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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Sat. Oct. 24 - 6:59 pm
Police & Fire
Stop, Drop and Roll to one of the 145 DEA Take Back collection sites throughout the Pacific Northwest
DEA Seattle - 10/22/20 9:19 PM

SEATTLE – DEA is holding its 19th National Prescription Drug Take Back Day on Saturday, Oct. 24 with 145 collection sites throughout the Pacific Northwest. The nationwide event aims to provide a safe, convenient, and responsible means of disposing of prescription drugs, while also educating the general public about the potential for abuse of medications.

Rates of prescription drug abuse in the United States are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet.

Collection sites will adhere to local COVID-19 guidelines and regulations in order to maintain the safety of all participants and local law enforcement.  There are 16 collection sites in Alaska, 40 in Idaho, 33 in Oregon and 56 in Washington State. 

“The initiative – now in its tenth year – addresses a vital public safety and public health issue,” said DEA Acting Administrator Timothy Shea. “Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse, and abuse. Together with our partners, we are not only holding National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, but offering other ways to dispose of unwanted, unused, and expired prescription medications.”

"Stop, drop and roll, no questions asked,” said DEA Special Agent in Charge Keith Weis. He further stated that, “With more people staying at home, we must remain vigilant, keeping our loved ones safe by cleaning out our medicine cabinets.” 

If you can’t find a Take Back Day drop-off site near you, there are other ways to keep your medications safe until the next Take Back Day, dispose of them, or drop them at a year-round collection location. Given the ongoing COVID-19 public health emergency, DEA wants to ensure that the public is aware of other ways they can dispose of unwanted prescription drugs without having to leave their homes. Both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency have tips on how to safely dispose of drugs at home.

In addition to DEA’s National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, prescription drugs can be disposed of at any of the 11,000 DEA authorized collectors at any time throughout the year. For more information, visit: https://apps2.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/pubdispsearch/spring/main?execution=e1s1.

DEA also encourages the public to reach out to their local law enforcement to find out if they have any permanent drug disposal locations throughout their local community.

DEA and its partners will collect tablets, capsules, patches, and other solid forms. DEA will also accept vape pens or other e-cigarette devices from individual consumers, only after the batteries are removed from the devices. If the battery cannot be removed, individual consumers can check with large electronic chain stores who may accept the vape pen or e-cigarette devices for proper disposal. Liquids, including intravenous solutions, syringes and other sharps, and illegal drugs cannot be dropped off. This service is free and anonymous, no questions asked.

For more information on DEA’s National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, and to find a collection site near you, visit www.deatakeback.com

 


DEA announces Project Safeguard - The Pacific Northwest intensifies efforts to combat drug-related violent crime
DEA Seattle - 10/20/20 1:18 PM

SEATTLE – Drug Enforcement Administration Acting Administrator Timothy J. Shea today announced that the DEA will direct resources to help reduce violent crime in communities throughout the country.  Under this initiative, called Project Safeguard, DEA will identify and prioritize ongoing drug trafficking investigations with a nexus to violent crime.

“Drug trafficking and violent crime are inextricably linked,” said Acting DEA Administrator Shea.  “From the extreme levels of violence in Mexican cartels, to the open air drug markets in American cities, drug traffickers employ violence, fear, and intimidation to ply their trade.  Neighborhoods across our country are terrorized by violent drug trafficking organizations that have little regard for human life, and profit from the pain and suffering of our people. Along with our law enforcement partners, DEA is committed to safeguarding the health and safety of our communities.”

“Violence goes hand in hand with illegal drug trafficking and continually threatens the safety of our communities.” said DEA Special Agent in Charge Keith Weis.  “While conducting investigations we continually  encounter individuals associated with violent actions that have included kidnappings, armed assaults, home invasions, murder for hire, weapons trafficking and  distributing the most dangerous drug we face –fentanyl.”

Working in collaboration with our federal, state, and local partners, including the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and the U.S. Marshals Service, DEA’s Project Safeguard will comprise three focus areas to address the growing violent crime threat in many cities across the United States:

  • Disrupting, dismantling, and destroying the most significant violent drug trafficking organizations throughout the United States;
  • Increasing federal prosecutions of firearms traffickers associated with drug trafficking organizations; and
  • Prioritizing the capture of DEA fugitives who employ violence as part of drug trafficking.

The traffickers that flood our communities with deadly drugs, including opioids, heroin, fentanyl, meth and cocaine, are often the same criminals responsible for the high rates of assault, murder, and gang activity in our cities.  These criminals employ fear, violence, and intimidation to traffic drugs, and in doing so, exacerbate a drug crisis that claims more than 70,000 American lives every year.   In recent months, violent crime has spiked in numerous cities and regions around the country, and drug trafficking is responsible, in part, for this violence.

Since August 1, 2020, the DEA Seattle Field Division and its state and local partners have conducted operations against these violent traffickers throughout the Pacific Northwest which have yielded:

  • 146 arrests
  • 95 weapons seized
  • $3,559,107.00 in assets seized
  • Seized drugs:

           120 pounds of heroin

           18.5 pounds of powder fentanyl

            571 pounds of methamphetamine

            37 pounds of cocaine

            41,200 pills containing fentanyl

The DEA Seattle Field Division has worked these high level investigations with the assistance of our local, state and federal law enforcement partners in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska. 


Mail Thefts Reported (Photo)
Camas Police Dept. - 10/19/20 2:00 PM
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Camas, Wash. -- 

On 10-18-2020, Camas Police responded to a report of found mail near Klickitat Park on Prune Hill.  Responding officers contacted a citizen who located various pieces of dumped mail which included six voters ballots.  The ballots were intact but wet from the weather.  The found mail including the ballots were returned to the owners by police.\

During the ensuing investigation, officers found that 4 community style mail boxes had been pried open and some mail stolen from each one. Later in the day an additional 3 voters ballots were located and returned to the owners by police.

Nearby neighbors were contacted and officers located some surveillance video of the possible suspect (See attached still photo).  The suspect has not been identified and the investigation is ongoing.

Mail theft is not uncommon and Camas officers respond to similar calls several times a year.  In general, the suspects are looking for mail items that can be used for financial gain (checks, credit cards, personal info that can be used for opening fake charge accounts).  In these cases the unwanted mail is often dumped nearby, just as the ballots were in this case.

Camas Police would like to remind citizens to be vigilant and observant, especially with the upcoming holiday season.  Be aware of your mailbox and those of your neighbors.  Immediately report any suspicious activity to the authorities.

No further information is available at this time.  Anyone with information regarding the investigation should call 311 (non-emergency line) for assistance.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/3902/139271/suspect.JPG

Decades-old skull identified as belonging to young woman who died in 1970s; detectives seek tips (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/22/20 8:38 AM
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Please reference CCSO Case # 86-025724

In 1986, two U.S. Forest Service workers found a partial human skull near Government Camp, Oregon.

Earlier this year, genetic and genealogical investigators finally identified the skull as belonging to 19-year-old Wanda Ann Herr. Today, the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office is asking for the public's help as it resurrects a decades-old cold case -- and investigates Wanda's mysterious disappearance and death in the late 1970s.


A mysterious skull

The case began on Aug. 2, 1986. Two Forest Service workers discovered a partial skull, several bone fragments, and a single human tooth on Still Creek Road 2612 and Road 145, near Government Camp off Highway 26.

Eleven days later, an Oregon State Police forensic examiner determined the skull likely belonged to a twentysomething woman or small man. He also estimated the skull had been in the woods approximately 10 years -- putting the subject's death on or around 1976.

In 2005, the remains were re-inventoried and re-curated at the Clackamas County Medical Examiner's Office. But the case otherwise lay dormant until 2008, nearly 22 years after the initial find, when Dr. Nici Vance -- the State Forensic Anthropologist with the Oregon State Police -- re-examined the skull. This, combined with DNA analysis of the skull at the University of North Texas, allowed for a refined victim description: The skull belonged to a female in her late teens to early 20s.

That same year, 2008, Sheriff's Office Forensic Imaging Specialist Joyce Nagy completed a facial reconstruction from the skull, in clay. The task was complicated by the partial remains: The lower half of the skull was missing. The reconstruction nevertheless generated a number of tips, but no solid leads.

The DNA profile of the skull was then uploaded into the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) and the case was entered into the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs). But the trail remained cold.

Until last year.


A genetic breakthrough

In January 2019, the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office received National Institute of Justice (NIJ) grant funds to perform forensic genetic genealogy and DNA phenotyping on 100 unidentified human skeletal remains cases. This combination of intensive genetic analysis and in-depth genealogical legwork was made famous as the process used to track down the Golden State Killer in 2018.

DNA phenotyping predicts the physical appearance and ancestry of an unknown person from their DNA; genetic genealogy can help identify an unknown person by searching for relatives in public databases and building family trees.

The Government Camp skull was among those sent out for the grant-funded investigation. It was also the first to produce a major finding.

First, the University of North Texas flagged the skull as having an existing DNA extract with extensive genetic information. Then, in December 2019, Parabon Nanolabs received the DNA extract and subjected it to in-depth genetic genealogy and DNA phenotyping.

The intensive genetic analysis revealed far more detail about the subject: The skull belonged to a female of Northern European descent with fair skin, hazel/brown eyes, brown hair, and some freckles.

This new info, combined with extensive genealogical research, soon revealed a likely name for the young woman: Wanda Ann Herr, born in 1957.

Detectives obtained Wanda's birth certificate and contacted her surviving sisters. Further DNA testing with the cooperation of the sisters confirmed it: The partial skull was that of Wanda Herr.


Detectives seek info on Wanda from mid-1970s

Based on interviews with the sisters, Wanda is believed to have disappeared sometime after June 1976, when she was 19 years old. At the time she may have been living in a group home in the Gresham area.

Info about Wanda is scarce. She was raised in a different household than her sisters. Though detectives believe she was a chronic runaway based on interviews, there are no records of Wanda as a runaway or missing person. She had no DMV record, no bank account, and there are no police reports that mention her. Attached is a photo of Wanda taken when she was just 12 years old -- seven years before her disappearance.

Detectives are working to discover more of her story -- and learn what led to her disappearance and death. If you knew or met Wanda in the 1970s, detectives want to hear from you.

Anyone who knew Wanda Ann Herr, her associates or her whereabouts in the 1970s  is urged to contact the Sheriff’s Office Tip Line — by phone at 503-723-4949 or by using the online email form at https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/tip . Please reference CCSO Case # 86-025724.

INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITY: Dr. Vance and Sheriff's Office detectives are available to speak about the case. Contact PIO Sgt. Mendoza for details.

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/624/139379/86-025724-WandaHerr-Age12.jpg , 2020-10/624/139379/PartialSkull.jpg

Seven Displaced in Hazel Dell Apartment Blaze (Photo)
Clark Co. Fire Dist. 6 - 10/23/20 4:05 AM
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Firefighters with Clark County Fire District 6 and Vancouver Fire battled a stubborn fire this morning in Hazel Dell.

Seven people and two dogs were displaced after the fire at 6205 NE 11TH avenue.

The fire was called in at 2:30 a.m., and by the time fire crews arrived the fire had spread from one of the units of the four-plex to the attic. Efforts to fight the fire were complicated by a layer of “car decking” on the ceiling of the residence. The apartment complex also has ceiling heat, which makes the task of fighting the fire more difficult due to numberous wires in the ceiling.

No one was injured fighting the blaze, and all residents escaped the building.  Red Cross has been notified and is in the process of assessing housing needs from the six adults and one child who live in the complex. Five engines, one squad, one truck and two Battalion Chiefs were called as part of the fire response. The fire was out by 3:30 a.m.

(Photos courtesy of Clark County Fire District 6)




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/810/139414/IMG_1534.jpg , 2020-10/810/139414/IMG_1533.jpg , 2020-10/810/139414/IMG_1532.jpg , 2020-10/810/139414/IMG_1529.jpg , 2020-10/810/139414/IMG_1523.jpg

Update:  Vancouver Police Officer Involved Shooting October 4, 2020
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/22/20 9:42 AM

The Regional Independent Investigative Team will provide weekly updates to the ongoing investigation to the media in accordance with Washington State Law I-940. 

 

The Regional Independent Investigative Team reports there is no new information to be released at this time regarding the ongoing investigation into the Vancouver Police officer involved shooting which occurred October 4, 2020.  


Stabbing In Clark County
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/21/20 2:00 AM

On October 20th at approximately 17:00 Clark County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a 911 call of an assault with a knife between two male roommates at 7003 NE 31st Ave. Upon arrival deputies located a stabbing victim and provided first aid. The victim was then transported to Peace Health Southwest Medical Center and taken into surgery.

The suspect was also located at the residence and taken into custody. He was booked into Clark County Law Enforcement Center on charges of Assault in the 1st Degree DV.

The suspect is 72-year-old William Loy of Vancouver.

The victim remains at PHSMC. Their name and condition will not be released at this time.

The Clark County Major Crimes Unit is investigating this incident.

There is no further information available regarding this incident.  

Updates will be made when they are available.

 

Media release prepared by SGT. Scott Schanaker

 


Correction: Clark County Sheriff's Office Homicide Investigation October, 17, 2020
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/19/20 10:27 AM

The victims name was incorrectly reported.  The victim has been identified as Daniel Tveidt not David as refered in orginal release.


Clark County Sheriff's Office Homicide Investigation October, 17, 2020
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/19/20 8:26 AM

On 10/17/2020 at approximately 7:00pm, Deputies responded to the Chelatchie Prairie store in Amboy, Washington on the report of a male who had been shot multiple times.  Life Flight was activated and responded to the area, but prior to Life Flight’s arrival 35-year-old David Tveidt succumbed to his injuries and passed away.  It was learned the shooting occurred approx. 9 miles east of the Chalatchie Prairie store. 

 

Suspect information was developed, and the suspect 32-year old Cody Nutter was arrested at his residence.  Clark County Regional SWAT team assisted in the apprehension of Nutter.

 

Nutter was booked into the Clark County Jail on Murder II and will make first appearance on Monday Morning (10/10/20). 

 

Clark County Major Crimes is investigating and anyone with information on this homicide is asked to contact Detective Justin Messman at (564)397-2051.

 

The investigation is ongoing. 

 

No further information at this time. 


