violating job safety rules, including exposing employees to falls that could seriously injure or kill them.

This is not the first time Oregon OSHA has cited the Portland-area contractor for neglecting to follow fall protection requirements.

The latest citation stems from an inspection of a job site at a house in Portland, where employees of the company were tearing off an existing roof and preparing to install a new one. The inspection found four employees were exposed to falls of about 11 feet with no fall protection systems in place.

Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry. Oregon OSHA maintains rules for construction activities that specify the minimum height at which workers must be protected from falling. In the case of West Coast Roofing and Painting, the company failed to implement fall protection systems – such as a personal fall restraint system or other measures – where employees were exposed to falling six feet or more to a lower level.

In fact, the company has now failed to heed that requirement three times since 2018. Two of those violations – including the latest one – were repeat offenses committed by the company within a month of each other this year.  

“There is never a good reason to ignore the need to protect workers from fall hazards, much less to repeatedly overlook rules that are designed to prevent serious injury or death,” said Oregon OSHA Administrator Michael Wood.

The inspection that led to the current citation also found other repeat violations on the part of West Coast Roofing and Painting. Those are:

  • Failure to protect an employee from the potential hazard of stepping or falling into an unprotected skylight on the second story of the house
  • Failure to provide a record certifying that employees were trained in fall-protection systems

Under Oregon OSHA rules, penalties multiply when employers commit repeat offenses. The citation against West Coast Roofing and Painting carries a total proposed penalty of $12,440. The fine amount includes a standard penalty reduction based on the small size of the company, which employed about 16 people at the time of Oregon OSHA’s inspection.

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers resources to help improve workplace safety and health.

The agency’s technical staff members can answer questions about rules and how to apply them:

Phone: 503-378-3272

Toll-free in Oregon: 800-922-2689

Email: tech.web@oregon.gov

Online contact form: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/Contact-Technical.aspx

Contact Oregon OSHA’s no-cost consultation services for help with safety and health programs:

Phone: 503-378-3272

Toll-free in Oregon: 800-922-2689

Field office locations and phone numbers: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/maps.aspx

Email: consult.web@oregon.gov

Take online fall protection training by visiting Oregon OSHA’s Fall Protection Suite, which includes Fall Protection for Roofing: https://osha.oregon.gov/edu/courses/Pages/fall-protection-suite.aspx

Visit the agency’s A-to-Z topic page about fall protection, which includes guides, fact sheets, and other resources: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/topics/fall-protection.aspx  

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 




Attached Media Files: Inspection document , 2019-11/1073/129224/IMG_0095.JPG , Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

Meals on Wheels People Delivers Thanksgiving Dinner to Homebound Seniors (Photo)
Meals on Wheels People - 11/12/19 9:41 AM
Volunteers will deliver thousands of meals to homebound seniors on Thanksgiving Day.
Volunteers will deliver thousands of meals to homebound seniors on Thanksgiving Day.
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Meals on Wheels People will deliver more than 2,800 hot turkey dinners to homebound seniors on Thanksgiving Day.

“A traditional holiday meal with turkey and all the trimmings will be delivered by volunteers to our most frail and isolated seniors on Thanksgiving Day,” said Meals on Wheels People Chief Executive Officer Suzanne Washington. “We are so grateful for the community volunteers who spend part of their holiday making the day brighter for these seniors.”

The menu includes roast turkey with gray, cranberry relish, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, stuffing, peas and pearl onions, and pumpkin pie.

Pick-up sites for Meals on Wheels delivery will be:
Meals on Wheels People Central Kitchen, 7710 SW 31st Ave, Portland
Double Tree Hotel, 1000 NE Multnomah, Portland
Ambleside Center, 600 NE 8th Street, Gresham
Forest Grove Center, 2835 19th Street, Forest Grove
Luepke Center, 1009 E McLoughlin Blvd., Vancouver, Wash.

Meal production will take place Monday through Wednesday, Nov. 25 through 27, at Meals on Wheels People Central Kitchen, 7710 W 31st Avenue. For more information call Meals on Wheels People at 503.736.6325.

About Meals on Wheels People: Meals on Wheels People has been changing lives, one meal at a time, since 1970. We provide more than a meal to thousands of older adults in the greater Portland metro area. Our service not only alleviates hunger and social isolation, but allows seniors to live independently with dignity in their own homes. Aging in place reduces depression, falls and hospitalization as well as the high cost of institutional care. For more information, visit: mowp.org.




Attached Media Files: Volunteers will deliver thousands of meals to homebound seniors on Thanksgiving Day.

Pilot Outdoor School program planned at Silver Falls State Park in 2020
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 11/12/19 9:31 AM

Silver Falls State Park will open its Silver Creek Youth Camp to Outdoor School students in 2020, part of a pilot project in partnership with Salem-based Straub Outdoors.  

Four schools in the Salem-Keizer and Dallas school districts will participate in the spring 2020 pilot program. Fifth- and sixth-grade students who attend school in Marion, Polk, Yamhill, Linn and Benton Counties will stay overnight at the camp Tuesday – Thursday during May and September for hands-on science and math education.

"Partnering with the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department for Outdoor School will benefit students from diverse cultural, racial, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds, many of whom have never before visited a state park,” said Rick Bastasch, Board President of Straub Outdoors. “Outdoor School is a place where learning, social-emotional growth and appreciation of Oregon's natural resources all come together. This partnership will help level the playing field so more students in our region can experience these important benefits."  

The public is able to reserve the facility Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights. This is a change from recent years, when the facility was available for reservations every night in May and September. The reservation process has not changed: reservations can be made up to nine months in advance by calling 800-452-5687.

Camp facilities sit on 60 acres in the secluded southeast corner of the park. Built in 1938, the camp accommodates 250 youth and includes 34 rustic cabins, a recreation hall, a dining hall with commercial kitchen, a swimming pool and a pond. 

“This facility was designed with the sole purpose of connecting youth with the outdoors,” said Silver Falls State Park manager Guy Rodrigue. “I am excited about the idea and potential for the camp to be used fully for the purpose in which it was intended, and that Oregon State Parks can help connect diverse groups of young people to this unique environment.” 

The YMCA has used the facility for summer camp in June, July and August since 1938. In May and September, the facility was open for reservations, but often sat unused. The partnership with Straub Outdoors will bring in consistent revenue to help cover the cost of deferred maintenance and historic preservation of the buildings, which were constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps. The camp is listed on the National Register as a Historic District.

Outdoor School is an immersive outdoor education experience for Oregon’s fifth and sixth graders in the world’s greatest classroom: nature. Students learn about themselves and their peers; the environment and natural resources; and the intersection of science, technology, engineering, the arts and math (STEAM). 

Straub Outdoors is a nonprofit educational service provider based in Salem that offers residential and non-residential outdoor school at several natural areas in western Oregon. Inquiry-based lessons at Straub Outdoor School highlight wildlife, habitats and ecosystems in the Willamette Valley and Cascade Foothills. Straub Outdoors field instructors have expertise in science, natural resources and humanities. The organization's focus is helping to close academic achievement gaps for underserved students through equitable and inclusive educational opportunities.

EDITORS: Photos of the youth camp are available here.
 


Centennial School District Governing Board Meeting Notice For November 13, 2019
Centennial Sch. Dist. - 11/12/19 9:23 AM

The Centennial School District Governing Board will hold a meeting Wednesday, November 13, 2019 at the district office board room at 7:00 p.m. Items of interest include an update on the facilities planning process. 

The agenda and accompanying documents are available for viewing by pasting the following address into your browser: https://v3.boardbook.org/Public/PublicMeetingMaterials.aspx?ak=1001533&mk=50332808

Contact Pamela Jordan, Board Secretary, at 503-762-3601 or pamela_jordan@csd28j.org for more information.


Boat Registration Renewal Notices Mailed (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 11/12/19 9:22 AM
Options and instructions to renew your boat registration
Options and instructions to renew your boat registration
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The Oregon State Marine Board mailed approximately 37,000 boat registration renewal notices to boaters whose motorboat registration expires on December 31, 2019.  Each renewal notice is unique to the owner and their boat. Additionally, registration renewals will also be sent electronically to 38,000 boat owners with emails on file in an effort to encourage online renewal.      

Renewing online using the Marine Board’s online store is fast and easy.  After completing the transaction, boat owners can print a temporary permit and go boating right away.  There is no transaction fee when using a credit or debit card online.  Another option is to mail the payment and coupon to the Marine Board. Registration decals are mailed within 7-10 business days from the date of receipt but may take an additional 2-4 weeks to arrive by US Mail.

Any watercraft with a motor or sailboats 12 feet or longer are required to title and register with the Marine Board. Registration fees vary based on boat length. The average boat length in Oregon is 16 feet, so the cost of a two-year registration is $100.20. 

Boat owners who renew their boat registration online receive their registration decals through the mail, faster. This method is also more cost-efficient, allowing the agency to leverage registration dollars toward boating facility improvement projects and on-water marine law enforcement services. Fees also support the aquatic invasive species prevention and abandoned derelict vessel programs

Access the online store directly at https://www.boatoregon.com/store. View the registration fee table at https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/Pages/Boat-Fees.aspx.

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The Marine Board is directly funded by boaters in the form of registration, title, and permit fees, as well as through marine fuel taxes. No lottery, general fund tax dollars or local facility parking fees support the agency or its programs. Boater-paid fees support the boating public through boating safety services (on-the-water law enforcement, training, and equipment), boating safety education, grants for the construction and maintenance of boating access facilities, and environmental protection programs. For more information about the Marine Board and its programs, visit www.boatoregon.com.




Attached Media Files: Options and instructions to renew your boat registration

East Gresham Elementary dedication set for November 12 (Photo)
Gresham-Barlow Sch. Dist. - 11/12/19 9:13 AM
New East Gresham Elementary School
New East Gresham Elementary School
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The new East Gresham Elementary School's Dedication Ceremony is scheduled to take place Tuesday, November 12, from 6:30 to 8:30 pm.

The event will include guest speakers, a ribbon cutting, and self-guided tours of the new building.

Construction of the new East Gresham Elementary School was funded by the 2016 school bond. It opened to students this fall.

The new facility replaces the old East Gresham campus, which was first built in 1950.

Building features:

-73,500 square feet and 30 new classrooms

-Technology upgrades such as 70-inch interactive flat panel touch screens in classrooms

-Modern, secure vestibule entrance to increase school safety and internally locking classroom doors

-Gymnasium with full-sized basketball court

-New cafeteria and library designed to maximize natural light

-New music room built on stage with movable wall that allows performances with audiences seated in gymnasium

More information about East Gresham Elementary School and the many other projects funded by the 2016 school bond can be found at: www.gresham-barlowbond.org.




Attached Media Files: New East Gresham Elementary School

News Release: Woodburn Police Seeking Suspect in Store Break In (Photo)
Woodburn Police - 11/12/19 9:06 AM
Surveillance footage 2
Surveillance footage 2
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Tuesday, November 12, 2019 - WoodburnOR - On 11/08/19 at approximately 4:13 a.m. an unknown suspect broke into the Verizon store on the 100 block of Arney Rd. The suspect used a hammer to break the glass on the side door of the location in order to enter. While in the store, the suspect used the same hammer to remove two of the display iPhone 11’s. The suspect attempted to remove five more phones with the hammer, but was unsuccessful and destroyed them. The suspect then exited through the glass door he had previously broken. The suspect is described as a black male adult, between 28-35 years of age, unknown height and 170 lbs. (See attached photos) Anyone with information is asked to please contact the Woodburn Police Department at 503-982-2345.

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Attached Media Files: Surveillance footage 2 , Surveillance footage 1

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense for Military Families (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 11/12/19 9:00 AM
TT - Veterans Scams - November 23, 2019 - GRAPHIC
TT - Veterans Scams - November 23, 2019 - GRAPHIC
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Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment.? Today:? Building a digital defense ?for those who have given so much to defend our country.? 

Veterans Day allows us to celebrate the service of U.S. military members and honor the sacrifices that they – and their families – have made. It is also a time to educate military families about those who wish to profit off their service.  

Unfortunately, military families may be more vulnerable to scams than the average American. A 2018 study by the Federal Trade Commission showed service members lost more than $25 million to just imposter scams over the course of a year. The median loss for a military member: about $700… $200 more than the median loss for the average person. 

Imposter fraud is a pretty simple scam. The bad guy pretends to be someone else, gains your trust, and convinces you to send money. He can pose as a potential employer offering a much-needed job, a lottery official promising a big prize, or even a government agent threatening arrest. No matter who he impersonates, his goal is to always get you to pay up. 

What can you do to protect yourself? 

  • Be wary of any call from someone claiming to be from the government who requests personal info or money. 

  • Think twice before paying any supposed debt or fee with a wire transfer or gift card.  

  • Don’t trust caller ID or the name on the email address or user ID. All can be faked. 

  • If in doubt, call the business or agency back from a publicly-available number to confirm what you’ve been offered or threatened with. 

Finally – some good news for veterans. Our friends at the FTC announced just a few weeks ago that the three major U.S. consumer reporting agencies will soon start offering free credit monitoring to active duty U.S. military members and members of the National Guard. To qualify as an active duty member – you must be assigned away from your usual duty station. All members of the National Guard will qualify regardless of where you are stationed. 

As always, if you have been victimized by a cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at? www.IC3.gov ?or call your local FBI office.? 

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These are the links service members can use to access the credit reporting agencies' military programs:

https://www.experian.com/lp/military.html 

https://www.equifax.com/personal/military-credit-monitoring/ 

https://www.transunion.com/active-duty-military-credit-monitoring 




Attached Media Files: TT - Veterans Scams - November 12, 2019 - AUDIO , TT - Veterans Scams - November 23, 2019 - GRAPHIC

MHCC Foundation raising funds to provide meals to hungry students for #GivingTuesday
Mt. Hood Comm. College - 11/12/19 9:00 AM

GRESHAM, Ore. – The Mt. Hood Community College (MHCC) Foundation is leveraging the #GivingTuesday campaign to raise funds and provide quick meals and fresh fruits and vegetables for students who do not always know where their next might come from.

More than 3,400 full-time students identify as facing challenges with food insecurity, according to a survey administered by the college. Many of these students rely on Barney’s Pantry, (MHCC’s campus food pantry) located in the student union.

Barney’s Pantry works in conjunction with the Oregon Food Bank and is a resource for food or personal hygiene items. Tylor Moua, who is studying business entrepreneurship at MHCC, leans on the pantry when he needs to keep his mind on his classes and not his hunger.

“I get extremely tired when I haven’t eaten. Having Barney’s Pantry keeps my mind off of my hunger and on my studies,” he said.

Tylor’s story is just one of many. That is why the MHCC Foundation is asking for donations this #GivingTuesday that will help the college provide one, two or even three quick meals for students in need.

To do this, we need your help raising:

  • $6,810 to cover one quick meal for each of these students, or
  • $13,620 to cover two quick meals, or
  • $20,430 to cover three quick meals

Every dollar donated as part of our #GivingTuesday campaign will be matched thanks to the MHCC Foundation and MHCC President Dr. Lisa Skari.

“Studies have shown that an estimated 48% of community college students face food insecurity. We are striving to address this on our campus so no student has to make the choice between getting an education and getting their next meal,” Dr. Skari said.

About #GivingTuesday:

#GivingTuesday is a global day of giving that falls on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving and the widely recognized shopping events Black Friday and Cyber Monday. The movement is meant to kick off the charitable giving season and will take place on December 3, 2019 this year.


Single Vehicle versus Pedestrian Fatal Crash on I-84- Sherman County
Oregon State Police - 11/12/19 8:53 AM

On Monday, November 11, 2019 at approximately 5:45 pm, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash involving a pedestiran on I-84 near MP 104.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a red and white 2016 Peterbilt Commerical Motor Vehicle, operated by Keith Allen Hille, age 31, of Moscow Mills, Missouri, was traveling westbound on I-84 in the slow lane, when he noticed a reflective vest moving around in the lane of travel. He initially thought the vest was blowing around then realized the vest was being worn by a pedestrian, identified as Alejandro Lozano Rivas, age 33, of Biggs Junction, Oregon. Hille swerved to avoid Lozano Rivas, but was unable to avoid striking him. Lozano Rivas suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene. Hille stopped immediately after the collison and is cooperating with the investigation.

OSP was assisted by the Sherman County Sheriff's Office, the Sherman County District Attorney's Office and ODOT.  


OnPoint Community Credit Union Announces Jackie Dunckley as New Chief Talent Officer (Photo)
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 11/12/19 8:43 AM
OnPoint Community Credit Union Chief Talent Officer Jackie Dunckley
OnPoint Community Credit Union Chief Talent Officer Jackie Dunckley
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PORTLAND, Ore., November 12, 2019—OnPoint Community Credit Union announced today that Jackie Dunckley will serve as Chief Talent Officer, a new position that serves on the credit union’s Executive Team. OnPoint, the largest credit union headquartered in Oregon with more than 383,000 members and $6.1 billion in assets, created the position to demonstrate its dedication to employee and member experiences during the company’s incredible growth.

“We believe investing in our people makes us even better at serving our members and community. The Chief Talent Officer will ensure that commitment is met as we grow well into the future,” said OnPoint President and CEO Rob Stuart. “Jackie has demonstrated purpose and excellence in leading OnPoint’s Human Resources team over the past five years, and she is uniquely qualified for this role.”

Since joining OnPoint in 2014, Dunckley has made important contributions to OnPoint as Vice President of Human Resources, including building partnerships across the organization, as well as developing systems and practices to support effective talent management. As part of her new role, she will lead efforts to promote OnPoint’s work around diversity, equity and inclusion. She will also lead the Member Services team, which includes more than 70 team members in OnPoint’s Contact Center. With more than 15 years of experience in Human Resources, Dunckley will continue to cultivate talent and provide excellent service to members.

“Our members and employees are the heart of OnPoint, and when we do what’s right for our employees, they are empowered to do what’s right for our members,” said Dunckley. “That is why the commitment to grow and retain OnPoint’s exceptional talent is at the core of our five-year strategy and I’m proud to be leading that effort.”

Prior to OnPoint, Dunckley earned her B.S. from Northern Arizona University and her Juris Doctorate from the Sandra Day O’Connor School of Law. She was admitted to the Arizona State Bar in 1998. Following a brief legal career, she took her expertise in-house to develop a diverse HR career in the newspaper, high tech, biotech and finance industries.

Dunckley also has a strong passion for education and serves as chair of the Board of Trustees at De La Salle North Catholic High School in Portland. Dunckley lives in Beaverton with her husband Curtis and three children.

The OnPoint Executive Team is comprised of the following members:

  • Rob Stuart, President/Chief Executive Officer
  • Jim Armstrong, Senior Vice President/Chief Information Officer
  • Jackie Dunckley, Senior Vice President/ Chief Talent Officer
  • Veronica Ervin, Senior Vice President/Chief Risk Officer
  • Jim Hunt, Senior Vice President/Chief Financial Officer
  • Steve Leugers, Senior Vice President/Chief Credit Officer
  • Tory McVay, Senior Vice President/Chief Retail Officer

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving more than 383,000 members and with assets of $6.1 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union’s membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 13 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson, Lane, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk, Washington and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at: 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.




Attached Media Files: OnPoint Community Credit Union Chief Talent Officer Jackie Dunckley

Police Activities League of SW Washington receives grant from 7-Eleven
Police Activities League of SW Washington - 11/12/19 8:24 AM

Vancouver, Wash. –The Police Activities League of SW Washington (PAL) is proud to announce the receipt of a grant totaling $6,450 from local Vancouver 7-Eleven stores. Locally, 7-Eleven has supported PAL programs, donating in-kind items for PAL youth, and has also partnered each year with the Vancouver Police Department to bring Operation Chill to Vancouver every summer! Operation Chill places free Slurpee certificates in the hands of police officers to give to youth throughout the summer.

“Our stores are part of these neighborhoods, and as such, we wanted to be good neighbors to the community we serve. This Project A Game grant lets us play a part in local kids success, and we can’t think of a better way to give back”, said Melissa Dickson Asset Protection Specialist North Pacific Zone - 7-Eleven, Inc.

There will be a check presentation from 7-Eleven to PAL at the PAL literacy event:

Date: Thursday November, 14, 2019

Time: 2pm

Location:  Fruit Valley Elementary School (3410 NW Fruit Valley Rd.)

Members of the media are invited to attend.

Learn more about PAL by visiting https://palofswwa.org

 

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Dalton Marshall Homicide Remains Unsolved After Four Years - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #15-41 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 11/12/19 8:00 AM
2019-11/5183/129215/Victim_Dalton_Marshall.jpg
2019-11/5183/129215/Victim_Dalton_Marshall.jpg
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The Portland Police Bureau, in cooperation with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to solve the homicide of a 19-year-old man from Vancouver, Washington.

On November 12, 2015, at 2:04 a.m., North Precinct officers responded to the intersection of North Bruce Avenue and Hudson Street on the report that a man was down in the street, bleeding and unconscious.

Officers and medical personnel arrived and located the victim, 19-year-old Dalton Marshall, and determined that he was deceased from an apparent gunshot wound.

The Oregon State Medical Examiner conducted an autopsy and ruled his death a homicide.

Homicide detectives believe that Marshall may have been socializing along North Interstate Avenue in Portland in the hours prior to his death.

There is no suspect information and no known motive for his death.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit https://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/support.php

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Attached Media Files: 2019-11/5183/129215/Victim_Dalton_Marshall.jpg

Mon. 11/11/19
Lebanon Firefighters Save Commercial Building From Blaze (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 11/11/19 7:01 PM
Truck 31 extinguishes hot spots on the roof of the structure.
Truck 31 extinguishes hot spots on the roof of the structure.
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A driver traveling on Santiam Highway Monday afternoon noticed light smoke coming from a commercial building on Burdell Boulevard and dialed 911 to report the incident at 2:50 pm. Firefighters responded to the former Champion Mil site behind Walgreens where the first arriving unit reported heavy smoke from the lone 8,500 square foot commercial structure remaining on the old mill property. Due to the potential for a large-scale fire, the incident commander called for a second alarm to bring additional resources to the scene and to cover the Lebanon Fire District while on-duty crews battled the fire. Fortunately, fire crews were able to make a rapid, aggressive attack on the fire from the exterior of the structure which stopped the blaze in its tracks and saved the structure. Damage was limited to some interior structural components with some heat and smoke damage to the metal structure. The property is believed to have been recently remitted to Linn County due to unpaid taxes.

Firefighters had to cut locks from large bay doors to make access to the structure while additional crews used powerful circular saws to cut access holes in the metal structure and direct water streams on the fire burning inside. The fire district’s new ladder truck was used to combat the fire as well. Crews extended the ladder into the structure from ground level where they could then use the remote nozzle to direct fire streams upwards towards the ceiling where heavy fire had built. Once the main body of fire was knocked down, crews entered the structure with hoses to finish extinguishing the fire and mop up remaining hot spots.

The Lebanon Fire Investigation Team was activated and four fire investigators remined on scene to determine the cause and origin of the fire. According to Lebanon Fire Marshal Jason Bolen, investigators were able to determine the area of origin of the fire but extensive damage from both fire and suppression efforts prevented investigators from singling out a specific cause. There were signs of forced entry into the structure through a wall panel, and the building was known to the Lebanon Police Department to be a home to transients.  “Based on the information gathered from our investigation it is possible that this fire was caused by a warming fire which was either left unattended and spread or simply got out of control.” said Bolen. “We were unable to determine a credible source of ignition, which unfortunately means that the cause of this fire will remain undetermined unless someone comes forward with additional information.”

Lebanon firefighters were assisted on scene by the Sweet Home Fire & Ambulance District and the Albany Fire Department. Officers from the Lebanon Police Department also assisted on scene. Firefighters from the Scio Fire District stood by at Station 31 and the Albany Fire Department provided a medic unit for district coverage. Fire crews had the blaze under control in about an hour and were on scene for three hours. There were no injuries to firefighters or civilians.

For HD Video of this and other LFD incidents, please subscribe to the Lebanon Fire District YouTube Channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjTxDBuPbD3DPAybCkCgEvg

For HD photos of this and other LFD incidents, please follow the Lebanon Fire District Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/LebanonFireDistrict/?ref=bookmarks

For updates on large scale incidents within the Lebanon Fire District, follow us on Twitter: @LebanonFD




Attached Media Files: Truck 31 extinguishes hot spots on the roof of the structure. , Lebanon's Truck 31 sprays water into the structure. , Firefighters direct a stream through a hold cut in the building's wall.

Portland Road closed at Wayside Terrace due to traffic crash.
Salem Police Dept. - 11/11/19 6:35 PM

Portland Road is closed to traffic in both directions at Wayside Terrace due to a traffic crash.  It is expected this closure will last several hours.  Drivers are asked to use alternative routes.

No additional information is available at this time.


Oregon National Guardsmen participate in Veterans Day events (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 11/11/19 5:35 PM
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SALEM, Ore. - Members of the Oregon National Guard participated in Veterans Day ceremonies and special events around the State of Oregon, honoring the service of military veterans of the armed forces, Nov. 11, 2019. 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

191111-Z-CM403: Oregon Army National Guard Col. Alan Gronewold, Director of Aviation and Safety for the Oregon National Guard, delivers remarks to veterans and guest attending the Vietnams Day ceremony held at the Vietnam Era Veterans Memorial, Canby, Ore., Nov. 11, 2019. Gronewold served as the guest speaker for the ceremony. (National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Aaron Perkins, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

191111-Z-CM403-170: Two U.S. Air Force F-15 Eagle fighter jets, assigned to the 142nd Fighter Wing base at the Portland Air National Guard Base, perform a Veterans Day ceremonial flyover at the Vietnam Era Veterans Memorial, Canby, Ore., Nov. 11, 2019. (National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Aaron Perkins, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

191111-Z-LM216-001: Veterans, and members of Mt. Angel American Legion Post #89 color guard post the colors during a Veterans Day celebration hosted by post #89, Mt. Angel, Ore., Nov. 11, 2019. Veterans Day began 100 years ago as "Armistice Day" on Nov. 11, 1919, the first anniversary of the end of World War I. (National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Zach Holden, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

191111-Z-LM216-002: Veterans observe as the colors are posted during a Veterans Day celebration hosted by the Mt. Angel American Legion post #89, Mt. Angel, Ore., Nov. 11, 2019. Veterans Day began 100 years ago as "Armistice Day" on Nov. 11, 1919, the first anniversary of the end of World War I. (National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Zach Holden, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

191111-Z-LM216-003: Oregon Air National Guard Lt. Col James E. McDonald (left), deputy director of the Oregon National Guard's State Partnership Program, speaks with Col. (ret.) William Mercer Harris IV, during a Veterans Day celebration hosted by the Mt. Angel American Legion post #89, Mt. Angel, Ore., Nov. 11, 2019. Mercer, a veteran with 40 years of service, started flying bombers with the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II, and later flew fighter jets with the U.S. Air Force during the Vietnam War. (National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Zach Holden, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

191111-Z-PL933-002: Oregon National Guard Full-time Support Chaplain, Maj. Cody Roach, leads a crowd of gathered veterans, family members and others during the traditional moment of silence and playing of taps during the Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs ceremonial wreath laying on Veterans Day, Nov. 11, 2019. (National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

191111-Z-PL933-003: Oregon National Guard Full-time Support Chaplain, Maj. Cody Roach, leads a crowd of gathered veterans, family members and others during the traditional moment of silence and playing of taps during the Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs ceremonial wreath laying on Veterans Day, Nov. 11, 2019. (National Guard photo by, Tech. Sgt. Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

191111-Z-AJ128-1001: 2nd Battalion, 218th Field Artillery, Oregon Army National Guard perform a gun salute during the Albany Veterans Day Memorial Service at Timber-Linn Park on Nov. 11, 2019. The Service consisted of guest speakers; Albany Mayor Sharon Konopa and Oregon Army National Guard Col. Karl Pond, laying of the Gold Star and POW/MIA wreaths, and a detachment of "Oregon's Own" 234th Band Army National Guard playing all the military service songs. (National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs)

191111-Z-AJ128-1002: A Color Guard team and members of the Oregon Army National Guard assemble and stand ready to participate and march in the Albany Veterans Day Parade in Albany, Ore., Nov. 11, 2019. The Parade is largest Veterans Day Parade ‘West of the Mississippi River,’ and the third largest in the country. The first Albany Veterans Parade stated in 1951 and the Oregon National Guard has been a part a central part from the beginning. (National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs)

191111-Z-AJ128-1003: A team member of the 102nd Civil Support Team (WMD) Oregon National Guard “High-Fives” many of the spectators watching the Albany Veterans Day Parade, Albany, Ore., Nov. 11, 2019. The mission of the 102nd Civil Support Team is to support civil authorities at domestic chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive (CBRNE) incident sites by identifying, assessing, advising and assisting during incidents involving the intentional or unintentional release of CBRNE. (National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs)




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-PL933-003.jpg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-PL933-002.jpg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-LM216-003.jpeg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-LM216-002.jpeg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-LM216-001.jpeg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-CM403-170.jpg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-CM403-122.jpg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-AJ128-1003.jpg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-AJ128-1002.jpg , 2019-11/962/129210/191111-Z-AJ128-1001.jpg

OHA reassigns Oregon Health Plan members in 5 counties to new coordinated care organizations for 2020 to preserve access to care
Oregon Health Authority - 11/11/19 3:28 PM

November 11, 2020

Contact: Robb Cowie, 503-421-7684; obb.cowie@dhsoha.state.or.us"> robb.cowie@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA reassigns Oregon Health Plan members in 5 counties to new coordinated care organizations for 2020 to preserve access to care

Oregon Health Plan (OHP) members in 5 counties will be reassigned to different coordinated care organizations (CCOs), when new contracts for Medicaid health plans begin on January 1, 2020. The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is moving members because the CCOs to which some OHP members were originally assigned (or members had chosen during the current member choice period) do not have health care provider contracts in place to serve them.

The changes include:

  • Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington counties: Trillium Community Health Plan will be ineligible to enroll members until at least April 1, 2020. All members currently slated to be enrolled in Trillium beginning January 1, 2020 (approximately 40,000 members) will be reassigned to Health Share of Oregon, the other CCO that is contracted to operate in the tri-counties at the start of 2020. The Oregon Health Authority is taking this action because Trillium Community Health Plan does not have a hospital in its provider network.
    • On November 8, 2019, the Oregon Health Authority notified Trillium Community Health Plan that the CCO will have until June 30, 2020 to contract with a hospital and meet other network requirements. If not, the CCO would lose its ability to serve the tri-county region over the next 5 years.
  • Jackson County: More than 10,000 members of AllCare CCO will be reassigned to Jackson Care Connect CCO, starting January 1, 2020. Members will be shifted between CCOs to preserve their current provider relationships: the provider network that currently serves the AllCare members affected by this change will no longer have a primary care contract with AllCare at the start of the new year, but will continue to contract with Jackson Care Connect. AllCare will retain OHP members who are served by other providers in Jackson County.
  • Lane County: Members of Trillium Community Health Plan who are served by a primary care provider network, which will no longer have a contract with the CCO in 2020, will be moved to Pacific Source of Lane County. The move is effective January 1, 2020. This change will ensure members continue to have access to their current providers. Trillium will continue to serve other OHP members in Lane County who are not affected by this change in Trillium’s Lane county network.

OHA will notify all affected members of changes in their enrollment in coming weeks, before new CCO contracts take effect on January 1, 2020.

OHA Director Patrick Allen said, “Our top priority during the transition to new CCO contracts has been to make sure OHP members continue to have access to high-quality, well-coordinated health care. OHP members depend on their CCOs to offer the doctors, counselors and other providers they need to ensure health and well-being for themselves, their families and their communities. We are doing everything we can to make sure nothing disrupts those vital provider relationships.”

On July 9, 2019, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) announced its intent to award 15 organizations contracts to serve as coordinated care organizations (CCOs) for the Oregon Health Plan’s nearly 1 million members. CCOs have been undergoing “readiness review,” which includes examination of their updated provider networks, since the summer. CCOs signed new contracts, totaling more than $6 billion for the 2020 contract year, prior to October 1, 2020. Contracts remain contingent on successful completion of the readiness review process.