Lower Columbia Major Crimes Team - Officer Involved Shooting in Longview - Press Release #5
Cowlitz Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/24/20 4:19 PM

Lower Columbia Major Crimes Team

October 2nd, 2020 Officer Involved Shooting Investigation

Case #A20-2486

Press Release 5 – October 23rd, 2020

 

 

The Lower Columbia Major Crimes Team has completed its investigation of the October 2nd, 2020 officer-involved shooting in Longview, Washington.  Through extensive investigation, investigators have established the following details:

 

  1. Detectives with the Longview Police Street Crimes unit were on duty on October 2nd, 2020.  They were wearing vests marked “POLICE” and identified themselves as police officers.  The detectives were operating a marked patrol car, with emergency lights activated, when they attempted to contact Justin Tofte.
  2. The detectives were seeking to arrest Tofte on a felony warrant for his arrest.  The detectives had received information that Tofte had recently been in possession of a firearm.
  3. The detectives identified themselves and gave Tofte lawful commands to stop, and advised him he was under arrest.  Tofte was non-compliant and fled on foot.  As detectives pursued Tofte, they noted he had something heavy in his right coat pocket and was reaching into that pocket as he fled.
  4. Detective Sanders deployed a TASER while pursuing Tofte through an alley.  Surveillance video showed Tofte fall, but he quickly returned to his feet and continue to run.  Data retrieved from the TASER showed there was only an intermittent connection, meaning the TASER deployment did not result in the intended neuromuscular incapacitation.
  5. While running through the alley, Tofte fell and an item slid away from his person.  Detective Sanders recognized this to be a pistol and ordered Tofte to put his hands behind his back.  Tofte immediately picked up the gun and Detective Sanders stated he believed Tofte presented an imminent threat to his life and the life of Detective Hartley, as well as a danger to the public.  Detective Sanders fired three shots, striking Tofte once in the right axilla area.
  6. Tofte continued to run after being shot, eventually stopping on 14th Avenue where he was taken into custody after making suicidal comments. Officers immediately provided first aid and medical units arrived on scene within approximately four minutes of the shooting.  Tofte was transported to the hospital and did not survive his injury.
  7. Early in the investigation detectives learned items had been removed from the scene prior to the arrival of scene security officers.  Detectives have identified and interviewed the involved subjects.
  8. The Smith and Wesson M&P Bodyguard .380 caliber semiautomatic pistol recovered from Tofte was stolen from a Cowlitz County resident.
  9. Toxicology results show the presence of methamphetamine, opiates and THC in Tofte’s system.

 

The Lower Columbia Major Crimes Team investigative report will be submitted to the Cowlitz County Prosecutor next week.  The medical examiner’s report and any other pending laboratory reports will be submitted to the Prosecutor’s Office upon receipt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Troy Brightbill

Chief Criminal Deputy / Cowlitz County Sheriff’s Office

Commander / Lower Columbia Major Crimes Team

                                                                    

 

 

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: Press Release 5

Homicide of Donald Polk Remains Unsolved After 10 Years - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #10-44 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 10/21/20 8:00 AM
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The Portland Police Bureau, in cooperation with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for your help in solving a homicide that occurred in October 2010 at Southwest 1st Avenue and Sheridan Street.

On October 21, 2010, at approximately 8:00 a.m., Portland Police officers responded to a bus shelter at Southwest 1st and Sheridan to assist medical personnel with a deceased male.

Officers arrived and found 50-year-old Donald Ray Polk dead of apparent stab wounds. Homicide detectives were called to the scene to begin an investigation into Polk's death.

"Pokey", as he was known to his friends, is believed to have been living on the streets at the time of his death.

There is no suspect information in this case.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, or to view other unsolved cases, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2020-10/5183/139251/Donald_Polk_ODL_Photo.jpg

Reward Offered in Sandra Ladd Homicide Investigation in Washougal - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #20-33 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 10/20/20 1:32 PM
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The Washougal (WA) Police Department, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to solve the homicide of Sandra Ladd.

On June 14, 2020, the Washougal Police Department responded to a residence in the 1900 block of 41st Street for a death investigation. That investigation led to the discovery of 61-year-old Sandra Ladd, later determined to have died from homicidal violence.

Detectives with the Washougal Police Department are asking for the public's help to solve this case.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, or to view other unsolved cases, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2020-10/5183/139313/Victim_Sandra_Ladd.jpg

Reward Offered in Darryl Lewis Homicide in Gresham - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #20-32 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 10/20/20 1:16 PM
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The Gresham Police Department, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to solve the homicide of Darryl Lewis.

On October 14, 2020, Portland residents Darryl Antonio Lewis, age 34, and Daquon Dupree Warren, age 21, were victims of a shooting at the Arco Gas Station in the 18000 block of East Burnside Street. Lewis was shot once in the head and died as a result of the shooting. Warren was shot multiple times and is expected to recover from his injuries.

The victims had just pulled up to a gas pump when a dark colored sedan stopped in the parking lot near them. An unidentified occupant of that car fired multiple rounds from a handgun, striking both men.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, or to view other unsolved cases, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2020-10/5183/139311/Victim_Darryl_Lewis.jpg

Armond Harper Homicide Remains Unsolved After Two Years - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #19-08 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 10/19/20 8:00 AM
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The Portland Police Bureau, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to solve the 2018 homicide of Armond Harper.

On Friday October 19, 2018, at 9:58 a.m., North Precinct officers responded to the report of a shooting at North Rosa Parks Way and North Albina Avenue.

Officers and medical personnel arrived and located 42-year-old Armond Ramoan Harper suffering from a gunshot wound. Passersby were providing medical aid to the victim prior to police and EMS arrival. Harper was transported by ambulance to a Portland hospital for treatment to life-threatening injuries. Medical personnel were unable to save Harper's life and he died early the next day.

Witnesses described the suspect as a Black male in his 20s, medium build, wearing gray or black clothing, and that he ran out of the area, northbound on North Mississippi Avenue.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, or to view other unsolved cases, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2020-10/5183/139224/Armond_Ramoan_Harper_DL_Photo.JPG

Dion Matthews Jr. Homicide Remains Unsolved After Five Years - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #17-28 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 10/18/20 9:00 AM
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The Portland Police Bureau, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to solve a 2015 homicide.

On Sunday October 18, 2015, at 11:15 p.m., Central Precinct officers responded to the report of a shooting at Southwest 3rd Avenue and Burnside Street.

Officers and medical personnel arrived and were directed to the parking lot behind Dante's, located at 380 West Burnside Street, where they located 23-year-old Dion Anthony Matthews Jr. deceased. The Oregon State Medical Examiner determined that Matthews died of a gunshot wound.

Witnesses described seeing people running from the area and vehicles being driven away after the shooting.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, or to view other unsolved cases, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2020-10/5183/139223/Dion_Matthews_Family_Photo.png

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Misinformation & Disinformation (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 10/20/20 8:58 AM
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Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week, reminders from the FBI’s Protected Voices campaign about misinformation and disinformation. 

We are just two weeks away from election day, and Oregonians have been receiving their ballots in the mail. As you are doing your research on the issues and the candidates, we encourage you to take a moment to consider whether the campaign information you are seeing online is truthful or the result of a foreign influence campaign. 

As foreign actors intensify their efforts to influence the outcome of the 2020 U.S. elections, they could use online journals and other platforms to advance and launder misinformation and disinformation to either denigrate or support specific candidates or political parties. Foreign actors could also target the U.S. elections by making claims of voter suppression, amplifying reports of real or alleged cyberattacks on election infrastructure, asserting voter or ballot fraud, and spreading other information intended to convince the public of the election's illegitimacy.  

One key factor to watch for: Is the information designed to create a strong emotional reaction? If so, that can indicate that the person or group posting the information is trying to manipulate you. Try to verify that information through independent means, such as a non-partisan fact checker. If you’re unable to verify the information, don’t click on the link or share the information further.? 

Here are some other ways to protect your vote: 

  • Verify who produced the content and try to determine what that person’s intent is. Is the content trying to sow division? Erode trust in legitimate authorities? If so, that could be a red flag. 

  • You should rely on state and local election officials as authoritative sources about how elections are conducted in their jurisdictions.  

  • Make sure you verify through multiple reliable sources any reports about problems in voting or election results before sharing such information via social media or other avenues. 

  • If appropriate, make use of in-platform tools offered by social media companies to report suspicious posts that appear to be spreading false or inconsistent information about election-related problems or results. 

The FBI is responsible for investigating malign foreign influence operations and malicious cyber activity targeting election infrastructure and other U.S. democratic institutions. Report potential federal election crimes—such as disinformation about the manner, time, or place of voting—to the FBI.?In Oregon, you can call us at (503) 224-4181 or submit a tip online at tips.fbi.gov. 

Finally – learn more about how you can protect your vote with the FBI’s Protected Voices campaign. You can find more resources at www.fbi.gov/protectedvoices. 

### 




Attached Media Files: TT - PV Misinformation - AUDIO , TT - PV Misinformation - GRAPHIC

Update: Two Additional Juveniles Connected to Downtown Gresham Homicide
Gresham Police Dept - 10/21/20 5:06 PM

Gresham, Ore.— Detectives took two additional Gresham juveniles into custody, 15 and 11-year-old brothers, for their alleged involvement in the assault and subsequent death of Tod Alan Barker.  This follows the arrest of a 16-year-old earlier in the week.

The two older youth remain in custody and the 11-year-old has been released to his family.  Investigators believe they have contacted all involved parties and are not looking for any additional suspects. 

###GPD###

 

 


Police Seek Public's Help in Locating Missing 8-year-old. (Photo)
Gresham Police Dept - 10/20/20 3:00 PM
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UPDATE

Ruben Berrelleza has been found and reunited with family.

Gresham, Ore.— Police are currently searching for a missing 8-year-old.  According to neighbors, Ruben Berrelleza was last seen near his home in the area of SE 184th and Yamhill ST at around 8:30 am. The 8-year-old was apparently seeking a ride to his father’s home in the area of NE 102nd and Prescott ST.  Ruben is described as a Latino male, 4’5”, 60-80 lbs, black hair, brown eyes. He was last seen wearing a red t-shirt, black pants, red shoes, and carrying a black backpack with neon stripes.

 

If anyone has information as to the whereabouts of Ruben, call Gresham Police.   




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/1278/139309/ruben2.JPG

UPDATE: One Victim From Wednesday's Gas Station Shooting Has Died (Photo)
Gresham Police Dept - 10/19/20 4:54 PM
2020-10/1278/139280/Darryl_Lewis.jpg
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Gresham, Ore.— Portland residents Darryl Antonio Lewis, 34, and Daquon Dupree Warren, 21, were victims of last Wednesday’s Arco gas station shooting in the 18000 block of East Burnside.  Lewis (photo) was shot once in the head and has died from his injury.  Warren was shot multiple times and is recovering.

The men had just pulled up to a gas pump when a dark colored sedan stopped the parking lot near them.  An occupant of that car fired multiple rounds from a handgun, wounding both men as they sat in their car, and then fled southbound on SE 181st Ave.  No suspects have been identified.

Detectives with the East County Major Crimes Team ask that anyone who has information about this incident call the Gresham Police tip line at 503.618.2719.  Crime Stoppers of Oregon is offering a $2,500 reward for information that leads to the arrest of the person responsible for this homicide.

No other information is available at this time.

###GPD###




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/1278/139280/Darryl_Lewis.jpg

Update: Juvenile Arrested in Downtown Gresham Homicide Investigation (Photo)
Gresham Police Dept - 10/19/20 4:41 PM
2020-10/1278/139279/Tod_Alan_Barker_20-46181.jpg
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Gresham, Ore.— Detectives have arrested a 16-year-old boy from Gresham for his alleged involvement in the assault and subsequent death of Tod Alan Barker.  The youth is facing changes of Murder and Assault in the Second Degree, Robbery in the First Degree, and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.  The investigation into the possibility of additional suspects is ongoing.

Barker, 53, was assaulted on the evening of Sept. 27 while walking in the 200 block of NE Roberts Ave.  Barker died on Oct. 9 from injuries sustained during the attack and the Multnomah County medical examiner ruled his death a homicide.

No other information is available at this time.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/1278/139279/Tod_Alan_Barker_20-46181.jpg

Otis man arrested after threatening law enforcement, Lincoln County Courthouse (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/22/20 10:27 AM
Kessler
Kessler
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On October 15th, 2020, the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office was made aware of a subject making threats against public employees and buildings.  Sources indicated 44-year-old Otis resident Daniel Scott Kessler was in possession of firearms and was preparing to harm specific law enforcement officers and the Lincoln County Courthouse. A prior court order prohibited Kessler from lawfully possessing firearms.

Detectives from the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office conducted an investigation with assistance from the Lincoln City Police Department; Federal Bureau of Investigation; Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives; and Oregon State Police.  It became apparent over the course of the investigation that Kessler’s threats were credible, and he had the means to follow through with his plans.

Investigators applied for a search warrant for Kessler’s Otis residence, which was executed on October 20th.  Kessler was in possession of several firearms when he was taken into custody during the execution of the search warrant.  Despite the allegations of threats to law enforcement, no use of force was required to take Kessler into custody.

Kessler is charged with two counts of Furnishing a Firearm Used in a Felony, four counts of Unlawful Use of a Weapon, and three counts of Unlawful Possession of Firearms.  Kessler also had an outstanding warrant for his arrest for unrelated crimes. Kessler was arraigned on the charges in court on October 20th.  After a brief hearing, Judge Branford denied bail and Kessler is currently being held in the Lincoln County Jail without the possibility of release. 

The incident remains under investigation by the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office and its partner agencies.  Anyone with information regarding this incident is encouraged to contact Detective Abigail Dorsey with the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office at (541) 265-0777. 




Attached Media Files: Kessler

Tip of The Week for October 26, 2020 - ODOT Work Zones (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/22/20 6:27 AM
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  TIP OF THE WEEK

 

Date:           10/22/20                         FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:      Sheriff Curtis Landers

                   541-265-0654

                   s@co.lincoln.or.us">clanders@co.lincoln.or.us

 

                                                                       ODOT WORK ZONES

If you notice when driving around the county and to other areas of the state any road work taking place, that may mean reduced speed limits and traffic delays in work zones.  Did you know that 4 out of 5 work zone crash victims are NOT the workers?  It is actually the drivers and their passengers traveling through the work zone areas.  Inattention and speed are the most common causes of work zone crashes. Oregon averages 488 work zone crashes per year.  That is one crash every 18 hours!

Work zones are dangerous for everyone even when workers are not visible.  That is why ODOT lowers the speed limits in work zones.  Exceeding work zone speed limits can be especially hazardous for numerous reasons:

  • Traffic patterns may change day to day.
  • Roads may be rough, uneven or covered with debris.
  • Temporary lanes may be narrow with abrupt edges.
  • Roadside equipment may obstruct views.

Travelers are often caught off guard by work zone hazards. Distracted driving and driving in excess of the speed limit reduces the necessary reaction time to avoid a crash. When you see orange signs, cones and barrels on the roadway, PAY EXTRA ATTENTION!  Those are your clues to be prepared for unexpected obstacles and stopped or slowing cars. So slow down, stay alert, avoid distractions and put down the phone.

For more information about work zone safety, go to ODOT's website at:

www.oregon.gov/ODOT/Safety/Pages/Work-Zone.aspx

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/5490/139376/102220_ODOT_Work_Zones.pdf , 2020-10/5490/139376/WORK_ZONES.PNG

Info Guide - Flooding 2020, Lincoln County
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/21/20 2:49 PM

Please see attached for full media release with graphics

(10.21.20 - Lincoln County)

Our flooding guide was specifically developed for Lincoln County communities by the Emergency Management Division of the Sheriff’s Office and provides the A-Z of information needed for before, during and after a flooding event occurs. The guide is intended as a one-stop shop on insurance opportunities, flood plain mapping, how to access current river level information, and how to protect yourself and your property. Important updates or reminders for this year:

Floods After Wildfire:

This year, an additional section was added; flood after wildfires. Heavy rain can produce flash flooding, debris flows, and mudslides in areas that have been burned by wildfires. When organic materials such as trees, scrub brush, plants, and litter on the forest floor burn at high temperatures, water repellant compounds are formed as vapors, and then condense onto cooler layers of soil below the hot fire.

This subsequently forms a layer of water repellant soils just below the surface, which prevents soils in the burned area from absorbing water after an intense wildfire. During heavy rainfall following a wildfire, water cannot penetrate the water repellant soil layer, which acts much like a layer of pavement, resulting in enhanced runoff of rainwater which can cause dangerous flash floods, debris flows, and mudslides.

Insurance:

Another important aspect of protection is reviewing your insurance policies to ensure you are adequately covered. The National Flood Insurance Program recently underwent a website upgrade and acts as a guide to property owners on insurance needs and benefits.

Flood insurance is not just for those property owners who live in the flood plain; it can protect many home and business owners from other events such as a tsunami or other water saturation events. Standard homeowners’ insurance may not cover these events.

Renters should also consider purchasing or updating their renter insurance policy to protect themselves from costs associated with damaged contents and/or if the Landlord is underinsured.

Updated Flood Plain Maps:

FEMA updated the Lincoln County Flood Plain Maps in 2020. This process is only completed once every 10 years. You can look up your address to see if you in the current flood zone by visiting FEMA’s website at https://msc.fema.gov/portal/search

Link for full Info Guide: Flooding for Lincoln County

###

Respectfully submitted,

Virginia "Jenny" Demaris
Emergency Manager
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office
Emergency Management
225 W. Olive St.
Newport, Oregon 97365
is@co.lincoln.or.us" target="_blank">vdemaris@co.lincoln.or.us
(541) 265-4199 Office

 




Attached Media Files: Information Guide - Flooding, Lincoln County , Media Release - Info Guide-Flooding, Lincoln County , Media Release - Info Guide-Flooding, Lincoln County

Manufactured Home Fire
Longview Police & Fire - 10/21/20 7:00 AM

Longview, WA - At 9:42 PM Tuesday, fire crews were called for the report of a manufactured home on fire at 1345 Baltimore Street, Space 16. While responding, firefighters were told by dispatch that it was unclear if anyone was in the residence.  First arriving units reported heavy smoke from the mobile home. Several bystanders reported that they thought the occupants were not home but that family pets might be inside.

The fire was brought under control at 9:54 PM and at 9:59, the home had been completely searched without finding pets or people. Later, the family dog was found a few homes away with minor injuries, but okay. No people were injured.

Preliminary findings indicate the fire started in the kitchen and then spread throughout the home.


Adult in Custody Walks Away from Transition Center (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/21/20 4:59 PM

Deputies are asking for the public’s help in locating an Adult in Custody, AIC, who walked away from the Marion County Sheriff’s Office Transition Center. Arlo Daniel Silbernagel, 34, walked away from the facility around 1:30 p.m., Wednesday, October 21st, 2020. Silbernagel was in custody for a Parole Violation.

Silbernagel is a white adult male with blue eyes and brown hair. He is 6’00” tall and weighs 150 lbs.

The Marion County Transition Center prepares AIC’s for re-entry into the community prior to release from custody. AICs are allowed to leave the facility for pre-approved treatment or medical appointments.  

Deputies are asking anyone with information about Silbernagel to call the Marion County Sheriff’s Office at 503-588-5032

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/1294/139371/Silbernagel_Arlo.jfif

Investigators Called to Scene of Shooting in East Salem ***Update***
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/20/20 2:55 PM

Detectives are continuing to investigate a shooting reported yesterday evening, October 19th, on Auburn Road NE near Clarmar Drive NE.  When deputies arrived in the area, they located one victim with a gunshot wound in the parking lot of a gas station a few blocks away.  The victim, a 16-year-old male, was transported to a local hospital with serious injuries.  The events leading up to the shooting are still being investigated; investigators stated this does not appear to have been a random act of violence.  There are no other known victims at this time and no arrests have been made. 

Investigators are asking anyone living in the area that may have surveillance video of the incident to contact investigators.  Additionally, anyone with information which may be helpful to this investigation is encouraged to call the Marion County Sheriff’s Office Tip Line at 503-540-8079 or submit a tip anonymously at https://www.co.marion.or.us/SO/Pages/tip411.aspx.

The Marion County Sheriff’s Office is being assisted with this investigation by the Keizer Police Department, Salem Police Department, and the Oregon State Police.

At about 6:50 p.m. on Monday, October 19th, 2020, deputies from the Marion County Sheriff’s Office were called to a reported shooting on Auburn Road NE near Clarmar Drive NE.  Deputies located one victim at a business a few blocks away on Lancaster Drive NE.  The victim was transported by ambulance to a local hospital; the victim’s condition is unknown at this time.  Detectives from the Criminal Investigations Unit have been called to the scene and are investigating.  Auburn Road is closed between Clarmar Drive NE and Tierra Drive NE.  This is an active investigation; no further details are available at this time.


Adult in Custody Walks Away from Transition Center (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/20/20 9:18 AM
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On October 19th, 2020, at approximately 1:18 p.m., an adult in custody (AIC) at the Marion County Transition Center walked away from the facility.  Anthony Travis Bodda, 21, was in custody serving a 90 day jail sentence for Reckless Endangerment and Possession of Burglary Tools.  Bodda is 5’10”, 140 lbs, with brown hair, brown eyes, and was last known to be living in the Stayton area. 

Staffed around the clock, the Transition Center provides an intermediate sanction between Jail and Probation.  Unlike the Marion County Jail, the Transition Center provides minimum-security supervision.  Residents are expected to work, either at their own jobs, or by performing community services.

If you see, or know the location of, Anthony Travis Bodda, please call the Sheriff’s Office at 503-588-5032 or submit at tip at https://www.co.marion.or.us/SO/Pages/tip411.aspx.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/1294/139294/Bodda_Anthony.jpg

19-year old cited for DUII crash involving bicyclist
McMinnville Police Dept. - 10/19/20 10:25 AM

On October 17, 2020 at approximately 6:38 pm McMinnville Police and EMS responded to a vehicle vs bicyclist crash in the 1100 block of SE Millright Ave.  The bicyclist was a 7 year old female.   The juvenile was initially transported via McMinnville Fire ambulance to Willamette Valley Medical Center but due to her injuries she was transferred via Life-Flight to Oregon Health Sciences University Hospital in Portland.  The driver of the vehicle, 19 year old John Joseph Kemp of Burien Washington, was cited to appear into Yamhill County Circuit Court for DUII-Alcohol, Reckless Driving, and Reckless Endangering.  Additional charges are possible after review by the Yamhill County District Attorney’s office. 

 

Crashes like these serve as reminders on two important issues: Don’t drink and drive and wear a helmet when riding bicycles. 

 

Anyone with information related to this investigations is urged to contact Officer Jared Hansen at ed.hansen@mcminnvilleoreon.gov">jared.hansen@mcminnvilleoreon.gov or 503-434-7303 and refer to case 20-3723.


Two People Die As A Result Of Injuries Sustained From Traffic Crash Near Troutdale (Photo)
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/19/20 7:25 PM
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On October 18, 2020 at approximately 4:06pm deputies from the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office (MCSO) responded to reports of a two-vehicle crash in the 1300 block of East Historic Columbia River Highway.

 

Deputies found a 1988 Beaver motorhome and a 1992 Lexus S40 sedan blocking the highway after being involved in a violent collision.  Both occupants of the Lexus, DAVID JOVON COLLINS JR, age 18, and KEAUSHA TACHELLE MAUESBY, age 19, were pronounced deceased at the scene.  The driver of the motorhome, BENJAMIN MICHAEL FELLER, age 46, was uninjured and cooperated with investigators.

 

The initial investigation has determined that the Lexus, which was traveling eastbound, crossed over the center line and crossed into the path of the Beaver, which was traveling westbound.  Excessive speed by the Lexus is believed to be a contributing factor to the cause of the crash.

 

ODOT assisted with the closure of the highway between the Troutdale Bridge and Woodard Road for approximately seven hours while members of the Vehicular Crimes Team completed the initial investigation.  The Vehicular Crimes Team is comprised of deputies from MCSO and officers from the Gresham Police Department.  Personnel from the Gresham Fire Department, Corbett Fire Department and American Medical Response also assisted with the response. 

 

No further information will be released at this time.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/1276/139285/HCRH_Crash_Scene.png

Fatal Crash on Hwy 101
Newport Police Dept. - 10/19/20 10:19 AM

On Friday, October 16, 2020 at approximately 2:48 PM, Newport Police Officers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Hwy 101 at milepost 143.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 1999 Toyota Corolla, operated by Victoria Cornelio-Fisher (17) of Waldport, was southbound on Hwy 101 when for unknown reasons it crossed the center line into the northbound lane and collided with a 2012 Toyota Camry, operated by Sidsel Tompkins (74) of Eugene.

Cornelio-Fisher was transported by ambulance to Good Samaritan Hospital in Newport, where she died from injuries sustained in the crash.

Tompkins, and her passenger, Michael Tompkins (76) of Eugene, were transported by ambulance to Good Samaritan Hospital in Newport for treatment of injuries sustained in the crash.

Newport Police was assisted by the Newport Fire Department, Pacific West Ambulance and Lincoln County Crash Team.         


Fatal Crash Hwy 569 - Lane County
Oregon State Police - 10/24/20 5:08 PM

On Saturday, October 24, 2020 at approximately 6:35 A.M., Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 569 near Goble Lane.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Honda motorcycle, operated by Nickolas White (34) from Eugene, had crashed sometime earlier.  

White sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

White had been reported to Lane County Sheriff's Office as a missing person.

Investigation is continuing.

OSP was assisted by ODOT.


Oregon State Police is Requesting the Public's Assistance with Killing and Waste of Mule Deer - Crook County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/19/20 4:08 PM
2020-10/1002/139278/20201012_112542.jpg
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The Oregon State Police is requesting the public's assistance in locating the person(s) that shot and killed a doe Mule Deer on Hwy 26 near milepost 46 in Crook County.   

On October 11, 2020 at 7:15 P.M., Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Troopers were notified that an unknown person(s) had shot and left to waste a doe Mule Deer. 

It is believed the shooting took place sometime earlier the same day.  Anyone who may have witnessed it would have been driving on Hwy 26 West of the Ochoco summit approximately one mile West of the Ochoco Christian Camp. 

OSP Fish and Wildlife Troopers request that if you have any information regarding this incident to please contact the TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677) or TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)  - Trooper Barr is investigating.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

Or the Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward fund also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, Furbearers, Game Fish and Shellfish.  Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags.

CASH REWARDS:

$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction

$200 Illegally Obtaining License/Tag(s)

$200 Unlawful Lend/Borrow Big Game Tags(s) 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/1002/139278/20201012_112542.jpg

Portland Fire & Rescue Awarded Over $2 Million in Grants from Federal Government to Assist in Prevention, Community Risk Reduction, and Emergency Response (Photo)
Portland Fire & Rescue - 10/19/20 12:59 PM
PF&R's Trench Rescue Team training
PF&R's Trench Rescue Team training
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Since September 2019, Portland Fire & Rescue (PF&R) has been awarded $2,355,612 in federal funding in areas ranging from firefighter wellness to community risk reduction to emergency response training. In a time when the effects of the pandemic on local economies continue to be felt, the success of PF&R’s grant-writing team in securing important funds to support the bureau’s mission to protect our region is all that more important.

“As an emergency response organization, we do not have the option to fail. At a time when General Fund dollars and budgets are constrained, we are always looking at other ways to finance critical programs. In order to respond to emergencies large and small, our effectiveness depends on our PPE, our equipment, our training, and our preparation. Our long-range planning fuels our successful grant program,” says Fire Chief Sara Boone. “I want to especially thank Trisha Schultz and Michael Wong, our grant writing team that collaborated with other PF&R personnel to identify and apply for grants that work toward supporting our highest mission of protecting life, property, and the environment.”

The winning grants, funded on behalf of the Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), are listed below:

2019 Assistance to Firefighters Grant (AFG):

  • $1,167,544 in funding to install Source Capture Exhaust Systems in PF&R’s 31 stations. Source Capture Exhaust Systems remove diesel exhaust from stations to reduce carcinogenic exposures to firefighters.
  • $290,530 for technical rescue training. Rescue trainings will include rope, confined space, trench, and machinery extrication for the technical rescue teams at Stations 1 and 12.

 2019 Fire Prevention & Safety (FP&S) Grant

  • $238,095 to conduct a community risk assessment and staffing study. PF&R will be contracting with a consultant over the next year to complete this study.

 2020 Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program - COVID-19 Supplemental (AFG-S)

  • $659,443 for the purchase of PPE and related supplies (including reimbursements) to prevent, prepare for, and respond to COVID-19.