About coordinated care organizations: Oregon first established CCOs in 2012 to transform health care delivery in the state. CCOs bring together physical, behavioral, and oral health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan. They improve health and reduce costs by providing more coordinated, flexible and innovative services. CCOs are rewarded for achieving specific health outcomes and quality measures.


Crews Extinguish Second Alarm Fire (Photo)
Clackamas Fire Dist. #1 - 11/11/19 2:58 PM
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Shortly after 12:00 p.m. firefighters were dispatchd to the Metro South Transfer Station at 2001 Washington St. in Oregon City.  First arriving crews reported a 20' x 20' area of garbage burning in Bay One of the facility with employees and customers being evacuated.  Hoselines were quickly deployed and the sprinkler system was supported to extinguish the fire and keep it from spreading to the buidling.  A second alarm was called due to the potential for fire spread, however the fire was brought under control in 40 minutes and the second alarm units were canceled. In total, 15 employees and approximately 20 customers were evacuated from the facility with no injuries reported. The fire was first reported by Metro staff who noticed some smoke in Bay One. The cause of this fire is undetermined.

For information about what material can be dropped off at the Metro Facilities please refer to Metro's website at oregonmetro.gov.




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/799/129207/Interior_View.JPG , 2019-11/799/129207/Exterior_Alpha_Side.JPG , 2019-11/799/129207/Ventilation_Team.JPG , 2019-11/799/129207/Ventilation_Team_2.JPG , 2019-11/799/129207/Hydrant_Engine.JPG

Science on Tap Portland -- How Forests Can Help Stop Climate Change [corrected links]
Via Productions - 11/11/19 1:51 PM

Date: Tuesday, November 19, 2019

Time: Event at 7 p.m. (doors at 6 p.m.)

Location: Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta Street, Portland, Ore.

Tickets: $15 for GA, $8 students (minors under 21 with parent/guardian only) 

Food & Drink: Full Bar, hand pies, pizza rolls, and an assortment of sweets and snacks available

Event Website: https://viaproductions.org/events/alberta_nov_19_forest/

As the growing effects of climate change become clear — massive fires and floods, hotter summers, stronger hurricanes — it’s obvious that we urgently need to do something. Forest loss and degradation is globally the second largest source of CO2 emissions (after fossil fuels), but it’s the only emissions source that can reverse course and reabsorb that same CO2. Forest conservation and restoration management can sequester massive amounts of carbon and promote climate resiliency. The Pacific Northwest is home to some of the most productive and carbon-rich forests on the planet, and changing how we manage these and other forests is key to ensuring a safe future.

At this Science on Tap we will hear from Laurie Wayburn, Co-Founder and CEO of the Pacific Forest Trust, who will discuss the immediate imperative— and opportunity— for forest conservation and restoration here at home as a climate solution. This cost effective strategy also has multiple benefits for water, wildlife habitat, human health, and jobs. Come learn about the unique role of forests and other land conservation efforts in as an essential climate strategy and how you can get involved to make positive change.

[Note: Ticketing and event links have been corrected.]


Science on Tap is a science lecture series where you can sit back, drink a pint, and enjoy learning. Listen to experts talk about the science in your neighborhood and around the world. You don't have to be a science geek to have fun--all you need is a thirst for knowledge! For more information on this event or about Science on Tap, visit Via Productions.


UPDATE: Hazelwood Shooting, Bullets Go Into Child's Bedroom (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/11/19 12:28 PM
Investigation Scene
Investigation Scene
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The investigation into Friday night's shooting in the Hazelwood neighborhood is ongoing by detectives on the Gun Violence Reduction Team. The investigation indicates that a vehicle (photo) was targeted by the suspect or suspects, but several of the bullets fired went into two occupied apartments behind it. In one, the bullets impacted a child's bed (no photo available). No children were in the room at the time and thankfully, no one was injured. In the attached photo of the overall scene, none of the vehicles shown are believed to be involved.

Detectives are requesting help identifying the suspects in this shooting. If anyone has information on this shooting, contact Detective Jennifer Hertzler at 503-823-1040 Jennifer.Hertzler@portlandoregon.gov or Detective Ryan Foote 503-823-0781 Ryan.Foote@portlandoregon.gov .

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared with investigators as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects.

Tips on gun crimes can be emailed to GunTaskForce@portlandoregon.gov

If you see a gun crime in progress, call 9-1-1.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is offering a minimum $250 cash reward to anyone who reports a convicted felon or a juvenile in possession of a firearm and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

### PPB ###

### ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW ###

On Friday, November 8, 2019 at 8:16 p.m., East Precinct Officers responded to an apartment building in the 12600 Block of Southeast Stark Street on reports of gunshots heard. When officers arrived they located evidence of gunfire, including bullet strikes to a vehicle and apartments. There are no known victims and the suspect or suspects fled the scene before officers arrived.

The Gun Violence Reduction Team responded to assist with the investigation. If anyone has information about this shooting and has not spoken to investigators, please call 503 823 3333 and reference case number 19-385674.

### PPB ###



Attached Media Files: Investigation Scene , Vehicle

M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Honors Standout Educators and Students in Science Fields
M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust - 11/11/19 11:13 AM

Contact: Colby Reade, APR

M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust

yr@murdocktrust.org">colbyr@murdocktrust.org

360.694.8415

 

M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Honors Standout Educators and Students in Science Fields

 

Pacific Lutheran and Reed professors headline awards given for outstanding efforts in science research and education

Students from Whitworth University, University of Puget Sound, Walla Walla University, University of Portland, George Fox University, Whitman College, Trinity Western University, Pacific Lutheran University, Eastern Washington University, Willamette University and University of Alaska Anchorage recognized for outstanding research

 

For Immediate Release

 

November 11, 2019 – This week, the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust continued its commitment to support and honor the important work of scientific research at predominantly undergraduate Pacific Northwest Universities at the twenty-eighth annual Murdock College Science Research Program Conference.

 

This year’s conference, themed “Collaboration–A Key to Success in Undergraduate Research,” included multiple awards for outstanding college and university educators as well as exciting news about a new program designed to increase collaboration among scientific institutions.

 

“Our benefactor, Jack Murdock, believed deeply in the importance of scientific research as a source of innovation and inspiration to help improve the lives of all individuals, families and communities,” said Dr. Steve Moore, executive director, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. “We are grateful to have the opportunity to recognize, honor and celebrate the tireless work of the outstanding researchers and educators who seek to serve the common good of our region through science.”

 

Pacific Lutheran and Reed Professors Honored

 

Dr. Dean Waldow, Professor of Chemistry, Pacific Lutheran University received the Lynwood W. Swanson Scientific Research Award for his exemplary research in the field of polymer chemistry and his commitment as a mentor to students over more than 25 years. Dr. Alison Crocker, Assistant Professor of Physics, Reed College was honored with the Lynwood W. Swanson Promise for Scientific Research Award for her research regarding the relationship between star formation and galaxy structure and for her investment in involving undergraduate students in her work.

 

The prestigious honors were established in 2016 to recognize two exemplary educators from the Pacific Northwest. The “Swanson Award” highlights a senior faculty exemplar with an established, productive and nationally recognized research program, while the “Swanson Promise Award” calls out a junior faculty member who has demonstrated exceptional potential in these areas through early research and work with students. Both awards were named in honor of noted educator, researcher, entrepreneur, and former trustee, Dr. Lynwood Swanson, upon his retirement from the Murdock Trust.

 

“It is an honor to recognize the valuable work of both Dr. Waldow and Dr. Crocker,” said Dr. Moses Lee, Senior Program Director for Scientific Research and Enrichment Programs, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. “Throughout his career, Dr. Swanson inspired and engaged students and young people through his own passion for science and discovery. He believes strongly in the ability of science to solve real world challenges and for educators to serve as mentors to the next generation of researchers. We are so proud to be able to honor Dr. Swanson’s legacy and recognize the outstanding work of those who seek to continue that effort, such as Dr. Waldow and Dr. Crocker.”

 

Dr. Dean Waldow will receive a $15,000 cash prize as part of his award and Dr. Alison Crocker will receive a $7,500 cash prize. A portion of each cash award is set aside specifically to help fund further student research and supplies.  

 

The awards were formally presented at the 2019 Murdock College Science Research Program (MCSRP) Conference in Vancouver, WA. The annual conference drew hundreds of college students and science educators from across the Pacific Northwest.

 

In addition to the two faculty awards, The Murdock Trust also honored several college students for research presentations delivered at the event. They include:

 

The 2019 John Van Zytveld Award in the Physical Sciences

A transparent UVA-1 biocompatible photoresin towards 3D printed lab-on-a-chip

Name: Samartha Shrestha and Christopher Roberts

Institution: Whitworth University

Mentor: Dr. Philip Measor

 

The 2019 John Van Zytveld Award in the Life Sciences

 “Song recognition and hybridization in a new secondary contact zone of white-crowned sparrows, Zonotrichia leucophrys”

Name: Will Brooks

Institution: University of Puget Sound

Mentor: Dr. Peter Wimberger

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Ecology-Evolution-Biodiversity

“Potential Factors Impacting the Severity of Seagrass Wasting Disease in the Salish Sea”

Name: Kallan Richards (presenter) and Noah Cline

Institution: Walla Walla University

Mentor: Dr. Cecilia Brothers

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Ecology-Evolution-Biodiversity

“Structural and spatial characteristics of Acer macrophyllum influence epiphyte communities in the Hoh temperate rainforest”

Name: Kaela Hamilton

Institution: University of Puget Sound

Mentor: Dr. Carrie Woods

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Developmental Biology-physiology

“Identifying How Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Affects Cardiac Neural Crest Migration Following Fetal Alcohol Exposure”

Names: Pia Fornell

Institution: University of Portland

Mentor: Dr. Laura Dyer

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Molecular and Cell Biology

 “Regulation of Functional hERG Isoform Expression by Poly(A) Binding Protein N1”

Name: Laney Search and Rachel Drgastin (co-presenters)

Institution: George Fox University

Mentor: Dr. Matthew Stump

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Neuroscience-Psychology-Exercise Science

“'The Role of Endolysosomal Trafficking protein Rab7A in DLX 5/6 Interneuron Development”

Name: Andrew Neumann

Institution: George Fox University

Mentor: Dr. Jim Smart

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Biochemistry

“Quantitative NMR Analysis Reveals New Trends in Substrate Specificity of Benzoate Dioxygenase”

Name: James Bent

Institution: Whitman College

Mentor: Dr. Jon Collins

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Organic Chemistry

“A practical synthesis of fluorinated catechol derivatives using silver(I) fluoride”

Name: Alan Brooke

Institution: Trinity Western University

Mentor: Dr. Chadron Friesen

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Analytical-Inorganic-Physical Chemistry

“Physicochemical properties of 2,5-dihydroxy-1,4-quinones appended with phosphonato groups”

Names: Kailin Mooney

Institution: University of Portland

Mentor: Dr. Eugene Urnezius

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Analytical-Inorganic-Physical Chemistry

“Endothermic singlet fission in di-benzoic acid perylene oligomers”

Name: Jennica Kelm

Institution: Pacific Lutheran University

Mentor: Dr. Nadia Korovina

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Environmental Science-Geology

“sUAV Mapping of the Porcupine Bay Road Landslide Complex”

Names: Ethan Ducken

Institution: Eastern Washington University

Mentor: Dr. Chad Pritchard

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Microbiology

“Microbial community composition of Oregon marine sediment: In search of novel archaea”

Name: Helen Madeen (presenter), Cassie Cosler, Jamie Smith, Mayely Polanco, and Alexandra Bless

Institution: Willamette University

Mentor: Dr. Rosa Leon Zayas

 

Murdock Poster Prize 2019 - Physics and Engineering

PIC Simulations of Multipole Plasma Trap Diagnostics and Loading Methods

Name: Henrique Miller

Institution: University of Alaska Anchorage

Mentor: Dr. Nathaniel Hicks

 

Inspiring Collaboration

 

In addition to honoring work completed by faculty and students, the 2019 MCSR Conference introduced a renewed commitment to inspire and support new research that has yet to begin. Leaders from numerous scientific institutions joined together to unveil RAISE (Research Across Institutions for Scientific Empowerment).

 

Formerly known as the Collaborative Research Alliance, RAISE seeks to create opportunities for researchers at mainly private colleges and universities and a few public research-active, primarily undergraduate institutions around the Pacific Northwest to connect and collaborate on new projects.

 

“Science does not exist in a vacuum,” said Dr. Lee. “The best research and findings often come when teams working on similar areas of research are able to combine their efforts, share their findings, and inspire one another to pursue new and cutting-edge tracks of discovery. RAISE will present a variety of opportunities for educators and researchers around the Pacific Northwest to grow and expand their work.”

 

For more information about the MCSRP Conference and how the Murdock Trust invests in science education and research, please visit www.murdocktrust.org.

 

About the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust

The Murdock Trust, created by the will of the late Melvin J. (Jack) Murdock, provides grants to organizations in five states of the Pacific Northwest—Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington—that seek to strengthen the region’s educational and cultural base in creative and sustainable ways. Since its inception in 1975, the Trust has awarded more than 6,700 grants totaling more than $1 billion of which about $200 million supported projects in scientific research. For more information, find the Murdock Trust on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and on our website.

 

About Dr. Lynwood Swanson

After starting his career as a professor and administrator at Linfield College, Dr. Swanson moved to Oregon Graduate Institute before co-founding FEI, a world-leader in electron optics and focused ion beam technologies in scanning and transmission electron microscopies. In conjunction with his extensive career in science education and research, Dr. Swanson served as a tireless advocate for these fields as a trustee for thirty years.

 

#####


Local Children to Shop with Portland Winterhawks and Officers (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/11/19 11:00 AM
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This FlashAlert is being sent on behalf of the Portland Police Sunshine Division (see contacts below)

Sunshine Division Contact: Kyle Camberg
503.577.6852
kyle@sunshinedivision.org

Portland Winterhawks Contact: Piper Criscola - (503) 752-2444 piperc@winterhawks.com

Winterhawks Booster Club Contact: Stuart Kemp -- (360) 852-5081 pwhbc@comcast.net


On November 12, 2019, 23 children will have a Winterhawks player in one hand, and a gift card in the other for a major holiday shopping experience like none other.

The Portland Winterhawks, Sunshine Division, and Portland Police Officers are teaming up to take 23 students from Chief Joseph Elementary for a unique shopping experience with the Portland Winterhawks, thanks to funding provided by the Winterhawks Booster Club.

The participating children were identified in partnership with Portland Police Bureau School Resource Officers who regularly participate in Sunshine Division's Izzy's Kid's program, referred to as a "Shop with a Cop." The students will have a very special opportunity to "Shop with a Hawk," as Winterhawks players shop one-on-one for toys and/or clothing with the students at the Interstate Fred Meyer store as well as interact with Portland Police Bureau Officers Steve Morinville, Heidi Kreis, and Matt Tobey, who are also participating in the event.

Each child will have approximately $134 to spend, thanks to the generosity of the team's Booster Club, who is funding the event.

Media are invited to attend; below are the details:

Event: Shop with a Hawk

Date: Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Location: Fred Meyer 7404 N Interstate Ave., Portland, OR 97217 (meet at check-in table on the second floor)

Arrival Time: Kids will begin to shop at 4:30 pm and then head to the snack table after.

Sunshine Division Contact: Lilieth Armenta | lili@sunshinedivision.org | 503.823.2347

Who Qualifies? Any child at the school elected most in need that are ages 7-10 years old.

Children Selected: 23 children from Chief Joseph elementary school, and 22 players from Portland Winterhawks Hockey Club.

Gift Card Amount: $134


About Sunshine Division:
Since 1923, Sunshine Division has been providing emergency food and clothing relief to Portland families and individuals in need. An independent charity, in unique partnership with the Portland Police Bureau, Sunshine Division operates year-round, and serves Portland's most vulnerable populations: families with children, seniors, the disabled, and veterans as they face economic challenges to meet basic needs. In addition to the over 15,000 households served directly through their doors each year, Sunshine Division donates food to over 50+ food-relief charities in five surrounding counties. Sunshine Division distributes new and gently used clothing through their Threadz clothing room and new clothing through the Izzy's Kids "Shop With a Cop" program, which pairs police officers with low-income students for a school clothes shopping trip.

For more information, please visit: https://sunshinedivision.org/

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2019-11/3056/129178/SD_Logo_07_28_13.jpg

Leading Identity Theft Expert Frank W. Abagnale Comes to Portland to Teach Us How to Avoid Scams, Protect Families from Fraud (Photo)
AARP Oregon - 11/11/19 10:00 AM
2019-11/5564/129190/Frank_Abagnale_Photo_2.jpg
2019-11/5564/129190/Frank_Abagnale_Photo_2.jpg
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For over four decades, Frank W. Abagnale has advised the FBI on how to outsmart con artists and now he’s coming to Portland November 14 at 7 p.m. to help us learn how to spot and avoid scams so we can protect our families. As one of the world’s most respected authorities on forgery, embezzlement and secure documents, Abagnale has joined forces with the AARP Fraud Watch Network and AARP Oregon. Between the ages of 16 and 21, Abagnale successfully posed as an airline pilot, an attorney, a doctor and cashed millions in fraudulent checks. In case you didn’t read the best-selling book…spoiler alert…he got caught and his exploits were depicted in the movie Catch Me If You Can starring Leonardo DiCaprio. Today, Abagnale is an expert on the subject of identity theft, has written three books on the subject and served as a consultant to some of the largest companies in the world on the subject of cybercrime. Details on this event for the public and the media are below: WHAT: Join the AARP Fraud Watch Network and AARP Oregon for a free presentation by Frank W. Abagnale on protecting yourself and your family from identity theft. WHO: Frank W. Abagnale, one of the world’s leading con artist experts. WHEN: Thursday, November 14, 2019, 7 p.m. WHERE: Revolution Hall RSVP: Members of the public may register for this free event by RSVPing here. If you are a member of the media and wish to interview Abagnale, one on one, please contact Joyce DeMonnin 971-330-6459. to try to schedule an interview. Abagnale is available November 14 from 1:20 to 1:50 p.m. by phone and 3:50-5:00 p.m. at Revolution Hall by appointment. Media is welcome to attend the event.




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/5564/129190/Frank_Abagnale_Photo_2.jpg

UPDATE: Suspect Identified in Lents Neighborhood Stabbing (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/11/19 8:08 AM
Reginald Walton
Reginald Walton
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After completing on scene investigation and conducting interviews in the Lents stabbing case, Portland Police Assault Detectives have booked the suspect into the Multnomah County Detention Center. Reginald B. Walton, 37 (photo), is facing a charge of Assault in the First Degree.

### PPB ###

### ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW ###

A victim is being treated for serious injuries after a stabbing in the Lents neighborhood.

On Sunday, November 10, 2019 at 10:43p.m., East Precinct officers responded to a report of a person stabbed in the 9200 block of Southeast Bush Street. Officers responded and located a victim with serious injuries. The victim was transported to the hospital.

Officers learned that the stabbing happened on the nearby multi-use path. They located and arrested a suspect. Assault detectives are now investigating. The suspect is not being identified at this time.

### PPB ###



Attached Media Files: Reginald Walton

Laray Seamster Homicide Remains Unsolved After Four Years - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #15-40 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 11/11/19 8:00 AM
2019-11/5183/129191/Laray_William_Seamster_26.jpg
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The Portland Police Bureau, in cooperation with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to solve the homicide of a 26-year-old man in North Portland's Eliot Neighborhood.

On November 11, 2015, at 3:16 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to the report of a shooting at North Vancouver Avenue and Fargo Street.

Officers and medical personnel arrived and located the victim, 26-year-old Laray William Seamster, suffering from multiple gunshot wounds.

Seamster was transported to a Portland hospital for treatment but died shortly after arrival.

Witnesses have told police that two younger black males were involved in the shooting and ran out of the area, possibly leaving in a silver vehicle.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit https://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/support.php

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2019-11/5183/129191/Laray_William_Seamster_26.jpg

UPDATE: Woman Killed in Pearl District Fatal Hit and Run was in Vehicle
Portland Police Bureau - 11/11/19 7:54 AM
PPB Traffic Division's Major Crash Team has finished its on-scene investigation and streets around Northwest 9th Avenue and Northwest Glisan Street have reopened.

Traffic Investigators now believe suspect vehicle that left the scene was a white pickup truck, and the woman found in the roadway was in the truck before the crash. Preliminary information is that she was in the passenger seat and, for an unknown reason, fell out of passenger side door and was run over by the truck. The truck was last seen northbound on Northwest 9th Avenue.

Investigators are working to identify the victim. She is a white female likely in her 40's.

If anyone witnessed the incident, or has any information about the white truck and its driver, and has not already spoken to police, they're asked to reach out to the investigating officer. Additionally, if anyone has access to surveillance video that might have captured the white truck, please share it with police. The primary investigator is Officer David Enz 503-823-2208 David.Enz@portlandoregon.gov .

This is the 56th Major Crash Team activation and the 48th traffic fatality in the City of Portland this year.

The Portland Police Traffic Division is committed to providing enforcement and raising awareness regarding traffic safety for vehicles, bicyclists and pedestrians. Each year, traffic officers respond to preventable collisions. These collisions can deeply impact those involved, their families and loved ones. Traffic officers' number one priority is to address behaviors of all road users that might lead to a collision, including speed, impairment, distraction, and disobeying signals.

The Portland Police Bureau works closely with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work toward reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

### PPB ###

### ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW ###


The Traffic Division's Major Crash Team is responding to a fatal hit and run crash in the Pearl District Neighborhood.

On Monday, November 11, 2019 at 2:22 a.m., Central Precinct officers responded to a call of a woman down in the street at Northwest 9th Avenue and Northwest Glisan Street. When they arrived, they discovered that she was deceased and that a vehicle was involved. The vehicle left the scene. There is no suspect description being released at this time.

Officers have closed the area for the investigation. Northwest Glisan Street is closed between Northwest Park Avenue and Northwest 11th Avenue. Northwest 9th Avenue is closed between Northwest Flanders Street and Northwest Hoyt Street.

If any witnesses to this crash have not yet spoken to officers, they're asked to call non-emergency dispatch at 503 823 3333.

### PPB ###

Sun. 11/10/19
Single Vehicle Fatal Crash on Hwy 38 - Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 11/10/19 2:34 PM

On Saturday, November 9, 2019, at approximately 2:45 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Hwy 38 near mile post 25 approximately 10 miles west of Elkton.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2016 GMC Canyon Pickup, operated by John Norlin (84) of Roseburg, was traveling on Hwy 38 when for unknown reasons left the roadway and struck a tree.

Norlin sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

One lane of Hwy 38 was closed for approximately four hours after the crash.

OSP was assisted Scottsburg FD, ODOT, and the Douglas County Sheriff's Office.

(No photos are available)

 


New Seasons Markets recalls fresh ground beef due to E. coli infection
Oregon Health Authority - 11/10/19 1:37 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—New Seasons Market is recalling fresh ground beef sold at meat counters in three of its stores because it may be contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7.

Three people in the Portland metro area have become ill with E. coli O157:H7 infection after having eaten ground beef purchased at different New Seasons outlets. All are recovering from the illness.

E. coli O157:H7 causes a diarrheal illness often with bloody stools. Although most healthy adults can recover completely within a week, some people can develop a form of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The condition is most likely to occur in young children and the elderly, and it can lead to serious kidney damage and even death.

The recalled fresh ground beef was sold at the company’s North Lombard, North Interstate and Cedar Hills locations. The product comes in 5%, 10% and 20% fat content varieties and is ground at the stores prior to sale. The products implicated were purchased between Oct. 19 and Oct. 23. OHA recommends customers who purchased the ground beef between these dates throw it away immediately.

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) identified the outbreak after laboratory tests conducted at the Oregon State Public Health Laboratory determined that an identical strain of E. coli O157:H7 was present in all three patients.

New Seasons Market has reported to OHA that it suspended the sale of the product while Oregon Department of Agriculture continues its investigation into the cause of the outbreak.

People who ate the product but did not get sick do not need to do anything. If you developed diarrhea after eating it, you should consult your health care provider and tell him or her about the exposure.

Consumers with questions may contact the company at talktous@newseasonsmarket.com.


Detectives are Investigating Several Shootings Overnight
Portland Police Bureau - 11/10/19 8:22 AM
Detectives with the Gun Violence Reduction Team (GVRT) are investigating several shootings overnight and are seeking help from the public to locate the shooters responsible.

On Saturday, November 9, 2019 at about 9:15 p.m., a man was in his parked car near Southeast 72nd Avenue and Southeast Duke Street in the Brentwood-Darlington neighborhood when he heard shots fired. He later discovered that his vehicle had been struck more than once. He was not hurt. Case Number #19-386904

At about 9:45 p.m., a victim was shot at while driving through North Columbia Way and North Macrum Avenue in the St. Johns Neighborhood. He suffered a minor injury. This incident was sent out in a separate release. Case #19-386935

At about 11:15 p.m., a pedestrian located evidence of gunfire at 6400 block of Northeast Columbia Boulevard in the Cully neighborhood. Officers responded and investigated. It's not clear when the shots were fired, possibly on another day. Case #19-386329

At about 11:30 p.m., A North Precinct officer saw a suspect vehicle leaving a shooting at Northeast 130th Place and Northeast Prescott Drive in the Argay Terrace neighborhood. When the officer tried to stop the vehicle, the suspect jumped out and ran. A search for the suspect was unsuccessful. Officers found evidence of gunfire at the scene and bullet strikes to a nearby townhouse. No known injuries. Case #19-387054

At about 1:00 a.m. on Sunday, November 10, 2019 at North Interstate Avenue and North Denver Avenue in the Kenton Neighborhood, a suspect fired a round in the air after getting into a verbal argument with another couple. No one was hurt. Case #19-387125

There's no indication that these events are connected, but they are nonetheless concerning. No arrests have been made. GVRT detectives are following up on all of them and are asking for the public's help. If anyone witnessed any of these events, or has other knowledge about what happened, they're asked to call or e-mail. If anyone has video surveillance in these areas that might have captured what happened or any suspect information, they're asked to check their recordings. If they find anything that could help, please save it and share it with investigators.

Anyone with information about these, or any, gun crimes in the City of Portland is encouraged to provide information to the Portland Police Bureau's Tactical Operations Division at 503-823-4106 or email information to GunTaskForce@portlandoregon.gov .

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, or YouTube should be shared with investigators as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects.

If you see a gun crime in progress, call 9-1-1.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is offering a minimum $250 cash reward to anyone who reports a convicted felon or a juvenile in possession of a firearm and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

### PPB ###

Single Vehicle Fatal Crash on Hwy 97 - Klamath County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 11/10/19 8:11 AM
2019-11/1002/129197/IMG_6362.JPG
2019-11/1002/129197/IMG_6362.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1002/129197/thumb_IMG_6362.JPG

On Saturday, November 9, 2019, at approximately 10:48 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 97 near mile post 281. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a red Honda Civic, operated by William Ogle (23) of Klamath Falls, was traveling north on Hwy 97 when for unknown reasons left the roadway and rolled several times.

Ogle sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Hwy 97 was reduced to one lane for approximately one hour following the crash.

OSP was assisted by Klamath County Fire District #1 and ODOT.

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/1002/129197/IMG_6362.JPG

Correction: Man Shot While Driving in St. Johns Neighborhood, Non-Life Threatening Injuries
Portland Police Bureau - 11/10/19 1:41 AM
This release corrects the date of the incident.

A man suffered minor wounds after being shot while driving his car in the St. Johns Neighborhood.

On Saturday, November 9, 2019 at 9:44 p.m., North Precinct Officers responded to a call from a victim who told officers someone had shot at him at North Columbia Way and North Macrum Avenue. When officers arrived they located evidence of gunfire in the intersection.

The victim told officers he had minor injuries from the shooting, so he was treated at the hospital and released. He reported that someone was in the street trying to flag him down as he drove past. He did not stop, and that's when he was shot.

Officers located bullet strikes to his car, as well as a nearby church and a residence. No one else was hurt.

The Gun Violence Reduction Team responded to assume the investigation.

No arrests have been made. If anyone has information about this shooting, call police non-emergency at 503 823 3333 and reference case number 19-386935.

The Tactical Operations Division is continuing to investigate several incidents of gun violence citywide.

Anyone with information about gun crimes in the City of Portland is encouraged to provide information to the Portland Police Bureau's Tactical Operations Division at 503-823-4106 or email information to GunTaskForce@portlandoregon.gov

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared with investigators as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects.

Tips on gun crimes can be emailed to GunTaskForce@portlandoregon.gov

If you see a gun crime in progress, call 9-1-1.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is offering a minimum $250 cash reward to anyone who reports a convicted felon or a juvenile in possession of a firearm and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

### PPB ###

Sat. 11/09/19
UPDATE: Investigators Looking for Witnesses to Lloyd District Shooting (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/09/19 4:33 PM
Crime Scene
Crime Scene
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Gun Violence Reduction Team detectives are continuing to look for the suspect or suspects in the Lloyd District shooting Friday night. Investigators believe that that more than one firearm was used during the shooting. An occupied building, a vehicle, and a parking meter were all struck by bullets. There is no suspect information being released at this time.

The victim that arrived at the hospital by private vehicle has injuries that are not life threatening. There is an indication that there were others injured in the shooting that have not reported to police.

Investigators are asking for any witnesses to this shooting, or anyone that has video of the events before, during, and after the shooting, to come forward. Information learned on social media can also be valuable in finding and arresting those responsible. Tips should be sent to Detective Brent Christensen at 503-823-2087 Brent.Christensen@portlandoregon.gov or Detective Bryan DeClercque 503-823-2056 Bryan.Declercque@portlandoregon.gov .

Or anonymous tips can be sent through Crime Stoppers. Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips. Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823 Or Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

### PPB ###

### ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW ###

On Friday, November 8, 2019 at 9:44 p.m., North Precinct Officers responded to a report of shots heard in the Lloyd District Neighborhood. When officers arrived they located evidence of gunfire near Northeast Broadway and Northeast 8th Avenue. They learned that the suspect or suspects had left. A short time later a victim, believed to be a victim of the shooting, arrived at a local hospital. The victim's condition is not being released at this time.

During the investigation, Northeast Broadway and 8th Avenue is closed to all traffic.

The Gun Violence Reduction Team responded to assist in the investigation. Investigators are gathering evidence and speaking to witnesses. If you have any information about this shooting, please call police non-emergency at 503 823 3333. The case number is 19-385761.

The Tactical Operations Division is continuing to investigate several incidents of gun violence citywide.

Anyone with information about gun crimes in the City of Portland is encouraged to provide information to the Portland Police Bureau's Tactical Operations Division at 503-823-4106 or email information to GunTaskForce@portlandoregon.gov

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared with investigators as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects.

Tips on gun crimes can be emailed to GunTaskForce@portlandoregon.gov

If you see a gun crime in progress, call 9-1-1.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is offering a minimum $250 cash reward to anyone who reports a convicted felon or a juvenile in possession of a firearm and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

### PPB ###



Attached Media Files: Crime Scene

Columbia Springs program offers free gift wrapping bags this holiday season (Photo)
Columbia Springs - 11/09/19 2:02 PM
Volunteer sewists create reusable fabric gift wrapping bags from upcycled fabric at last year’s holiday Night Market
Volunteer sewists create reusable fabric gift wrapping bags from upcycled fabric at last year’s holiday Night Market
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/3579/129193/thumb_IMG_5991.JPG

Repair Clark County program will help residents reduce their “waste” line this holiday season by sewing reusable wrapping bags from upcycled fabric

 

[VANCOUVER, WA, November 9th, 2019] The Repair Clark County program will offer free reusable gift wrapping bags, sewn from upcycled holiday fabric

 

Cost: FREE!

What, When, Where:

 

 

Day

Time

Location

ReWrap at the Night Market

Friday, November 22nd

5 PM - 9 PM

Warehouse 23

ReWrap at the Night Market

Saturday, November 23rd

5 PM - 9 PM

Warehouse 23

ReWrap at the Holiday Farmer's Market

Sunday, December 1st

11 AM - 2 PM

Hilton

 

Most people don’t realize that waste generation increases by at least 25% around the holidays. One often overlooked contributor is wrapping paper. The Repair Clark County program will be helping residents reduce their waste generation this holiday season by starting a tradition of fun, easy to use, fabric gift wrapping bags. 