Total grant dollars: $2,355,612




Attached Media Files: PF&R's Trench Rescue Team training

Arrest Made in Series of Early Morning Fires In East Portland
Portland Fire & Rescue - 10/18/20 1:22 PM

From approximately 1:40 am until 4:15 am this morning, Portland Fire & Rescue responded to a series of 10 suspicious fires in the area of SE 161th and SE Alder, SE 160th and SE Stark, and several locations in this vicinity along E Burnside St. These fires included: a car fire that spread to a carport and threatened a residence; two other building fires; an additional car fire; one fire involving a homeless camp; two dumpster fires at an apartment complex; two garbage bin fires; and a mailbox fire. There were no injuries associated with any of these fires.

 

Portland Police Bureau officers, who were in the area investigating these suspicious fires, extinguished two of these fires using fire extinguishers carried in their patrol vehicles and arrested a female adult suspect early this morning in the area of SE 147th and E. Burnside St. This arrest was initially made on non-arson related charges; as of 12:30 pm today, after continued investigation by PPB and PF&R’s Investigations Unit, the suspect, Sierra Nicole Murdock, has been charged with two counts of Arson I with several more charges anticipated as the investigation progresses. 

 

PF&R would like to thank our PPB partners for their work in both quickly effectuating this arrest and extinguishing several of these fires themselves, thus potentially saving lives and property from further fires.

 

PPB and PF&R’s Investigations Unit are asking any witnesses to these fires or members of the public with any information on these fires to contact them via the contact information below.

 

Lt. Jason Andersen, PF&R: 503-823-3787

Tip Line: 503-823-INFO

 


Shooting Investigation Underway in Centennial Neighborhood
Portland Police Bureau - 10/24/20 2:57 AM
On October 24, 2020, at approximately 1:03 a.m., East Precinct officers responded to the 600 block of Southeast 162nd Avenue on reports of shooting. Officers arrived on scene and found evidence of gunfire to include a subject who had been shot inside a crashed motor vehicle. Officers learned an altercation between two subjects occurred, leading them to shoot each other. After the shooting, the subjects went to their separate vehicles in an attempt to leave the scene. One of the subjects crashed their car near the location, striking other parked vehicles. This crash was most likely due to the subjects injuries sustained during the shooting. The other subject left the scene prior to police arrival.

The subject who remained on scene in the crashed vehicle was transported to an area hospital by ambulance, their medical status is unknown at this time. The other subject involved in this shooting is still outstanding.

Officers have secured a crime scene and Southeast 162nd Avenue is closed from Southeast Stark Street to Southeast Taylor Street.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

If anyone has information about the shooting and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

An update will be provided if appropriate for the investigation.

###PPB###

Major Crash Team Activation in North Portland - fatal crash investigation
Portland Police Bureau - 10/23/20 7:34 AM
On October 22, 2020 at about 9:24 p.m., Portland Police responded to the report of a motorcycle crash on Interstate 5, southbound at the Rosa Parks Boulevard ramp. Officers arrived to find that a motorcycle rider crashed into a sign post.

The Portland Police Bureau Traffic Division Major Crash Team responded to investigate. The preliminary investigation indicated that the motorcycle was travelling at a high speed on the freeway, left the roadway and struck a sign. There was one rider on the motorcycle, who died at the scene.

This was the 45th traffic fatality investigated by the crash team in 2020.

This crash is still under investigation. Anyone with information can contact Officer Garrett Dow at Garrett.Dow@portlandoregon.gov or 503-823-5070.


###PPB###

The Major Crash Team (MCT) is responding to southbound I-5 just north of Rosa Parks Way to assist in a traffic crash investigation. A motorist involved in the traffic crash is deceased. The Rosa Parks Way off ramp from southbound I-5 is closed.

No additional information is available at this time. The PIO is not responding to the scene.

An updated news release or social media post will be pushed out as investigators learn more.

###PPB###

Shooting Investigation Underway in St. John's Neighborhood, Two Individuals Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 10/22/20 10:44 PM
On October 22, 2020, at approximately 9:18 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to the 7300 block of North St. Louis Avenue on reports of a shooting. When officers arrived on scene, they found two victims with gunshot wounds. Both victims were transported to area hospitals by ambulance. The victims' medical statuses are unknown at this time.

No suspects have been arrested in regards to this incident.

Officers have secured a crime scene and the intersection of North Ivanhoe Street and North St. Louis Avenue are closed.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

If anyone has information about the shooting and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

An update will be provided if appropriate for the investigation.

###PPB###

Retired officer indictment
Portland Police Bureau - 10/22/20 3:47 PM
It has been reported that a former Portland Police officer, Scott Groshong, has been indicted by a Multnomah County Grand Jury. Mr. Groshong retired in August 2020, after 27 years with the Portland Police Bureau.

On June 25, 2020, the Portland Police Detective Division became aware of potential criminal activity involving Mr. Groshong, while he was employed by the Portland Police Bureau. On June 26, 2020 the Detective Division initiated a criminal investigation, at the direction of the chief's office. At the same time, the Portland Police Bureau Professional Standards Division opened an administrative investigation.

The Marion County District Attorney's office took responsibility for the case, from Multnomah County. The Portland Police Detective Division collaborated with the Salem Police Department and transferred the criminal investigation to the Salem Police Department on July 2, 2020. The Marion County District Attorney's Office presented the case to a Multnomah County Grand Jury, which is the county where the criminal activity allegedly took place, and the Grand Jury indicted Mr. Groshong.

"As policing professionals, we have a responsibility to ourselves, to each other, and to our community to adhere to the oath we swore as public servants. We have to hold each other accountable to the high standards of our profession and the expectations of the community," said Acting Chief Chris Davis. "It is important that we refrain from passing judgment as the process continues. People are innocent until proven guilty in court. It is important to know our process of police accountability is working and is proceeding as it was intended."

This is an ongoing investigation under the supervision of other agencies and therefore the Portland Police Bureau does not have additional information to release regarding this case.

###PPB###

Wrong Way Driver Crashes, Other Driver Dies
Portland Police Bureau - 10/22/20 2:41 PM
On October 22, 2020, at 3:55 a.m., officers from East Precinct were dispatched to a report of a head on, two vehicle crash on Interstate 84 eastbound under the Interstate 205 freeway ramps (Near the Halsey / Gateway Exit). Oregon Department of Transportation and East Precinct officers closed down the freeway and secured the scene. Portland Fire and Rescue personnel attempted life-saving efforts for one driver, however the driver did not survive their injuries at scene.

The Major Crash Team (MCT) was contacted and responded to investigate. MCT learned that one vehicle was traveling the wrong direction in a curved area on Interstate 84 where it would have been difficult for drivers going the right way to see.

The wrong way driver was transported to an area hospital with minor injuries. Investigators believe the driver was impaired. That driver, 28 year-old Brian Paul Gardner, was arrested for Manslaughter II, Reckless Driving, DUII, and was lodged in the Multnomah County Detention Center.

The name of the victim is not being released at this time.

If anyone witnessed the crash and has not spoken to police, they are asked to contact investigator Dow at the Portland Police Traffic Division, 503-823-5070.

This is the 40th MCT call out, and the 44th traffic related fatality of 2020.

###PPB###

Wrong Way Driver on I84 Crashes, Other Driver Dies
Portland Police Bureau - 10/22/20 2:40 PM
On October 22, 2020, at 3:55 a.m., officers from East Precinct were dispatched to a report of a head on, two vehicle crash on Interstate 84 eastbound under the Interstate 205 freeway ramps (Near the Halsey / Gateway Exit). Oregon Department of Transportation and East Precinct officers closed down the freeway and secured the scene. Portland Fire and Rescue personnel attempted life-saving efforts for one driver, however the driver did not survive their injuries at scene.

The Major Crash Team (MCT) was contacted and responded to investigate. MCT learned that one vehicle was traveling the wrong direction in a curved area on Interstate 84 where it would have been difficult for drivers going the right way to see.

The wrong way driver was transported to an area hospital with minor injuries. Investigators believe the driver was impaired. That driver, 28 year-old Brian Paul Gardner, was arrested for Manslaughter II, Reckless Driving, DUII, and was lodged in the Multnomah County Detention Center.

The name of the victim is not being released at this time.

If anyone witnessed the crash and has not spoken to police, they are asked to contact investigator Dow at the Portland Police Traffic Division, 503-823-5070.

This is the 40th MCT call out, and the 44th traffic related fatality of 2020.

###PPB###

PPB Officers Arrest Commercial Burglary Suspect (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 10/22/20 9:56 AM
recovered merchandise
recovered merchandise
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3056/139384/thumb_recovered_merch.jpg
On October 22, 2020, at 1:44 a.m., officers from North Precinct responded to an audible alarm call in the 4200 block of Northeast 122nd Ave. Officers arrived and found the front door of the business had been smashed. The subsequent investigation led officers to a hotel in the 11300 block of Northeast Sandy Blvd were a suspect was located.

The suspect, 25 year-old Jadon Nathaniel Hockett of Portland, was arrested for Burglary II and lodged at the Multnomah County Detention Center.

Additionally, officers recovered over $600 in stolen property.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: recovered merchandise

Subject from Traffic Stop in Madison South Neighborhood Brandishes Handgun and Flees Scene
Portland Police Bureau - 10/21/20 11:21 PM
On October 21, 2020, at approximately 9:11 p.m., officers conducted a traffic stop on a motorcycle and a vehicle that had been closely following the motorcycle in the 9000 block of NE Fremont Street. As the motorcycle and vehicle came to a stop, the operator of the motorcycle ran into a nearby residence. Soon after entering the residence, the operator of the motorcycle exited the residence, and approached the vehicle that had been following him.

The operator of the motorcycle then entered the vehicle that had been following him and pointed a handgun at officers. He then ordered the female driver out of the driver's seat, and into the front passenger seat before fleeing from the traffic stop in the vehicle. The motorcycle was left behind at the traffic stop and officers learned it was stolen.

It is unknown at this time whether the driver of the vehicle and the operator of the motorcycle are known to one another. Officers are seeking assistance in locating the vehicle, a white Mitsubishi Lancer, Washington license plate BNV0608.

If anyone sees this vehicle they are urged to call 911. If anyone has information regarding this case and they have not already been spoken to by investigators they are asked to call the nonemergency line at (503)-823-3333.

###PPB##

Police Seek Public Help in Locating Missing Portland Man (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 10/21/20 2:08 PM
vehicle
vehicle
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3056/139358/thumb_vehicle.JPG
A man missing for 10 days is considered endangered and the Portland Police Bureau is hoping the public can help by looking out for him and his vehicle.

Chase Stevens, was last seen Sunday, October 11, 2020, around 1:30 p.m. leaving his residence in the 3500 block of Northeast Mathison Place and was last known to be traveling through Banks near Hwy 26.

Mr. Stevens (photo) is a 31 year-old white male, 5'9" in height, 190 pounds, and has no scars, marks, or tattoos. He may be driving in his vehicle, which is a grey 2013 Ford Escape SUV (similar to photo), Oregon license 506GCU. Mr. Stevens may be in possession of a firearm. If members of the public see him or his vehicle, please call police rather than contacting him. There is no information that Mr. Stevens is any danger to the public.

If anyone has seen Mr. Stevens or his vehicle, please contact Portland Police Missing Persons Detective Heidi Helwig at 503-823-0797 or missing@portlandpolice.gov.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: vehicle , Stevens

Call of Suspicious Vehicle Leads to Recovery of Two Handguns, Heroin, and Methamphetamine; Subject Arrested (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 10/20/20 9:43 PM
2020-10/3056/139331/Guns_East_Stop.jpg
2020-10/3056/139331/Guns_East_Stop.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3056/139331/thumb_Guns_East_Stop.jpg
At approximately 1:03 p.m., on October 19, 2020, East Precinct officers responded to the 3500 block of Southeast 88th Avenue on reports of a suspicious vehicle. A caller reported they had witnessed the occupant of the vehicle make several exchanges with pedestrians, believing these exchanges were drugs. When officers arrived on scene, they located the suspicious vehicle and watched as a subject walked away from the vehicle at a quick pace. Officers approached the vehicle, noticing a different male subject seated in the driver's seat.

As officers spoke with the male subject, 28-year-old Brandon Thompson, they learned he was a felon in possession of a firearm. As officers continued their investigation, they recovered two 9mm handguns from inside the vehicle along with 41.8 grams heroin, 7.9 grams methamphetamine, and numerous suspected stolen items such as cellphones, tablets, power tools, and expensive clothing. Over $6500 in cash was found both on Thompson's person and inside the vehicle.

Thompson was booked in to the Multnomah County Detention Center on two charges of delivery of a controlled substance, two charges of possession of a controlled substance, theft 1, two charges of a felon in possession of a firearm, possession of a loaded firearm, and two charges of delivery of a controlled substance near a school.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2020-10/3056/139331/Guns_East_Stop.jpg , 2020-10/3056/139331/Money_East_Stop.jpg

Rope Tied in a Noose Found at Park in Bridlemile Neighborhood (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 10/20/20 6:42 PM
2020-10/3056/139330/Bridlemile_School.jpg
2020-10/3056/139330/Bridlemile_School.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3056/139330/thumb_Bridlemile_School.jpg
On October 16, 2020, at approximately 10:56 a.m., Central Precinct officers responded to Hamilton Park located in the 4300 block of Southwest 47th Drive on reports of a rope tied in a noose hanging from a baseball diamond backstop. The park is located directly next to Bridlemile Elementary School.

Officers arrived at the location and spoke to school officials, learning the rope was possibly hung from the backstop sometime on October 15th. Officers took pictures of the rope and how it was found at the baseball diamond backstop (photo). Bias crime detectives were notified and are currently reviewing the case.

The Portland Police Bureau's Equity Team is working closely with Portland Public Schools while the case is under review.

Anyone with additional information about this incident are encourage to submit a tip with Crime Stoppers. Tips may be submitted safely and securely to Crime Stoppers of Oregon online at http://crimestoppersoforegon.com/ or by phone at 503-823-HELP (4357).

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips from your smart phone.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2020-10/3056/139330/Bridlemile_School.jpg

Man Assaulted with Mallet and Steel Bar (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 10/20/20 12:19 PM
Mallet and steel bar
Mallet and steel bar
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3056/139306/thumb_mallet_and_bar.jpg
On October 19, 2020, at 7:31 p.m., Portland Police Bureau officers from East Precinct responded to the 3500 block of Southeast 122nd Ave on an assault call. Officer arrived and found an adult male victim who had been attacked by two male suspects, who were armed with a mallet and steel bar.

The victim notified a security guard who was in the area that two males were harassing people in the area. The victim continued on his way but the two males began to harass him as he was trying to leave. The two males then began to assault the man, who was not fighting back.

Two security guards in the area witnessed the assault and ran over to assist the victim. They were able to safely intervene and keep the suspects there until police arrived.

The victim was hit on the front and back of the head several times with both the wooden mallet and steel bar. The victim was transported to an area hospital with significant, but non-life-threatening injuries.

One suspect was a male juvenile and was taken to Donald E. Long Juvenile Detention Center for offenses including Assault II and Unlawful Use of a Weapon. The other suspect, 18 year-old Jakub Raymond Cyr, was lodged at the Multnomah County Detention Center on charges of Assault II, Assault III, and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.

Anyone with information about this incident is asked to call Detective Christensen at 503-823-2087 or email Brent.Christensen@portlandoregon.gov.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Mallet and steel bar

PPB Responds to a Series of Stabbings Overnight
Portland Police Bureau - 10/20/20 11:12 AM
On October 19, 2020, at 10:03 p.m., Officers from East Precinct and Transit Police responded to the 1100 block of Northeast 99th Ave in the Hazelwood neighborhood on reports of a robbery. It was reported that four young males between the ages of 11-15 exited the Max at Gateway where they approached an adult woman, who was homeless, and attempted to steal her purse. The woman struggled with the youth to retain her purse. The woman's husband confronted the youth and was stabbed in the neck by one of them. The victim was transported to an area hospital with serious injuries. The suspects fled the scene and no arrests were made. Once at the hospital, it was learned that the victim's injuries were non-life-threatening.

A few hours later, at 1:03 a.m. on October 20, 2020, a victim of a stabbing walked into an area hospital with serious, but non-life-threatening injuries. The adult male victim, who is also homeless, was stabbed five times near his camp in the Lents neighborhood by an unknown suspect. No crime scene was located and no arrests were made.

The last stabbing was reported at 2:39 a.m., where another victim walked into an area hospital with a serious, but non-life-threatening injury after being struck with a hatchet. The adult male victim was uncooperative with police, however, officers learned that the incident occurred in the Lents neighborhood near Southeast 92nd Ave and Flavel St. No crime scene was located and no arrests were made.

If anyone has information about this case, please contact Assault Detectives at 503-823-0400 or crimetips@portlandoregon.gov and reference case number 20-315551.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###PPB###

Mass Gathering Marches on the PPA Office, Blocks Streets, and Set a Fire.
Portland Police Bureau - 10/20/20 1:07 AM
On October 19, 2020, at approximately 8:00 p.m., a small group began to gather at Arbor Lodge Park in North Portland. Some people who gathered brought shields and masks with them. By 9:50 p.m., the crowd had grown to approximately 100 people and at 10:08 p.m. about 75 members of the group began to march.

The group marched east towards the Portland Police Association (PPA) Office with support vehicles following and blocking traffic.

The sound truck gave three announcements when the group arrived that said, "This is the Portland Police Bureau (PPB). The streets in the area around the PPA are open to vehicular traffic. Please remain on the sidewalk and be courteous to your neighbors. Do not vandalize buildings." The group immediately began spray painting the PPA office.

Some individuals stood on the sidewalks while others blocked North Lombard. The group used A-frame traffic signs to also block North Lombard. Some in the crowd climbed onto business roofs in the area.

At 11:15 someone started a fire on a billboard next to the PPA office. The fire burned the attached advertisement as the rest of the structure appeared to remain unaffected by the fire. The fire appeared to extinguish itself.

The sound truck then gave a new announcement that said, "This is the PPB. Stay off buildings, do not light fires, and remain on the sidewalk. If you engage in criminal activity you could be arrested and subject to use of force to include crowd control agents, impact weapons, and/or tear gas."

By 12:15 a.m. on October 20, 2020, the crowd began to dissipate on their own. With the exception of the sound truck, PPB did not interact with the crowd during this event. The incident commander requested Portland Fire and Rescue to check the billboard that was set on fire and roof of the PPA office. No arrests were made.

###PPB###

Repeat Burglary Suspect Arrested (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 10/19/20 11:54 AM
shattered glass door
shattered glass door
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3056/139262/thumb_business_door.jpg
On October 19, 2020, at 3:06 a.m., officers from North Precinct responded to an alarm in the 2300 block of Northeast Alberta St. When officers arrived they heard glass breaking and the sounds of an individual moving around inside. A police K9 arrived and a perimeter around the block was established. A suspect inside the business was taken into custody.

The suspect, identified as 55 year-old Marvin J. Perry, was arrested for Burglary II, Criminal Mischief I, and was lodged at the Multnomah County Detention Center on an outstanding warrant for Burglary II, Criminal Mischief I, and Theft I.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: shattered glass door

UPDATE: Photos of Vehicle Hit by Gunfire and Age Correction (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 10/18/20 1:37 PM
Vehicle 3
Vehicle 3
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3056/139234/thumb_162nd_Shooting_3.jpg
This update includes photos of the bullet strikes to the victims' vehicle.

Also, the little girl is actually 6 years of age. The original release was incorrect.

###PPB###
###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###


Three people, including a 6-year-old girl, were nearly struck by bullets as a suspect fired into their car.

On Sunday, October 18, 2020 at 12:14a.m., East Precinct officers responded to a report of a shooting near Southeast 162nd Avenue and Southeast Haig Street. They found a victim vehicle with damage consistent with gunfire.

The driver reported that he was driving on Southeast 162nd Avenue with his girlfriend and his girlfriend's young daughter when someone began shooting at their car. The suspect vehicle then passed the vehicle and fired from the front. When the victim made a turn to try to get away, the suspects fired into the side of the vehicle. There were at least 5 bullet strikes to the victim's vehicle. One of the bullets lodged into the seat directly behind the little girl. But no one was injured.

No suspect information is being released at this time.

If anyone has information about this case, please contact Assault Detectives at 503-823-0400 or crimetips@portlandoregon.gov and reference case number 20-315551.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Vehicle 3 , Vehicle 2 , Vehicle 1

Teenager Stabbed, Seriously Injured in the Centennial Neighborhood
Portland Police Bureau - 10/18/20 3:53 AM
A 15-year-old boy is recovering at a hospital after a stabbing in the Centennial Neighborhood.

On Saturday, October 17, 2020 at 11:09p.m., East Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a stabbing in the 17200 block of Southeast Alder Street. They located the victim with a stab wound to the back. He was transported by ambulance to the hospital with serious injuries.

Preliminary investigation indicates that he was approached by two boys in their early teens, one of whom cut him with an unknown weapon.

Officers attempted to locate the suspects, but were unsuccessful.

If anyone has information about this case, please contact Assault Detectives at 503-823-0400 or crimetips@portlandoregon.gov and reference case number 20-315473.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###PPB###

One Victim Injured After Shooting in Centennial Neighborhood
Portland Police Bureau - 10/17/20 10:26 PM
A woman is recovering from a gunshot wound after a shooting in the Centennial Neighborhood.

On Saturday, October 17, 2020 at 12:29p.m., East Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a shooting at an apartment complex in the 2500 block of Southeast 167th Avenue. When officers arrived the located one victim, an adult female, with a gunshot wound to the arm. Officers applied a tourniquet to reduce blood loss while paramedics were responding. The victim was transported to a hospital and her injury was determined to be non-life threatening.

Officers investigated and learned that an argument between known persons led to the shooting in the parking lot. The suspect left the area before police arrived and no arrests have been made.

Anyone with information about this shooting is asked to call Assault Detective Michael Jones at 503 823-0400 or Michael.Jones@portlandoregon.gov. Please reference case number 20-314952.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/
###PPB###

Drive-by Shooting in Cully Neighborhood, Detectives Request Information
Portland Police Bureau - 10/17/20 8:47 PM
A shooting outside of a market in the Cully Neighborhood has Assault Detectives requesting information from the public.

On Saturday, October 17, 2020 at 3:50p.m., North Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a shooting at Northeast Killingsworth Street and Northeast Cully Boulevard. Officers did not locate any victims or suspects, but they did discover evidence of gunfire in front of a corner market.

Officers investigated and learned that three victims, all males, were the apparent targets of the shooting. They ran off after the shots were fired and did not contact police. Assault detectives are hoping to get statements from them as well as any witnesses who saw the shooting.

The suspect vehicle is described as a light colored sedan with an unknown number of occupants.

Anyone with information about this shooting is asked to call Assault Detectives at 503 823-0400 or CrimeTips@portlandoregon.gov. Please reference case number 20-315133.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###PPB###

Barn Fire outside of Dallas
Sheridan/SW Polk/West Valley Fire Dists. - 10/23/20 2:25 PM

Just before 10:30 AM on October 22, 2020 Dallas, Sheridan, SW Polk and West Valley Fire District personnel were dispatch to a structure fire in the 3400 block of Liberty Rd. outside of Dallas. Due to the building being reported as a hay barn, the incident commander requested additional resources from prior to arrival. Personnel arrived to find a barn filled with smoke and fire coming from the barn with a residence two feet from the barn. All structures were evacuated prior to personnel arriving. The fire was contained to one side of the barn, with the majority of the contents of the barn being salvaged. The cause of the fire remains under investigation by the Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Office.  However, it was confirmed that wet hay was not the cause of this fire. Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Office will continue to investigate this fire in the coming days. Sheridan, SW Polk and West Valley personnel would like to thank Dallas Fire, Falls City Fire, Polk Co. #1, Polk County Sheriff’s Office, and Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Office for their assistance during this incident. 

 

Sheridan, SW Polk and West Valley Fire District personnel would like to remind the public, as the temperatures drop, to properly maintain heating appliances. This includes proper cleaning of appliances, preventative maintenance of appliances and safe storage of matches and lighters.  


Vancouver Police seek public assistance to identify robbery suspect (Update: Arrest)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 10/22/20 5:10 PM

Update

The suspect in this case, Anthony M. Sollers, 19, was arrested and booked into the Clark County Jail on Robbery I. 

Nothing further is releasable at this time.

Vancouver, Wash. –On October 20, 2020, at approximately 10:16 a.m., Vancouver Police responded to the IQ Credit Union, 7017 NE Vancouver Mall Drive for the report of a strong-armed robbery. The victim had made a withdrawal of cash from the ATM at the branch and before he could secure his wallet, an unknown male pushed him down from behind, stole his wallet and fled on foot.

A surveillance camera captured images of the suspect.

Anyone with information on the identity of the suspect is asked to call the Vancouver Police Tip Line at (360) 487-7399.

 

 

###

 

 


Vancouver Police conducting enhanced patrols around ballot boxes
Vancouver Police Dept. - 10/19/20 2:34 PM

Vancouver, Wash. –In an effort to ensure community members have free access to and from ballot drop locations, to deter potential voter intimidation and/or tampering with the ballot boxes, and to provide safety for the election officials collecting the ballots,  the Vancouver Police Department will be conducting enhanced patrols around authorized ballot boxes throughout Vancouver through November 3. Officers will also be looking for any non-authorized ballot boxes.

Vancouver Police will not be touching or handling ballots and will notify a Clark County election official if a ballot box appears to be unsecured.

Any incidents of voter intimidation or ballot box tampering should be reported by calling 3-1-1.

 

###

 

 

 

 


Impaired Driver Strikes Large Boulder, Propels it into Occupied Parked Car (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/24/20 1:46 PM
Crash scene photo
Crash scene photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1128/139457/thumb_3.jpg

On Thursday, October 22, 2020, at 11:22 p.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a three-vehicle crash in the 19200 block of SW TV Highway in Aloha. When they arrived, they saw that a 2003 Ford F-150 had struck a large landscaping boulder on the north side of the road. The impact of the collision propelled the boulder about 75 feet, where it collided with a parked 2004 Toyota Corolla. Two people were in the Corolla at the time. The Ford truck continued another 85 feet, where it went up and over the rear of a 2003 Chevrolet Impala before coming to rest. Fortunately, no one was injured.

The investigation revealed that 18-year-old Ezequiel Garrido-Torres was driving while impaired. Mr. Garrido-Torres was cited for DUII – Controlled Substance, Recklessly Endangering Another Person and Reckless Driving. No booking photo is available at this time. His first court appearance will be on November 24th.

The Washington County Sheriff’s Office wishes to remind the public about the dangers of impaired driving. Deputies recommend designating a safe driver prior to any consumption of alcoholic beverages or marijuana. As alternatives, public transportation, taxis and app-based transportation networking companies are readily available in the Portland Metro area.

One victim who was in the Toyota Corolla is willing to speak to the media. Please call or email the PIO to obtain her contact information.




Attached Media Files: Media Release in PDF format , Crash scene photo , Crash scene photo , Crash scene photo

UPDATE: Deputies Arrest Armed Kidnapping Suspect (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/21/20 2:56 PM
Booking Photo
Booking Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1128/139362/thumb_SANNICOLASNICHOLAS_MONTEVERDE.png

On Tuesday, October 20, 2020, at around 6:30 p.m., Washington County Sheriff's Office deputies arrested Nicholas San Nicolas during a suspicious circumstances call on SW Sammy Drive in the community of Aloha.

Mr. Nicolas was lodged on the following charges:

  • Robbery in the second degree
  • Kidnapping in the second degree
  • Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle
  • Assault in the fourth degree
  • Unlawful use of a weapon
  • Felon in possession of a weapon
  • Menacing
  • Reckless driving
  • Parole violation

The first vehicle involved in the kidnapping (blue truck) was recovered in August. The second vehicle involved in this case (white truck) was recovered this morning (Wednesday) in the same area where Mr. Nicolas was arrested.

 

(Original Release Below)

Detectives Seek Public's Help in Locating Armed Kidnapping Suspects

August 27, 2020

On Thursday, August 27, 2020, at 3:30 p.m., Washington County Sheriff's Office deputies responded to the Forest Ridge Apartments located at 7330 SW 204th Avenue in the community of Aloha. Deputies learned that a 22-year-old male was standing outside his apartment when two men approached with guns drawn. Deputies learned that 31-year-old Nicholas San Nicolas forced the victim into the victim's Nissan truck and drove off. San Nicolas' accomplice followed San Nicolas in a 2016 or 2017 dark blue BMW Z3.

One of the victim's family members suspected the victim had been taken and began driving around the area looking for the victim's vehicle. Less than 10 minutes after the kidnapping, the family members saw the Nissan truck near the intersection of SW 185th Avenue and SW Farmington Road. The family member saw that the victim was in danger and subsequently rammed the Nisan truck. Shortly after getting rammed, San Nicolas pushed the victim out of the Nissan truck and onto the road near the intersection. The victim was later transported to a local hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

San Nicolas drove off in the victim's Nissan truck, described as a late 90's body style, with red seats, and purple straps in the bed.