 

Sewing pros will transform fabric into reusable holiday gift wrapping bags. Market customers can bring their own treasured fabric (vintage table cloth, linens or tree skirt for example) or choose from a limited selection of recycled holiday fabric. They’ll be sewing bags the Friday and Saturday before Thanksgiving at the Holiday Night Market and the Sunday after Thanksgiving at the Holiday Farmer’s Market.

 

Drop off fabric/choose from provided fabrics, enjoy the market and pick up the finished bags on the way out. Limit of 3 bags per person.

 

--


About Columbia Springs: 

Located on a 100 acre natural area in the City of Vancouver, Columbia Springs is dedicated to providing outdoor recreation and science education close to home. The Repair Clark County program is primarily an “off site” program for the community, offering free fixing events, repair skills workshops and other waste reduction programming throughout Clark County. 


 

 

Contact: Terra Heilman, Repair Clark County, Columbia Springs

Phone: 360-882-0936 X 224

Email: repair@columbiasprings.org


 

###




Attached Media Files: Volunteer sewists create reusable fabric gift wrapping bags from upcycled fabric at last year’s holiday Night Market , Repair Clark County program coordinator, Terra Heilman, helps a resident pick holiday fabric for reusable gift wrapping bags at last year’s Holiday Night Market , Fabric gift wrapping bags can help reduce waste around the holiday season.

Interstate 5 accident sends three to hospital (Photo)
Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue - 11/09/19 10:04 AM
2019-11/3738/129192/I-5WreckHonda2.jpg
2019-11/3738/129192/I-5WreckHonda2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/3738/129192/thumb_I-5WreckHonda2.jpg

Cowlitz County, Wa- Firefighters from Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue responded to a motor vehicle accident involving two passenger cars and a semi truck on Interstate 5 Northbound near exit 36 Saturday morning at 5:36.  Three patients were transported, by two ambulances, to Peace Health St. John’s Medical Center for sustained injuries from the wreck.  The accident caused heavy damage to one Honda Accord, moderate damage to another passenger car, and damage to the rear axle of the semi truck’s trailer.  The two inside lanes were closed while Washington State Patrol conducted their investigation of the crash causing traffic to back up to Kalama for most of the morning.  A fire engine, two medic units, and a Chief Officer responded from Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue.  Cowlitz County Sheriff deputies and Kelso Police also responded to the incident.  The identities and injuries of the patients, and cause of the accident have not been released by authorities.  




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/3738/129192/I-5WreckHonda2.jpg , 2019-11/3738/129192/I-5WreckHonda3.jpg

Fri. 11/08/19
Martin Allen Johnson Found Guilty of 1998 Murder of 15-Year-Old Heather Fraser (Photo)
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 11/08/19 5:43 PM
2019-11/6208/129187/JOHNSON_MARTIN_ALLEN.png
2019-11/6208/129187/JOHNSON_MARTIN_ALLEN.png
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HILLSBORO, Ore.- On November 8, 2019, a Washington County jury found Martin Allen Johnson guilty of eight counts of first-degree murder in the 1998 rape and murder of 15-year-old Heather Fraser. The jury delivered a unanimous decision after less than three hours of deliberations. Chief Deputy District Attorney Bracken McKey and Senior Deputy District Attorney Jeff MacLean prosecuted Mr. Johnson in Judge Eric Butterfield’s courtroom.

Mr. Johnson was convicted of aggravated murder in 2001. In 2017, the Oregon Supreme Court upheld a decision made by the Oregon Court of Appeals to overturn the conviction, citing inadequate representation on behalf of Mr. Johnson’s defense team during the original trial.

Mr. Johnson was charged with eight counts of first-degree murder in this new case due to new guidelines established by Senate Bill 1013. Those guidelines also barred prosecutors from seeking the death penalty once again.

During the course of the two-week trial, Mr. McKey and Mr. MacLean proved to the jury that Mr. Martin drugged, raped and killed Ms. Fraser. The defendant then drove the victim to Astoria, Oregon where he threw her body off a bridge and into the Columbia River.

Mr. Martin was quickly identified as a suspect by authorities. He then fled the state and was apprehended in Florida more than a year later.

A sentencing hearing will be held on November 13, 2019 at 9 a.m. in Judge Butterfield’s courtroom.




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/6208/129187/MARTIN_ALLEN_JOHNSON.pdf , 2019-11/6208/129187/JOHNSON_MARTIN_ALLEN.png

Cowlitz County Sheriff's Office Investigates Fatal Log Truck Collision
Cowlitz Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/08/19 5:16 PM

At 0900 hours of November 8, 2019 deputies with the Cowlitz County Sheriff's Office were dispatched to the Weyerhaeuser 6500 line for a report of a log truck that had gone off the roadway.  Weyerhaeuser's dispatch center reported another driver was out with the involved vehicle and was unable to obtain a pulse from the driver.  Deputies and medical staff from Cowlitz Fire District 5 arrived on scene and found the log truck had gone downhill after leaving the logging road.  The driver was deceased from injuries incurred during the collision.

The driver was identified as Robert N. Smith, age 58, of Longview. 


142nd Fighter Wing to conduct Veterans Day flyovers (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 11/08/19 4:46 PM
2019-11/962/129185/5696768.jpg
2019-11/962/129185/5696768.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/962/129185/thumb_5696768.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore. – The 142nd Fighter Wing based at the Portland Air National Guard Base,
Portland, Oregon will conduct Veterans Day flyovers for ceremonies at locations throughout the
state on Monday, Nov 11, 2019.


The F-15 Eagle fighter jets are scheduled to conduct flyovers at the following community
locations at, or around, the designated times:


10:30 a.m. - Tillamook Air Museum, Tillamook, Ore.


11:11 a.m. - University of Portland, Portland, Ore.


11:40 a.m. - Capital Manor Retirement Community, Salem, Ore.


12:00 p.m. - Vietnam Era Veterans Memorial Park, Canby, Ore.


All passes will be approximately 1,000 feet above ground level and about 400 mph airspeed.
Flights could be canceled or times changed due to inclement weather or operational
contingencies.

-30-


About the 142nd Fighter Wing:
The Portland Air National Guard Base employs 1,500 Airmen who provide an economic impact
of nearly $500 million to the region. The 142nd Fighter Wing defends our homeland with F-15
Eagle fighter jets, guarding the Pacific Northwest skies from northern California to the Canadian
border through their Aerospace Control Alert mission as part of Air Combat Command and the
North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Their mission is to provide
unequalled, mission-ready units to sustain combat aerospace superiority and peacetime tasking
any time, any place in service to our nation, state and community.
For more information, contact 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs at 503-335-4347.

Photo Caption:

Oregon Air National Guard F-15C Eagles, assigned to the 142nd Fighter Wing prepare for an afternoon training mission as part of dissimilar aircraft combat training (DACT) on Aug. 13, 2019, at the Portland Air National Guard Base, Ore. The Oregon Airmen are training with U.S. Navy F-18F Super Hornet from VFA-41 squadron, based out of Naval Air Station Lemoore, Calif., during two-weeks of DACT exercises. (Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. John Hughel, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs)




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/962/129185/5696768.jpg

Jessie Ezell receives 31 year prison sentence for sexually abusing a child
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 11/08/19 3:50 PM

November 8, 2019

Jessie Ezell receives 31 year prison sentence for sexually abusing a child

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 45-year-old Jessie Ezell received a 31 year prison sentence for repeatedly sexually abusing a female child.

A jury convicted Ezell on August 30, 2019 of two counts of sodomy in the first degree and four counts of sexual abuse in the first degree.

The two sodomy convictions fall under “Jessica’s Law,” which went into effect in 2006 and requires a 25 year mandatory minimum sentence for adults convicted of raping, sodomizing or sexually penetrating a child younger than 12 years old.

“Jessie Ezell repeatedly sexually abused this child for the sole purpose of satisfying his own sexual gratification,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Amber Kinney, who litigated this case. “Only Mr. Ezell knows the true scope of this abuse. The crimes reflected in the indictment are only a fraction of the amount of exploitation that he is likely responsible for. He has shown no remorse or empathy. He betrayed this child in every possible way and used his position of trust to give this girl a true life sentence.”

The state sought a 37 year prison sentence based on the child’s age and the amount of harm both physically and emotionally done to her as a result of the repeated abuse.

This investigation started in February 2017 when the Oregon Department of Human Services received a child abuse tip. The caller expressed welfare concerns about the child victim because she was reportedly being exposed to abuse and neglect. During the investigation, DHS received information that Ezell was using methamphetamine, impairing his judgement and impulse control, likely contributing to the sexual abuse of the victim, according to trial testimony.

The child victim was evaluated at CARES Northwest on two occasions – once in 2017 and again the next year – and disclosed the sexual abuse during the 2018 evaluation.  

Ezell was arrested on September 21, 2018 after law enforcement located him in Gresham, Oregon.

It was through the coordination, communication and collaboration of the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team that this case was investigated and prosecuted.

The Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team includes representatives from local law enforcement, public schools, hospitals, courts, health departments, the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS), and the Oregon Department of Employment Child Care Division.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team is responsible for reviewing and managing child abuse and neglect cases in Multnomah County. The team also handles all child homicides, felony child physical abuse cases, felony child abandonment cases, custodial interference cases, and felony sex crimes where the victim is currently under the age of 18 and where the perpetrator is determined not to be a stranger to the child.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the Multnomah County Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team, the Portland Police Bureau, PPB Detective Stephen Gandy and the staff at CARES Northwest in Multnomah County for their dedicated efforts investigating this matter. The District Attorney’s Office also recognizes Victim Advocate Malia Bruni for commitment to supporting the victim and her family throughout the criminal justice process.

CARES Northwest, Multnomah County’s child abuse assessment center, is a community-based medical program for the assessment, treatment and prevention of child abuse. The organization is one of the largest child abuse assessment centers in the nation and serves more than 5,000 children annually.

Ezell will be on lifetime post-prison supervision and will have to register as a sex offender.

The jury acquitted Ezell on one count of rape in the first degree and one count of sexual abuse in the first degree.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/5769/129184/PR-19-258-Jessie_Ezell.pdf

Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee to meet November 13 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 11/08/19 3:47 PM

November 8, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee to meet November 13 in Portland

What: Meeting of the Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target Implementation Committee

When: November 13, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building; 800 NE Oregon St, Conf. Room 177 Portland, OR 97232

Members of the public can call in to listen by dialing 888-808-6929, participant code 915042#.

Agenda: welcome; cost growth target introduction; committee charge; charter and operating procedures; process for developing committee recommendations; public meetings law; public comment; next steps

For more information on the meeting, visit the committee’s meeting page.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jennifer Uhlman at 503-739-5267, 711 TTY at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Wanted Suspect Arrested After Attempting to Elude in Pearl District (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/08/19 3:25 PM
Box In
Box In
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/3056/129181/thumb_BoxIn2b.jpg
On Friday, November 8, 2019, at about 11 a.m., a Central Precinct sergeant located a wanted suspect near Northwest 14th Avenue and Northwest Glisan Street. The suspect, Matthew S. Harris, 36 (photo), had a history of eluding police, and was seen getting into a rented van.

The sergeant requested additional units and then tried to stop Harris. He attempted to elude the sergeant. Another assisting officer deployed spike strips and deflated the tires of the van. Harris still failed to stop until officers were able to box-in the vehicle at Northwest 14th Avenue and Northwest Flanders Street (photos). A box-in is a maneuver where police vehicles are positioned around a suspect vehicle to prevent a suspect from driving away.

Officers arrested Harris. He has been booked at the Multnomah County Detention Center on multiple warrants. Other charges are pending.

### PPB ###



Attached Media Files: Box In , Matthew Harris , Box In

OSP Fish and Wildlife Troopers Seeking Public's Assistance in Illegal Shooting of Bald Eagle Lower Cow Creek-- Douglas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 11/08/19 3:16 PM
2019-11/1002/129180/Eagle.jpg
2019-11/1002/129180/Eagle.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1002/129180/thumb_Eagle.jpg

Oregon State Police (OSP) Fish and Wildlife troopers are seeking the public’s assistance regarding a bald eagle being illegally shot with a firearm on Lower Cow Creek Road near West Fork Cow Creek Road. 

On November 7, 2019 at about 9:00 AM, OSP Fish and Wildlife troopers responded to a reported bald eagle that was deceased in Lower Cow Creek.  Upon examination by Fish and Wildlife troopers and personnel from Umpqua Wildlife Rescue, it was determined that the bald eagle died from being shot by a firearm.  It is believed the bald eagle had been deceased for one to two days before being reported.

In conjunction with The TIP program and the Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward fund, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is offering a reward up to $2,500 for information leading to a criminal conviction of the person(s) responsible for the shooting.  The bald eagle is currently protected by the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. The killing or possession of a bald eagle or its parts is a violation of both Acts, punishable by imprisonment of up to one year and a fine of up to $100,000.

Anyone with information regarding this case is urged to contact OSP Senior Trooper Kyle Bachmeier or Senior Trooper Curtis Weaver through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (mobile). 

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

Or the Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward fund also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, Furbearers, Game Fish and Shellfish.  Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags.

CASH REWARDS:
$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat and Moose

 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction

$200 Illegally Obtaining License/Tag(s)

$200 Unlawful Lend/Borrow Big Game Tags(s) 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 
 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

 

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/1002/129180/Eagle.jpg

Union Ridge Elementary Celebrates Successful Read-a-Thon (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 11/08/19 2:31 PM
Union Ridge Elementary School students decorated their classroom doors with literary themes for their annual Read-a-Thon fundraiser.
Union Ridge Elementary School students decorated their classroom doors with literary themes for their annual Read-a-Thon fundraiser.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/889/129179/thumb_Read_a_Thon_Doors_2.jpg

Friday, November 8, 2019 – Ridgefield, WA – The students at Union Ridge Elementary just completed their biggest Read-a-Thon fundraiser of the year, raising over $12,000 for the school!  To celebrate, they invited special guest readers this week for a fun reading day.

Guest readers included Mayor Don Stose, Ridgefield School Superintendent Nathan McCann, officers from the Ridgefield Police Department and the Cowlitz Indian Tribe, a hula instructor and Rally, the Ridgefield Raptors mascot.  Many parents read stories to the students as well.

The students dressed as their favorite character or wore their pajamas, and they also decorated their classroom doors with their favorite books and other fun literary themes.

Union Ridge Elementary is grateful to all who took part in the Read-a-Thon and celebration and to the Union Ridge Elementary PTO for their support of this successful fundraiser.

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Attached Media Files: Union Ridge Elementary School students decorated their classroom doors with literary themes for their annual Read-a-Thon fundraiser. , Ridgefield Mayor Don Stose reads to Union Ridge Elementary school students during a fun reading day celebrating the success of the school's Read-a-Thon fundraiser.

Suspicious powder received at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 11/08/19 1:39 PM

On November 8, 2019, at 10:30 a.m., the Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF) mail room received an envelope with an unknown substance. The mail room area was secured and the administration building evacuated. Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue Hazardous Materials Team, the Oregon State Police, and the Federal Bureau of Investigations are on site to evaluate the powder for any hazardous substances. Five employees were working in the mail room and two have been transported to a local hospital for evaluation.

Every day, thousands of pieces of mail are received at the Department of Corrections’ (DOC) 14 institutions, and each piece is opened and examined. DOC mail room employees are a critical component of operating safe and secure institutions because they help keep drugs and other contraband out of the state’s prisons.

This is the second evacuation of the CCCF administration building in the last two months. On September 11, mail room employees received an envelope with an unknown substance. The four mail room employees were decontaminated and transported to a local hospital with minor symptoms. The Oregon State Police investigated and determined the substance to be non-biological and a non-controlled substance.

CCCF is a multi-custody prison located in Wilsonville accommodating 1,260 adults in custody. The prison has cell and dormitory housing, work programs, skills training, treatment programs, health services, religious services, physical plant, a central records unit, and administrative areas. CCCF participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises, including a contact center, auto CAD, and document scanning. In addition, CCCF houses the state’s intake center, which provides intake and evaluation of all individuals committed to state custody by the courts. The intake center houses approximately 400 adults in custody. CCCF’s minimum facility opened in 2001, and the medium facility opened in 2002.


Historic Military Uniforms Display at Lottery (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 11/08/19 1:34 PM
Three of the six historic military uniforms on display at the Oregon Lottery's office in Salem.
Three of the six historic military uniforms on display at the Oregon Lottery's office in Salem.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/4939/129175/thumb_11-8_Uniform_display.jpg

The public has an opportunity to view six historic military uniforms next week, which were worn by Oregonians who served our armed forces. This is part of a month-long celebration at the Oregon Lottery to celebrate Veterans Day and the 85 veterans who work at the state agency.

This display was put in the lobby at the Oregon Lottery to help celebrate the fact it is providing millions in funding to assist all 36 counties across the state fund their local County Veteran Services Offices.

The six uniforms on display were provided by VFW Marion Post 661 in Salem are from a collection of over 1,900 uniforms. The uniforms are from different branches and eras of the military service.

Lottery Director Barry Pack and Oregon Dept. of Veteran Affairs Kelly Fitzpatrick addressed Lottery staff Thursday, Nov. 7 in what has become an annual event at the Lottery to honor veterans.

“With nearly 20 percent of Lottery staff being veterans, recognizing their service is so important,” said Lottery Director Pack. “And with the passage of Measure 96 in 2016, Lottery proceeds now benefit Oregon veterans by solidifying and expanding veteran services.”

The Oregon Lottery’s Salem headquarters will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday next week and is located at 500 Airport Road SE in Salem.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements, as well as Veteran Services and Outdoor School. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

 

 

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Attached Media Files: Three of the six historic military uniforms on display at the Oregon Lottery's office in Salem.

Cryptosporidium Monitoring Update: Detections from routine monitoring in the Bull Run. Customers do not need to take any additional precautions at this time.
Portland Water Bureau - 11/08/19 1:30 PM

Customers do not need to take any additional precautions at this time.

Since 2017, the Portland Water Bureau has detected low levels of Cryptosporidium from routine monitoring. Monitoring results were received from the Bull Run Watershed intake for Cryptosporidium, a potentially disease-causing microorganism. In the six 50-liter samples collected between Thursday, October 31 and Wednesday, November 6, one Cryptosporidium oocyst was detected in the sample collected on Nov. 1. Cryptosporidium was not detected in the samples collected on Oct. 31, or Nov. 3 through Nov. 6. Prior to these detections, Cryptosporidium was last detected from the Bull Run Watershed intake on Oct. 30, 2019.

The Bull Run watershed is Portland’s primary source of drinking water. The Portland Water Bureau does not currently treat for Cryptosporidium, but is required to do so under drinking water regulations. Portland is working to install filtration by September 2027 under a compliance schedule with Oregon Health Authority. In the meantime, Portland Water Bureau is implementing interim measures such as watershed protection and additional monitoring to protect public health. Consultation with public health officials has concluded that at this time, customers do not need to take any additional precautions.

Exposure to Cryptosporidium can cause cryptosporidiosis, a serious illness. Symptoms can include diarrhea, vomiting, fever and stomach pain. People with healthy immune systems recover without medical treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people with severely weakened immune systems are at risk for more serious disease. Symptoms may be more severe and could lead to serious or life-threatening illness. Examples of people with weakened immune systems include those with AIDS; those with inherited diseases that affect the immune system; and cancer and transplant patients who are taking certain immunosuppressive drugs.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has estimated that a small percentage of the population could experience gastro-intestinal illness from Cryptosporidium and advises that customers who are immunocompromised and receive their drinking water from the Bull Run Watershed consult with their healthcare professional about the safety of drinking the tap water. The Portland Water Bureau and Burlington, City of Gresham, City of Sandy, City of Tualatin, Green Valley, GNR, Hideaway Hills, Lake Grove, Lorna Domestic Water, Lusted, Palatine Hill, Pleasant Home, Raleigh, Rockwood, Skyview Acres, Tualatin Valley, Two Rivers, Valley View and West Slope Water Districts receive all or part of their drinking water supply from the Bull Run. To learn if your drinking water comes from Bull Run, please contact your local drinking water provider.

The public and the media are encouraged to view all sampling results posted to the City’s website at portlandoregon.gov/water/cryptoresults. The bureau will notify the media and public immediately should further test results indicate a risk to public health and precautions are necessary.

Customers with questions regarding water quality can call the Water Line at 503-823-7525.




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/1240/129173/Crypto_Press_Release_110819.docx

Fatal Crash on Hwy 140W - Lake County
Oregon State Police - 11/08/19 12:48 PM

On Wednesday, November 8, 2019 at approximately 5:03 A.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 140W near milepost 74.

Preliminary investigation reveals that a green Chevrolet Suburban, operated by Nicholas Whitebread-Lanaro (19) of Bly, was eastbound when for unknown reasons left the roadway and rolled several times. 

Whitebread-Lanaro sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by the Lakeview Disaster Unit and ODOT


Deshaun Marcel receives 180 months prison sentence for violently beating, raping and sexually assaulting a woman in NE Portland
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 11/08/19 12:47 PM

November 8, 2019

Deshaun Marcel receives 180 months prison sentence for violently beating, raping and sexually assaulting a woman in NE Portland

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 25-year-old Deshaun Marcel received a 180 month prison sentence after he violently beat, strangled, raped and sexually assaulted a woman at a residence in Portland’s King neighborhood.

"I was horrified," the victim said Friday during Marcel's sentencing hearing. "I was screaming for my life, banging on the walls, hoping that neighbors would call 9-1-1 to help me. He has no remorse and doesn't belong in society."

This investigation started on April 22, 2018 when the victim reported to family, friends and law enforcement that Marcel held her against her will inside her residence and forcibly sexually assaulted her while choking her to the point of unconsciousness. The victim and Marcel are known to each other.

The attack happened while the victim’s daughter slept in a bedroom feet from the attack.

“The victim in this case made it clear to our office that she wanted a prison sentence for Mr. Marcel for the senseless and predatory abuse and trauma he violently inflicted upon her,” said Multnomah County Senior Deputy District Attorney David Hannon, who litigated this case. “Mr. Marcel violated the sanctity and the security of the victim’s residence. The violence exhibited by him was extraordinary.”

On September 6, 2019, Marcel changed his plea, the day his trial was supposed to start. The court convicted him of one count of rape in the first degree constituting domestic violence, two counts of sodomy in the first degree constituting domestic violence, two counts of sexual abuse in the first degree constituting domestic violence and one count of strangulation constituting domestic violence.

As stated in court documents, the author of the pre-sentence investigation in this case recommended a sentence of 200 months in prison, which the state concurred with.

By changing his plea, Marcel stipulated there is sufficient evidence in this case that a judge or jury could have found him guilty at trial.

“The victim in this case truly is a survivor in every sense,” SDDA Hannon said. “Her fortitude is a testament to who she is as a person. The support network she has will be instrumental in allowing her to move on from this horrible chapter in her life.”

Upon his release, Marcel will be on post-prison supervision for a period of no less than 12 years. He will also have to register as a sex offender.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes Portland Police Detective Ross Dormady and the Portland Police Bureau’s Sex Crimes Unit for their dedicated efforts investigating this case. The District Attorney’s Office also recognizes Victim Advocate Vanessa Palacios for the advocacy and support she provided the victim throughout this investigation.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Domestic Violence Unit is committed to ending family abuse. The unit engages in evidence-based prosecution of domestic violence. It emphasizes the importance of victim advocacy services for all victims and their children. Even when a prosecutor decides to proceed with a case without a victim’s participation, every effort is made to offer the victim advocacy services from available resources.

Resources:

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/5769/129171/PR-19-256-Deshaun_Marcel.pdf

Battle Ground High School sophomore publishes children's chapter book (Photo)
Battle Ground Sch. Dist. - 11/08/19 12:42 PM
Michlin Swanson (right) with 8th grade teacher Melissa Theis (left)
Michlin Swanson (right) with 8th grade teacher Melissa Theis (left)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/20/129170/thumb_IMG_1272_(1).jpg

What started as a short story writing assignment in middle school has led to Battle Ground High School sophomore Michlin Swanson earning the distinction of "published author." Michlin (pronounced Mike-Lynn), now a tenth grader at BGHS, achieved the impressive feat when her debut book, a 107-page children’s chapter book titled “The First Flying Car,” was published earlier this year.

The assignment that Amboy Middle School teacher Melissa Theis gave to her 8th grade English Language Arts class was straightforward and open-ended: write a short story on any school-appropriate topic or genre. Swanson said that before she was given the project, she had been thinking about ways cars could be made to fly, and that she imagined designs in her head. Still pondering her flying car designs when the assignment landed on her desk, Swanson began writing a story about two people who built a flying car and went on adventures exploring the world.

“I’m so proud of Michlin,” Theis said. “She deserves recognition for all the work she put into this, and it’s impressive that she turned a seventh grade narrative writing assignment into a published book.”

After completing the assignment, Michlin said she couldn’t stop thinking about it, and started adding more to the story. “Before I knew it, I had enough for a book," Swanson said. "While I dreamed of getting it published, I didn’t really know how to go about it.”

Unbeknownst to her, Swanson’s mother Tammy sent a copy of the manuscript to Newman’s Springs Publishing for review. Within a few weeks, the Swansons received a response saying the company was interested in publishing the book, kicking off a yearlong process of working through edits, design layouts, and creating the illustrations and cover artwork. 

For the book’s artwork, Swanson recruited her friends Adalie Smithline, Kylie Smithline, and Evenlynne Samwell for help. The group drew many illustrations that they sent to Newman’s Springs Publishing. The company’s graphic artists enhanced the student illustrations, creating the professional versions that appear in the book.  

“I was able to have complete ownership over every aspect of the publishing process, making sure it was laid out just how I wanted the finished book to look,” Swanson said. “It’s been a great experience from start to finish, and I’m proud of the result.”

Throughout the editing and layout process, Swanson never stopped adding to the story, and says she has written enough material to author two additional books that would complete a “First Flying Car” series. Not only that, but Swanson has started writing another book series in the magical/fantasy genre.

Swanson says that her goal is to someday be a professional author or writer, and that she also has an interest in screenwriting. In the meantime, Swanson said she’s eager to continue taking creative writing classes in high school and college to enhance her skills even further.

“I’m very grateful to the teachers who’ve supported me and helped instill in me a deep love of reading and writing,” Swanson said. “One of the main things I’ve learned through all of this is that a little progress each day adds up to big results. Even though things may get hard in some spots, I’d encourage others to work hard to achieve their goals and never give up. In the end, it will be worth it.”

“The First Flying Car” is 107 pages long and is best suited for kids in the third or fourth grade, Swanson said. Print copies of the book are available for purchase from Barnes and Noble and Amazon, and electronic versions are also available as Nook or Kindle e-books. Swanson will be at the Amboy/Yacolt PTO Country Fair Bazaar at Amboy Middle School on Saturday, Dec. 7 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. selling copies in person.




Attached Media Files: Michlin Swanson (right) with 8th grade teacher Melissa Theis (left)

Community Invited to Open House at Share House on Nov. 18; Volunteers Needed for Share Hot Meals Program
Share - 11/08/19 12:35 PM

Vancouver, WA – The community is invited to attend an open house at Share House, 1115 W 13th Street, on Mon. Nov. 18, 3 to 5 p.m.

“We appreciate the opportunity to welcome members of our community into Share House to see first-hand the offices, dorms, transitional housing rooms and community areas in which our case managers and housing navigators work each day to engage and motivate our residents by linking them with housing opportunities, developing budgets, completing applications and assisting them in telling their story to local landlords,” said Diane McWithey, executive director.

Staff will be on hand to provide tours through the building and to answer questions. Snacks and beverages will be available. The open house marks the reopening of the men’s shelter and recent restart of the Share Hot Meals program following an accidental fire back in July.

“Over 40 years, our Hot Meals program has relied on the generosity of numerous faith-based and community groups to prepare and serve meals. Many of our current groups include seniors, some who have volunteered for more than 20 years, who are unable to continue donating their time,” said Molly Evjen, director of volunteers and community resources. “We have an increased need for a new base of volunteers to support our Hot Meals program and hope that our generous community will step up to answer our call for help.”

All volunteers are required to complete an application and background check which can be done online at sharevancouver.org. For more information, contact Molly Evjen at 360-952-8228 or mevjen@sharevancouver.org.

About Share

Share was founded in 1979 with the goal of caring for the homeless and hungry in the greater Vancouver area. Share operates three shelters for the homeless, a transitional housing program, Lincoln Place (a 30-unit Housing First model apartment complex), a street outreach program, including a Day Center, a Housing & Essential Needs (HEN) program, provides case management to clients and provides daily meals for the homeless and low-income members of our community. Share also operates a summer meals program for low-income children and a backpack program benefitting 1,535+ children at 95 schools to provide food for weekends to children receiving free or reduced-fee lunches. Additionally, Share offers financial programs that incorporate financial education and matched dollars for savings; these programs are designed to assist in the improvement of credit scores and financial management. For more information on Share, visit our Web site at www.sharevancouver.org.

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Thermo Fisher Volunteers Visit HSD Girls STEM Career Clubs
Hillsboro Sch. Dist. - 11/08/19 12:20 PM

Volunteers will lead STEM activities to provide engaging hands-on, real-world applications in hopes of encouraging the girls to continue their pursuits within STEM fields

November 8, 2019, Hillsboro, OR - Hillsboro School District is pleased to welcome Thermo Fisher volunteers to the Girls STEM Career Clubs at each of its middle schools on Tuesday, November 12.

The volunteers will lead the girls through three STEM activities:

  • MyScope: What is, and how to use, a Scanning Electron Microscope?
    Students will use an online Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) simulator, which will introduce the basics of using a SEM and how to obtain a successful microscopy image. 
     
  • Scavenger Hunt: What is this image?
    Students will observe multiple electron microscopy images from the Thermo Fisher STEM kits for Nanotechnology so they can understand how the magnification of objects allows them to be seen in more detail. 
     
  • Build a microscope
    Students will have the opportunity to assemble building sets modeled after two of Thermo Fisher’s microscopes - either the DualBeam or the Krios cryo-electron microscope.

The Hillsboro School District’s after-school Girls STEM Career Clubs are possible because of the El Camino grant, awarded by the Intel Foundation in March of 2019 to the District and the Chicas Youth Development Programs of Adelante Mujeres. The goals of that grant and of Thermo Fisher in this endeavor are very similar: for girls to explore educational and career paths in the STEM fields that may previously have been unknown to them or felt out of reach. 

Though events will take place at each middle school, including Groner K-8, the media is encouraged to attend the event at Poynter Middle School. 

What:           Thermo Fisher volunteers conduct STEM activities with Girls STEM Career Club

Where:        Poynter Middle School, 1535 NE Grant St., Hillsboro

When:          Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 3:30 p.m.

Agenda:       Observe the interaction between volunteers and students

Media are asked to RSVP to Chief Communications Officer Beth Graser at aserbe@hsd.k12.or.us">graserbe@hsd.k12.or.us or
503-844-1772.

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Attached Media Files: 2019-11/107/129168/Media_Advisory_Thermo_Fisher_Volunteer_Day_111219.pdf

Beaverton Man Sentenced To 40 Years In Prison For Assaulting Federal Task Force Officers With Explosive Device
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/08/19 12:12 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Jason Paul Schaefer, 28, of Beaverton, Oregon, was sentenced today to 40 years in federal prison and 5 years’ supervised release for detonating an improvised explosive device on October 11, 2017, assaulting two members of the Portland Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF).

            In May 2019, Schaefer was convicted after a six-day trial of two counts of assaulting a federal officer and one count each of carrying and using a destructive device during and in relation to a crime of violence, carrying and using an explosive during the commission of a federal felony, unlawful transport of explosive materials, possession of an unregistered destructive device and being a felon in possession of explosives.