San Nicolas is a male Pacific Islander, approximately 5' 4" tall and weighing 230 pounds. His hair is currently long and tied in a ponytail.

San Nicolas' accomplice is also an adult male Pacific Islander. Both San Nicolas and his accomplice are wanted for several crimes, including kidnapping in the first degree, felon in possession of a firearm, unlawful use of a weapon, unlawful use of a motor vehicle, menacing, and an outstanding felony warrant.

San Nicolas and his accomplice are considered armed and dangerous. If you have information about the location of San Nicolas or the identity of his accomplice, please call 911. The Washington County Sheriff's Office urges community members not to approach either male.

 




Attached Media Files: PDF Version , Booking Photo , White Truck , Blue Truck

The West Linn Police Department will add extra patrols for the last week of National Distracted Driving Month, October 24th through October 31st, 2020
West Linn Police Dept. - 10/23/20 1:39 PM

In Oregon over the past five years, 137 people lost their lives in crashes involving a distracted driver, and more than 20,992 were injured. Perhaps the saddest part of these statistics, besides there being real people behind them, is that these are preventable crashes.

What is distracted driving?  Distraction occurs when a driver voluntarily diverts attention to something not related to driving that uses the driver's eyes, ears, or hands. There are four types of driver distraction:


• Visual -- looking at something other than the road

• Auditory -- hearing something not related to driving

• Manual -- manipulating something other than the wheel

• Cognitive -- thinking about something other than driving Most distractions involve more than one of these types, with both a sensory -- eyes, ears, or touch -- and a mental component.
 
 In Oregon, distracted driving costs include not only the potential loss of life or injury, but can hurt the pocketbook as well:

  • First offense, not contributing to a crash: Class B violation; Fine up to $1,000.
  • Second offense – or first offense if it contributed to a crash: Class A violation; Fine up to $2,000.
  • Third offense in ten years: Class B misdemeanor; Fine up to $2,500; Could be up to six months in jail.

The West Linn Police Department will be working overtime patrols to specifically stop drivers displaying distracted driving behaviors. Please drive safely. For all of us.   


Medical
PeaceHealth offers tips for celebrating Halloween safely
PeaceHealth - 10/22/20 10:00 AM

COVID-19 continues to be active in Cowlitz County, and PeaceHealth has several ideas to help your family celebrate the holiday in a safe manner.

PeaceHealth Nurse Practitioner Jason Whitney is concerned that after eight months of meticulous masking, hand washing and social distancing, the upcoming holidays may cause people to let down their guard. “Facial covering fatigue is setting in and people are growing weary of social distancing," said Whitney. "However, it is important that we remain focused on the fact that our efforts to stop the spread of the virus are saving lives and protecting jobs in our community.”

Whitney, who provides care at PeaceHealth’s Family Practice and Pediatric Clinic, has great sympathy for the many experiences children are missing out on due to COVID-19. “Halloween is on a Saturday this year, which would normally be a great opportunity for people to get together celebrate. However, starting with Halloween and then at Thanksgiving, Christmas and on New Year's Eve, it will be extremely important that families celebrate the holidays in safe and healthy ways.”

PeaceHealth recognizes the importance of keeping the holidays festive. Many traditional Halloween activities such as costume parties can be high-risk for spreading viruses. As the holiday approaches, consider some of these safe but non-traditional ways to celebrate Halloween:

  • Carve pumpkins with members of your household or outside with neighbors or friends.
  • Walk from house to house admiring Halloween decorations at a distance.
  • Set up an outdoor Halloween-themed scavenger hunt.
  • Hide Halloween treats in and around your house. Hold a Halloween treat hunt with household members.
  • Hold an outdoor costume parade or contest in your neighborhood so everyone can show off their costumes.
  • Host an outdoor Halloween movie night with friends or neighbors, or an indoor movie night with your household members.
  • Take your family on a nature walk to admire the fall foliage in an orchard or forest.

Many traditional Halloween activities such as costume parties can be high-risk for spreading viruses, and the Washington Department of Health is discouraging traditional door-to-door trick-or-treating this year. If you do expect Halloween visitors at your home, plan ahead to minimize contact with trick-or-treaters to protect both your health and theirs.

  • Wear a mask and wash your hands before handling treats, and after every visitor.
  • Wait outside with treats, if possible, and set up a treat station with individually bagged treats for children to grab and go.

With many fall and winter celebrations on the calendar for the next few weeks including Halloween, Día de los Muertos, Navratri, Diwali, Thanksgiving, Día de la Virgen de Guadalupe, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Christmas and New Year’s, families and friends will naturally long to host and attend gatherings. If you will be hosting a celebration, follow CDC tips for hosting gatherings.

About PeaceHealth
PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 900 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.


Celebrating Halloween Safely During COVID-19
PeaceHealth - 10/20/20 2:30 PM

COVID-19 continues to be active in Clark County, and PeaceHealth has several ideas to help your family celebrate the holiday in a safe manner.

PeaceHealth Family Medicine physician Heather Bergstrom, DO is concerned that, after eight months of meticulous masking and hand washing, the upcoming holidays may cause people to let down their guard. “I worry that mask fatigue is setting in, and people are growing weary of social distancing. However, we must continue to be mindful that our efforts to stop the spread of the virus are saving lives.”

Dr. Bergstrom, who provides care at PeaceHealth  Family Medicine Clinic at Fisher’s Landing, has great sympathy for the many experiences children are missing out on due to COVID-19. “Halloween is on a Saturday this year, which would normally offer such a great opportunity to get together as a community. However, from Halloween through Thanksgiving, Christmas and the New Year, it will be extremely important that we celebrate the holidays in socially distanced, safe and healthy ways.”

Many traditional Halloween activities such as costume parties can be high-risk for spreading viruses, and the Washington Department of Health is discouraging traditional door-to-door trick-or-treating this year. Dr. Bergstrom says it’s important to keep the holidays festive, but suggests creative new ways that protect our health:

  • Carve pumpkins with members of your household or outside with neighbors or friends using separate tools/equipment.
  • Walk from house to house, admiring Halloween decorations at a distance.
  • Take the family on an autumn hike to an orchard or forest.
  • Set up an outdoor Halloween-themed scavenger hunt with your household members.
  • Hide Halloween treats in and around your house. Hold a Halloween treat hunt with household members.
  • Hold an outdoor costume parade or contest in your neighborhood so everyone can show off their costumes while remaining socially distanced.
  • Host an outdoor Halloween movie night with friends or neighbors, or an indoor movie night with your household members.

With many fall and winter celebrations on the calendar for the next few weeks including Halloween, Día de los Muertos, Navratri, Diwali, Thanksgiving, Día de la Virgen de Guadalupe, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Christmas, and New Year’s, families and friends will naturally long to host and attend gatherings. This can be hard to resist, but socially distancing is important. Consider gathering in smaller groups outdoors or virtual options to reduce the risk of infecting those you care about. However, if you still plan to host a celebration, follow CDC tips for hosting gatherings and our local state/county recommendations.

About PeaceHealth
PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 900 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.


Utilities
Willamette Intake Facilities Board Meeting - October 26, 2020
Tualatin Valley Water Dist. - Willamette Intake Facilities - 10/19/20 5:17 PM

The October Willamette Intake Facilities (WIF) Board Meeting will be held on Monday, October 26, 2020, at 6:00pm.

An executive session will be held at 5:30 pm. under ORS 192.660(2)(f) to consider information or records that are exempt by law from public inspection and ORS 192.660(2)(h) to consult with counsel concerning the legal rights and duties of a public body with regard to current litigation or litigation likely to be filed.

Location: In compliance with COVID-19 restrictions, meeting access is via conference dial-in only. If you wish to attend remotely, please contact annette.rehms@tvwd.org or call 971-222-5957 for dial-in information by 3:00pm on October 26, 2020. If you wish to address the WIF Board, please request the Public Comment Form and return it 48 hours prior to the day of the meeting.  

The Board meeting agenda packet and additional information regarding the Willamette Intake Facilities are available on the WIF Commission website: 

https://www.tvwd.org/district/page/willamette-intake-facilities-commission-meeting-9


Transportation
Hop Fastpass(TM) Electronic Fares Coming to C-VAN
C-TRAN - 10/19/20 8:57 AM

On Sunday, November 1, 2020, Hop Fastpass will make its debut on C-VAN, C-TRAN’s paratransit service that provides transportation for those with disabilities. The electronic fare payment system provides passengers with an easy-to-use and contactless way to pay fares on both C-TRAN and TriMet. Passengers can easily load value to their cards through the auto-load feature available through www.myhopcard.com, or the phone app available through Google or Apple stores. For those who choose to register their Hop card, they can sign up for lost card protection which ensures their card’s value is protected in the event it’s lost or stolen.

Every current and active C-VAN passenger has already received a free Hop card in the mail, along with instructions for loading value, how to use the card and where to get further assistance. C-TRAN’s website also features a “how to” video with step-by-step instructions for ambulatory and non-ambulatory passengers who use Hop on C-VAN. While paper passes and punch cards are no longer sold, passengers who have unused C-VAN punch cards can use them through December 31, 2021. Cash will continue to be accepted on all C-TRAN and TriMet services.

C-TRAN is the regional public transportation provider for Clark County. It offers Local bus service within its Clark County service area, plus Regional and Express bus service to Portland. It also provides Connector service within the city limits of Vancouver, Camas, La Center, and Ridgefield. For more information on C-TRAN please visit C-TRAN’s website at www.c-tran.com, or call Customer Service at 360-695-0123.


24/7 lane restrictions lifted on Oregon 138E, daytime lane closures begin Sunday
ODOT: SW Oregon - 10/23/20 3:39 PM

GLIDE -- The 24-hour lane closures that have been in effect on Oregon 138E (North Umpqua Highway) between Idleyld and Steamboat (milepost 19-39) will be lifted at 5 p.m. today, Oct. 23.

Cleanup work related to the Archie Creek Fire will resume on Sunday, Oct. 25, and will continue each Sunday to Friday for the next several weeks. Motorists should expect daytime (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.) lane closures and 20 minute delays between Idleyld and Steamboat. All lanes are expected to be open each Saturday.

Multiple work zones will be in place through this area. Flaggers will provide traffic control as needed.

All forest lands in this area are closed within the burn area. Motorists are advised to stay in their cars and avoid parking along the shoulder due to ongoing hazardous conditions.

Visit www.TripCheck.com for the latest information on road and travel conditions.

##ODOT##


Federal
TODAY: Join the BLM for a Post-Wildfire Assessment Presentation on the Archie Creek Fire
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 10/22/20 10:02 AM

Roseburg, Ore. – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Roseburg District, will hold a virtual meeting to present findings from the Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) team, on Thursday, October 22, 2020, at 4:00 p.m. The BAER team compiles an initial report on fire impacted resources and provides recommendations on stabilizing burned areas to minimize additional damage.  

The BAER presentation will be hosted virtually, and open to the public on the Zoom platform with alternate methods for attendance available.  

To access the meeting, please use one of the methods outlined below:  

Join ZoomGov Meeting 
https://blm.zoomgov.com/j/1608330362?pwd=WUE1NUdRUlM1c1pLWUw0QnptUW4yQT09 
Meeting ID: 160 833 0362 
Passcode: 262068 

 

One tap mobile 
+16692545252,,1608330362# US (San Jose) 
+16468287666,,1608330362# US (New York) 

 

Dial by your location 
        +1 669 254 5252 US (San Jose) 
        +1 646 828 7666 US (New York) 
        833 568 8864 US Toll-free 

Meeting ID: 160 833 0362 
Find your local number: https://blm.zoomgov.com/u/adR65tWHzr 

 

Join by SIP 
1608330362@sip.zoomgov.com 

 

Join by H.323 
161.199.138.10 (US West) 
161.199.136.10 (US East) 
52 
61 
100.140 
Meeting ID: 160 833 0362 
Passcode: 262068 

 

For further information on BLM managed public lands and closure information within the Roseburg District, please contact Cheyne Rossbach at 541-579-0648 or by e-mail at: ossbac@blm.gov" target="_blank">crossbac@blm.gov

 

-BLM- 

 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs.  


It's all about the numbers: BLM Releases Annual Almanac (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 10/20/20 3:31 PM
2019 BLM Facts
2019 BLM Facts
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/5514/139325/thumb_BLM_Facts_2020.jpg

Portland, Ore. – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon and Washington is proud to announce the latest BLM Facts, our annual illustrated almanac answering the diverse and detailed questions one may have about public lands in the Pacific Northwest. 

BLM Facts has lots of numbers, and those figures do tell a story. In most cases, your public lands are located within an hour's drive from where you live or work. You can find an amazing array of resources and opportunities at almost any site you visit.

This 2019 report has the latest BLM news and updates – from wild and scenic rivers and exciting recreation sites to wildlife, cultural, and archaeological programs. BLM Facts also shares information about management plans for minerals and energy, forestry, mining, wild horses, and much more.

In addition to maintaining our commitment to delivering an updated volume every year, we continue to make improvements such as full-color maps, photos, and a plethora of timely, user-friendly data. You can read it online at:

https://www.blm.gov/documents/oregon-washington/public-room/fact-sheet/2019-blm-facts

You can also review BLM’s annual almanac library, going all the way back to 1963, at:

https://www.blm.gov/media/public-room/oregon-washington

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in the 11 Western states and Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.




Attached Media Files: 2019 BLM Facts

Representatives Needed for Steens Mountain Advisory Council
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 10/19/20 3:50 PM

HINES, Ore. – Did you know the Bureau of Land Management has Resource Advisory Councils – made up of people just like you – that give citizen-based advice and recommendations on the management of public lands? These groups provide an opportunity for individuals from all backgrounds and interests to have a stronger impact on the decisions made for public lands.

The Steens Mountain Advisory Council (SMAC) currently has five vacant positions and six positions with terms expiring in 2021 open for public nomination:

  • a person interested in fish and recreational fishing in the Steens Mountain Cooperative Management and Protection Area (CMPA);
  • a person who is a grazing permittee on Federal lands in the CMPA;
  • two persons who are recognized environmental representatives, one to represent the State as a whole and one from the local area;
  • a person who has no financial interest in the CMPA to represent statewide interests;
  • a person who participates in mechanized or consumptive recreation in the CMPA, such as hunting, fishing, or off-road driving;
  • a recreation permit holder or representative of a commercial recreation operation in the CMPA;
  • a person who regularly participates in dispersed recreation in the CMPA, such as hiking, camping, nature viewing, nature photography, bird watching, horse back riding, or trail walking;
  • a person to serve as the State government liaison to the Council;
  • a private landowner within the CMPA; and
  • a member of the Burns Paiute Tribe.