            “The government may never fully know why Mr. Schaefer amassed a large quantity of dangerous precursor chemicals and the components needed to make a large, remote-detonating bomb. What we do know is that on October 11, 2017, he tried to kill two federal task force officers attempting to make a lawful arrest,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “We owe a debt of gratitude to the JTTF agents and partners and our prosecutors for protecting our community by taking this violent criminal off the streets. This prosecution affirms the critical public safety mission of the JTTF and the need for continued and active participation of all federal, state and local partners.”

            “Jason Schaefer’s sentence is commensurate to the danger he posed to his neighbors in the community. The officers and agents of the FBI’s JTTF hope this sentence will serve as a deterrent to others who may consider dangerous or violent illegal actions,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon.

            “The Oregon State Police is proud of the collaboration among our local and federal partners on the JTTF, with our mutual goal to keep Oregon safe. We are grateful that our troopers and taskforce officers were not seriously injured during this rapidly developing event. OSP is also appreciative of the time and attention of the U.S. Attorney's Office to seek justice in this case,” said Travis Hampton, Superintendent of the Oregon State Police.

            “The Washington County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the JTTF and partnering agencies for their hard work in this investigation. We value these important public safety partnerships that work tirelessly to keep our communities safe,” said Pat Garrett, Washington County Sheriff.

            According to court documents and evidence presented at trial, on or about September 21, 2017, FBI Portland determined that Schaefer had purchased several items that could be used to make a bomb. Schaefer was known to federal investigators after an April 2017 incident where he threatened to kill his landlords and used mercury to deter people from entering an apartment garage he rented in Beaverton. The incident led to Schaefer being arrested and prosecuted for illegally possessing body armor.

            On October 11, 2017, federal agents and task force officers executed a search warrant on Schaefer’s Beaverton apartment. Schaefer arrived that morning at a meeting with his probation officer to find two federal agents there to meet him. They notified Schaefer of the warrant and asked if his property was booby trapped. Schaeffer told the agents that it was not and the search commenced.

            After a brief conversation with the agents, Schaefer departed in a white sport utility vehicle. The agents followed Schaefer, but lost him. Meanwhile, agents searching Schaefer’s apartment found several explosive precursors and electronic matches. While the search was ongoing, Schaefer returned to the apartment and threatened a task force officer before fleeing.

            Two task force officers pursued Schaefer who soon got stuck in traffic. The officers approached Schaefer on foot and ordered him out of the vehicle. Schaefer did not comply, threatened to kill the officers and ignited an explosive device concealed in a cigarette pack. The blast caused significant injury to Schaefer’s hand and sent debris flying into one of the officers, who suffered bodily injury. Following the explosion, Schaefer was arrested and officers found a second cigarette pack containing explosives in his vehicle.

            This case was prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon. It was investigated by the Portland JTTF. The Portland JTTF includes FBI special agents and more than a dozen state and local law enforcement officers.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/6325/129167/SENTENCING-Schaefer-Final.pdf

Conference of Local Health Officials meets Nov. 21 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 11/08/19 12:12 PM

November 8, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Conference of Local Health Officials meets Nov. 21 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO).

Agenda: Potential changes to Public Health Accountability Metrics Process Measures; Public Health Modernization State/Local Learning Collaborative update; letter of support for Environmental Health Assessment Program grant application.

Agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/ prior to meeting.

When: Thursday, Nov. 21, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Where: Two locations – Portland State Office Building Room 177, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland OR 97232; Lane County Health and Human Services, 151 W. 7th Ave., Room 530, Eugene OR 97401. No conference call option is available.

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs, and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340)

Program contact: Danna Drum, 503-957-8869, um@dhsoha.state.or.us">danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 503-957-8869, 711 TTY or um@dhsoha.state.or.us">danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


State-of-the-art recycling saves millions of dollars for Northwest electric customers
Bonneville Power Administration - 11/08/19 12:07 PM

MEDIA ADVISORY — Nov. 8, 2019

Who:   The Bonneville Power Administration

What:   Tour of BPA’s award-winning recycling program and mechanical laboratory in recognition of the upcoming National Recycling Day

Where: The Bonneville Power Administration’s Ross Complex, ABC parking lot located south of the Ross Complex at NE Ross St, Vancouver, WA 98663

When:  Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019

Time:    1 to 3 p.m.      

For security purposes, please RSVP to David Wilson at 503-230-5607 by noon Tuesday, Nov. 12.      

 

Vancouver, Wash. The Bonneville Power Administration’s innovative approach to recycling saved northwest electric ratepayers nearly $3 million in 2018, and the agency projects even more savings in 2019. The agency’s sustainability efforts – from recycling transmission conductor and tower parts to auctioning off used equipment – have won national awards.

On Thursday, Nov. 14, BPA invites members of the media to tour its Investment Recovery Center and the Mechanical Lab. Visitors will see a machine that uses choppers and magnets to separate and recover aluminum and steel from used transmission wire. Since March of 2018, the machine has recovered more than 750,000 pounds of aluminum valued at $700,000.

Those on tour will also experience a mechanical testing lab and a corona and arc flashover that ends with a boom. Visitors are also invited to watch BPA lab engineers test and break a piece of high-voltage transmission wire.

Background: In 2018, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency honored BPA with the Federal Green Challenge Materials Management Award. The EPA is honoring BPA again in 2019 for its outstanding sustainability efforts and care for the environment.

About BPA: The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale, carbon-free hydropower from 31 federal dams in the Columbia River Basin. It also markets the output of the region’s only nuclear plant. BPA delivers this power to more than 140 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also owns and operates more than 15,000 circuit miles of high-voltage power lines and 262 substations, and provides transmission service to more than 500 customers. In all, BPA provides nearly a third of the power generated in the Northwest. To mitigate the impacts of the federal dams, BPA implements a fish and wildlife program that includes working with its partners to make the federal dams safer for fish passage. It also pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain safe, affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov


Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 11/08/19 11:30 AM
Stephen Kessler
Stephen Kessler
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1070/129163/thumb_Kessler_S.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Stephen Kessler, died the evening of November 7, 2019.  Kessler was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI) in Umatilla and passed away while on hospice at the facility. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Kessler entered DOC custody on October 1, 1982, from Multnomah County with an earliest release date of October 1, 2052. Kessler was 76 years old. Next of kin has been notified.  

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

TRCI is a multi-custody prison in Umatilla that houses approximately 1,800 adults in custody. TRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including institution and industrial laundry, mattress manufacturing, and sewing. Other institution work programs include repair and cleaning of irrigation ditches, maintenance of local baseball fields, and work with local cities and the Hermiston School District. The facility provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, religious services, and behavioral health services. TRCI opened in 2000.

 

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Attached Media Files: Stephen Kessler

PPB's GVRT Officer Arrest Shooting Suspect from September Incident (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/08/19 11:08 AM
Arellano Photo
Arellano Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/3056/129161/thumb_Arellano_Photo.jpg
On Wednesday, November 6, 2019, at 8:00 p.m., Officers with the Portland Police Bureau's Gun Violence Reduction Team (GVRT) located a shooting suspect driving a vehicle in Gresham in the area of Powell Boulevard and Eastman Parkway.

The suspect, 30 year-old Elias Arellano, was identified as the suspect from a shooting on September 23, 2019, in the 2800 block of Southeast 145th Avenue. This incident was a domestic violence related incident and involved a menacing with a firearm and a shooting. Investigators have been searching for Arellano, but he had evaded capture for over a month.

PPB GVRT Officers worked with the Portland K9 Unit, Metro Gang Officers, and Gresham Officers to attempt a high risk traffic stop. Officers attempted the traffic stop, but Arellano fled in the vehicle into the area near Eastman Parkway and Yamhill Street.

Arellano then attempted to flee from the vehicle, but was quickly and safely apprehended near 217th Avenue and Stark Street.

Arellano was transported to the Multnomah County Detention Center on charges of Attempt Elude (Felony), Felon in Possession of a Firearm, Unlawful Use of a Weapon, Unlawful Possession of a Firearm, Unlawful Possession of a Loaded Firearm Within the City, Domestic Violence Menacing with a Firearm, and a Warrant.

Domestic violence is among the most frequent and serious forms of violent crime investigated by police. If you or a loved one are experiencing domestic violence or are concerned that domestic violence may be an issue, help is available.

Call to Safety provides access to advocacy services, including confidential peer support, information and referrals to community resources. Call to Safety's 24-hour crisis line can be reached at 503-235-5333, or 1-888-235-5333.

Additional, web-based resources are available from Multnomah County's Domestic Violence Coordinator's office: http://web.multco.us/dv

The Portland Police Bureau's Domestic Violence Reduction Unit is a unique collaboration between the Portland Police Bureau, the Multnomah County Domestic Violence Coordinating Council, Volunteers of America, Raphael House, El Programa Hispano and victim advocates. Specially trained Police Officers and victim advocates work as a team to review and follow-up on reported incidents of domestic violence.

Information on DVRU is available at: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/35679

The City of Portland, Multnomah County and numerous other partners have also joined together to create The Gateway Center. The Gateway Center attempts to limit the impact of intimate partner violence through by providing multi-cultural and survivor-centered advocacy and services. Given the complexity of domestic violence, this center provides a single-point of access to services and resources for survivors of intimate partner violence.
Information on The Gateway Center can be found at http://www.portlandoregon.gov/gatewaycenter/52837

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Arellano Photo

City of Vancouver proposal to acquire new Operations Center site advances
City of Vancouver - 11/08/19 10:13 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The City of Vancouver’s proposal to purchase a 35-acre site currently owned by Clark County for a future replacement Operations Center has received the go-ahead by the Clark County Council, which authorized County Manager Shawn Henessee to proceed with the sale agreement. Authorization of the site purchase will be considered by the Vancouver City Council at a future Council meeting.

Vancouver’s Operations Center is a 24/7 hub for essential City services and disaster response - streets, water, sewer, traffic signals, street lights, grounds maintenance, facilities, utility customer services, vehicle/equipment services, and more.

The current Operations Center, 4711 E. Fourth Plain Blvd., was built for Clark Public Utilities in 1951, and purchased by the City in 1978, when Vancouver’s population was 42,000. The City’s population is now about 185,000. Meanwhile, the City’s Water Utility is the third largest municipal provider in the state, serving more than 250,000 residents, which includes much of the surrounding urban area as well as residents within Vancouver city limits.

Based on recent seismic studies, the existing Public Works Operations Center would not withstand even a moderate earthquake, resulting in significant impacts to the City’s ability to provide first response to streets, drinking water, sewer, police/fire support, and other services. In addition, the site configuration, size, outdated electrical and plumbing, more than 40-year-old fueling systems, and lack of accessibility have strained the facility's operational limits.

Replacement of the existing facility has been carefully considered and evaluated over the years. According to a detailed needs assessment and evaluation, rebuilding the Operations Center at a new location is the most cost-effective and operationally beneficial path going forward.

The proposed new Operations Center site, located along the east side of Northeast 94th Avenue and north of Padden Parkway, lies within the City’s Water Service Area and the City’s Urban Growth Boundary. The new facility is being planned with a minimum 50-year service life, which the new location provides with future growth in mind. Financing for the new Operations Center is expected to include reserves, sale of existing properties, and General Obligation and Utility Revenue bonds.

Contingent upon City Council approval, planning, permitting and design of the new Operations Center would take place in 2020-2021. The City plans to work closely with the surrounding neighborhoods as part of that process. Construction is anticipated to begin in 2022, with completion in 2024.

                                                                                                              ###

Note: See City of Vancouver news release webpage for more information about the Operations Center project.


PCC wins $1 million NSF grant to support women, minorities in STEM
PCC - 11/08/19 9:43 AM

PORTLAND, Ore. – The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded Portland Community College with a $999,941 grant to create pathways from college to careers within the areas of mathematics and science.

The College to Careers in Math and Science Project, which starts Nov. 1, is funded by NSF’s Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Program (S-STEM) and will be based at PCC’s Southeast Campus (2305 SE 82nd and Division St.). The aim of this project is to implement strategies that lower barriers to participation for women and other underrepresented students in STEM fields and provide the support structure for them to succeed.

The project is a collaboration between PCC, industry advisors, Portland State University and PSU’s statewide Oregon Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement (OR MESA) Program. The College to Careers in Math and Science Project will award 108 one-year scholarships during the grant’s five years. Students enrolled in biological, physical, and mathematical sciences at the Southeast Campus will be eligible for the scholarships. Seventy two of the scholarships will be specifically for transitioning recipients to Portland State’s STEM programs.

The project’s staff anticipate that 85 percent of scholars will be retained from their first to second years due to the project’s wrap-around support in key subjects, ensuring better completion rates.

“The grant will allow institutionally underserved students at the Southeast Campus to connect with other students within a cohort and experience STEM courses,” said Laura Horani, dean of Math, Sciences & the CTE Division at the Southeast Campus. “Students will be further supported by peer tutors and mentors working in STEM fields with the goal of recruiting and retaining diverse scholars.”                        

The National Science Foundation (NSF) supports research, innovation, and discovery that provides the foundation for economic growth in this country. By advancing the frontiers of science and engineering, our nation can develop the knowledge and cutting edge technologies needed to address the challenges we face today and will face in the future.

About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to nearly 70,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. PCC has four comprehensive campuses, eight education centers or areas served, and approximately 200 community locations in the Portland metropolitan area. The PCC district encompasses a 1,500-square-mile area in northwest Oregon and offers two-year degrees, one-year certificate programs, short-term training, alternative education, pre-college courses and life-long learning.

Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/


With help from loggers, woman on horseback, and miniature Australian Shepherd, Sheriff's Office leads successful search for 2-year-old in Molalla Rec Area; video available (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/08/19 9:42 AM
2019-11/624/129156/TammyStevensWithDeputies2.jpg
2019-11/624/129156/TammyStevensWithDeputies2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/624/129156/thumb_TammyStevensWithDeputies2.jpg

Please reference CCSO Case # 19-026456 

B-ROLL VIDEO, INCLUDING TAMMY STEVENS INTERVIEW (.mp4 format):
https://www.dropbox.com/s/uvviavbawav60oh/2019-11-07-MolallaRiverTrailRescueBRoll.mp4?dl=0

MOLALLA -- The Sheriff's Office is thanking local logging crews and a woman on horseback for their help during a successful search for a missing 2-year-old.

At approximately 11:19 a.m. on Thursday, November 7, 2019, the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office was notified of a missing 2-year-old girl in the Molalla River Recreation Area. This area is maintained by the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management. It is located about 10 miles south of the city of Molalla, OR. 

There is very limited cellular reception in the area, which made it difficult to obtain detailed information. Dispatch received two initial calls -- one from a passerby who was flagged down by a grandmother who stated she had lost her grandchild. The second call was from another passerby who was flagged down by a logger who stated they were looking for a missing child. In both cases, the caller had to travel to an area where there was cell-phone reception before calling 911.

Several Sheriff's Office deputies and Molalla Police officers responded to the area. 

Sheriff's Office Search & Rescue Coordinators responded to the area, as well. 

When deputies arrived at the location, they learned Gayla Ann Jay, 62, of Molalla had been on a walk with her two grandchildren in the Molalla River Recreation Area when Iris Nix, 2, of Molalla, had run ahead on the trail and out of sight. 

While trying to catch up to Iris, Gayla came to a four-way split in the trail and did not know where Iris was. 

After searching for 15 minutes, Gayla sought out help. 

There were several logging crews passing by on the road. Flagged down by Gayla, multiple loggers stopped and began to scour the area in an effort to find Iris. 

Search & Rescue Coordinators also began summoning resources and directing deputies and officers in the area. The Clackamas County Water Rescue Consortium was summoned, due to the proximity to the Molalla River. Resources from across Clackamas County deployed to the area to assist.

Residents in the area also spontaneously stepped up to help. Among them: Tammy Stevens, 59, of Beavercreek. 

Tammy was riding her horse "Bo" on a Molalla River Recreation Area trail along with her two dogs -- miniature Australian Shepherds named Wilson and Maddie

When Tammy heard there was a missing 2-year-old in the area, she immediately joined the search, scouting the terrain on horseback, flanked by her two dogs. 

Tammy described some of the terrain she was checking as steep and dangerous. 

After about 20 minutes of searching, Tammy heard a child crying.

She told Wilson, “Go get her.” 

Wilson led Tammy to a very steep hill. 

Tammy dismounted. Tammy and Wilson then climbed up the hill together -- about 70 feet up -- and found Iris. It was just after 1 p.m.

About 10 minutes later, Tammy found Dave, a logger who had been out searching as well. Dave was able to bring Iris to where deputies and medical personnel were staged.

Iris was checked out by paramedics with Molalla Fire and reunited with her family. 

Iris was found off Looney’s Trail, about a half mile from Hardy Creek. 

The Sheriff's Office wants to thank Tammy, Dave and many others who were in the area searching for Iris and contributed to her safe return. 

NOTE: Normally, for safety and logistical reasons, we do not encourage untrained individuals to engage in search operations; however, in this case, those who helped -- and who located Iris -- happened to be in the remote area and were familiar with the terrain, leading to a quick and successful rescue. The Sheriff's Office and Iris' family extend their deepest appreciation.

B-ROLL VIDEO AVAILABLE:

Photos are attached. B-roll video -- including an interview with Tammy Stevens and footage of her interacting with her horse and dogs -- is available at this Dropbox link:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/uvviavbawav60oh/2019-11-07-MolallaRiverTrailRescueBRoll.mp4?dl=0

INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITY:

Iris' grandmother Gayla Ann Jay is available for media interviews. iffpio@clackamas.us?subject=Molalla%20successful%20SAR">Contact PIO Sgt. Mendoza if interested.

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/624/129156/TammyStevensWithDeputies2.jpg , 2019-11/624/129156/TrailSystemMap.jpg , 2019-11/624/129156/TammyStevensWithDeputies.jpg , 2019-11/624/129156/SARTruck2.jpg , 2019-11/624/129156/SARTruck.jpg , 2019-11/624/129156/MolallaRiverRecAreaSign.jpg , 2019-11/624/129156/IrisPostRescue.jpg , 2019-11/624/129156/Iris3.jpg , 2019-11/624/129156/Iris.jpg , 2019-11/624/129156/GrandmotherAndIris.jpg

OnPoint Community Credit Union to Open New Branch in Vancouver's Growing Waterfront Development
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 11/08/19 9:03 AM

PORTLAND, Ore., November 8, 2019—OnPoint Community Credit Union will open its new Vancouver Waterfront Branch on Tuesday, November 12. This is the credit union’s fifth branch in Southwest Washington and 32nd branch overall. The new branch broadens the scope of services available to the growing community in and around Vancouver’s Waterfront Development.

“The Vancouver Waterfront is quickly emerging as a regional destination spot for consumers and businesses alike,” said OnPoint President and CEO Rob Stuart. “We’re excited to be part of the Waterfront to provide another convenient location for our members and signal our ongoing commitment to the Southwest Washington region.”

OnPoint’s new branch, located at 611 W. Columbia Way, opens just over a year after thousands of people celebrated the grand opening of the Waterfront Development. Since then, the area has seen continued growth, adding wineries and restaurants, as well as additional retail, office and residential space.

The Vancouver Waterfront Branch will provide a robust suite of financial services, including membership enrollment, consumer and commercial lending, mortgages, financial planning, ATM, coin machine and notarization; plus, it will be open on Saturdays. The branch will be led by OnPoint’s SW Washington Area Manager Amy Reeves and Branch Operations Supervisor April Weissert. Reeves and Weissert bring 20 years of combined experience with OnPoint, providing exceptional operational skills and member service.

“We’re passionate about supporting the Vancouver community and providing an extraordinary experience for our members,” said Reeves.  “We’re ready to welcome in our neighbors and area businesses to work together to achieve growth and success that brings value to our entire community.”

OnPoint invites neighbors, businesses and residents to a grand opening event and open house on Saturday, December 7, from 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. It will feature giveaways, new member enrollment, refreshments from local food cart Mack Shack, and a $2,500 check presentation to local nonprofit Innovative Services NW. Innovative Services NW has been serving the Vancouver area since 1963 with a mission to build self-reliant children and adults. The nonprofit provides early learning and childcare, pediatric therapy and neurodevelopment services, and job training and placement services. The OnPoint donation will support Innovative Service’s pediatric speech therapy program, which serves 80 children per month.

“We want to thank OnPoint and its members for this generous contribution,” said Dena Strong, President and CEO of Innovative Services NW. “This donation will provide our growing Speech Therapy discipline with furnishings and equipment for two new therapy rooms, helping us grow this practice to meet the increasing demand in Clark County for speech therapy services.”

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving more than 383,000 members and with assets of $6.1 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union's membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 13 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson, Lane, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk, Washington and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

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Happy Valley's annual Youth Town Hall to include relevant panel speakers (Photo)
City of Happy Valley - 11/08/19 8:36 AM
2019-11/2996/129153/Happy_Valley_Youth_Town_Hall_discussion.JPG
2019-11/2996/129153/Happy_Valley_Youth_Town_Hall_discussion.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/2996/129153/thumb_Happy_Valley_Youth_Town_Hall_discussion.JPG

Happy Valley Youth Council’s 10th Annual Youth Town Hall event once again invites teens throughout Clackamas County to connect and share concerns. Through interactive activities and guided discussions, the participating teens voice their ideas and develop solutions to issues that are especially meaningful to them. This year, the event includes guest speakers representing community in the business, education, law enforcement, and social services realms.  

The Youth Town Hall is free to participants and all local high school students are encouraged to attend. Happy Valley resident and business owner, Eric Post, will moderate this year’s activities. Panelists include Happy Valley City Councilor and local business owner, David Golobay, North Clackamas School District Assistant Superintendent of Education, Shay James, Clackamas County Suicide Prevention Coordinator, Galli Murray, and Clackamas County Sheriff, Craig Roberts. Students will have the opportunity to not only hear from the panelists, but also ask questions and engage in open dialogue.

The Happy Valley Youth Council was established in 2010 and serves as the City’s platform for bringing to light the voice of the area’s youth. Comprised of 12 council members, the Youth Council provides dynamic leadership and has pioneered such integral programs as an annual prescription drug take back event, teen driver safety awareness, and educational opportunities related to mental health.

The City of Happy Valley prides itself on the ability to offer purposeful and thoughtful ways for the youth of the area to be involved in the community and government happenings.

“This event is a time for local teens to get together, share ideas and talk about issues they believe are affecting their community. It’s a time for adults to really listen and take our youth’s perspective into consideration.” – Stephani Hern, City of Happy Valley Community Involvement Specialist and Youth Council advisor

For teens interested in attending the Youth Town Hall, they are encouraged to contact Stephani Hern at 503-783-3819. Event will occur, Nov. 13 from 7-9 p.m. at Happy Valley City Hall, located at 16000 SE Misty Drive, Happy Valley, Oregon 97086.

For further information, please contact Steve Campbell.




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/2996/129153/Happy_Valley_Youth_Town_Hall_November_13.pdf , 2019-11/2996/129153/Happy_Valley_Youth_Town_Hall_discussion.JPG

Kelly Wade Roberts receives a year and a half jail sentence following a bias crime in SW Portland
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 11/08/19 8:28 AM

November 8, 2019

Kelly Wade Roberts receives a year and a half jail sentence following a bias crime in SW Portland

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that 36-year-old Kelly Wade Roberts changed his plea and received a year and a half jail sentence following a bias crime that occurred in downtown Portland last fall. 

Roberts pleaded guilty and was convicted of one count of intimidation in the second degree and one count of criminal mischief in the second degree.

Roberts’ jail time will be served in the custody of the Federal Bureau of Prisons and will run concurrently to a sentence he previously received in U.S. District Court.

“This was an incident that had an extraordinary, terrifying and lasting impact on the victim’s life,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Nicole Hermann, who litigated this case. “She was just eating her pita inside a restaurant when Mr. Roberts, an employee, blasted her with hate speech for no reason. His vitriol and aggression shocked the victim and she is still living with the emotional repercussions of this event.”   

This investigation started on October 1, 2018 when Portland State University Campus Public Safety responded to the 1800 block of Southwest 5th Avenue in Portland, Oregon on reports of a verbal disturbance.

When police arrived, they contacted the woman who was visibly shaken. Officers learned that while the victim, who is black, was eating her dinner, Roberts started yelling hateful, racist, and misogynistic words towards her.

The victim stood up and told Roberts that she did not like his derogatory language and asked him to stop. Upon doing so, Roberts picked up a metal chair, which weighed about five pounds, and raised it over his head. The victim told police that she feared for her life because she believed Roberts was about to physically attack her.

Police arrested Roberts on scene and lodged him into the Multnomah County Detention Center.

The victim attended Thursday’s change of plea and sentencing hearing.

Through the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office, she informed the court that she supports the change of plea. She hopes Roberts will reflect on his actions while in custody and recognize the impact they had on her. She also hopes Roberts can identify the root cause of his behavior and to seek treatment to prevent it from ever occurring again.

When determining its sentencing recommendation, the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office considered the victim’s desire to seek a significant amount of incarceration, Roberts’ criminal history and the amount of harm done to the victim during this incident.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office was an active participant of the Oregon Attorney General’s Hate Crimes Task Force and helped draft the language that was in Senate Bill 577. The law, which went into effect on July 15, 2019, renamed the crime of “intimidation” to “bias crime,” added gender identity to the list of protected categories and removed the requirement that two or more people commit the crime in order to make it a felony in certain circumstances.

This case was issued and litigated before July 25, 2019, which is when Oregon’s new bias crime law went into effect. As a result, the crimes Roberts was convicted of should be referred to as “intimidation in the second degree.”

All potential bias crime cases, whether they are a felony or misdemeanor, are reviewed by the Violent Crimes Unit within the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office. If a misdemeanor bias crimes case is issued, the felony-level attorney will retain the case.

If you are the victim of a bias crime assault or you are witnessing one, immediately call 9-1-1. If you are the victim of a bias crime and the suspect is no longer present or if you have information about a bias crime committed in the past, call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/5769/129152/PR-19-255-Kelly_Wade_Roberts.pdf

City launches fifth annual Korey's Joy Drive Nov. 11 (Photo)
City of Vancouver - 11/08/19 8:18 AM
Joy Drive Graphic
Joy Drive Graphic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/144/129151/thumb_Korey_s_Joy_Drive-social_med_graphics_2019-02.jpg

Vancouver, Wash. - Starting Nov. 11, the City of Vancouver invites the community to support the third annual Korey's Joy Drive, a toy drive in memory of Korey Cochran, a City employee who passed away in 2017 at age 38 from cancer.

The City will collect new, unwrapped toys and new youth and adult winter coats, gloves, sock and hats through Dec. 13. All donations will be delivered to Randall Children's Hospital at Legacy Emanuel, Share of Vancouver WA, Children's Justice Center, Children's Center and Open House Ministries the week of Dec 16:

  • Latte Da Coffee House & Wine Bar: 205 E. 39th St.,  Vancouver
  • Vancouver City Hall lobby: 415 W. 6th St., Vancouver
  • Firstenburg Community Center front desk: 700 N.E. 136th Ave., Vancouver
  • Marshall Community Center front desk: 1009 E. McLoughlin Blvd., Vancouver
  • Vancouver Marine Park Engineering: 4500 S.E. Columbia Way, Vancouver
  • Water Resources Education Center front desk: 4600 S.E. Columbia Way, Vancouver
  • Vancouver Police West Precinct front desk: 2800 N.E. Stapleton Road, Vancouver
  • Vancouver Police East Precinct front desk: 520 S.E. 155th Ave., Vancouver
  • Vancouver Fire Station 5 front desk: 7110 N.E. 63rd St., Vancouver
  • Vancouver Public Works Operations Center front desk: 2323 General Anderson Rd., Vancouver
  • Vancouver Community Library lobby: 901 C Street, Vancouver
  • Three Creeks Community Library lobby: 800-C N.E. Tenney Road
  • SWAG Gymnastics: 3000 Columbia House Blvd, Suite 120, Vancouver

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About Randall Children's Hospital

Randall Children's Hospital at Legacy Emanuel offers an innovative approach to children's health care. It's a place where complex medical and surgical care is blended with a peaceful environment to create a new world of healing and health. The Randall Children's Hospital provides services for infants, youth and teens. Children at the hospital are treated for cancer, heart disease, and much more. Donations of toys and games will keep kids engaged and happy while undergoing treatment.

About Open House Ministries

Open House Ministries is committed to equipping homeless families with the tools necessary for resolving issues that lead to poverty and homelessness. They provide a holistic, long-term approach to working with homeless families to meet their physical, mental and spiritual needs to break the cycle of homelessness. Donations will help brighten the holidays of homeless youths and teens.

About Children’s Justice Center

The Arthur D. Curtis Children’s Justice Center is a nationally accredited Children’s Advocacy Center that provides a safe, child-focused place for alleged child victims of criminal-level abuse and their non-offending family members.

The Center’s multidisciplinary team of trained responders comes together from across agencies and jurisdictions to address crimes against children, including holding perpetrators accountable through the judicial system and sensitively considering children’s health and healing needs.

About Share of Vancouver, WA

Share provides services to individuals and families and prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, economic status, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation and marital or family status.




Attached Media Files: Joy Drive Graphic

Don Robertson named Interim Community Services Director
City of Oregon City - 11/08/19 8:04 AM

The City of Oregon City appointed Don Robertson as Interim Community Services Director effective November 7, 2019.

Robertson has more than 30 years of Parks and Recreation experience in local agencies such as Metro, City of Ashland, City of Gresham, North Clackamas, and the City of Milwaukie.

“It is important to fill this key management position in the City,” said City Manager, Tony Konkol, “Mr. Robertson will serve the City as we conduct a national recruitment for the next Community Services Director.”

On September 25, the City announced that Phil Lewis, Community Services Director, accepted a position with the City of Rocklin, California as their Parks and Recreation Director. His last day with the City of Oregon City was November 1, 2019.
 

“I am honored to serve as Interim Community Services Director,” Robertson said, “It will be a privilege to work with a talented team and dedicated community. I am grateful for the vision and energy City Commission provides and look forward to helping the Community Services Department transition to new leadership.”
 
The City is posting the Community Services Director position and expect to hire in early 2020.

 


Serious Injury Crash on Interstate 84 - Morrow County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 11/08/19 7:50 AM
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On Thursday, November 7, 2019, at approximately 2:00 A.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of single vehicle rollover crash on I-84 near milepost 151. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a light blue 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee, occupied by Jason Michael Gentilini (29) of Beaverton and Ariel Leigh Holien (28) of Hillsboro, was traveling eastbound on Interstate 84 when for unknown reasons the Jeep drifted off the interstate causing the vehicle to roll. OSP is still investigating which person was driving.   

Holien was flown by helicopter to Virginia Mason Medical Center then to Haborview Medical Center in Seattle, Washington with serious injuries. 

Gentilini was transported to Good Shepherd Medical Center by ground Ambulance then to Legacy Emanuel Medical Center with serious injuries.  

OSP was assisted by Morrow County Sheriff’s Office, Gilliam County Sheriff’s Office, Boardman Police Department and ODOT. 

OSP is requesting anyone who witnessed the crash or the vehicle before the crash to contact the Oregon State Police at OSP and refer to Sergeant Placido Lopez.  

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/1002/129146/20191107_044422.jpg , 2019-11/1002/129146/20191107_044241.jpg

10 Year-Old Injured by Blade in Halloween Candy from Vancouver, WA (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/08/19 1:30 AM
Candy with Blade 2
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On Thursday, November 7, 2019, at 11:04 p.m., North Precinct Officers responded to Randall Children's Hospital at 2801 North Gantenbein Avenue on the report of an injured child.

The child was reported to have bitten into a mini Hershey's candy bar and injured her tongue on a small blade in the candy (PHOTO). The injury is considered non-life threatening and is described as redness to the tongue and not a cut or slice. The child was treated and released.

The candy originated from Halloween trick-or-treating, according to the parents. The family trick-or- treated in the immediate area of the 1900 block of Northeast 97th Street in Vancouver, Washington.

This is a highly unusual case and there is concern about other tainted candy existing or being ingested. Parents are cautioned to carefully inspect all candy and notify the police if any other tainted candy is located. If anyone collected candy in the same immediate area, they should take extreme caution prior to ingesting any items or consider discarding the candy.

At this time, it is unclear exactly where the candy originated and there is no identified suspect information. If anyone has information about this incident, contact non-emergency dispatch at (503) 823-3333 and reference case 19-384577.