If you are interested in public land management on Steens Mountain, this is a great opportunity to share your expertise and work with a collaborative group. The SMAC has been successful in bringing diverse and often competing interests to the table to deal with issues of mutual concern. This inclusive approach has shown great promise as a means to creatively and successfully deal with long-standing problems of public land management. Consensus-driven recommendations often lead to sustainable outcomes that benefit natural resources and have a high level of public support.

"Resource Advisory Councils provide the BLM with vital feedback on current issues, concerns and proposals, and enable us to engage local communities and stakeholders to improve our management of public lands," said BLM Burns District Manager Jeff Rose.

To nominate yourself or someone you know, submit a membership application and supporting letters of recommendation from the groups or interests to be represented to the BLM Burns District Office, 28910 Hwy 20 West, Hines, Oregon. Nominees will be evaluated based on their training, education, and knowledge of the Steens Mountain area.

The application deadline is November 13, 2020. Nomination forms can be picked up at this same location,
by mail or phone request at (541) 573-4400, or online at: https://www.blm.gov/get-involved/resource-advisory-council/apply

The specific category the nominee would like to represent should be identified in the nomination form and letters of reference. The BLM and the Governor of Oregon will review the applications and submit recommended nominees to the Secretary of the Interior, who has the responsibility for making the appointments.

Appointed members must reside in the State of Oregon. The SMAC generally holds quarterly meetings in Hines, Bend and Frenchglen. Although members serve without monetary compensation, travel and per diem expenses are reimbursed at current rates for government employees. SMAC members are normally appointed to three-year terms.
For more information on the SMAC, call Tara Thissell at (541) 573-4400.

- BLM -

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in the 11 Western states and Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.


Astoria Man Accused of Civil Disorder for Throwing a Large Cylindrical Firework at Police
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/23/20 2:07 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that an Astoria, Oregon man has been charged with Civil Disorder during protest activities in Portland.

            Ty John Fox, 23, is charged in a one-count indictment with Civil Disorder in violation of Title 18 U.S.C. Section 231(a)(3).

            According to the court record, on the evening of September 6, 2020, Fox was part of a group protesting near the Portland Police Bureau’s (PPB) East Precinct building. Fox was seen on video with other protesters, who had formed a line in the street across from PPB officers and Oregon State Police troopers. Fox can be seen, while walking behind the line of protesters, turning toward the camera, using a torch lighter to ignite a large, cylindrical firework, and throwing the device over the protesters toward the officers. Moments later, an explosion and flash occurred near the officers. He was arrested later that night.

             Fox made his initial appearance in federal court today before U.S. Magistrate Judge Youlee Yim You.  He was arraigned, pleaded not guilty, and ordered released pending a two-day jury trial scheduled to begin on December 29, 2020.

            The Federal Bureau of Investigation investigated this case.  It is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

            An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.




Attached Media Files: Astoria Man Accused of Civil Disorder for Throwing a Large Cylindrical Firework at Police

Portland Man Accused of Civil Disorder
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/21/20 4:09 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that a Portland, Oregon man has been charged with Civil Disorder and Theft of Government Property during protest activities in Portland.

            Jeffrey Richard Singer, 33, is charged in an two-count indictment with Civil Disorder in violation of Title 18 U.S.C. Section 231(a)(3) and, in a separate incident, Theft of Government Property in violation of Title 18 U.S.C. Section 641.

            According to the court record, on the evening of October 4, 2020, Singer was one of a number of individuals protesting near the Portland City Hall in Downtown Portland.  Singer charged at two officers with his shoulder lowered.  He slammed into the officers, causing one of them to stagger backwards from the force of the impact and injuring that officer’s hands.  After colliding with the officers, Singer was arrested.  

In a separate incident on September 19, 2020, a group of individuals were protesting near the Gus Solomon Courthouse in downtown Portland. Singer is alleged to have stolen the U.S. flag from the Court’s flagpole.

             Singer made his initial appearance in federal court today before U.S. Magistrate Judge Youlee Yim You. He was arraigned, pleaded not guilty, and ordered released pending a two-day jury trial scheduled to begin on December 22, 2020.  While on release, he must abide by strict conditions, including a curfew from 8:30 p.m. until 6:00 a.m.

            The Federal Bureau of Investigation investigated this case. It is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

            An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.




Attached Media Files: Portland Man Accused of Civil Disorder

Minneapolis Resident Accused Of Engaging In Multiple Acts Of Vandalism And Violence Including Throwing Rocks At Police During Civil Disorder In Portland
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/21/20 2:30 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that a Minneapolis, Minnesota resident has been charged with engaging in multiple acts of vandalism and violence including throwing rocks at police officers engaged in lawful crowd dispersal during a civil disorder event.

            A federal grand jury in Portland has returned a one-count indictment charging Adrian Ruben De Los Rios, 32, with Civil Disorder.

            According to court documents, in the evening of August 5, 2020, a group of individuals blocked traffic on SE 106th Avenue outside of Portland Police Bureau’s (PPB) East Precinct. By 9:40 p.m., people began tearing off the boards that were protecting the glass windows of East Precinct. An unlawful assembly was declared shortly before 10:00 p.m. and PPB made public address announcements telling the group to leave the area.

            A PPB officer inside the East Precinct witnessed an individual, later identified as De Los Rios, throw several chunks of concrete at the building’s glass, and strike the building’s glass with a hammer. Afterward, the same officer observed De Los Rios at a fire that was in a trash can approximately one foot away from the front door of the East Precinct. De Los Rios was seen placing a 2x4 piece of lumber into the fire and leaning it up against the building. Other PPB officers reported viewing videos on the internet that depicted De Los Rios engaging in the above-mentioned acts. A PPB officer also reported viewing a video that showed De Los Rios placing a 2x4 piece of wood through the exterior door handles of the East Precinct and ramming the doors with what appeared to be a 4x4 piece of wood.

Later in the evening, as PPB officers were dispersing the crowd, a PPB officer witnessed De Los Rios throw multiple baseball-size rocks at police officers. On one occasion, De Los Rios threw a rock at the officer while holding additional rocks in his opposite hand. The officer was able to continually observe De Los Rios while PPB officers were dispersing the crowd. De Los Rios was located later and taken into custody, wearing the same clothing as earlier in the evening. A search incident to arrest revealed two baseball-size rocks inside De Los Rios’s backpack.

Adrian Ruben De Los Rios made an initial appearance in federal court today before U.S. Magistrate Judge Youlee Yim You, was arraigned, pleaded not guilty, and was ordered released pending a two-day jury trial scheduled to begin on December 22, 2020.

            The FBI investigated this case. It is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon. An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/6325/139360/INDICTMENT-DE_LOS_RIOS_-_FINAL.pdf

5th Annual Building Bridges Of Understanding In Our Communities Event Invites Hundreds Of Community And Law Enforcement Leaders
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/21/20 9:28 AM

Fifth annual event to be held on October 22, 2020, 5:00 pm

PORTLAND, Ore.—Hundreds of law enforcement officials and community members from throughout the tri-county area are coming together for the fifth-annual Building Bridges of Understanding in Our Communities event on October 22, 2020, via ZOOM hosted by the Muslim Educational Trust (MET) in Tigard, Oregon.

            A video of last year’s event is available here.

This year’s theme is “Redefining Community and Public Safety Relationships”. Criminal justice and community leaders share perspectives in moderated panel discussions and engage with community members with comments and questions.

A panel of diverse community and law enforcement perspectives will delve into the topic of “Defunding Police and Reimaging Public Safety”. Public Safety leaders will lay out their goals for accountability, transparency and community engagement to build community trust. The audience will be provided the opportunity to ask questions and provide comments to all panelists.

            Presenters include community leaders from Word is Bond, Coalition of Communities of Color, Reimagine Oregon, Latino Network, Muslim Educational Trust, and public safety leaders from the tri-county area including Chiefs, Sheriffs, District Attorneys, the U.S. Attorney and the FBI’s Special Agent in Charge.

For the last five years, leaders from public safety and civil society organizations have come together to build and strengthen trust with one another and to cultivate that trust within the communities served. The annual event has been held at MET since its inception in the fall of 2016.

The Building Bridges event series is sponsored by Washington County Sheriff’s and District Attorney’s Offices, Washington County Administration, Clackamas County District Attorney’s Office, City of Lake Oswego, Lake Oswego Respond to Racism, Concerned Citizens of West Linn, Latino Network, Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon, IRCO, Muslim Community Center of Portland, Tigard Police Department, Portland Office of Civic Life, Portland Bureau of Transportation, Portland Police Bureau, New Portlanders Foundation, Portland’s New Portlanders Policy Commission, Salman Alfarisi Islamic Center of Corvallis, Multnomah County Sheriff’s and District Attorney’s Offices, Urban League of Portland and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

If you have media inquiries or would like to book interviews with steering committee members, please contact Stephen Mayer of the Washington County District Attorney’s Office: Stephen_Mayer@co.washington.or.us, 971-708-8219.

Media outlets are also welcome to contact the following steering committee members:

# # #




Attached Media Files: Building Bridges Announcement

Portland Man Accused of Illegal Possession of Body Armor
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/20/20 2:50 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that a Portland Oregon man with a previous felony conviction has been charged with possessing body armor during protest activity in Portland.

            Maurice Lonnie Monson, 30, is charged by indictment with one count of Felon in Possession of Body Armor in violation of Title 18 U.S.C. Section 931.

            According to court documents, on the evening of September 4, 2020, a group of protestors were blocking traffic along North Lombard Street in Portland, Oregon, near the vicinity of the Portland Police Association (PPA) office. The PPA office has been targeted by violent protest activity numerous times throughout the summer. 

            At approximately 11:35 p.m., Portland Police declared an unlawful assembly after some within the protest hurled rocks, water bottles and cans at officers. As part of the unlawful assembly declaration, protestors were ordered to clear the roadway. Monson was arrested when he failed to comply with the order to disperse. When arrested, it was discovered that Monson was wearing a ballistic “bullet proof” vest. Additional investigation revealed that Monson has a previous felony conviction in Multnomah County, Oregon in 2009. As such, it is illegal for Monson to possess ballistic body armor.

             Monson made his initial appearance in federal court today before U.S. Magistrate Judge Youlee Yim You. He was arraigned, pleaded not guilty, and ordered released pending a two-day jury trial scheduled to begin on December 22, 2020.

            The Federal Bureau of Investigation investigated this case. It is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

            An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.




Attached Media Files: Portland Man Accused of Illegal Possession of Body Armor

State
DPSST Fire Policy Committee Meeting Canceled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 10/20/20 2:15 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

October 20, 2020

Contact:      Mona Riesterer  
                   (503) 378-2431

Notice of Meeting Cancelation

The Fire Policy Committee meeting scheduled for November 17, 2020 @ 9:00 a.m. has been canceled. The next Fire Policy Committee meeting is scheduled for February 24, 2021 @ 9:00 a.m. For further information, please contact Mona Riesterer at (503) 378-2431.


New Artist Relief Program to provide $1.25 million in relief to Oregon artists (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 10/19/20 9:21 AM
Mobile Projection Unit (Fernanda D’Agostino & Sarah Turner) with musician Crystal Cortez “Springs,” 2020. Photo by Photo Brian Foulkes.
Mobile Projection Unit (Fernanda D’Agostino & Sarah Turner) with musician Crystal Cortez “Springs,” 2020. Photo by Photo Brian Foulkes.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1418/139249/thumb_Artist_Relief_Fenanda_Sarah.jpg

Oregon artists may now apply to a new Artist Relief Program created by the Oregon Arts Commission in partnership with The Oregon Community Foundation and the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation. Awards ranging from $1,000 to $5,000 will be distributed until the program fund, totaling just over $1.25 million, is depleted.

“Without our artists, there would be no art in Oregon,” said Brian Rogers, executive director of the Oregon Arts Commission. “We feel strongly that, in addition to the significant relief we were able to provide to arts and cultural organizations through federal CARES Act funds allocated to the National Endowment for the Arts and the Oregon Cultural Trust, we need to offer relief funding to struggling Oregon artists as well. We are extremely grateful to The Oregon Community Foundation and the Miller Foundation for joining us in that effort.”

The purpose of the Artist Relief Program is to provide relief funding to Oregon artists who have experienced financial hardship during the COVID-19 pandemic due to cancellations of exhibitions, performances, rehearsals or other activities with a stipend, events, teaching opportunities, book signings or other professional presentation opportunities. Guidelines are now posted on the Arts Commission website.

“In times of crisis, artists help us make sense of our world and stay connected to one another,” said Martha Richards, executive director of the Miller Foundation. “The Miller Foundation stands with Oregon artists in this difficult time because we recognize the critical roles they play in our communities and our lives--they are the foundation of our state’s arts ecosystem.”

“Oregon Community Foundation is thrilled to be a partner in this new Artist Relief program,” added Jerry Tischleder, Oregon Community Foundation’s program officer for arts and culture. “We recognize that independent and freelance artists are vital to the recovery of our communities, bringing hope and inspiration to the world while using their creativity to help process the collective trauma, grief and loss we’ve all experienced in these unprecedented times.”

The program supports professional artists from specific disciplines who have experienced or anticipate experiencing loss of revenue of $1,000 or more between March 1 and Dec. 31, 2020.

The artistic disciplines supported are: Literature (creative non-fiction, fiction, play writing and poetry); dance (including choreography); music (composition and music performance); theatre and performance art; folk and traditional arts; visual arts (crafts, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, mixed media and new media); design arts; and media arts.

Applications are due by 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 10. Awards must be spent by July 31, 2021.

Artists from underserved communities, including (but not limited to) rural communities and communities of color, as well as artists with disabilities, are especially encouraged to apply.

                   

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org.

 




Attached Media Files: Mobile Projection Unit (Fernanda D’Agostino & Sarah Turner) with musician Crystal Cortez “Springs,” 2020. Photo by Photo Brian Foulkes.