The family desires privacy and does not have interest in media contact.

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Attached Media Files: Candy with Blade 2 , Candy with Blade

Thu. 11/07/19
St. Stephen's Academy Builds on XC Success (Photo)
St. Stephen's Academy - 11/07/19 9:03 PM
Archers Varsity Women
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Beaverton, OR - After 1A St. Stephen’s Academy (Beaverton, OR) made an unexpected run into the State Championship Cross-Country meet in 2018, the Archers from Beaverton ended up placing 2nd in the State meet, runners-up to two-time champions Cove High School.  Prior to 2018, the Archers men had only qualified an individual runner one time in the eight-year history of the program, so qualifying a team was a big step forward. Head coach Tim Tsuei joined the program in 2016: “Sending a team to the State meet last year was so important for our program.  Runners got a taste of that experience and came back this summer ready to go for more.” As 2019 senior co-captain Colton Six recalls, “The moment when I realized we got second on a team where none of the top five runners were seniors was awesome. It showed me we could do something even greater in 2019.”  

The 2019 men’s team returned leading runners senior Aiden Smith, junior Seth Bergeron, and sophomore Colin Friend along with Colton Six and Luke Williams from the 2018 State runner-up team.  The 2019 women were able to field a team of five, led by returning runners, senior Annaliese and sophomore Olyvia Oeverman. An unprecedented roster of 15 athletes was assembled from the St. Stephen’s high school student body of 51.  Building on this core, the Archers attacked their summer training with motivation and clear goals, but perhaps the most meaningful summer event was the first ever XC team retreat. The Archers ran together, swam in the Willamette, attended a baseball game, and did their second annual run across five of Portland’s bridges.  The athletes convened their own session where they verbalized and documented their individual and team goals for the coming season. This team culture of accountability, motivation, and commitment was exemplified in the student-led workout schedule throughout the season. This team only meets with coaches three times a week for prescribed practices of duration and intensity.  Three other times during the week, the team meets in small groups without coaches, or works out individually to build speed and endurance.  

In September, the Archers started the 2019 season with a bang, winning men and women’s team titles at the first two 5k meets of the season.  The men collected another two meet titles in October before prepping for the Districts meet on November 1 at Tualatin High School. When asked about the challenge of having a small team, Olyvia Oeverman said, “To an outsider, having a team of five might sound pretty tough. But I believe having five members of the team this year actually contributed to how successful we were; it puts responsibility on each and every girl, and a constant mindset of, 'My 100% effort is completely vital for this team's success.' "

Headed into Districts, the men’s team was heavily favored to repeat as champs, but the women were only projected to finish 5th. Women’s teams had to finish in the top 3 to qualify for state, so this would be a formidable task.  Under a beautiful autumn sky, the Archers women rose to the challenge, erasing the projected deficit of 25 points to not only break into the top 3, but secured the 2nd place finishing spot to stamp their ticket to the State meet in Eugene.  Coach Tsuei said, “We were really pushed over the top by our 3-4-5 runners as they all set personal and course records of 2-3 minutes. We managed to leapfrog into the runner-up spot and now these young women get to fulfill a dream they never even dared to dream.”  Meanwhile the men dominated Districts, scoring fewer than 25 points and finishing 1st, 2nd, and 4th on their way to placing the entire varsity roster on the All-District team.

This coming Saturday, November 9, both teams will compete at the OSAA State Championships at Lane Community College. For the Archers men, especially, the expectations are high. Three Archers runners are vying for the top individual spot in the state and the team is expected to compete for the team title.  Senior co-captain Aiden Smith says, “As much as state runner-up (in 2018) was an enormous milestone for the program and for us as individuals, we know we each have more to give.” Two-time champ Cove is back as well, but St. Stephen’s looks to flip the script this year. Coach Tsuei said, “We know that Cove has experienced coaches and runners, and they’ll come ready to defend their title.  We’ve set a goal of scoring under 50 points; we feel that will help secure our first-ever school title in any OSAA sport.”

Whatever happens at the state championships, St. Stephen’s is looking to build on the success of 2018 with the hopes of establishing a winning tradition.  Coach Tsuei concluded, “We’ve learned that we have to dream big in order to achieve big things. I’m thankful for having such a great group of athletes of high character and personal motivation.  These kids are in such an academically rigorous program at St. Stephen’s, yet they prioritize their time so they get in their training. I’m just so glad they’re seeing success. We want that storybook ending this year.  They’ve earned it.”

St. Stephen’s Academy is a classical Christian school with campuses in Beaverton and Lake Oswego, Oregon, serving students in pre-kindergarten through the twelfth grade. The school is the only classical Christian school in the Portland metropolitan area west side and has been serving the greater Portland area for twenty years. Its campuses are located at 7275 SW Hall Boulevard, Beaverton, on the same site as Evergreen Presbyterian Church, and 4565 Carman Drive, Lake Oswego, at Lake Bible Church.

 




Attached Media Files: Archers Varsity Women , Archers Varsity Men

Driver Killed After Crash on Highway 8 (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/07/19 7:44 PM
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On Thursday, November 7, 2019, at 2:10 p.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies were dispatched to a serious crash on Highway 8 at NW 334th Avenue. When deputies arrived, they discovered a 2002 Ford F350 collided with a 2004 Ford F150. Both vehicles had significant damage.

The male driver in the F150, 82-year-old Delbert Dewolf of Hillsboro, was pronounced deceased at the scene. The adult female driver of the F350 and her two passengers had minor injuries. They were later transported to a local hospital for precautionary reasons. The driver of the F350 had no signs of impairment and was cooperative with investigators.

The initial investigation indicates the F350 was heading westbound on Highway 8, and Mr. Dewolf had been heading south on NW 334th Avenue. Investigators believe Mr. Dewolf stopped at the stop sign before Highway 8. After stopping, Mr. Dewolf drove onto Highway 8 and into the path of the F350. The F350 did not have a stop sign at the intersection.

Members of the inter-agency Washington County Crash Analysis Reconstruction Team (CART) responded to assist in the traffic crash investigation. Investigators are continuing their investigation into the crash.




Attached Media Files: Media Release PDF , Scene picture

Robbery Suspects Arrested-Firearm and Marijuana Recovered (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/07/19 4:55 PM
Angel Photo
Angel Photo
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On November 6, 2019, at 9:57 p.m., East Precinct Officers responded to an alarm call at 5515 Southeast 122nd Avenue, where The Oregon Bud Company is located. As officers arrived, there was an update that a robbery at gunpoint had occurred at the location. Officers learned currency and marijuana had been taken in the robbery.

Officers flooded the area and located two subjects near Southeast 115th Avenue and Southeast Reedway Street who were believed to be connected to the robbery. Officers recovered a bag of money, a handgun, marijuana, and a replica firearm. The two subjects were arrested and Robbery Detectives took over the investigation.

19 year-old Christopher Angel and 21 year-old Stephen Lewis were charged with Robbery I, Robbery II, and Unlawful Use of a Weapon (PHOTOS).

If anyone has further information about this case, contact Detective Todd Prosser at (503) 823-9320 or todd.prosser@portlandoregon.gov

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Attached Media Files: Angel Photo , Lewis Photo

City of Tualatin Names New Traffic Safety Projects
City of Tualatin - 11/07/19 4:53 PM

In late October, Tualatin City Council approved the first round of community-nominated Neighborhood Traffic Safety projects to be constructed in 2020. The seven priority projects include signalized pedestrian crossings and driver feedback signs at these locations:

Mohawk St east of Martinazzi Ave

90th Ave and Sweek Dr

Borland Rd between Bridgeport Elementary School and 60th Ave

Nyberg Ln at Boones Ferry Park (between 50th Ave and 65th Ave)

Martinazzi Ave between Avery St and Dakota Dr

Tualatin Rd between 105th Ave and 115th Ave

Nasoma Ln between Boones Ferry Rd and 90th Ave

All seven projects will be completed next year as part of Tualatin Moving Forward, the City’s bond-funded transportation program.

Most of the new pedestrian crossings will include state-of-the-art reflective signage plus rapid flashing beacons with push-button controls. Research shows these attention-grabbing signals are the safest option for protecting drivers, pedestrians, and bicyclists. The high intensity LED beacons command drivers’ attention whenever pedestrians want to cross, in all weather conditions, with day and night time visibility.

“These new rapid flashing beacons have been very effective wherever we have installed them at pedestrian crossings and in school zones,” said Jeff Fuchs, P.E., Tualatin Public Works Director. Along with driver feedback signs, the new pedestrian crossings with flashing signals are the safety improvements requested most often by Tualatin neighborhoods.

The driver feedback signs represent another emerging technology. These solar-powered LED screens (Tualatin already has several in place) use radar to display speeds and slow drivers and are also highly effective.

The recently announced neighborhood safety improvements were selected through a community-wide process that sought nominations from Tualatin residents and community groups. Around 145 project ideas were submitted by community members. The selected projects met the criteria of spreading improvements citywide, solving specific safety problems, and fitting within the program’s budget.

Another round of safety projects will be selected in October 2020. Residents who want to suggest a project in their neighborhood can go to the website TualatinMovingForward.com and click on the Suggest a Project button.




Attached Media Files: Press Release

Celebrate Global Entrepreneurship Week: Learn how to achieve sustainable business growth
WSU Vancouver - 11/07/19 4:36 PM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – The Columbia River Economic Development Council and Washington State University Vancouver’s Business Growth Mentor and Analysis Program invite the public to celebrate Global Entrepreneurship Week with “Grow Clark County: Driving Sustainable Growth” from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Nov. 21 at Tandem Hall, 808 Main Street A, Vancouver.

Henry Schuck, CEO of ZoomInfo powered by DiscoverOrg, will discuss how the company was launched, and what factors he believes have contributed to the company’s fast growth and phenomenal success. ZoomInfo powered by DiscoverOrg launched its sales and marketing intelligence platform at the beginning of the last economic downturn and has since negotiated a number of major acquisitions and appeared on Deloitte’s Fast 500 list four times and the Inc. 5000 list eight times. Take with you Schuck’s advice on how to be resilient, pivot and decide when to scale your company.

General admission is $15 and includes appetizers and a no-host bar; CREDC Investor admission is $10; and college student admission is $5 with a student ID. To purchase tickets, visit CREDC.org/events. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. The program begins at 5:20 p.m.

About Global Entrepreneurship week

Global Entrepreneurship Week is an annual international initiative that has involved more than 10 million people from 102 countries since its launch in 2007. GEW celebrates the innovators and job creators who launch startups that bring ideas to life, drive economic growth and expand human welfare.

About Columbia River Economic Development Council

Serving Clark County since 1982, CREDC is a private-public partnership of more than 150 investors and partners working together to advance the economic vitality of Clark County. Through collaborative leadership, CREDC promotes job creation and capital investment while maintaining the County’s high quality of life. www.credc.org  

About WSU Vancouver

As one of six campuses of the Washington State University system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

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Linn County Sheriff's Office Identifies Suspect in October Central Linn Bomb Threat
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 11/07/19 4:20 PM

Linn County Sheriff Jim Yon reports his deputies have identified a suspect in the bomb threat that caused the Central Linn High School to be on lockdown for several hours on October 29th. 

On the morning of October 29th at 9:44 a.m. deputies responded to the school to investigate a threat that came in over the phone.  The caller referenced a “bomb”, which put the school on alert and caused them to lockdown the facility.  The school was locked down for approximately three hours, while deputies searched the entire school, including school grounds, every building and classroom.  Deputies did not find any suspicious items and the lockdown was eventually lifted.

During the lockdown, parents were not allowed to pick up their children.  This was necessary to preserve the scene and keep the children safe during the deputies’ search.  Parents were kept informed of the situation by a Sheriff’s Office representative until the lockdown was lifted.

Deputies were able to trace the phone number back to an address in Warrenton, Virginia.  Through their investigation, it was learned similar threatening calls were made from the same number to New York Fire Departments and other government agencies throughout the nation, including others in Oregon.  With numerous jurisdictions investigating similar threats, Paul Oliver Martikainen, 45 years old, was eventually taken into custody for the threats in Bryson City, North Carolina.  The FBI has been involved in these cases and Martikainen is facing federal charges.  Specific charges are not known at this time. 

Th Linn County Sheriff’s Office was assisted by New York Police Department and Fauquier County Sheriff’s Office in Virginia.  The Linn County Sheriff’s Office takes every threat seriously.  Deputies will thoroughly investigate each incident to identify the suspect and hold them accountable.  The safety of our children and schools is our highest priority.

Linn County Sheriff Jim Yon reports his deputies have identified a suspect in the bomb threat that caused the Central Linn High School to be on lockdown for several hours on October 29th. 

On the morning of October 29th at 9:44 a.m. deputies responded to the school to investigate a threat that came in over the phone.  The caller referenced a “bomb”, which put the school on alert and caused them to lockdown the facility.  The school was locked down for approximately three hours, while deputies searched the entire school, including school grounds, every building and classroom.  Deputies did not find any suspicious items and the lockdown was eventually lifted.

During the lockdown, parents were not allowed to pick up their children.  This was necessary to preserve the scene and keep the children safe during the deputies’ search.  Parents were kept informed of the situation by a Sheriff’s Office representative until the lockdown was lifted.

Deputies were able to trace the phone number back to an address in Warrenton, Virginia.  Through their investigation, it was learned similar threatening calls were made from the same number to New York Fire Departments and other government agencies throughout the nation, including others in Oregon.  With numerous jurisdictions investigating similar threats, Paul Oliver Martikainen was eventually taken into custody for the threats in Bryson City, North Carolina.  The FBI has been involved in these cases and Martikainen is facing federal charges.  Specific charges are not known at this time. 

Th Linn County Sheriff’s Office was assisted by New York Police Department and Fauquier County Sheriff’s Office in Virginia.  The Linn County Sheriff’s Office takes every threat seriously.  Deputies will thoroughly investigate each incident to identify the suspect and hold them accountable.  The safety of our children and schools is our highest priority.  The investigation is continuing. 


Health Share of Oregon and CareOregon announce plans to improve non-emergent medical transportation for members
Health Share of Oregon - 11/07/19 4:00 PM

Nov. 6 (Portland, Ore.)—Today, Health Share of Oregon and CareOregon announced plans to improve Ride to Care, Health Share’s non-emergent medical transportation (NEMT) program. Plans announced today include the selection of two new vendors for network management and dispatch management starting in 2020, and immediate steps to address reliability and performance.

In October, Health Share announced that it would transition administration of Ride to Care to CareOregon to support better integration of the NEMT benefit. CareOregon has developed a new model for the program, in which the three core functions of the NEMT program—call center management, network management and dispatch management—will be provided separately by organizations with expertise and established systems in each area, with oversight and coordination by CareOregon.

CareOregon issued “intents to award” to local non-profit Ride Connection for network management and ComTrans Community Transport for dispatch management services.

“Non-emergent transportation is a vital service for Oregon Health Plan members,” said Eric C. Hunter, CEO of CareOregon. “We are excited to bring on partners with such a depth of experience and track record delivering transportation services locally.”

Ride Connection has more than 30 years of experience coordinating and providing rides for older adults and people with disabilities in the Portland metro region. The organization has expertise in network management and deep connections with the region’s transportation partners, social service agencies, community members, and stakeholders.

Likewise, ComTrans Community Transport has 24 years of experience scheduling and dispatching vehicles for non-emergency medical transportation.

“We know that the current NEMT model isn’t delivering for patients or our transportation providers,” said Maggie Bennington-Davis, MD, Interim CEO and Chief Medical Officer at Health Share of Oregon. “Doing right by our patients and drivers is our top priority, and we are confident that these changes will better meet our members’ needs.”

In addition, Health Share submitted a corrective action plan to the Oregon Health Authority on November 1 to address performance issues and improve ride reliability between now and April 2020, when the administration of the Ride to Care Program will transition from GridWorks to the newly contracted vendors under CareOregon’s management.

Key elements of the action plan include:

  1. Addressing provider no-shows by auditing the past no-show rates of each transportation provider; reviewing all grievances; and meeting with providers to assess and mitigate specific issues leading to no-shows.
  2. Addressing on-time ride performance by auditing the past on-time performance of each transportation provider; meeting with providers who are not meeting standards to assess and mitigate specific issues; and pre-scheduling “predictable” rides (for dialysis, chemotherapy, etc.) 30 days in advance.
  3. Reducing call center wait times by assessing staffing levels and training plans; hiring and training additional staff as necessary; implementing improvements in the Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system; and providing on-site oversight of the call center function.
  4. Addressing member grievances by auditing all past grievances; addressing acute unresolved issues that have been identified in grievances; and engaging the regional Disability and Aging Services Advisory Committees to make recommendations for better serving vulnerable populations.

Jeremy Koehler, one of Health Share’s leaders, will be embedded at Gridworks between now and April 2020 to monitor operations, implementation of the corrective action plan, and the transition of service to the new vendors. Koehler currently serves as Health Share’s Director of Behavioral Health, and has extensive professional experience in crisis response and call center management.

Health Share is submitting weekly and monthly reports to the Oregon Health Authority detailing progress on the corrective action plan measures.

To ensure continuity of services during the transition, there will be an overlap period while the new model goes into effect. The first priority of the transition will be to ensure that Health Share members have access to safe and timely rides. Health Share and CareOregon are also committed to stabilization of the NEMT workforce – both administrative staff and drivers. CareOregon will phase in its services with a soft launch beginning in early 2020, and Health Share’s current contractor GridWorks will remain in place until March 31, 2020. The CareOregon model is expected to be fully operational by April 1, 2020.

 

About CareOregon

CareOregon is a nonprofit community benefits company involved in health plan services, reforms and innovations since 1994. We currently serve more than 275,000 Oregon Health Plan/Medicaid and Medicare members. By listening to our members and exploring innovative solutions with our providers and communities, we help Oregonians prevent illness and live better lives. Every day, we strengthen our communities by making health care work for everyone.

About Health Share of Oregon

Health Share of Oregon is the state’s largest Medicaid coordinated care organization (CCO), serving OHP members in Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington Counties. Our mission is to partner with communities to achieve ongoing transformation, health equity, and the best possible health for each individual.

Health Share was founded and continues to be governed by eleven health care organizations serving OHP members: Adventist Health, CareOregon, Central City Concern, Clackamas County, Kaiser Permanente, Legacy Health, Multnomah County, Oregon Health & Science University, Providence Health & Services, Tuality Health Alliance and Washington County.

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Attached Media Files: Press Release_ Health Share of Oregon and CareOregon announce plans to improve non-emergent medical transportation for members Board of Directors hosts Public Engagement Meeting

Hoover Criminal Gang Member Lorenzo Jones Indicted for Racketeering Conspiracy
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/07/19 3:48 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, announced today that Lorenzo Laron Jones, 46, a Portland resident and senior member of the Hoover Criminal Gang, has been indicted for his role in a racketeering conspiracy that caused the shooting deaths of two Portland men.

Jones is charged with racketeering conspiracy and two counts each of murder in aid of racketeering, using and carrying a firearm during a crime of violence, and causing death through the use of a firearm.

The superseding indictment alleges that beginning in June 1989, Jones engaged in a 30-year pattern of violent racketeering activity for the purpose of maintaining and increasing his position in the Hoover Criminal Gang, a criminal enterprise engaged in racketeering in California, Oregon, Washington and elsewhere.

Jones is alleged to have murdered Ascensio Genchi Garcia on July 19, 1998 and Wilbert Butler on September 17, 2017, both in Portland. Additionally, he is accused of attempting to murder six other people, possessing stolen firearms, and distributing cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine.

Jones made his initial appearance in federal court today and was detained pending a four-week jury trial before U.S. Chief District Court Judge Michael W. Mosman.

Jones is named alongside fellow Hoover gang members Ronald Clayton Rhodes, 34, and Javier Fernando Hernandez, 23, both of Portland, in the superseding indictment unsealed today. Rhodes and Hernandez were previously charged with murder in aid of racketeering, using and carrying a firearm during a crime of violence, and causing death through the use of a firearm for the December 16, 2015 murder of Portland resident Kyle Polk.

Jones, Rhodes and Hernandez will be tried together and each face a maximum sentence of death or life in prison.

According to the indictment, the Hoovers are a criminal street gang operating in Oregon, and are known to engage in acts of violence including murder, assault, robbery, sex trafficking and the distribution of narcotics. The Hoovers originated in Los Angeles in the late 1960s and established a presence in Portland in the early 1980s. The gang has a loose hierarchical structure in which members have different amounts of power and influence based on age and gang activity. To maintain status and increase one’s position in the gang, members are expected to carry out violence on behalf of the enterprise.

This case was investigated by the FBI, the Portland Police Bureau, Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, Gresham Police Department, and Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) and is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

This case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts.  PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release , Timeline

Phelan Development begins Construction of Cipole Road Industrial Park in Sherwood
City of Sherwood - 11/07/19 3:01 PM

Phelan Development, based in Newport Beach, California, has begun construction of three new speculative industrial buildings with a total building area of 235,875 SF on a nearly 12 acre site on the north side of Tualatin Sherwood Road, between SW Cipole Road and SW Wildrose Place in the city of Sherwood, Oregon.  This is the newest project from Phelan Development in the Greater Portland market.   Building A will contain 108,200 square feet.  Building B will consist of 34,450 square feet while Building C will be approximately 92,400 square feet.   The buildings will be divisible. Each building will have numerous loading docks, 32’ clear height, 800 amps 3-phase power and build-to-suit office space.   Delivery is expected to occur by Summer 2020.  Each building will be offered for lease or for sale.  With access to Cipole Road and Wildrose Place, there will be excellent truck access to the properties and direct visibility to Tualatin Sherwood Road, a well-established major regional industrial corridor. 

The property is the first major new industrial park development to be constructed along Tualatin Sherwood Road in Sherwood’s eastside gateway industrial area.  Businesses locating in the Cipole Industrial Park will have immediate access to I-5 - which serves all West Coast markets - and to I-205 via Tualatin Sherwood Road.  Michael DeArmey, partner with Phelan Development has stated that “our company selected Sherwood because of its prime location within the Greater Portland’s I-5 Southwest Business Corridor, its available talented workforce, strong market demand and its business-friendly environment.    Adds Kyle Bertelson, who recently joined Phelan Development as their local Partner, “We recognized that Sherwood is the next logical location for new industrial park development.  I have enjoyed working with the City staff to make this development a reality.”

Phelan is represented by Kevin VandenBrink at Macadam Forbes Commercial Real Estate in Portland for the sale/leasing of the properties.

According to Sherwood Mayor Keith Mays “The City of Sherwood is excited that Phelan has selected our community for this new industrial park which will help Sherwood to attract additional family-wage jobs and continue our city’s strong focus on economic development.   I invite you to learn about Sherwood’s many competitive advantages and why companies of all types are discovering that Sherwood is open for business.”

ABOUT SHERWOOD, OREGON:  The City of Sherwood, Oregon is a growing, dynamic place to do business, with a diverse economy and strong manufacturing base.  The city is the preferred home to new residents and businesses due to its location within the burgeoning I-5/ Southwest Portland Business Corridor, it’s highly skilled labor force, exceptional quality of life, highly regarded schools, supportive city government and entrepreneurial environment.  Businesses locating in Sherwood have excellent access to I-5 which serves the entire West Coast of North America, I-205, I-405, Highway 99W and all areas of the Greater Portland Region.  Sherwood is focused on creating opportunities for companies of all types to locate in the city, including advanced manufacturing, industrial equipment manufacturing, cleantech, high technology manufacturing, software/media development, computer design, engineering, environmental services, outdoor wear design services, metal working, food products, creative services and many other small and large businesses.    The City works closely one-on-one with businesses to assist companies to locate in the community and to obtain the business services and resources they may require to be successful. 

ABOUT PHELAN DEVELOPMENT

Phelan Development is a privately-owned real estate company based in Newport Beach, California, with over $4 billion of development.  The company is focused on developing high quality industrial, office, R+D-flex, and retail projects.  Phelan Development prides itself on the ability to deliver well-designed buildings in strategic locations.  The company has a strategic focus on Los Angeles Mid-Cities, the Inland Empire, Northern California, Oregon, Washington, Texas and Nevada.

For more information on these additions to the City of Sherwood, please contact Bruce Coleman, Economic Development Manager at 503.625.4206


Christmas with Jim Fischer & Friends with Special Guests Tracey Harris & Renato Caranto on Dec. 1; A Benefit Event for Friends of the Carpenter
Friends of the Carpenter - 11/07/19 3:00 PM

Vancouver, WA – A benefit concert to support Friends of the Carpenter (FOC) will be held on Sun. Dec. 1, 3 p.m., First Presbyterian Church, 4300 Main Street, Vancouver. The concert headliner is Jim Fischer and Friends with special guests Tracey Harris and Renato Caranto. The concert is free and open to the public; a freewill offering will be held.

“We invite the community to join us for a wonderful opportunity to start the Christmas season in style: an afternoon of fun, refreshments and music all while supporting Friends of the Carpenter,” said Tom Iberle, executive director.

Additional performers include Northwest Harmony Chorus, a group of dynamic women singing a capella, four-part harmony in the barbershop style, and Battle Ground High School Vocal Jazz.

Guests are asked to bring a donation of toiletries to supply the Shower Outreach Project at Friends of the Carpenter, a weekly effort in partnership with Food with Friends.

About Friends of the Carpenter

Friends of the Carpenter was incorporated in Vancouver, WA in Oct. 1998 and began as a vision of a practical outreach of simple welcome and personal interaction between volunteers from the church and people living in poverty. Since the beginning, regular contact has been made with vulnerable members of our community through woodworking events scheduled around the area and which, today, are mostly held at FOC’s Friendship Center. Our mission: Friends of the Carpenter is a non-profit, faith-based day facility that provides safety, structure and purpose for vulnerable members of our community. Learn more at friendsofthecarpenter.org.

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Pacific University News Capsule
Pacific University - 11/07/19 1:33 PM

 

 

 

Greetings from Pacific University where we're always a little ahead of time, even when we've turned back the clocks.

Here's some news from our campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Woodburn, Portland and Eugene:

Guadalupe Flores '21 and Favian Campos-Pena '20 Awarded Golden Guard Scholarships

Students and staff support Out of the Darkness Walk in Eugene

And here are some things coming up in the coming week:

Open Forum with President Hallick
Nov. 7, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 a.m. | UC Lounge

Sway: Drawing by Kate Lund
Through November, 1 - 5 p.m. | Scott Hall, Cawein Gallery

Teatro Milagro at The Vault Theatre
Nov. 7, 7-9 p.m. | Vault Theatre, Hillsboro

2019 First-Generation Student Success Conference 
Nov. 8, Noon - 6 p.m. | U.C. Multi-Purpose Room

JV Volleyball vs Linfield College JV 
Nov. 8, 3 - 5 p.m. | Stoller Center, Gym 123

Volleyball vs Linfield College 
Nov. 8, 7 p.m. | Stoller Center, Gym 123

Jazz Nite
Nov. 8, 7:30 p.m. | Taylor-Meade Peforming Arts Center

Volleyball vs Willamette University
Nov. 9, 6 p.m. | Stoller Center, Gym 123

Al Stewart  | Performing Arts Series
Nov. 9, 7:30 p.m. | Taylor-Meade Peforming Arts Center

Women's Soccer vs University of Puget Sound
Nov. 10, Noon - 2 p.m. | Hanson Stadium

Women's Wrestling - Mike Clock Open
Nov. 10, 2 - 6 p.m. | Stoller Center, Gym 123

Symphonic Band Fall Concert
Nov. 10, 7:30 p.m. | Taylor-Meade Performing Arts Center

Veterans Day
Nov. 11, All Day | University Closed

Pacific University Undergraduate Research Conference
Nov. 12, 4:30 - 7:30 p.m. | Murdock Hall, McGill Auditorium 118, Scott Hall

Beyond Fake News: How We Can Find Accurate Information about the World
Nov. 12, 5:30 - 7 p.m. | Forest Grove Senior Community Center, Brockman Room

Storyteller Esther Stutzman
Nov. 13, 11:45 a.m. - 12:45 p.m. | Taylor Auditorium 216

Open Forum & Speaker Panel on the Oppresion of Minority Groups
Nov. 14, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. | U.C., Lounge 204

Alumni Remembrance Ceremony
Nov. 14, Noon | Old College Hall

State of the University Address
Nov. 14, 3 - 4:30 p.m. | U.C., Multi-Purpose Room, HPC2, Room 204, Hillsboro

2019 Autumn Choreographers Concert
Nov. 14, 7:30 p.m. | Warner Hall, Tom Miles Theatre

— pacificu.edu —

Pacific University is a diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn, as well as healthcare clinics throughout the Portland area. Pacific is currently ranked the No. 1 private research university in the Pacific Northwest and is also committed to civic engagement, sustainability and interprofessional education as part of its core teaching philosophy.

 


PeaceHealth St. John nationally recognized with an 'A' for safety (Photo)
PeaceHealth - 11/07/19 1:00 PM
2019-11/5173/129120/licensure-logo-green-with_flag-_fall_2019-web.jpg
2019-11/5173/129120/licensure-logo-green-with_flag-_fall_2019-web.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/5173/129120/thumb_licensure-logo-green-with_flag-_fall_2019-web.jpg

Longview, Wash., Nov. 7, 2019 – PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center was awarded an ‘A’ in fall 2019 Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade, a national distinction recognizing the local hospital’s achievements protecting patients from harm and providing safer health care. The Leapfrog Group is an independent national watchdog organization driven by employers and other purchasers of health care committed to improving health care quality and safety for consumers and purchasers. The Safety Grade assigns an ‘A’, ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’ or ‘F’ grade to all general hospitals across the country based on their performance in preventing medical errors, injuries, accidents, infections and other harms to patients in their care.

“This grade is a direct reflection of the continued hard work, focus and dedication that our caregivers and physicians are putting forward every day in support of quality and safety initiatives to benefit the care and well-being of our patients, families and communities,” says Cherelle Montanye, PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center Chief Executive.

“‘A’ hospitals show us their leadership is protecting patients from preventable medical harm and error,” said Leah Binder, president and CEO of The Leapfrog Group. “It takes genuine commitment at every level – from clinicians to administrators to the board of directors – and we congratulate the teams who have worked so hard to earn this A.”

Developed under the guidance of a national expert panel, the Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade uses 28 measures of publicly available hospital safety data to assign grades to more than 2,600 U.S. acute-care hospitals twice per year. The Hospital Safety Grade’s methodology is peer-reviewed and fully transparent, and the results are free to the public.

PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center was awarded an ‘A’ grade today, when Leapfrog announced grades for the fall 2019 update. To see PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center’s full grade details, learn how employers can help, and access patient tips for staying safe in the hospital, visit hospitalsafetygrade.org.

About The Leapfrog Group
Founded in 2000 by large employers and other purchasers, The Leapfrog Group is a national nonprofit organization driving a movement for giant leaps forward in the quality and safety of American health care. The flagship Leapfrog Hospital Survey collects and transparently reports hospital performance, empowering purchasers to find the highest-value care and giving consumers the lifesaving information they need to make informed decisions. The Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade, Leapfrog’s other main initiative, assigns letter grades to hospitals based on their record of patient safety, helping consumers protect themselves and their families from errors, injuries, accidents and infections. 

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 1,200 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/5173/129120/licensure-logo-green-with_flag-_fall_2019-web.jpg , 2019-11/5173/129120/licensure-logo-green-with_flag-_fall_2019-print.jpg

U.S. 26 westbound closure planned for this Monday and Tuesday evenings
ODOT: Valley, No. Coast - 11/07/19 1:00 PM

There will be a two-night closure of westbound U.S. 26 from midnight to 5:30 a.m. this Monday and Tuesday (November 11-12) to allow for the placement of a Variable Message Sign (VMS) at Gordon Road.  The closure is needed to safely lift the sign which spans the westbound lanes of U.S. 26.

During the closure, travelers will detour by using Exit 57 at Glencoe.  After exiting, travelers will go north on Glencoe Road, west on North Avenue, north on Gordon Road, west on Mountaindale Road, south on Dersham Road and return to U.S. 26.

Expect delays. 


Rocks honoring veterans scattered in Kelso-Longview area by middle school students (Photo)
Kelso Sch. Dist. - 11/07/19 12:43 PM
2019-11/57/129126/Rock_3.jpg
2019-11/57/129126/Rock_3.jpg
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The leadership class at Huntington Middle School put 50 painted rocks out in Kelso and Longview this week to honor and celebrate veterans. Each rock is painted by a student, and includes designs of American flags, yellow ribbons, camouflage, red poppies, and more.

The students hope that the rocks will create a ripple of appreciation for veterans and are asking people to look for, photograph, and share images of the rocks on social media.

“Impacted by stories they heard from veterans and their experiences coming back after serving, our students wanted the entire community to think more about our veterans and their place in our community,” said Katie Ahola, teacher and leadership advisor at Huntington Middle School. “They thought creating a rock finding mission would be a creative way to include more people in celebrating and appreciating the service of our veterans.” 

The rocks have been placed in and around school campuses, grocery stores, coffee shops and any place someone may wander or walk. The challenge to find and share the rocks goes through November.

“When someone finds a rock, we are asking them to take a picture of the rock itself, or of them with the rock and share it on social media with the hashtag #HMSRockChallenge,” said Ahola. “Then, people can choose to keep the rock, re-locate it, or they can gift it to a veteran they know.” The students would also like to be tagged on Facebook at Huntington Middle School or on Instagram @huntington_huskies.

The rocks for this project were generously donated by DeRosier Trucking.




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/57/129126/Rock_3.jpg

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets November 12 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 11/07/19 11:41 AM

November 7, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets November 12 in Portland

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD.

When: Tuesday, Nov. 12, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1B (main floor), 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight-member panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. Along with this, they advise the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. For more information, please visit the commission's website at http://www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Youth and Families Workgroup meets November 8
Oregon Health Authority - 11/07/19 11:20 AM

November 7, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Youth and Families Workgroup meets November 8

What: A public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Youth and Families Workgroup.

Agenda: Report on number of proposals submitted for review and review process; define the minimum criteria for proposal review star ratings to deem that a proposal adequately aligns with the project design criteria; discuss the role the workgroup wants to play in the implementation of the project.

When: November 8, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative (RBHC) brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, visit the RBHC website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Cross State Collaboration Nets Significant Drug, Cash, and Weapons Seizure and Arrest (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/07/19 11:16 AM
Guns
Guns
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On Wednesday, November 6, 2019, at 9:24 a.m., Officers with the Portland Police Bureau's Drugs and Vice Division), as well as the Special Enforcement Reaction Team (SERT), assisted the Clark-Vancouver Drug Task Force with the arrest of a known drug dealer.

Clark-Vancouver Drug Task Force Investigators learned the suspect resided in Vancouver, but worked in Portland. Officers with the Portland Police Bureau's DVD and SERT teams apprehended the subject in Portland and conducted a search of his vehicle. During the search, Officers recovered 2 semi-automatic handguns, 1,340 grams of methamphetamine, 43.5 grams of heroin, and 18.6 grams of suspected Fentanyl. Well over 7,000 single dosage units were seized in total for an estimated street value of drugs of $112,300 (PHOTO).

The Clark-Vancouver Drug Task Force recovered a shotgun, body armor and ammunition at the suspect's residence in the 11500 block of Northeast 126th Avenue in Vancouver (Photos).

37 year-old Michael Lail was arrested and booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on charges of Felon in Possession of a Firearm (2 counts), Possession of a Controlled Substance (Methamphetamine), Delivery of a Controlled Substance (Methamphetamine), and a warrant (PHOTO).

For further information about the Vancouver case, direct inquiries to the Clark County Sheriff's Office PIO.

Tips on gun crimes can be emailed to GunTaskForce@portlandoregon.gov

If you see a gun crime in progress, call 9-1-1.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is offering a minimum $250 cash reward to anyone who reports a convicted felon or a juvenile in possession of a firearm and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

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Attached Media Files: Guns , Drugs , Meth , Shotgun , Vest , Lail Photo

PacificSource Community Solutions Contracts with WVP Health Authority
PacificSource Health Plans - 11/07/19 10:59 AM

(SALEM, Ore.) Nov. 7, 2019— PacificSource Community Solutions, a Coordinated Care Organization (CCO), has contracted with WVP Health Authority to serve as part of the organization’s provider network beginning January 1, 2020. PacificSource Community Solutions recently signed a contract with the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) to serve as the CCO in Marion and Polk Counties.

“We are pleased to welcome the WVP Health Authority to PacificSource Community Solutions’ provider network,” said Ken Provencher, president and CEO of PacificSource. “Their more than 40 years of health care experience will be a great asset as we work together to meet the needs of the Medicaid population.” 

“On behalf of our member physicians and provider organizations, we are committed to our community and our patients to ensure they continue to receive quality care and access to vital health care services,” said Dean Andretta, CFO of WVP Health Authority. “We stand ready to assist PacificSource with this transition for the benefit of the community.”

WVP Health Authority, originally known as Capitol Health Care Physicians, has been serving the health care needs of Marion and Polk Counties since 1976. The association has approximately 530 members practicing primary and specialty care, with a mission to preserve and promote the wise use of health resources in Marion and Polk Counties, and enhance the ability of physicians to act as patient advocates using a sound and ethical business environment.

 

About PacificSource:

PacificSource Community Solutions is part of the PacificSource family of companies serving its Medicaid members. PacificSource Health Plans is an independent, not-for-profit community health plan serving the Northwest. Founded in 1933, PacificSource is based in Oregon, with offices throughout the state as well as in Idaho, Montana, and Washington. The PacificSource family of companies employs more than 1100 people, serves more than 300,000 individuals, and has 3,900 employer clients throughout the Northwest. For more information visit PacificSource.com.


9-1-1 Operators to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy / DPSST
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 11/07/19 10:53 AM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 116th Basic Telecommunications Class.

The three-week course includes emergency call handling techniques, stress management, civil liability, ethics, criminal law, overview of fire-rescue and law enforcement operations, and a number of other topics. Upon completion of the course, students will return to their employing agency to continue their training for a number of months with a field training officer.

The 9-1-1 training program began in 1993 when the Oregon Legislative Assembly enacted legislation which requires that individuals who receive emergency calls for assistance from the public, meet professional standards for training and certification. There are approximately 950 men and women across the state who work in this profession in city, county, tribal, regional, and state public safety communications centers.

Basic Telecommunications #BT116 Graduation will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, November 15, 2019, at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. Telephone: 503-378-2100.  The guest speaker is 9-1-1 Operations Manager, Marcela Haack, of the City of Grants Pass.  DPSST would like to invite you to join us in observing the ceremony and congratulating Basic Telecommunications #BT116 on their successful completion of basic training.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.

Reception immediately following.

Members of Basic Telecommunications Class #116:

 

Dispatcher Sarah Baley

Lincoln City Police Department

 

Dispatcher Autumn Barnes

Frontier Regional 9-1-1

 

Dispatcher Samantha Dee

Oregon State Police

 

Dispatcher Maycie Dibble

North Bend Police Department

 

Dispatcher Meredith Gegner

Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety

 

Dispatcher Kimberli Goff

Willamette Valley Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Gina Gray

North Bend Police Department

 

Dispatcher Katelyn Gwin

Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety

 

Dispatcher Rachael Haller

Umatilla County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Amanda Harker-Owens

Prineville Police Department

 

Dispatcher Nikki Hepworth

Prineville Police Department

 

Dispatcher Taylor Hodson

Central Lane Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Amanda Iles

Coos Bay Police Department

 

Dispatcher Devinity Johnson

Willamette Valley Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Brittany Kleiven

Linn County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Katelynn Masters

Grants Pass Dept of Public Safety

 

Dispatcher Nomarie Miro

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Amy Myers

Josephine County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Kylie Norton

Willamette Valley Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Benjamin Peters

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher April Potter

Douglas County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Angel Ray

Florence Police Department

 

Dispatcher Shannon Ross

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Communications Specialist Yosajandy Salgado

Central Lane Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Amber Sullivan

Central Lane Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Steven Susbauer

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Melissa Unrau

Albany Police Department

 

Supervisor Angie Vose

Oregon State Police

 

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director and Patricia Patrick-Joling, public member, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Corvallis is honored as Oregon Tree City of the Year (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 11/07/19 10:51 AM
These Oregon white oaks are part of the healthy urban forest found in Corvallis. The Oregon Department of Forestry in partnership with Oregon Community Trees named Corvallis Oregon Tree City of the Year for 2019.
These Oregon white oaks are part of the healthy urban forest found in Corvallis. The Oregon Department of Forestry in partnership with Oregon Community Trees named Corvallis Oregon Tree City of the Year for 2019.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1072/129118/thumb_Quercus_garryana_on_OSU_campus_Corvallis_(2).JPG

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) in partnership with Oregon Community Trees (OCT) has named Corvallis as Oregon Tree City of the Year for 2019. Each year, ODF and OCT select one of Oregon’s 66 nationally recognized Tree City USA communities statewide to award for that city’s commitment to its urban forest. Last year’s Oregon Tree City of the Year was Lake Oswego.

OCT President Samantha Wolf said the award is intended to highlight communities delivering best urban forestry practices to their residents. “People who live in Corvallis have a better quality of life because they live in a healthy urban forest. We’re acknowledging the City of Corvallis with this award for the work it does to ensure its urban forests continues to provide those benefits long into the future.”

According to ODF’s Urban and Community Forestry Assistance Program Manager Kristin Ramstad, “Corvallis exemplifies what a great Tree City USA should be. They are always innovating. They have consistently good planning and significant citizen engagement, recently launching a Neighborhood Tree Steward program. This award recognizes their many years of outstanding work to care for and promote a healthy urban forest.”

Achievements that contributed to Corvallis being named Oregon Tree City of the Year include:

  • Having a robust urban forestry program and staff, along with the requisite management plans and inventories.
  • Being proactive about exploring ways to prepare for and manage a potential outbreak of emerald ash borer in native ash trees.
  • Launching a Neighborhood Tree Stewards program that recruits and trains community volunteers to help maintain and nurture urban trees.
  • Partnering with local businesses to salvage and mill city trees that must be removed due to disease or decline.
  • City Parks and Recreation staff holding positions on statewide boards and advisory committees.

Over the last two decades, Corvallis has met the Tree City USA program’s four minimum standards by:

  • maintaining a tree board (Parks and Natural Resources Advisory Board)
  • a tree ordinance
  • a minimum $2 per capita expenditure for tree planting and maintenance
  • an annual celebration and proclamation of Arbor Day

Urban Forestry Specialist Jennifer Killian said Corvallis Parks and Recreation staff felt honored by the Oregon Tree City of the Year award. “It was incredible to be recognized for all of the hard work we did last year, particularly developing the Neighborhood Tree Steward program. This was a great team effort between our arbor crew and Neighborhood Tree Stewards. We are eager to continue cultivating a robust urban forestry program to serve our community.”

Corvallis is a Sterling Tree City USA for having earned 10 years of Tree City USA Growth Awards.  Growth Awards are achieved when a Tree City USA completes additional urban forestry program activities that go beyond the basic minimum requirements of Tree City USA, an Arbor Day Foundation recognition program.

Visit www.arborday.org/programs/treecityusa/ to learn more.

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Attached Media Files: These Oregon white oaks are part of the healthy urban forest found in Corvallis. The Oregon Department of Forestry in partnership with Oregon Community Trees named Corvallis Oregon Tree City of the Year for 2019.

Oregon Virtual Academy
Oregon Virtual Academy - 11/07/19 10:34 AM

NOTICE OF ANNUAL  MEETING OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

November 13th, 2019 @ 8:30 AM-3:30 PM

Oregon Virtual Academy Board Members are hereby notified of the Board meeting to be held via teleconference 1-720-707-2699 Ext. 526309737# and via Zoom https://zoom.us/j/526309737

Located at the Residence Inn by Marriott Downtown Portland RiverPlace

2115 SW River Parkway Portland Oregon 97201


Corporate Activity Tax FAQs updated on Department of Revenue website
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 11/07/19 10:28 AM

Salem, OR— What is the Corporate Activity Tax (CAT)?  Who is subject to the CAT? When are the filing and payment deadlines?

The answers to these questions and others can be found on the Oregon Department of Revenue’s website in a newly updated list of frequently asked questions (FAQs).

“These are questions Oregon business taxpayers and tax preparers asked most often during our 12-city stakeholder input tour of the state, and a series of video and teleconferences,” said Nia Ray, director of the Department of Revenue. “The updated FAQs won’t answer every question about the CAT, but they do provide a thorough overview of the new law.”

Understanding what stakeholders needed to know helped members of the agency’s CAT team craft better, more complete answers to the most asked questions. Those questions and answers have now been made available to business taxpayers, tax preparers and the public.

The Corporate Activity Tax is imposed only after a taxpayer exceeds $1 million of taxable commercial activity. Once they pass that threshold, the tax is $250 plus 0.57% on gross receipts greater than $1 million after subtractions. Proceeds of the tax are directed by statute to boost funding for public schools.

Some of the other topics covered in the frequently asked questions include:

  • “What is commercial activity?”
  •  “Who is not subject to the CAT?”
  • “When do I need to register for the CAT?”

As a new tax, the CAT has generated a lot of questions. The FAQ section of the Corporate Activity Tax page on the Department of Revenue website is designed to provide a basic understanding of the tax for those who may be affected by it.

Those with additional questions are urged to email their questions to cat.help.dor@oregon.gov/dor.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.


Celebrating OMSI's Birthday: OMSI to Host Events, Science Demos, and More to Commemorate 75 Years of Science Education
OMSI - 11/07/19 9:41 AM

Portland, Ore. – The world witnessed a number of significant events in 1944: Smokey Bear was first introduced to teach about wildfire; the St. Louis Cardinals won the World Series; George Lucas, Danny DeVito, and Michael Douglas were born; and Franklin D. Roosevelt became the first U.S. President to be elected to a fourth term. Meanwhile in Portland, efforts to establish a permanent museum had finally paid off and on November 15, 1944, OMSI was born!

During the first few years, a small writing room in the Portland Hotel housed the museum’s headquarters. Then in 1949, a few years after officially becoming a museum, OMSI set up temporarily in a house on NE Hassalo Street and included the first planetarium in the Pacific Northwest.

The museum quickly outgrew that space, and the City Council offered land in Washington Park – and on a single day in 1957, hundreds of volunteers laid thousands of bricks to raise the walls of the museum's new building. Over the next 30 years, millions of children and adults came to OMSI for hands-on science activities, science fairs, featured exhibits, and a memorable blue and green planetarium.

But by the mid-1980s, OMSI was so popular that 600,000 people per year were coming to a museum built to accommodate only 100,000. Longtime OMSI supporter Portland General Electric stepped in and generously donated nearly 20 acres for the current building on Water Avenue, and the museum doors opened on October 24, 1992. 

Next week, the museum is holding a series of special events, science demos and games to celebrate 75 years of inspiring curiosity through engaging science-learning experiences.

November 11
•    10 a.m. – 5 p.m. | Submarine Science | Main Lobby 
Learn about density and buoyancy from our submarine staff and volunteers. 
•    10 a.m. – 5 p.m. | Meet a Submariner | Main Lobby
Meet a submarine veteran and learn what life was like on a submarine.
•    2 p.m. | USS Blueback Commissioning | Auditorium 
A presentation with Bill Diltz, OMSI’s submarine supervisor, and Ron Bell, submarine veteran and USS Blueback volunteer. Commissioned into the U.S. Navy on October 15, 1959, the USS Blueback earned two battle stars for service during the Vietnam War, and appears in the movie “The Hunt for Red October.” Join us to hear about this submarine and its adventures.
•    3 p.m. | How the USS Blueback Came to OMSI | Auditorium
A presentation with Dave Vrooman and Bob Walters, submarine veterans and USS Blueback volunteers. Hear the story of what it took to get the USS Blueback over 172 miles from Bremerton, Washington, to Portland. Go behind-the-scenes with two Navy veterans who were here the day it arrived.

November 12
•    2:30 p.m. | Soda + Mentos Craziness | Front Plaza
Soda and Mentos make quite an eruption. We plan to scale up and go big for OMSI's Birthday.

November 13
•    1 p.m. | Hydrogen Balloon Explosion | Turbine Hall
We’re filling balloons with hydrogen and blowing them up!
•    3:30 p.m. | Sugar Flares with a Birthday Cake | Chemistry Lab
Sometimes you have a cake...sometimes you use chemistry to turn the cake into a flare.

November 14
•    10 a.m. – 3 p.m. | Before OMSI or After OMSI | Turbine Hall
Test your knowledge of scientific discoveries by classifying events as happening either before or after OMSI was established.
•    1-5 p.m. | Birthday Cupcake Flamethrower | Chemistry Lab
Most people blow out the candles on a cake, OMSI prefers to blow up the candles!
•    3:30 p.m. | Sugar Flares with a Birthday Cake | Chemistry Lab
Sometimes you have a cake... sometimes you use chemistry to turn the cake into a flare.

November 15
•    9 a.m. – 1 p.m. | Musical Tesla Coils | Auditorium
Tesla Coils make lightning. And with the right song, those lightning bolts can sing and dance!
•    10 a.m. – 3 p.m. | Before OMSI or After OMSI | Turbine Hall
Test your knowledge of scientific discoveries by classifying events as happening either before or after OMSI was established.
•    10 a.m. – 5 p.m. | Best of OMSI Experiments | Chemistry Lab
A collection of our favorite experiments for visitors to try - flubber, color-changing fire, and more!
•    2:30 – 7 p.m. | Birthday Cards to OMSI | Teen Tech Center
Help us celebrate OMSI's birthday by creating electric, light-up birthday cards for science.
•    3:30 p.m. | Sugar Flares with a Birthday Cake | Chemistry Lab
Sometimes you have a cake... sometimes you use chemistry to turn the cake into a flare.

November 16
•    10 a.m. – 3 p.m. | Before OMSI or After OMSI | Turbine Hall
Test your knowledge of scientific discoveries by classifying events as happening either before or after OMSI was established.
•    10 a.m. – 2 p.m. | Spin Art | Discovery Lab
Show off your creative ideas by adding paint to a spinning disk and see how your creation spins to life.
•    3:30 p.m. | Sugar Flares with a Birthday Cake | Chemistry Lab
Sometimes you have a cake... sometimes you use chemistry to turn the cake into a flare.


PGE wind farm earns workplace safety recognition (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 11/07/19 9:27 AM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1073/129112/thumb_OSHA_Logo_-_RGB_Green.jpg

(Salem) – Portland General Electric Co.’s Biglow Canyon wind farm has graduated from Oregon OSHA’s Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP), a significant milestone in growth and commitment to worker safety.

SHARP coaches companies on how to effectively manage workplace safety and health. It empowers employers to continuously improve. In turn, companies are recognized for their success in reaching specific benchmarks. An employer becomes a graduate when it completes five years of SHARP.

During its SHARP journey, Biglow Canyon – which encompasses 217 wind turbines covering 25,000 acres outside of Wasco – tackled a variety of safety improvements. Those included installing deflector plates to protect workers from permanent obstructions or clearance issues as they move up and down ladders inside wind towers; standardizing safety and health procedures across facilities; and setting up TV monitors to display safety trending reports.

In assessing Biglow Canyon’s safety culture, Oregon OSHA consultants noted that personnel at the site do not hesitate “to ensure the task at hand is being performed in the safest manner possible.”

“Biglow’s graduation from SHARP is a great example of what an employee-driven safety culture can achieve,” said Elizabeth Kokos, PGE senior wind technician. “Employees are more willing to be active contributors in a company’s safety programs when they own them. Biglow’s ability to attain SHARP graduate status is a prime example of what can be achieved when everyone pulls together for safety.”

SHARP encourages Oregon employers to work with their employees to identify and correct hazards, and develop and implement effective safety and health programs. The benefits of the program, which is part of Oregon OSHA’s consultation services, include lower injury and illness rates, decreased workers’ compensation costs, increased employee morale, and lower product losses.

Oregon employers that have been in business for more than one year are eligible to apply for SHARP. For information about the program, visit https://osha.oregon.gov/consult/sharp-vpp/Pages/SHARP.aspx.

For information about Oregon OSHA’s no-cost consultation services, visit https://osha.oregon.gov/consult/Pages/index.aspx.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 

 




Attached Media Files: Oregon OSHA logo , SHARP logo , (From left): Elizabeth Kokos, senior wind technician for PGE’s Biglow Canyon wind farm, Scott Elliot, wind asset manager for the company, and Trena VanDeHey, a field consultation manager for Oregon OSHA.

Notice of Press Conference
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/07/19 9:23 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Billy J. Williams, United States Attorney for the District of Oregon, will hold a press conference today with Portland law enforcement partners.

Date: Thursday, November 7, 2019

Time: Camera preset at 1:30PM. Conference to begin between 2:00-2:15PM. Last entry at 2:00PM.

Location:

U.S. Attorney’s Office – Sixth Floor – Main Conference Room

Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse

1000 SW Third Ave., Suite 600

Portland, OR 97204

Access:

All credentialed media are invited to attend and required to display valid photo identification to gain entry into the courthouse and the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

Please limit attendance to a maximum of three individuals from any one media outlet.

Photo/Video:

Credentialed media are invited to use camera and audio equipment during the press conference. Livestreaming is permitted, but public Wi-Fi is not available. Use of camera and audio equipment is otherwise prohibited in the federal courthouse.


Tip of the Week for November 11 - How You Can Help If Someone Is Being Abused Or Neglected (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/07/19 9:01 AM
2019-11/5490/129109/abuse_neglect.jpg
2019-11/5490/129109/abuse_neglect.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/5490/129109/thumb_abuse_neglect.jpg

How You Can Help If Someone Is Being Abused Or Neglected

 

Child abuse or neglect is when a parent or other caregiver does something that harms—or will likely harm—a child. This also includes times when a parent or other caregiver fails to do things that will keep a child safe and healthy

It’s often really hard—even for adults—to know if a child is being harmed. Sometimes we may see it happening with our own eyes, such as if we notice an adult hitting a child. But other times we may only see signs of what could be happening. These signs may mean a child is being hurt by an adult, but there could be other causes, too.

If you suspect or know that a child is being abused or neglected, there are ways you can help. If you or someone else is in immediate and serious danger, you should call 911. In other cases, you can find a trusted adult to talk with. You don’t need to be 100 percent sure that a child is being abused or neglected to talk with someone. You should share your worries, and the adult can help determine what to do next.

 You also can encourage for the child to talk to a trusted adult. Many times, there is a trusted adult already in your life—such as a parent, teacher, school counselor, or coach—that you can approach. You can tell this trusted adult what your concerns are or what you’ve witnessed. Give a complete, honest description of what you know.

This may be a difficult conversation to have but remember the reason you’re having it: to keep someone (maybe you) safe. The adult can help figure out what can be done. Some children and youth may not have an adult that they trust enough to talk with about their concerns, or they may have told an adult who does not believe them. In this case, there are national and local hotlines they can call for help.

The Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline has counselors available 24 hours every day to talk with children and adults about abuse and neglect. To reach a Childhelp counselor,    call 1-800-4-A-CHILD (1-800-422-4453) and then press 1. For more information about Childhelp, you can visit https://www.childhelp.org/hotline/resources-kids/.

 

For more information and tips visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and like us on Facebook: Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office-Oregon.

                                       

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/5490/129109/111119_How_You_Can_Help_If_Someone_Is_Being_Abused_Or_Neglected.pdf , 2019-11/5490/129109/abuse_neglect.jpg

Mt. Hood Jazz Festival Set to Return to MHCC April 2020 (Photo)
Mt. Hood Comm. College - 11/07/19 9:00 AM
The Mt. Hood Jazz Festival will return to MHCC for the first time since 2004.
The Mt. Hood Jazz Festival will return to MHCC for the first time since 2004.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/37/128979/thumb_JazzPhoto.jpg

GRESHAM, Ore. – The Mt. Hood Jazz Festival will return to Mt. Hood Community College April 24-26, 2020 and has an amazing lineup of musicians ready to welcome it home.

Tickets are on sale now and sponsorship opportunities are available for those who wish to support the festival. Newly envisioned for 2020, the Mt. Hood Jazz Festival will focus on jazz education, bringing the next generation of artists and supporters into contact with the contemporaries and historical figures of this important genre.

“The new Mt. Hood Jazz Festival will connect the jazz artists of today with the jazz artists of tomorrow by joining our educational festival with an impressive professional line-up,” said Dan Davey, director of jazz studies at MHCC. “Our jazz audience will experience a weekend jazz immersion into the culture and inspiration of this American-born style.”

In addition to the performances by internationally-acclaimed jazz musicians Wycliffe Gordon and Ben Wendell, more than 70 high school and middle school jazz ensembles will compete throughout the weekend. Headlining artists will be joined by local jazz icons including George Colligan, Tim Gilson, Renato Caranto, Charlie Porter, Charlie Doggett and Tim Rap. Regional jazz artists will hold hourly masterclasses and the MHCC Jazz Ensemble will hold special performances throughout the festival.

Additional performances and events will be announced as they are added to the lineup. Visit www.mhcc.edu/jazzfestival and follow the festival on Facebook @MtHoodJazzFestival.




Attached Media Files: The Mt. Hood Jazz Festival will return to MHCC for the first time since 2004.

Wed. 11/06/19
Tuesday, November 12, 2019 Working Session - Board Retreat Agenda
Parkrose Sch. Dist. - 11/06/19 6:46 PM

The Parkrose Board of Education of School District No. 3, Multnomah County, Oregon, will convene in a Working Session Meeting on Tuesday, November 12, 2019 in the Boardroom at the Parkrose District Office located at 10636 NE Prescott St., Portland, Oregon at the hour of 6:30pm. The Board will swear in their two newly appointment Board Members Joshua Singleton and Elizabeth Durant. Review their budget, plan for the OSBA November convention and vote on the OSBA elections. They will hear an update on equity in Parkrose, the Parkrose/Argay development study, and Student Success Act engagement. The agenda is posted on the Parkrose School District Website at https://v3.boardbook.org/Public/PublicAgenda.aspx?ak=1000205&mk=50351039.


Woodland Public Schools' Career Explorations Fair and partnerships with area businesses provide students with the opportunity to discover living-wage career opportunities in their community (Photo)
Woodland Sch. Dist. - 11/06/19 6:00 PM
In the afternoon, job-seekers from the area attended Woodland Works, a job fair resulting from the partnership between the Port of Woodland and Woodland Public Schools
In the afternoon, job-seekers from the area attended Woodland Works, a job fair resulting from the partnership between the Port of Woodland and Woodland Public Schools
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/59/129097/thumb_Woodland-Works-2019-Job-Fair-8.jpg

Wednesday, November 6, 2019-Woodland, WA-Career Explorations, a partnership between Woodland Public Schools and the Port of Woodland, connected 69 area businesses with Woodland High School’s 750 students during a one-day event on Thursday, October 24, 2019 where business owners and career professionals taught students about the myriad of different living-wage career opportunities right in their home region. 

 

Teaching students about career opportunities after graduation through Career-Life-College

In 2018, the Woodland Public Schools partnered with the Port of Woodland to help align the skills taught to students in class with the skills needed by local businesses. In addition to working on school curriculum, the partnership resulted in the development of Career Explorations, an event designed to teach students about careers available locally along with the required qualifications, certifications, and any additional education or training necessary to obtain a living-wage job. 

The partnership with the Port stems from Woodland Public Schools’ focus on Career-Life-College, a district-wide approach to prepare all students for whatever future they desire after high school by teaching them the skills they will need. Career-Life-College capitalizes on the Career and Technical Education (CTE) curriculum combined with innovative opportunities and beneficial partnerships from area businesses.

Career-Life-College focuses on exposing students to a broad cross-section of jobs, professions, and industries with Career Explorations introducing students to the concept that a single company may offer many different positions available in a variety of fields. “Career-Life-College is about helping kids figure out what they want for their futures by learning about the many, many opportunities that exist for them,” said Assistant Superintendent Asha Riley. “There are many more roles available at companies beyond the ones seen at the surface level.”

In addition to in-school experiences like Career Explorations, Career-Life-College also takes students out of the classroom to get hands-on experience with careers and businesses. During a recent field trip, 25 students visited Columbia Precast, a Woodland-based company which produces precast concrete products used in utility infrastructure. “We want to have our students visit companies on-site to see how the skills students learn in school directly apply to careers they will have at businesses,” said Riley. “The students who visited Columbia Precast experienced first-hand how one company needs employees with a range of skill sets to fill a wide variety of roles including engineers, welders, accountants, administrators, managers, and more.”

 

Overwhelming community support helps make learning happen

Sarah Hadaller, Riley’s assistant, organized and managed both Career Explorations and Woodland Works, a job fair which followed Career Explorations on the same day.

In addition to inviting local businesses to participate, Hadaller managed attendance records, mapped out the conference space, directed company representatives, designed conference materials, and much more in order to ensure both intertwining events went on without a single issue. “Neither of these events could have happened without Sarah’s unbelievable hard work and dedication,” said Riley. “I had several business representatives tell me that Career Explorations and Woodland Works were the best-organized of any event they attended.”

This year’s Career Explorations attracted a record 69 participating businesses including a law firm, an orthodontist, a dealership for recreation vehicles and a wide scope of others. “Our goal was to have 25 businesses participate last year and we ended up with more than 40, so we were hoping for a similar turnout this year,” said Riley. “Having 69 businesses attend this year’s event once again blew away our expectations.” 

The Woodland community maintains a proud heritage of supporting its schools and prioritizing the value of education. “Our area professionals know how important teaching our students is for the future development of our community and they show it by participating in school events and funding education over and over again,” said Riley. “We are so incredibly grateful that so many of our dedicated business professionals took time out of their busy workdays to meet with our students.”

Business representatives greatly enjoyed engaging with Woodland’s students. “We were surprised by how few students knew the different jobs and duties available in local government,” said Mari Ripp, Clerk-Treasurer for the City of Woodland. “With baby boomers retiring, there will likely be a shortage of applicants to fill these city jobs so showing students the possibilities that exist is certainly valuable.” Allison Miller, Controller for B. Young RV, a provider of recreational vehicle sales and service, greatly enjoyed the event, “I think Career Explorations was a wonderful opportunity for the students!”

Woodland Public Schools and the Port of Woodland would like to thank the many businesses who participated in this year’s Career Explorations fair including:

  • AJAC
  • American Medical Response (AMR)
  • Atlas Plumbing Contractors
  • Aveda Institute of Portland
  • Builders First Source
  • B. Young RV
  • Clark County Fire & Rescue
  • Clark County Sheriff’s Office
  • Clark Public Utilities
  • Columbia Bank
  • Columbia Precast Products
  • Cowlitz 911
  • Cowlitz County Public Works
  • Cowlitz Public Utilities
  • Creekside Place Assisted Living
  • CRESA
  • Department of Natural Resources (DNR)
  • Dick Hannah Dealerships
  • EmpRes Healthcare Management
  • Entek
  • Fibre Federal Credit Union
  • Henderson Taylor Law Firm
  • Hilton Vancouver
  • ilani
  • International Air & Hospitality Academy
  • International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW #48)
  • International Longshore & Warehouse Union (ILWU)
  • iQ Credit Union
  • JH Kelly
  • Joel Olson Trucking
  • Keller Williams Realty
  • Lauren Cai DDS – MS Family Orthodontics
  • Lineage Logistics
  • Longshoremen’s Federal Credit Union
  • Mill Plain Electric
  • NW Innovation Works
  • Pape Machinery
  • Patriot Fire Protection
  • Paul Davis
  • PeaceHealth SW Medical Center
  • PNW Massage Academy
  • PortCo Packaging
  • Precision Industrial Contractors (PIC)
  • Red Canoe Credit Union
  • RightLine
  • Sadie & Josie’s Bakery
  • Schwabe Williamson & Wyatt
  • Shaver Transportation
  • Stacie Crochet
  • Style Masters College of Hair Design
  • Temco
  • Tidewater Barge Lines
  • Topper Industries
  • Touchmark at Fairway Village
  • Vigor Industrial
  • Washington Department of Transportation
  • Washington State Patrol
  • West Coast Training
  • Weyerhaeuser
  • Woodland Community Development
  • Woodland Police Department
  • Woodland Public Works
  • Woodland Real Estate
  • WSP 

 

Woodland Works – Student Career Fair by morning, area Job Fair by afternoon

Following the success of 2018’s Career Explorations fair, many business participants suggested a job fair for employers to recruit area job-seekers. This year, the District and the Port teamed up to create Woodland Works – a three-hour job fair where interested businesses could meet with prospective employees.

The Woodland Works job fair started at 1 p.m. following the Career Explorations fair. Businesses could choose whether to participate in just the morning Career Explorations fair, just the job fair, or both. As a result, 51 area businesses attended Woodland Works to meet with jobseekers from around the region. “Participating employers were incredibly pleased with the attendance at Woodland Works,” said Jennifer Keene, Executive Director for the Port of Woodland. “With the national unemployment rate at a record low, offering a free job fair for both employers and applicants provided a much-needed service to our area.”

Employers and companies interested in participating in future Career Explorations and/or Woodland Works events may contact Sarah Hadaller via email at hadalles@woodlandschools.org or call the Woodland Public Schools’ district office at (360) 841-2700.

 

Business Back to School Day

Business Back to School Day, the next event for Career-Life-College, invites area businesses to return to school on Friday, November 22, 2019 from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. at Woodland High School. 

During Business Back to School Day, local business owners and employees will tour the Woodland High School campus and meet with students to learn how area business can help prepare students for their futures and support their education now. 

Attendees will also enjoy a free breakfast specially-prepared by Woodland High School’s award-winning Culinary Arts students.

If you are an area professional who would like to attend this free event, RSVP by contacting Nicole Galloway at gallowan@woodlandschools.org or by phone at (360) 841-2703.

 

Career-Life-College and Career & Technical Education (CTE) at Woodland Public Schools

Woodland Public Schools aims to prepare all students for whatever future they decide to pursue after high school graduation with Career-Life-College. At Woodland High School, students can take a wide variety of Career and Technical Education (CTE) courses specifically designed to help students develop the skills they need for careers and trades following graduation which offer living-wages to support families. 

Woodland Public Schools works with local businesses and organizations to continually align the district’s course offerings with the needs of employers seeking high school graduates looking for good jobs. “We regularly review and update our course catalog and course curricula to ensure our students learn the skills they will need in the workforce,” said Riley. “The district also partners with dedicated industrial organizations to help line up the skills our schools teach with what businesses need their employees to know.”

Currently, Woodland High School offers CTE courses in the following areas: 

• Automotive Maintenance

• Computer Applications

• Computer Science

• Culinary Arts

• Digital Arts

• Early Childhood Education

• Financial Fitness

• Floral Design

• Horticulture

• Independent Living

• Maritime Trades

• Marketing

• Medical Science

• Metals

• Office Aide

• Programming

• Publications

• Robotics

• Website Design

• Woodworking Foundations

Companies interested in partnering with Woodland Public Schools’ Career-Life-College can contact Assistant Superintendent Asha Riley. “Engaging students with professionals in a wide variety of careers is one of my biggest passions,” she said. “We are so lucky to have the Woodland community – both businesses and individuals – who place a priority on education and support our students by providing enriching experiences as well as monetary funding.” Contact Asha Riley via phone by calling the district office at (360) 841-2700 or email her directly at ileya@woodlandschools.org">rileya@woodlandschools.org

###




Attached Media Files: In the afternoon, job-seekers from the area attended Woodland Works, a job fair resulting from the partnership between the Port of Woodland and Woodland Public Schools , In the afternoon, job-seekers from the area attended Woodland Works, a job fair resulting from the partnership between the Port of Woodland and Woodland Public Schools , In the afternoon, job-seekers from the area attended Woodland Works, a job fair resulting from the partnership between the Port of Woodland and Woodland Public Schools , Students visited businesses at their tables and interviewed them about the qualifications required to get a job with the company , Students visited businesses at their tables and interviewed them about the qualifications required to get a job with the company , Business owners and professionals taught students about the variety of different jobs available at a single company , Business owners and professionals taught students about the variety of different jobs available at a single company , Business owners and professionals taught students about the variety of different jobs available at a single company , Career Explorations connected 69 area businesses with Woodland High School's Career-Life-College program , Career Explorations connected 69 area businesses with Woodland High School's Career-Life-College program

Lebanon Fire District responds to a Structure Fire (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 11/06/19 5:57 PM
Firefighters Brant Lapp and Mike Maynard conducting roof operations.
Firefighters Brant Lapp and Mike Maynard conducting roof operations.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1191/129105/thumb_IMG_5511.jpg

Lebanon Fire District responded to a structure fire on Nelson Dr. The fire was reported at 2:49 Wednesday afternoon. Initial reports indicated that there was a fire in the kitchen that was spreading up the wall. First arriving units reported that the structure was full of smoke and the residents were evacuated. Fire crews made an interior attack on the fire and were able to limit the spread of the fire. While crews were fighting fire inside the structure, other fire crews went to the roof to ventilate the smoke and heat out of the structure. One resident was transported to a local hospital for smoke inhalation. No firefighters were injured during the incident.




Attached Media Files: Firefighters Brant Lapp and Mike Maynard conducting roof operations.

PPB's GVRT Officers Arrest Felon in Possession of Firearm and Drugs (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/06/19 5:09 PM
Carter Weapons Drugs Photo
Carter Weapons Drugs Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/3056/129103/thumb_Carter_Weapon_Drugs_Photo.PNG
On November 5, 2019, at 11:05 p.m., Officers with the Portland Police Bureau's Gun Violence Reduction Team conducted a traffic stop in the area of Southeast 167th Avenue and East Burnside Street for a speeding violation.

Officers located a revolver, over 62 grams of cocaine, and over 19 grams of methamphetamine in the vehicle (PHOTO).

The driver was identified as Darin Carter, a 21 year-old male (PHOTO). He was booked at the Multnomah County Detention Center on charges of Felon in Possession of a Firearm, Unlawful Possession of a Firearm, Possession of a Loaded Firearm in Public, Possession of a Controlled Substance (Cocaine), Delivery of a Controlled Substance (Cocaine), Possession of a Controlled Substance (Methamphetamine), and Delivery of a Controlled Substance (Methamphetamine).

Anyone with information about gun crimes in the City of Portland is encouraged to provide information to the Portland Police Bureau's Tactical Operations Division at 503-823-4106 or email information to GunTaskForce@portlandoregon.gov

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared with investigators as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects.

Tips on gun crimes can be emailed to GunTaskForce@portlandoregon.gov

If you see a gun crime in progress, call 9-1-1.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is offering a minimum $250 cash reward to anyone who reports a convicted felon or a juvenile in possession of a firearm and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Carter Weapons Drugs Photo , Carter Darrin Photo

Jury convicts Brandon Frison of 'out of the blue' assaults in North Portland
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 11/06/19 4:57 PM

November 6, 2019

Jury convicts Brandon Frison of ‘out of the blue’ assaults in North Portland

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that a jury convicted 23-year-old Brandon Frison of randomly assaulting three people in the Kenton neighborhood last fall.

“This vicious attack came out of the blue,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Todd Jackson, who litigated this case. “It was completely unprovoked. Two of the victims were out on the street just like anyone else and ended up getting punched in the face and suffered facial fractures, which took months to recover from. Doctors had to wire one of the victim’s jaw shut and drill screws into his teeth. He wasn’t able to eat solid food for six weeks and lost 40 pounds because of this attack.”

This investigation started on September 8, 2018 when Portland Police responded to reports of an assault with multiple victims near the intersection of North Lombard Street and North Denver Avenue.

The first victim told police that he was walking down North Denver Street with the second victim when they passed a man. Shortly thereafter, the victim heard someone run up behind him.

Before he could turn around, the victim was punched. He was immediately knocked to the ground, briefly lost consciousness and suffered three separate facial fractures, according to his testimony during trial.

The second victim testified that he was walking with the first victim and also heard a man, later identified as Frison, approach from behind and then “sucker-punched” the first victim with a closed fist.

Frison then punched the second victim in the face, which knocked him to the ground. He did not lose consciousness.

Police contacted an eye witness who testified that an unknown man approached his vehicle shortly after he had parked and asked the eye witness to roll down a window.

The man, later identified as Frison, started flirting with the witness’ girlfriend. When Frison tried to reach into the vehicle, the eye witness told him to stop and leave. The eye witness watched as Frison passed the first two victims on foot, stopped, turned around, ran to them and then punched them in the face, according to court testimony.

Police contacted the third victim at the hospital after learning that a family member had driven him to the hospital after he was randomly attacked by Frison while walking his dog. During trial, the third victim testified that his jaw was broken as a result of the assault. Doctors had to install plates in his jaw, which are expected to remain permanently.

Police located Frison in a nearby parking lot and arrested him based on the identification of the witnesses, according to trial testimony. While being arrested, Frison confessed that he assaulted the three men because he believed they all separately looked at him like he was “an attractive female.” Frison later denied assaulting anyone when testifying at trial.

Sentencing in this matter is scheduled for Friday November 8, 2019 at 11 a.m. before Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Heidi H. Moawad.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time pursuant to the Oregon Professional Rules of Conduct.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/5769/129102/PR-19-254-Brandon_Frison.pdf

Vancouver Police seek assistance to identify voyeur (Photo)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 11/06/19 4:26 PM
2019-11/385/129101/2319-17031_2.jpg
2019-11/385/129101/2319-17031_2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/385/129101/thumb_2319-17031_2.jpg

Vancouver, Wash. –On October 14, 2019, Vancouver Police responded to the Vancouver Mall for the report of voyeurism. The female victim reported that she was in a family restroom nursing her child when an unknown male holding a cell phone, entered the restroom,  opened the curtain of the room she was in and repeatedly asked her if she had lost her cell phone.  Another female who was in the restroom asked if the victim was okay and the suspect then left the restroom.

A surveillance camera captured an image of the suspect and his associated vehicle, which appears to be a Chrysler 300 with black oversized rims/tires and tinted windows.

Anyone with information on the identity of the suspect is asked to contact the Vancouver Police Department Tip Line at (360) 487-7399.

 

###




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/385/129101/2319-17031_2.jpg , 2019-11/385/129101/2319-17031.jpg

Free Admission to the Oregon Historical Society Veterans Day Sponsored by Wells Fargo
Oregon Historical Society - 11/06/19 4:15 PM

Featured exhibit explores the challenges and triumphs of African Americans who served during World War II

Press Kit: http://bit.ly/fftrtfpresskit 

Portland, OR – In honor of Veterans Day and the Oregon Historical Society’s current exhibit, Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in World War II, admission to the museum will be free to all on Monday, November 11, thanks to the generous support of Wells Fargo. Wells Fargo is one of two national sponsors of this touring exhibit, on loan from The National WWII Museum based in New Orleans. Representatives from Veterans Legacies will also be on site to talk about their Mighty Endeavor program, with its mission is to gather veterans’ oral histories, recordings, images, and videos with the intent of using their stories to educate youth and help reconnect veterans with the community they served.

On view through January 12, 2020, Fighting for the Right to Fight features artifacts, photographs, and oral histories that highlight some of the extraordinary achievements and challenges of African Americans during World War II, both overseas and on the Home Front. Also on display at the Oregon Historical Society museum is Ladies and Gentlemen… The Beatles!, which ends its run on November 12.

Museum hours on Veterans Day are 10am to 5pm.

About Fighting for the Right to Fight

In the years before World War II, African Americans in many parts of the country were treated as second-class citizens. The government condoned discriminatory practices and denied African Americans many rights and liberties through laws that kept them in positions of inferiority. Due to the landmark Plessy v. Ferguson Supreme Court decision in 1896, the United States was a nation where “separate but equal” was law in many states. In addition, many military leaders declared African Americans unfit to serve in combat. However, once the war began, thousands rushed to enlist, determined to fight for freedom, while still being denied equality at home.

On display through January 12, 2020, Fighting for the Right to Fight illustrates how hopes for securing equality inspired many to enlist, the discouraging reality of the segregated noncombat roles given to black recruits, and the continuing fight for “Double Victory” that laid the groundwork for the modern Civil Rights Movement.

Through myriad interactive experiences, visitors will discover the wartime stories of individual service members who took part in this journey of extraordinary challenge, from unheralded heroes to famous names, including Alex Haley (U.S. Coast Guard); Sammy Davis Jr. (U.S. Army); Benjamin Davis Jr. (U.S. Army Air Forces); Medgar Evers (U.S. Army); and more.

The centerpiece of the exhibit is an original eight-minute video about the famed 332nd Fighter Group (better known as the Tuskegee Airmen), who in many ways became the public focus of African American participation during the war. Television personality Robin Roberts narrates the piece, whose own father flew with the Tuskegee Airmen during the war.

Including personal accounts from members of the 332nd Fighter Group, the video provides an overview of how their success in battle became a great symbol of bravery, helping refute notions that African Americans were inferior performers in the military, especially in roles requiring advanced training. Lieutenant Colonel William Holloman III recalls his leader Colonel Benjamin O. Davis, Jr.’s encouragement: “He said, ‘America’s watching you.’ He instilled in us a pride that I don’t think was there before we went in the service.”

Additionally, Fighting for the Right to Fight features two medals representing the seven African Americans who were awarded the Medal of Honor in 1997, the bittersweet result of a long investigation by the U.S. military on discriminatory policies in the awarding of combat medals. The exhibit will also provide in-depth coverage of lesser-known events and service, such as that of the USS Mason, the first American ship to have a predominately African American crew.

A national advisory committee, including the late Dr. Clement Alexander Price of Rutgers University, helped frame the exhibition. The committee, led by co-chairs Dr. John Morrow of the University of Georgia and Claudine Brown of the Smithsonian Institution, helped advise on the exhibition’s narrative arc and content. To view artifacts and images from the exhibit, and to access educator resources and lesson plans, visit righttofightexhibit.org.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

About The National WWII Museum

The National WWII Museum tells the story of the American experience in the war that changed the world – why it was fought, how it was won, and what it means today—so that future generations will know the price of freedom, and be inspired by what they learn. Dedicated in 2000 as The National D-Day Museum and now designated by Congress as America’s National WWII Museum, it celebrates the American spirit, the teamwork, optimism, courage and sacrifices of the men and women who fought on the battlefront and served on the Home Front. For more information, call 877-813-3329 or 504-528-1944 or visit nationalww2museum.org


E-Government Portal Advisory Board to meet
State of Oregon - 11/06/19 3:23 PM

The Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board will meet at 9 a.m., Wednesday, Nov. 13, at the Department of Administrative Services. The meeting is open to the public and may be attended in person or via the web; public comments will be taken from those attending in person and online. To join the meeting virtually, please see the instructions. The agenda and handouts will be posted on the advisory board’s website.

The legislature established the advisory board with enactment of ORS 276A.270-276. The board will advise the State Chief Information Officer (CIO) on key decisions and strategic choices about how the CIO manages and operates the state’s web portal services.

The Oregon.gov portal is the connection point for citizens to access state agency services and information on the internet. “Web portal services” means providing the hosting, content management, electronic commerce, public collaboration and application development needed to operate and maintain Oregon.gov, online services and make payments over the web. The board provides oversight of specific websites, services and online payments where agencies choose to utilize the state CIO’s E-Government Program as their service provider.

With the board’s advice, the state CIO wants to make the Oregon web portal services and their operation as effective as they can be for citizens to interact with state government. 

Meeting Details:
Wednesday, Nov. 13, 9 – 11:45 a.m.
General Services Building, DAS IT Conference Room
1225 Ferry Street SE
Salem, OR  97301
 
Links:
http://www.oregon.gov/epab/Documents/EPAB_Internet_Public_Attendee_Instructions.pdf
http://www.oregon.gov/epab/Pages/agenda_minutes_handouts.aspx

 


Battle Ground's Annual Tree Lighting Kicks off the Holiday Season on Friday, December 6 (Photo)
City of Battle Ground - 11/06/19 3:03 PM
Santa arrives via FD3 Engine
Santa arrives via FD3 Engine
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Kick off the holiday season at Battle Ground’s Annual Holiday Tree Lighting on Friday, December 6 at the Battle Ground Community Center located at 912 East Main Street in Battle Ground’s historic Old Town District.     

The free event begins outside around the tree at 5:30 p.m. with caroling and live music by the Battle Ground High School Jazz Choir.  At 5:45 p.m., Santa and Mrs. Claus will arrive by Fire District 3 Engine to lead the lighting of the tree. 

From 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. the celebration moves indoor to the warmth of the Community Center where Santa and Mrs. Claus will greet children, young and old.  Professional photos of your family with Santa are available and free to everyone, thanks to the kind support of Academy Mortgage.

The holiday celebration includes festive treats, of course – free hot cocoa, generously gifted by Dutch Bros Coffee Battle Ground, and holiday cookies.

Battle Ground’s Holiday Tree Lighting & Celebration provides a wonderful opportunity for families and neighbors to gather as a community and celebrate the joys of the holiday season.   Join us!

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The City of Battle Ground, located in the heart of Clark County, WA serves 21,520 residents.  The surrounding natural beauty, access to recreation activities, and close proximity to the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area make Battle Ground a desirable place to live and has created a period of considerable growth. The City functions under a Council-Manager form of government and provides vital public services such as police, planning and development, roads, parks, utilities and others. City leaders operate under guiding principles that were created with community input through a recent visioning process. More information about the City, including a list of its guiding principles can be found at www.cityofbg.org.

 




Attached Media Files: Santa arrives via FD3 Engine , Photos with Santa & Mrs. Claus , Tree Lighting

Wilson High School Freshman to Represent Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland Metro at State-Wide Event (Photo)
Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland Metro Area - 11/06/19 2:45 PM
Youth of the Year Candidates Together
Youth of the Year Candidates Together
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

November 6, 2019

Last Friday, November 1, Blazers Boys & Girls Club member and Wilson High School freshman Joliesse Carmona-Perez was named the 2020 Portland Metro Youth of the Year.  

An outspoken and inspiring young woman, Joliesse aspires to become a lawyer and politician in order to advocate for others. She has been the recipient of multiple awards, including Outstanding Leadership & Excellence in Community Service and Student of the Month. Her innovative ideas have made a difference in her academic community: founding a school newsletter, becoming Chief Editor and distributing an advice column to peers, and combating bullying by creating a student leadership team that recognizes academic successes and provides mentorship to younger students. Joliesse currently serves on the Youth Against Violence Committee for the Multnomah County Youth Commission.  

Five other outstanding local members also vied for the 2020 Youth of the Year title, including Arianna Perez-Garcia (YouthForce), TreNisha Shearer (Regence Club),  La’Markus Causey (Rockwood Club), Gia Sevier (Blazers Club), and Alexa Ramirez-Hernandez (Wattles Club and YouthForce). These youth were recognized as title finalists that uphold and represent our Clubs’ core values, receiving $500 scholarships along with their own prize packages.  

Judges heard speeches and interviewed each of the six candidates at the Blazers Club prior to the Youth of the Year Celebration. During the luncheon, each candidate shared their story and speeches with an audience of families, Boys & Girls Clubs staff and members of the public before the judges announced the winner. 

In addition to the title, Joliesse received a $1000 scholarship and a prize package containing a new backpack, laptop, and other items to help her achieve academic success. Next March, Joliesse will represent the Portland Metro Clubs in the statewide Youth of the Year selection process, held in Portland, Oregon. 

ABOUT YOUTH OF THE YEAR 

Established in 1947, Youth of the Year is Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s (BGCA) premier recognition program for Club members. Youth of the Year promotes service to Club, community and family; academic success; life goals; and poise and public speaking ability. Celebrations are held at the local, statewide, regional, and nationwide level, each tier awarding scholarships to help youth pursue their academic aspirations. The nationally chosen Youth of the Year acts as a role model and advocate representing BGCA throughout the next year. 

ABOUT BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF PORTLAND METRO 

Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland Metro empowers more than 4,000 youth each year to discover their full potential through impactful after-school and summer programs. Clubs are designed to support kids and teens as they develop the qualities they need to achieve academic success, become responsible leaders, and live healthy lives. Today, the Clubs operate ten facilities located throughout the metropolitan area, including school-based programs in the Reynolds and North Clackamas School Districts. Learn more at bgcportland.org.




Attached Media Files: Youth of the Year Candidates Together , Joliesse , Joliesse Carmona-Perez gives speech after judges announce her as the Portland Metro Youth of the Year.

UPDATE: PPB GVRT Detectives Arrest Suspect from October Shooting (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/06/19 2:25 PM
Moody Photo
Moody Photo
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On Tuesday, November 5, 2019, at 10:00 a.m., Detectives with the Portland Police Bureau's Gun Violence Reduction Team (GVRT) and the Special Emergency Reaction Team (SERT) executed a search warrant in the 400 block of Northeast Killingsworth Street.

This search warrant was connected to a shooting on October 25th near Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and Northeast Monroe Street. In the shooting, one victim sustained critical injuries.

Jaron Moody, a 27 year-old male, was arrested during the search warrant in connection with the shooting. He was booked in the Multnomah County Detention Center on charges including: Attempt Murder II (a new ORS), Assault I, Unlawful Use of a Weapon (2 counts) and Felon in Possession of a Firearm.

Detective Todd Teats is the primary investigator on this case and if anyone has information, he can be reached at 503-823-2137 or todd.teats@portlandoregon.gov

The Tactical Operations Division continues to investigate several incidents of gun violence citywide and we need the public's help with information to solve these cases.

Anyone with information about gun crimes in the City of Portland is encouraged to provide information to the Portland Police Bureau's Tactical Operations Division at 503-823-4106 or email information to GunTaskForce@portlandoregon.gov

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared with investigators as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects.

Tips on gun crimes can be emailed to GunTaskForce@portlandoregon.gov

If you see a gun crime in progress, call 9-1-1.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is offering a minimum $250 cash reward to anyone who reports a convicted felon or a juvenile in possession of a firearm and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###PPB###


###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

On Friday, October 25, 2019 at 9:43 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and Northeast Monroe Street on a report of a shooting. Officers arrived in the area and found evidence of gunfire. A short time later, a victim suffering from gunshot wounds arrived at an area hospital. The victim's condition is unknown at this time.

The Portland Police Bureau's Gun Violence Reduction Team is responding to assist with the investigation. Northeast Monroe Street is closed in both directions from Northeast Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard to Northeast 7th Avenue.

If anyone has information about the shooting and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to call the police non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

An update will be provided if appropriate for the investigation.


###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Moody Photo

Pulp, paper industry safety conference coming to Portland
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 11/06/19 2:15 PM

(Salem) – Workers, contractors, and employers in Oregon’s pulp, paper, and forest products industries are invited to attend a Dec. 3-6 conference in Portland that will highlight best safety and health practices in their respective fields.

Although the 29th annual Western Pulp, Paper & Forest Products Safety & Health Conference delves into safety and health issues in those industries, the event also offers learning opportunities that apply to many other workplaces. Those sessions include an examination of emergency preparedness issues, such as earthquakes and subduction zones, and personal and jobsite disaster preparedness.

The Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA) is one of several partners presenting the four-day conference at the Red Lion Hotel on the River – Jantzen Beach in Portland.

Todd Conklin, a human and organization performance consultant based in Santa Fe, N.M., will deliver the keynote presentation on Tuesday, Dec. 3. Conklin will discuss how rapidly changing technology has created new dimensions in how people react to their surroundings.

In showing how traditional methods of coping with our surroundings no longer apply, Conklin will illustrate the “human performance” view of workplace systems and safety. His presentation will include a question-and-answer period designed to help attendees apply his concepts to their own situations.

In the human performance view, Conklin said, failures and accidents are redefined. “Rather than looking at the accident in hindsight, workers and management process the situation with the idea that accidents will happen because work is performed by humans, and we are not perfect,” he said. With that approach, he added, the focus shifts to minimizing consequences, saving lives, and reducing expenses.

Additionally, the  conference  will feature exhibits, company safety meetings, roundtable discussions, and more than 35 workshops.

Sessions include:

  • Energized equipment beyond zero: How to follow lockout/tagout rules all the time
  • Common sawmill hazards: How they happen and how to prevent their causes
  • Fundamentals of steam distribution and prevention of water hammer events
  • Advanced solutions: The future of drones, wearables, and autonomy in the workplace
  • Developing a machine guarding program
  • Employee engagement: Best practices
  • Overhead crane accident reduction through training and technology

The registration fee is $300 to attend the full conference. The fee for one day – Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday – is $100. It is $40 for Friday. To register, go to https://safetyseries.cvent.com/wppfp19.

If you have questions or need help registering, call the Oregon OSHA Conference Section, 503-947-7411.

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 


Fugitive and Tax Fraud Promoter Captured and Set to Serve His 10 Year Prison Sentence
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/06/19 1:34 PM

WASHINGTON – A fugitive and former Hillsboro, Oregon, tax fraud promoter, who had been on the run since he was supposed to start serving a 10 year prison sentence, was caught in Arizona and apprehended on Nov. 1, 2019, by the U.S. Marshals Service, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard E. Zuckerman of the Justice Department’s Tax Division.

Winston Shrout, 70, was convicted by a jury in April 2017 of submitting fraudulent financial instruments to banks and the U.S. Treasury, and failing to file income tax returns. According to the evidence presented at his trial and sentencing, from approximately 2008 through 2015, Shrout created and submitted more than 300 such fraudulent instruments. He also held seminars and private meetings to promote and market the use of these instruments to pay off debts, including federal taxes. Shrout sold recordings of his seminars, templates for fraudulent financial instruments and other materials through his website.

In addition, Shrout did not file his 2009 through 2014 tax returns despite earning substantial income from seminars, licensing fees associated with the sale of his products, and annual pension payments. Shrout admitted during trial that he had not paid income tax for at least 20years.

On Oct. 22, 2018, Judge Robert E. Jones sentenced Shrout to 10 years in prison, to serve five years of supervised release, and to pay restitution to the IRS. Shrout failed to report to prison as ordered in March 2019, and was a fugitive until his arrest late last week. Shrout appeared in district court and will be transferred to the custody of the Bureau of Prisons to begin serving his prison term.

Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Zuckerman commended the diligent investigation of the U.S. Marshals Service in Portland, Oregon, and Phoenix, Arizona, for bringing Shrout to justice. Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Zuckerman also commended special agents of IRS–Criminal Investigation, who conducted the investigation, Trial Attorneys Stuart Wexler and Lee Langston of the Tax Division, who prosecuted the case, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon, and Assistant United States Attorney Ryan Bounds, for their support during the investigation, prosecution, and apprehension of the defendant in this case.

Additional information about the Tax Division and its enforcement efforts may be found on the division’s website.

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Darren Orange's "Those Who Step Into The Same Rivers" to be exhibited in the Governor's Office Nov. 14 -- Jan. 21 (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 11/06/19 1:07 PM
Darren Orange, “Ship Of Theseus,” 2019. Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 inches. Courtesy the artist.
Darren Orange, “Ship Of Theseus,” 2019. Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 inches. Courtesy the artist.
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Salem, Oregon – Astoria artist Darren Orange will exhibit “Those Who Step Into The Same Rivers” in the Governor’s Office of the Capitol Building in Salem from Nov.14 to Jan. 21.

In this new body of work Orange’s compositions stretch further from literal reference and deeper into abstraction. The artist continues to explore automatism, a practice of intuitive mark making that engages both play and meditative focus. The resulting built-up paint layers present suggestive imagery that reveal the history of the painting process in line, smudge and replacement. The exhibited works were created in Orange’s studio on the Columbia River.

The exhibition title refers to a quote by Greek philosopher Heraclitus. In response to the ancient philosophical paradox known as The Ship of Theseus, Heraclitus stated that though a river changes as the water is replenished by other water, the river continues to be the same river. Likewise, a person who steps into the same river twice may also have changed, but still maintains the same identity.

After studying art at Western Washington University, Orange moved to the remote area of the Lower Columbia in 2000, setting up a studio with friends in a defunct schoolhouse. He has resided in Astoria since then, minus a two-year sojourn to Santa Fe in the mid-2000s. The sublime and grandeur experience of nature, in the place where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean, continues to inspire him.

Orange’s work is recognized throughout the Northwest and abroad. His work has been selected for exhibitions by Dominic Iocono of the Syracuse University Art Galleries, Michael Klein of the Microsoft Collection, Nat Trottman of the Guggenheim, Bonnie Laing Malcolmson of the Portland Art Museum, Margarette Bullock of the Tacoma Art Museum, and many others. Academic institutions such as Portland State University, Mt. Hood Community College, Peninsula College, Lower Columbia College, Oregon Coast Council for the Arts, and Clatsop College have awarded him with solo exhibitions. Orange’s paintings are in private and public collections including Western Oregon University, Trimet, and the Columbia Memorial Hospital Foundation. He is represented by Imogen Gallery in Astoria.

The Art in the Governor’s Office Program honors selected artists in Oregon with exhibitions in the reception area of the Governor’s Office in the State Capitol. Artists are nominated by a statewide committee of arts professionals who consider artists representing the breadth and diversity of artistic practice across Oregon, and are then selected by the Arts Commission with the participation of the Governor’s Office. Only professional, living Oregon artists are considered and an exhibit in the Governor’s office is regarded as a “once in a lifetime” honor. Artists whose work has previously been shown in the Governor’s office include Henk Pander, Michele Russo, Manuel Izquierdo, James Lavadour, Margot Thompson, Gordon Gilkey and Yuji Hiratsuka.

                   

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org.




Attached Media Files: Darren Orange, “Ship Of Theseus,” 2019. Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 inches. Courtesy the artist.

New winter hours for community park gazebos & shelters
City of Vancouver - 11/06/19 12:37 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – As daylight hours decrease in the winter, operating hours for gazebos and shelters at several of Vancouver’s community parks will change to be closed at night. 

As of Nov. 4, 2019, gazebos and shelters are closed to the public from 6 p.m. until 6 a.m. at Arnada Park, David Douglas Park, Esther Short Park, Evergreen Park, Fisher Basin Park, LeRoy Haagen Memorial Park, Leverich Park, Marine Park, Marshall Park and Shumway Park. Longer hours will resume on Mar. 8, 2020, when Daylight Saving Time begins.

Signs will be posted on the structures to alert park users. “The facilities at the park are best used during the daylights hours,” said Julie Hannon, Director of the Parks and Recreation Department. “We want to ensure that our visitors have the safest and most enjoyable experience at our parks. As it gets darker earlier in the evening during the winter, gazebo and shelter hours at parks will change to reflect that. Come spring, these structures at our parks will be open longer.”

Facilities at Esther Short Park may occasionally be open during evening hours in the winter for permitted special events and programs. For a listing of parks and hours of operation, visit the City of Vancouver’s website at: www.cityofvancouver.us/parksrec.

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Fatal crash on Hwy 140 - Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 11/06/19 11:59 AM
2019-11/1002/129089/20191105_142218.jpg
2019-11/1002/129089/20191105_142218.jpg
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On Tuesday,  November 5, 2019 at approximately 1:45 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Highway 140 at the intersection of Kershaw Road.

Preliminary Investigation revealed that 2000 gold Ford Explorer, operated by Enrique Hames (25) of Argentina, was northbound on Kershaw Rd. when it failed to stop at the traffic control device onto Hwy 140.  The Ford drove into the path of an eastbound 2005 Fleetwood Motor home operated by William Silva (41) of Grants Pass.

Hames was transported with serious injuries. 

Silva was transported with minor injuries.

 

There were two passengers in the Ford -

Nicole Rossi (24) of Argentina was transported to the hospital with serious injuries.

Cristina Hernandez Selles (26) of Spain sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene. 

 

OSP was assisted by Jackson County Fire District 3, Jackson County Sheriff's Office, and ODOT

Next of kin was notified with the assistance of the Spanish Consulate. 

  




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/1002/129089/20191105_142218.jpg

Aumsville Man Charged with Arson Following House Fire (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/06/19 11:38 AM
2019-11/1294/129086/Daylight_Photo.jpg
2019-11/1294/129086/Daylight_Photo.jpg
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A few minutes before 5:00 pm on November 5th, 2019, deputies were dispatched to a disturbance at a residence in the 11000 block of Causey Lane SE.  When deputies arrived on scene they discovered the front of the residence, a carport, and multiple vehicles were engulfed in flames.  

While waiting for fire crews to arrive, deputies learned there were still two adults in the home who were unable to get out along with multiple dogs.  Deputies went into the manufactured home and were able to assist an adult female and a disabled adult male out of the home.  After ensuring all people were all accounted for, deputies were able to get four dogs out of the residence as well.  One person from the home was transported to an area hospital with non-life threatening burn injuries.

Justin Jameson, a 28-year-old Aumsville man, has been arrested in connection with this incident and has been lodged at the Marion County Jail.  Jameson faces charges including Arson 1 and Assault 2.  He is scheduled for arraignment on November 6th, 2019 at 3:00 pm at the Marion County Circuit Court Annex.

Detectives from the Marion County Sheriff’s Office are continuing the investigation into the events leading up to the fires.  The Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the Aumsville Rural Fire District, Sublimity Rural Fire District, Santiam Ambulance, American Red Cross and the Oregon State Police for their assistance during this response.




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/1294/129086/Daylight_Photo.jpg , 2019-11/1294/129086/Scene_2.jpg , 2019-11/1294/129086/Scene_3.jpg

Neighborhood Watch Group Starting in Lincoln City
Lincoln City Police - 11/06/19 11:31 AM

The Roads End Improvement Association (REIA), in conjunction with the Lincoln City Police Department (LCPD), is announcing the kick off of a new Neighborhood Watch group for the Roads End area. Chief Jerry Palmer and REIA Board member Marie McFarland have been meeting with her committee to establish the first Neighborhood Watch group in the city.

The main focus of this group is to add eyes on the area to assist the police in detecting suspicious events in the neighborhood before they become problems. In addition to the many more eyes observing the neighborhood, the Neighborhood Watch group is planning on some events for our neighbors to get acquainted with the neighbors in their areas. The group has already established block captains and is looking for more people to become involved.

McFarland states, "The police can't be everywhere, so we become the eyes and ears for the Police Department. We don't try to make contact or apprehend, we just let people know we are there. Our main function is to observe, recognize, and report as appropriate. We are coming together to keep an eye on our neighborhood and to assist our police department with their crime fighting and prevention. As we know, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure."

Chief Palmer said, "The Lincoln City Police Department is very proud and excited to partner with and support the Neighborhood Watch Program in our community. We are so glad Marie is spearheading this initial effort to establish Neighborhood Watch in Roads End, and we are hopeful other areas of town will follow Roads End's lead. We expect this to be an excellent partnership with our citizens."

McFarland and Palmer are happy to share this program with other groups in the city and help get their own Neighborhood Watch Programs going if anyone is interested. The Neighborhood Watch Program was first started in 1972. Its primary focus is to empower citizens to help in the fight against crime. This organization has become very popular with cities around the country and is sponsored by the Nationals Sheriff's Association. Lincoln City is joining the effort with Roads End leading the way. There are other neighborhoods in the city that are looking into starting programs of their own.

If you have questions about this program or wish to be put in touch with Marie McFarland and the Roads End group, please contact Lincoln City Police at 541-994-3636


Marshall Leadership Award Nominations Open (Photo)
The Historic Trust - 11/06/19 11:27 AM
General George C. Marshall
General George C. Marshall
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The Historic Trust announces the opening of Marshall Award nominations.

 

VANCOUVER, WA (November 6, 2019) — The Historic Trust and City of Vancouver announce the opening of nominations for the Marshall Adult and Youth Leadership Awards. The annual awards recognize demonstrated leadership, civic engagement, and commitment to public service. The Marshall Leadership Awards were created in cooperation with the Marshall Foundation in Virginia to honor the legacy of this world statesman.  General George C. Marshall lived for two years at Fort Vancouver serving as the commander of the 5th Brigade of the 3rd Division U.S. Army.

General Marshall is best known for the Marshall Plan, the post-war reconstruction of Europe. He also served as Secretary of State, Secretary of Defense, and the President of the American Red Cross. “We are pleased to continue the annual Marshall Leadership Awards, recognizing Vancouver’s up and coming community leaders,” said David Pearson, CEO and President of The Historic Trust. A committee made up of business leaders, public officials, Trust board members, and retired military will be involved in the interview and selection process.

Information about the nomination process and criteria can be found at https://www.thehistorictrust.org/marshall-awards/. Nominations close January 10, 2020 and the nominees’ applications are due February 7, 2020. One adult, 35 years or younger, with a four-year college degree, and one high school senior will be selected for each award. The winners will be announced at the Marshall Award Ceremony/Dinner on March 19, 2020 at Warehouse 23 in Vancouver, WA.

###

About The Historic Trust: The Historic Trust is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, founded in 1998, dedicated to inspiring civic pride and economic vitality through education, preservation, and celebration of our community's history. Learn more at www.thehistorictrust.org or follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/HistoricTrustWA.




Attached Media Files: General George C. Marshall

Science on Tap Vancouver -- Using Neuroscience to Enhance Teaching and Learning
Via Productions - 11/06/19 11:16 AM

Date: Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Time: Event at 7 p.m. (doors at 6 p.m.)

Location: Kiggins Theatre, 1011 Main Street, Vancouver, WA

Cost: $9.00 advance, $10.00 door, $5.00 students

Food & Drink: Beer, wine, pizza slices, popcorn, and snacks available

Event Website: https://viaproductions.org/events/kiggins_nov_13_memories/

How does your brain learn best? As the field of Neuroscience uncovers the neural mechanisms of perception and learning, can we begin to bring these findings into the classroom to help improve how students learn? This Science on Tap will discuss the brain’s learning networks, their emotional connections and how the visual and motor pathways influence what we process. Join us as Dr. Mark Pitzer demonstrates of how each brain circuit can be recruited by instructors to improve teaching and learning in and out of the classroom and how neuroscience can make learning truly memorable.

Mark Pitzer, Ph.D. is a Neuroscientist at the University of Portland. For the last 25 years he has worked to better understand diseases of the brain. He has worked on techniques to improve the survival of newly transplanted brain cells as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease and, more recently, conducted experiments using a genetic technique to halt the production of toxic proteins in the brain as a potential treatment for Huntington’s disease. Currently, his lab is conducting experiments designed to identify the neural circuits and neurotransmitters that play a role in the personality changes that affect those who suffer from Huntington’s disease. Mark is also an award-winning teacher that uses the findings from the fields of Learning and Neuroscience to invoke enduring enthusiasm, curiosity and deep learning in his college students.

_______ 

Science on Tap at the Kiggins is produced in partnership with Washington State University Vancouver

 


Science on Tap is a science lecture series where you can sit back, drink a pint, and enjoy learning. Listen to experts talk about the science in your neighborhood and around the world. You don't have to be a science geek to have fun--all you need is a thirst for knowledge! For more information on this event or about Science on Tap, visit Via Productions.


Statewide trail grant advisory committee seeks volunteers to fill vacancies
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 11/06/19 10:48 AM

SALEM, Ore. - Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is seeking volunteers for three positions on the Recreation Trails Program (RTP) Grants Advisory Committee.

Upcoming vacancies:

  • Biking representative
  • Off-Highway Vehicle representative
  • Accessibility representative

The ten-member committee typically meets once or twice per year to evaluate grant proposals for statewide trail projects. Members serve three-year terms; successful candidates will begin their terms Jan. 1, 2020. Members are eligible to serve a second term.

Ideal candidates can live anywhere in Oregon and will have experience in at least one of the following areas: land management, recreation planning, trail planning, project management, grant management or recreation-related volunteerism.

Those interested in serving must submit an OPRD grant advisory committee appointment interest form by Nov. 30. The form is available online: oregon.gov/oprd/GRANTS/Pages/RTP-Committee.aspx

RTP grants are funded by the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration and administered by OPRD. Grants are awarded to nonprofits and governments for motorized and non-motorized trail projects, including building new trails, improving existing trails and developing or improving trail facilities.

For more information about the advisory committee or application process contact Jodi Bellefeuille, RTP grant coordinator, at ellefeuille@oregon.gov">jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov or 503-986-0716.


Lou Savage appointed to acting Director of the Department of Consumer and Business Services
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 11/06/19 10:40 AM

 

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services Director, Cameron Smith, resigned today to explore new opportunities and ways to serve Oregon. The Governor’s office appointed Workers’ Compensation Division Administrator Lou Savage to acting director.

“I am proud of the care this department provides Oregonians and local businesses,” said Lou Savage, acting director. “It is an honor to lead DCBS during this transition.”

A national search for the DCBS Director is planned.

Savage has served as the administrator of the Workers’ Compensation Division since May 2016. He served as the senior policy advisor and legislative director for DCBS for nearly 10 years and was the Oregon insurance commissioner from 2011 to 2013.

Lou Savage is a member of the Oregon State Bar. Before joining state government, he spent his career working on consumer and business issues in the nonprofit, private, and public sectors. His background includes serving as director of Multnomah County Legal Aid and state director for Oregon Congressman (now Senator) Ron Wyden’s office. He has also practiced law in the private sector.

Savage spent nearly 3 years in Tunisia consulting and training attorneys in North Africa and the Middle East. He has a law degree from Lewis & Clark College and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Oregon.

###

 

About DCBS: The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.

 




Attached Media Files: Cameron Smith Letter of Resignation , Press Release

Salem City Club Program -- The Politics of Oregon's Rural-Urban Divide (Photo)
VanNatta Public Relations - 11/06/19 10:31 AM
Salem City Club Logo
Salem City Club Logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1853/129084/thumb_clear_bckgrd_salem_city_club_logo_bw_1.jpg

SALEM, OR (Nov. 6, 2019) - Salem City Club, a biweekly forum open to members and non-members, will meet Nov. 15 at the Willamette Heritage Center to learn about Oregon’s rural-urban divide.

Mark Henkels, the professor of Politics, Public Administration and Policy at Western Oregon University, will discuss the politics of the rural-urban divide and prospects for bridging the gap, which has been affected by increased urbanization, shifting political power, and environmental, economic, and cultural controversies. In addition to teaching, he has chaired the Social Science Division, served as pre-law adviser, and supervised the Politics and Administrative Practicum program at Western Oregon.  Dr. Henkels has written and co-authored extensively on the topic of governing Oregon.

In 2008, Henkels and co-authors presented a paper, “The Politics of One Oregon: The Causes, Consequences and Prospects of Overcoming the Rural – Urban Divide,” at the Toward One Oregon conference in Salem. The paper attracted considerable attention from local and national newspapers as they seek to understand the current political divide between rural and urban voters.  

The program will begin Friday, Nov. 15, at 12 p.m. at the Willamette Heritage Center at 1313 Mill Street St. SE. Registration fees are $10 for non-members. Lunch for members and non-members is $17 or $16 if payment is made with check or cash. Register online at SalemCityClub.com.




Attached Media Files: Salem City Club Logo

Distracted Driving Safety Campaign
Beaverton Police Dept. - 11/06/19 10:26 AM

The Beaverton Police Department is participating in a yearlong Distracted Driving Traffic Safety Campaign. The focus of this campaign is to reduce distracted driving and make Beaverton roadways safer.   

 

Officers will be out on targeted patrols for distracted drivers during the month of November. This High Visibility Enforcement (HVE) detail will be paid for by grant funds from Oregon Impact and Oregon Department Of Transportation. 

 

Distracted driving is dangerous, claiming 3,166 lives in 2017 alone. Although there are many distractions in a vehicle, texting is the most alarming distraction.  Sending or reading a text takes your eyes of the road for an average of five seconds.  At 55 mph, that’s like driving the length of a football field with your eyes closed. 

 

Beaverton Police Department is dedicated to making our roadways safer. Please eliminate driving distractions and remember, if U Drive and U Text U Pay.

##BPD##




Attached Media Files: Press Release

PPB's East NRT Officers Arrest Subject with Multiple Firearms (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/06/19 9:53 AM
Bleichner Firearms
Bleichner Firearms
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/3056/129081/thumb_Bleichner_Firearms.jpg
On November 5, 2019, Officers with the East Precinct Neighborhood Response Team (NRT) and Street Crime Team (SCT) executed a search warrant in the 2900 block of Southeast 125th Avenue. Officers had developed information on a subject who was a felon and was reported to be in possession of heroin and multiple firearms.

Officers safely executed the search warrant and took custody of 27 year-old Dillon Bleichner (PHOTO). Officers seized $1,559, over 120 grams of heroin, 3 semi-automatic handguns, an AR-15 assault rifle, a .308 assault rifle, a 30-30 lever action rifle, a black powder revolver, a sawed off 12 gauge shotgun, ballistic vests, and ammunition (PHOTO).

Bleichner was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on charges of Possession of Heroin, Delivery of Heroin, and Felon in Possession of a Firearm. This is an on-going investigation and more charges will be considered as appropriate.

Anyone with information about gun crimes in the City of Portland is encouraged to provide information to the Portland Police Bureau's Tactical Operations Division at 503-823-4106 or email information to GunTaskForce@portlandoregon.gov

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared with investigators as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects.

Tips on gun crimes can be emailed to GunTaskForce@portlandoregon.gov

If you see a gun crime in progress, call 9-1-1.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is offering a minimum $250 cash reward to anyone who reports a convicted felon or a juvenile in possession of a firearm and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Bleichner Firearms , Bleichner Photo

A Veterans Day Message from ODVA Director Kelly Fitzpatrick: Veteran Stories Are Crucial Part of Our Nation's History (Photo)
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 11/06/19 9:51 AM
Kelly Fitzpatrick bio
Kelly Fitzpatrick bio
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1082/129080/thumb_Kelly_Fitzpatrick.jpg

I love to study our nation’s history through the lens of our military veterans.

Who could fail to be inspired by the brash courage of the United States Marines during the Battle of Belleau Wood in World War I? Or by the words of Marine Captain Lloyd W. Williams, who, after being repeatedly urged to turn back by retreating French forces, famously said, "Retreat? Hell, we just got here."

Legend has it that it was at this battle that Marines earned the German nickname "Teufelshunde": “Devil Dogs.”

What about the story of Pfc. Dirk J. Vlug, serving in the Philippines during World War II, who refused to back down despite being outnumbered 5-to-1. No, it wasn’t one against five enemy soldiers. It was one soldier against five, heavily armed Japanese tanks.

Reacting on instinct, Pfc. Vlug grabbed a bazooka and six rounds of ammunition, and managed to destroy all five tanks singlehandedly.

I still get goosebumps when I read the words of Lt. Gen. Lewis “Chesty” Puller, the most decorated Marine in American history, when he and his men were surrounded by enemy forces at the Battle of Chosin Reservoir: “They’re on our left, they’re on our right, they’re in front of us, they’re behind us…we got them right where we want them. They can’t get away this time.”

Or the story of Master Sgt. Roy Benavidez, who jumped from a helicopter armed only with a knife, determined to help a Special Forces patrol trapped in North Vietnam. Over the course of a six-hour ordeal, Benavidez was wounded by bullets, bayonets and shrapnel a total of 37 times.

When he was awarded the Medal of Honor, President Reagan said that if his story were a movie script, audiences wouldn’t believe it. His heroic actions saved the lives of eight men.

In Iraq, Sgt. Leigh Ann Hester became the first woman awarded the Silver Star since World War II. A retail store manager from Kentucky, Hester led the counter-assault against 50 insurgents who attacked her convoy, braving heavy mortar and machine gun fire to engage the enemy on foot.

These stories of courage, selflessness and sacrifice are so much more than just stories to tell on Veterans Day. They are a crucial part of our nation’s history, and the foundation upon which its legacy has been built.

Countless millions of American lives — with more to come — have been lived in the freedoms secured by the blood and service of our veterans.  

Despite this rich history of military service that continues to this day, our country has not drafted a single soldier in over 45 years.

Since the draft ended in 1973, no person has been compelled to serve their country. And yet, each year, an estimated 180,000 young Americans voluntarily enlist in the United States Armed Forces.

One of the many things that makes this country so great is that its people have the will to serve. They have the will to lay down their own freedoms, and even their own lives, to defend those of others.

Our veterans didn’t have to be told to serve or to sacrifice. It was already there, in our DNA.

This is why I believe it is so important to honor, remember and celebrate our veterans, not just on Veterans Day, but every day. And it’s not only because they have earned it — though they have.

But it’s also because in honoring and remembering our veterans, we reveal the values that matter to us as a nation: Courage. Sacrifice. Selflessness. Dedication. The willingness to give up one’s own life so that others might live and be free, which we call “heroism.”

We reveal ourselves and our values in what we remember, and in what we give our time to. This Veterans Day, I encourage you to spend your time in a meaningful way.

Say, “Thank you,” to a veteran, yes, but also take some time to hear their story. I guarantee you: It’s a story you won’t hear anywhere else.

Kelly Fitzpatrick is the director of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs and Governor Kate Brown’s policy advisor on veterans’ issues. She is a retired Army officer. Her military awards and decorations include multiple awards of the Meritorious Service Medal, the Southwest Asia Service Medal and the Army Parachutist Badge.

The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs maintains an online list of Veterans Day events across the state. To see what’s happening in your area, visit oregondva.com/2019/11/01/2019-veterans-day-statewide-events.

For information about benefits and resources for Oregon veterans and their families, please visit www.oregon.gov/ODVA.




Attached Media Files: Kelly Fitzpatrick bio

Lane Christopher Martin death investigation grand jury transcript released
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 11/06/19 9:30 AM

November 6, 2019

Lane Christopher Martin death investigation grand jury transcript released

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that a transcript of the grand jury proceedings in the death investigation of Lane Christopher Martin was posted to the District Attorney’s website.

Upon return of a “not true bill” (see press release) in this matter by the grand jury, the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office filed a motion with the presiding court to create and release a transcript of the grand jury proceedings recorded pursuant to ORS 132.260(1).

The Portland Police Bureau previously posted its investigative files to its website, which can be accessed by clicking here.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office has no additional comment on this matter.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Phone: 503.988.6567 | Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/5769/129069/PR-19-253-Lane_Christopher_Martin_death_investigation_grand_jury_transcript_released.pdf

Oregon Tree Farm System honors Clackamas County family for sustainable forestry management (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 11/06/19 9:28 AM
2019-11/1072/129078/Clackamas_Co._2019_Outstanding_Tree_Farmer_of_the_Year_-_Alan_Tim_Wilma_Rob_Don_and_Gary_Ruttridge_(1).jpg
2019-11/1072/129078/Clackamas_Co._2019_Outstanding_Tree_Farmer_of_the_Year_-_Alan_Tim_Wilma_Rob_Don_and_Gary_Ruttridge_(1).jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1072/129078/thumb_Clackamas_Co._2019_Outstanding_Tree_Farmer_of_the_Year_-_Alan_Tim_Wilma_Rob_Don_and_Gary_Ruttridge_(1).jpg

SILVERTON, Ore. – Brothers Alan, Rob, Don, Gary and Tim Guttridge of Clackamas County and their mother, Wilma Guttridge, were recognized recently by the Oregon Tree Farm System for exceptional sustainable forestry management. The recognition came at an annual awards luncheon at The Oregon Garden, where Gordon and Gail Culbertson of Lane County were named as Oregon’s 2019 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year.

The Culbertsons are being recognized for their multiple-use management of land they purchased in 2007.  Gordon Culbertson has worked in the forestry sector for 50 years and has used his knowledge to improve the health of variously aged forests. The couple’s goals include income, family recreation, and wildlife. Toward these goals, the Culbertsons have worked to reduce tree diseases, thin trees, improve bird habitat and eliminate invasive plant species, such as scotch broom, Japanese knotweed and Himalayan blackberry.

The Oregon Tree Farm System also recognized five other family forest landowners for their exceptional, sustainable forestry management. Besides the Guttridge family, other honorees were:

  • K.C. Thompson, Sid Picht and Diana Blakney (Benton County)
  • Tim and Kathy Otis (Linn County)
  • Ernie and Linda Rieben (Washington County)
  • Harry and Bonnie Roberson (Yamhill County)

For 53 years, the Oregon Tree Farm System has recognized family forest landowners who provide forest benefits and products using sound forestry management principles. There are approximately 700 landowners in the Oregon Tree Farm System managing 746,000 acres. This is 21 percent of Oregon’s 3.6 million acres of family forestlands.

Nationwide there are 74,000 members in the American Tree Farm System. ATFS and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

OTFS and the Oregon Department of Forestry share the goal of family forest landowners voluntarily improving the health of their forests. Both provide assistance in the development of forest management plans using a jointly developed plan template.

For more information on the Oregon Tree Farm System, visit www.otfs.org.

                                                                                                             # # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/1072/129078/Clackamas_Co._2019_Outstanding_Tree_Farmer_of_the_Year_-_Alan_Tim_Wilma_Rob_Don_and_Gary_Ruttridge_(1).jpg

Local colon cancer physicians available for interview to interpret new national guidelines
The Oregon Clinic - 11/06/19 9:11 AM

This week, The American College of Physicians published updated guidance around Colon Cancer screening, in an attempt to unify several medical groups’ advice. 

Local gastroenterologists at The Oregon Clinic, some of the region’s most respected colon cancer physicians, are available for interview to interpret these guidelines and advise our local community what they really need to know. 

Colon cancer is still the second most common cause of cancer deaths of men and women (combined), highlighting the continued relevance of this topic for everyone in our region.

American College of Physicians guidelines: https://annals.org/aim/fullarticle/2754194/screening-colorectal-cancer-asymptomatic-average-risk-adults-guidance-statement-from

 

Please reach out to coordinate an interview.

Thanks, Liz

 


Oregon Tree Farm System honors Yamhill County couple for sustainable forestry management (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 11/06/19 9:00 AM
Yamhill County 2019 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year, Harry and Bonnie Robinson. They were honored recently for their forest management activities at the Oregon Tree Farm System’s Annual Awards Luncheon.
Yamhill County 2019 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year, Harry and Bonnie Robinson. They were honored recently for their forest management activities at the Oregon Tree Farm System’s Annual Awards Luncheon.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1072/129074/thumb_Yamhill_Co.__2019_Outstanding_Tree_Farmer_of_the_Year.jpg

SILVERTON, Ore. – Harry and Bonnie Robinson of Yamhill County were recognized recently by the Oregon Tree Farm System for exceptional sustainable forestry management. The recognition came at an annual awards luncheon at The Oregon Garden, where Gordon and Gail Culbertson of Lane County were named as Oregon’s 2019 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year.

The Culbertsons are being recognized for their multiple-use management of land they purchased in 2007.  Gordon Culbertson has worked in the forestry sector for 50 years and has used his knowledge to improve the health of variously aged forests. The couple’s goals include income, family recreation, and wildlife. Toward these goals, the Culbertsons have worked to reduce tree diseases, thin trees, improve bird habitat and eliminate invasive plant species, such as scotch broom, Japanese knotweed and Himalayan blackberry.

The Oregon Tree Farm System also recognized five other family forest landowners for their exceptional, sustainable forestry management. Besides the Robinsons, other honorees were:

  • K.C. Thompson, Sid Picht and Diana Blakney (Benton County)
  • Alan, Rob, Don, Gary and Tim Guttridge (Clackamas County)
  • Tim and Kathy Otis (Linn County)
  • Ernie and Linda Rieben (Washington County)

For 53 years, the Oregon Tree Farm System has recognized family forest landowners who provide forest benefits and products using sound forestry management principles. There are approximately 700 landowners in the Oregon Tree Farm System managing 746,000 acres. This is 21 percent of Oregon’s 3.6 million acres of family forestlands.

Nationwide there are 74,000 members in the American Tree Farm System. ATFS and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

OTFS and the Oregon Department of Forestry share the goal of family forest landowners voluntarily improving the health of their forests. Both provide assistance in the development of forest management plans using a jointly developed plan template.

For more information on the Oregon Tree Farm System, visit www.otfs.org.

                                                                                                            # # #




Attached Media Files: Yamhill County 2019 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year, Harry and Bonnie Robinson. They were honored recently for their forest management activities at the Oregon Tree Farm System’s Annual Awards Luncheon.

County manager recommends fiscally conservative 2020 budget
Clark Co. WA Communications - 11/06/19 8:48 AM

County Council public hearings scheduled for November

Vancouver, Wash. – County Manager Shawn Henessee has recommended a budget to the county council that emphasizes a balance between the increase in both the demand and cost of providing critical public services.

“We are faced with trying to balance the challenges of an increase in demand for county services due population growth with providing the high quality services our community deserves,” said Henessee.

The county council will consider the $545.27 million budget during a public hearing beginning at 2 pm Monday, Nov. 25. The county’s other elected officials will be first to testify on budgets proposed by their departments.

Anyone interested may testify when the hearing continues at 10 am Tuesday, Nov. 26. If needed, public testimony will be continued to 10 am Wednesday, Nov. 27. All sessions will be in the sixth-floor hearing room in the Public Service Center, 1300 Franklin St.

After public testimony, the council will deliberate and make a decision on the 2020 budget. Per state law, the county budget must be adopted after the budget hearings and prior to the beginning of the next fiscal period, Jan. 1, 2020.

The County Manager’s recommendation comes on the heels of a year-long review of all departments to look for efficiencies within their existing budgets.

“The budget deep dive project over the last year was a considerable amount of work, but in the end it makes this recommended 2020 budget much more achievable,” said Henessee. “Moving forward, we are going to have to continue to look for those efficiencies and cost savings in order to have a more sustainable General Fund.”

Key recommendations

Henessee told the council in a work session last week that most of the recommended budget updates dealt with software and cybersecurity needs, critical law and justice safety needs, infrastructure upkeep and replacement, and maintaining service levels while meeting increase workload demands.

Henessee included in his recommended budget a request to set aside $700,000 for a multi-campus space planning project for county buildings. This study would include law and justice services such as the county jail.

On the revenue side, he recommended that the council enact a 1 percent property tax increase allowed by state law which will increase revenues by $639,370. Henessee also recommended increasing property taxes by an additional .979 percent of “banked capacity” available to the county because it did not enact the 1 percent increase in recent years. This would increase revenues by $621,315.

The complete 2020 recommended budget can be found on the county’s website at https://www.clark.wa.gov/budget/2020-budget.  


Oregon Tree Farm System names Lane County couple as Oregon's Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 11/06/19 8:20 AM
Oregon 2019 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year – Gail and Gordon Culbertson (center). Presenting them their award is Lisa Northrop, Deputy Regional Forester, Pacific NW Region, USDA-Forest Service (left), and Lena Tucker, Oregon Deputy State Forester (r
Oregon 2019 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year – Gail and Gordon Culbertson (center). Presenting them their award is Lisa Northrop, Deputy Regional Forester, Pacific NW Region, USDA-Forest Service (left), and Lena Tucker, Oregon Deputy State Forester (r
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1072/129072/thumb_Tree_Farmer_of_the_Year_2019_-_Gail_and_Gordon_Culbertsons_-_Lane_County_flanked_at_left_by_Lisa_Northrup_USFS_and_right_Lena_Tucker.jpg

EUGENE, Ore. – The Oregon Tree Farm System has announced that Gordon and Gail Culbertson of Lane County have been named as Oregon’s 2019 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year. Their efforts were honored Oct. 26 during an annual awards luncheon at The Oregon Garden in Silverton.

The Culbertsons’ 72-acre property is in the Coast Range of Lane County about halfway between Eugene and Florence. The Culbertsons are being recognized for their multiple-use management of the land.

Both Gordon and Gail came from farming families. They purchased the property in 2007 so that they could, along with their children and grandchildren, stay connected to the land and the rewards that come from working the land to produce products.

Gordon has worked in the forestry sector for 50 years and has used his knowledge to improve the health of variously aged forests. The couple’s goals include income, family recreation, and wildlife. Toward these goals, the Culbertsons have worked to reduce tree diseases, thin trees, improve bird habitat and eliminate invasive plant species, such as scotch broom, Japanese knotweed and Himalayan blackberry.

The Oregon Tree Farm System also recognized five other family forest landowners for their exceptional, sustainable forestry management. The other honorees were:

  • K.C. Thompson, Sid Picht and Diana Blakney (Benton County)
  • Alan, Rob, Don, Gary and Tim Guttridge (Clackamas County)
  • Tim and Kathy Otis (Linn County)
  • Ernie and Linda Rieben (Washington County)
  • Harry and Bonnie Roberson (Yamhill County)

For 53 years, the Oregon Tree Farm System has recognized family forest landowners who provide forest benefits and products using sound forestry management principles. There are approximately 700 landowners in the Oregon Tree Farm System managing 746,000 acres. This is 21 percent of Oregon’s 3.6 million acres of family forestlands.

Nationwide there are 74,000 members in the American Tree Farm System. ATFS and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

OTFS and the Oregon Department of Forestry share the goal of family forest landowners voluntarily improving the health of their forests. Both provide assistance in the development of forest management plans using a jointly developed plan template.

For more information on the Oregon Tree Farm System, visit www.otfs.org.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Oregon 2019 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year – Gail and Gordon Culbertson (center). Presenting them their award is Lisa Northrop, Deputy Regional Forester, Pacific NW Region, USDA-Forest Service (left), and Lena Tucker, Oregon Deputy State Forester (r

Oregon Tree Farm System announces Oregon's Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year for 2019 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 11/06/19 8:14 AM
Oregon's 2019 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year – Gail and Gordon Culbertson (center). Presenting them their award is Lisa Northrop, Deputy Regional Forester, Pacific NW Region, USDA-Forest Service (left), and Lena Tucker, Oregon Deputy State Forester
Oregon's 2019 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year – Gail and Gordon Culbertson (center). Presenting them their award is Lisa Northrop, Deputy Regional Forester, Pacific NW Region, USDA-Forest Service (left), and Lena Tucker, Oregon Deputy State Forester
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1072/129071/thumb_Tree_Farmer_of_the_Year_2019_-_Gail_and_Gordon_Culbertsons_-_Lane_County_flanked_at_left_by_Lisa_Northrup_USFS_and_right_Lena_Tucker.jpg

SILVERTON, Ore. – The Oregon Tree Farm System has announced that Gordon and Gail Culbertson have been named as Oregon’s 2019 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year. Their efforts were honored recently during an annual awards luncheon at The Oregon Garden in Silverton.

The Culbertsons’ 72-acre property is in the Coast Range of Lane County about halfway between Eugene and Florence. The Culbertsons are being recognized for their multiple-use management of the land. Both Gordon and Gail came from farming families. They purchased the property in 2007 so that they could, along with their children and grandchildren, stay connected to the land and the rewards that come from working the land to produce products.

Gordon has worked in the forestry sector for 50 years and has used his knowledge to improve the health of variously aged forests. The couple’s goals include income, family recreation, and wildlife. Toward these goals, the Culbertsons have worked to reduce tree diseases, thin trees, improve bird habitat and eliminate invasive plant species, such as scotch broom, Japanese knotweed and Himalayan blackberry.

The Oregon Tree Farm System also recognized five other family forest landowners for their exceptional, sustainable forestry management. The other honorees were:

  • K.C. Thompson, Sid Picht and Diana Blakney (Benton County)
  • Alan, Rob, Don, Gary and Tim Guttridge (Clackamas County)
  • Tim and Kathy Otis (Linn County)
  • Ernie and Linda Rieben (Washington County)
  • Harry and Bonnie Roberson (Yamhill County)

For 53 years, the Oregon Tree Farm System has recognized family forest landowners who provide forest benefits and products using sound forestry management principles. There are approximately 700 landowners in the Oregon Tree Farm System managing 746,000 acres. This is 21 percent of Oregon’s 3.6 million acres of family forestlands.

Nationwide there are 74,000 members in the American Tree Farm System. ATFS and its state chapters operate an internationally recognized forest certification program overseen by and for family forest landowners to promote sustainable forest management through education, recognition, and assistance.

OTFS and the Oregon Department of Forestry share the goal of family forest landowners voluntarily improving the health of their forests. Both provide assistance in the development of forest management plans using a jointly developed plan template.

For more information on the Oregon Tree Farm System, visit www.otfs.org.

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Attached Media Files: Oregon's 2019 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year – Gail and Gordon Culbertson (center). Presenting them their award is Lisa Northrop, Deputy Regional Forester, Pacific NW Region, USDA-Forest Service (left), and Lena Tucker, Oregon Deputy State Forester