"Blue Cheese Day" Celebrates America's First Grand Champion Cheese (Photo)
Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council - 10/18/20 2:56 PM
Rogue Creamery in Central Point
Rogue Creamery in Central Point
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/4131/139239/thumb_Rogue_Creamery_in_Central_Point.jpg

It was exactly one year ago today that a small American creamery from Oregon made national and international news.

On October 18, 2019, Rogue Creamery from Central Point, Oregon, earned the title of “best cheese in the world” for their Rogue River Blue Cheese at the World Cheese Awards in Bergamo, Italy. It was the first time in the history of the competition that an American cheese was selected as grand champion.

In honor of Rogue River Blue’s historic win, Oregon Governor Kate Brown issued a proclamation designating October 18 as Blue Cheese Day.

Similar to the “Judgement of Paris” in 1976, when American wines triumphed over the best French vintners in a blind taste test, this was a statement win and a landmark moment for American artisanal and farmstead cheeses.

U.S. Dairy Export Council President, Tom Vilsack said, “This is more than a win for Rogue Creamery of Central Point, Oregon, The ‘Best Cheese’ title creates a halo effect that will cause global customers to look at all U.S. cheeses in a brighter light.”

This was no small feat. An international panel of 260 judges selected Rogue River Blue out of more than 3,800 cheeses from 42 countries.

The judges experienced the signature Rogue Valley terroir captured within each taste of the organic, cave-aged blue cheese wrapped in Syrah grape leaves soaked in pear spirits, with flavors of sweet pine, wild ripened berries, hazelnuts, morels and pears. It earned their high praise and respect.

This special cheese is the product of seventeen years of hard work and refinement by President David Gremmels with support from his dedicated team at Rogue Creamery and their organic herd of Brown Swiss and Holstein cows. Rogue Creamery is a certified B-Corporation that serves as a model for sustainability in dairy, committed to leaving a positive impact on people, animals, and the planet.

“I am humbled and filled with gratitude. This is the greatest distinction a cheese can receive,” said Rogue Creamery President, David Gremmels. “What extraordinary validation of our commitment to quality, of the place that inspires our cheese – Southern Oregon’s Rogue Valley – and of the excellence of the growing American artisan cheese industry.”

Since the 2020 World Cheese Awards were postponed to 2021, Rogue River Blue will have the rare distinction of continuing its reign as “best in the world” for two years running.

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Attached Media Files: Blue Cheese Day Proclamation , Rogue Creamery in Central Point , World Cheese Awards Grand Champion , Rogue Creamery President David Gremmels 2 , Rogue Creamery President David Gremmels 1 , Rogue Creamery team with President David Gremmels 3 , Rogue Creamery team with President David Gremmels 2 , Rogue Creamery team with President David Gremmels 1

Missing child alert -- Missing infant Dennis Johnson believed to be at risk (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/23/20 7:31 PM
Dennis Johnson
Dennis Johnson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/973/139453/thumb_Dennis_Johnson.JPG

(Salem, Ore.) – Dennis Johnson, an infant born Nov. 14, 2019, went missing with his parents Kayla Burk and Joseph Johnson from Portland, Ore. on Oct. 20, 2020. The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) believes that Dennis may be at risk and is searching for him to assess his safety.

ODHS asks the public to help in the effort to find Dennis Johnson. Anyone who suspects they have information about the location of Dennis Johnson or his parents Kayla Burk and Joseph Johnson should call 911 or the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline at 1-855-503-SAFE (7233). They are believed to be in the Portland metro area.

Name: Dennis Johnson
Date of birth: Nov. 14, 2019
Height: 29 inches
Weight: 20 pounds
Eye color: Blue
Hair color: Blonde
Portland Police Bureau Case #20-319821
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1404759

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

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Attached Media Files: Dennis Johnson , Dennis Johnson with Joseph Johnson , Dennis Johnson with Kayla Burk

UPDATE -- Mya Miranda found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/22/20 5:25 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – Mya Miranda, age 16, a foster child who went missing from Boardman, Ore. on Oct. 17, 2020, was found on Oct. 22, 2020. The Oregon Department of Human Services, Child Welfare Division is thankful for the community support to find her.

A small number of children in foster care may be in significant danger when they run away or have gone missing. As DHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and ensure their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

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Waiver expands options for food benefits in 23 counties
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/22/20 12:35 PM

A waiver approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) allows Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Disaster SNAP recipients in the following 23 counties to purchase hot or prepared foods from authorized SNAP retailers until Nov. 20.

Approved counties: Benton, Clackamas, Columbia Coos, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Hood River, Jackson, Josephine, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, and Yamhill.

Normally, SNAP benefits cannot be used to purchase "hot food products prepared for immediate consumption." This restriction is being waived following the severe winds and wildfires that led to the displacement of many residents and left them without access to a kitchen to prepare meals. Examples of allowable prepared foods include hot deli foods, fountain drinks, including but not limited to coffee and tea, a slice of hot/prepared pizza, hot soup, salad bars, and sandwiches.

This waiver will last through Nov. 20 and allows SNAP and DSNAP recipients to use their benefits to buy prepared food at any participating retailer that accepts SNAP EBT cards. Restaurant purchases are still prohibited.

For more information about the hot food waiver, visit https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/ASSISTANCE/FOOD-BENEFITS/Pages/DSNAP-Hot-Foods-Waiver.aspx.

Emergency Allotment Update
Oregon also received approval from FNS to provide maximum emergency allotment benefits for SNAP recipients in November. The emergency allotments, see schedule below, will bring families not receiving the maximum SNAP allotment for their household size to the maximum for the seventh consecutive month.

Issuance date (SNAP recipients will see the benefit the following day)

  • Nov. 10: Current SNAP households not receiving the SNAP maximum allotment
  • Nov. 27: New SNAP recipients between Nov. 10 and Nov. 27

For more information about Emergency Allotments, and to view the maximum allotment amounts, visit https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/ASSISTANCE/FOOD-BENEFITS/Pages/About-SNAP.aspx.

Oregonians who receive SNAP can contact their local SSP, APD or AAA office for more information. Find a local office at oregon.gov/DHS/Offices/Pages/index.aspx

To determine the maximum allotment for your household and view the FAQ, visit https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/assistance/food-benefits/pages/about-snap.aspx.

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) at 1-855-ORE-ADRC or 1-855-673-2372.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/973/139394/Waiver_expands_options_for_food_benefits_in_23_counties.pdf

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Advisory Committee to Hold Virtual Meeting Next Week
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 10/20/20 1:52 PM

The next meeting of the Advisory Committee to the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs will be held Monday, Oct. 26, 2020, via Zoom. The meeting begins at 9:30 a.m.

The committee is made up of veterans appointed by the governor to provide counsel on veteran issues and represent veteran concerns across Oregon. Its nine members serve in a vital advisory role to the director and staff of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

ODVA’s October 2020 Report to the Advisory Committee has been presented and is available to the public as an attachment to this press release. It is also available here: https://issuu.com/odva/docs/sept_2020_odva_rpt_to_the_advisory_committee

This meeting is being held virtually due to travel and gathering size restrictions related to the coronavirus pandemic. The public is invited to attend.

To attend:

Join by Zoom via Videoconference: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYtc-6srjojHtAOWKiGFZQT9eEyf-1ZMc9u Pre-registration is required.

Join by Zoom via Telephone: Dial 1 (253) 215-8782. When prompted, enter the meeting ID: 820 4740 1944# and password/participant ID: 310082#

You will be prompted to state your name. State your name (first and last), branch of service and organization(s) you are representing.

More information can be found online at www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/advisory.aspx or to contact the Advisory Committee, please email vaac@odva.state.or.us.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/1082/139315/October_2020_ODVA_Rpt_to_the_Advisory_Committee.pdf

Roseburg contractor fined more than $38,000 for multiple job safety violations (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/22/20 10:33 AM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1073/139390/thumb_OSHA_Logo_-_RGB_Green.jpg

Salem – Oregon OSHA has fined a general contractor in Roseburg more than $38,000 for multiple serious job safety violations, including repeatedly failing to follow the minimum requirements to protect workers from fall hazards that could kill them.

The division cited Mid Oregon Builders LLC following an inspection prompted by a confidential complaint. The inspection included an examination of work activity at residential construction sites in Sutherlin, Winston, and Roseburg; interviews of employees and a supervisor; and a review of the company’s recordkeeping practices.

In one violation, the company failed to follow requirements to implement adequate fall protection systems – such as personal fall arrest or guardrail systems – where workers are exposed to falling six feet or more to a lower level. One example involved roofing work at a jobsite in Sutherlin, where the company left employees in danger of potentially falling at least 13 feet.

The failure to comply with Oregon OSHA’s six-foot trigger-height requirements was a repeat violation by Mid Oregon Builders. In fact, it was the fourth such violation committed by the company since October 2018.

Under Oregon OSHA’s rules, penalties multiply when employers commit repeat offenses. In this case, the division cited Mid Oregon Builders $36,000 for not ensuring employees are protected from falling when working six feet or more above a lower level.

Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry.

“Our fall protection requirements are designed to prevent serious injury or death, and they have proven effective at protecting workers,” said Michael Wood, administrator for Oregon OSHA. “Repeatedly failing to take them seriously demonstrates a lack of responsibility and serves only one purpose – to further put lives at risk.”

The citation against Mid Oregon Builders proposes a total fine of $38,390. In addition to the repeat violation, the citation includes the following four serious violations:

  • The company did not ensure employees were trained by a competent person qualified in the use and operation of fall protection systems, such as guardrail systems and personal fall arrest systems. Proposed penalty: $490.
  • The company did not take all reasonable steps to provide adequate fall protection and to ensure employees used protective systems while working on elevated surfaces so they could safely accomplish their work. Proposed penalty: $1,400.
  • The employer did not provide copies of injury and illness records for 2019 in a timely manner. Proposed penalty: $150.
  • The employer did not enter each recordable injury or illness on the proper documents in a timely manner for 2018 and 2019. Proposed penalty: $350.

The citation issued against Mid Oregon Builders includes a standard penalty reduction based on the small size of the company. In addition to the increase in the penalty for the repeat violation, the fine amount reflects upward adjustments for the company’s poor faith and negative history. 

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers resources to help improve workplace safety and health. These resources include the division’s Fall Protection Suite of online video training and its A-to-Z topic page about fall protection.

Learn more about help provided by Oregon OSHA’s consultation services, technical staff, and additional education and training services.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

Community Bank Week recognizes a vital member of Oregon communities
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/21/20 8:57 AM

Salem – Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has proclaimed Oct. 19 – 23 as Community Bank Week. The week honors local banks and their employees for their economic and civic contributions in communities across the state.

Oregon community banks provide more than 7,200 family wage jobs, $3.7 billion in home purchase and refinance loans, and safeguards $35.5 billion in deposits.

Oregon’s community banks, most of which are chartered by the Department of Consumer and Business Services, play an essential role in promoting the economic health and prosperity of the state. In some communities, they are the sole provider of banking products and services and sometimes the largest employer.

“Our state banks are a major financing source for Oregonians in every corner of the state; they create jobs, support small businesses, and back 80 percent of the state’s agriculture,” said Andrew Stolfi, DCBS director. “Their commitment to this state is evident through the thousands of volunteer hours and the millions they have pledged to support people affected by COVID-19, the wildfires, and racial inequality.”

State-chartered banks throughout Oregon are celebrating Community Bank Week in their local neighborhoods. To learn more about Oregon’s state chartered banks, go to https://www.oregonbankers.com/local.html.

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About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.
 

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and www.dfr.oregon.gov.


Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 10/20/20 10:08 AM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died October 19, 2020. He was incarcerated at the Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19. He was between 50 and 60 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the sixteenth AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,000 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state.

DOC requires employees and AICs to wear masks if they cannot maintain six feet of social distancing. Wearing masks is mandatory at all times in health services areas, some work areas, and in food services areas. Face coverings have been provided to AICs and staff. If an AIC becomes ill and exhibits flu-like symptoms, CDC and OHA guidance for supportive care are followed.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. This screening includes a temperature check and a screening questionnaire. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC is working with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.

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Attached Media Files: COVID-19 at ODOC

DOC announces Assistant Director (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 10/19/20 10:48 AM
Assistant Director Rob Persson
Assistant Director Rob Persson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1070/139257/thumb_persson_small.jpg

Colette S. Peters, Director of the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC), recently announced the appointment of Rob Persson as the agency’s new Assistant Director of Operations, effective December 1. Mr. Persson will step into this role after the retirement of Assistant Director Michael Gower, who has dedicated the past 37 years to law enforcement.

Mr. Persson is a 25-year DOC veteran, beginning his career in 1995 as a Correctional Officer. He promoted through the ranks to Lieutenant at Santiam Correctional Institution and Mill Creek Correctional Facility. Persson served as Prison Term Analyst Manager and then Administrator for the Offender Information and Sentence Computation Unit. He later became Assistant Superintendent at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF), promoting to Superintendent at Oregon State Correctional Institution and then Superintendent at CCCF. Currently, Persson serves as the Westside Institutions Administrator for the Operations Division. He holds a Bachelor of Science Degree from Western Oregon University and a Certificate of Public Management from Willamette University, Atkinson Graduate School of Management.

“We are thrilled to welcome Rob to the Executive Team as we continue our great work in these challenging times. Rob’s leadership, experience, and ingenuity – coupled with his relationships both internally and externally – will be invaluable as we persevere and move into the future,” stated Director Peters.

DOC employs 4,600 staff members at 14 institutions, two community corrections offices, and several centralized support facilities throughout the state. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of approximately 14,000 adults sentenced to more than 12 months of incarceration, and direct or indirect supervision of 31,000 offenders on felony supervision in the community. DOC is recognized nationally among correctional agencies for providing adults in custody with the cognitive, education, and job skills needed to become productive citizens when they transition back to their communities.

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Attached Media Files: Assistant Director Rob Persson

Oregon Board of Forestry hosts virtual public meeting on Nov. 4
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/23/20 1:29 PM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 4. In compliance with Gov. Kate Brown’s directive on social distancing to slow the spread of COVID-19, this will be a virtual public meeting.

The meeting agenda includes:

  • A landowner appealed their addition to the forest patrol assessment roll and requested a hearing before the Board
  • An update on fire season
  • A presentation on the Board’s statutory authority regarding rulemaking and policymaking for carbon and climate
  • A series of guest presenters will provide information on topics relating to forest carbon accounting framework
  • Information on the urban and community forestry achievements, and forestry research relative to human health and urban livability
  • Information on the Oregon Global Warming Commission Executive Order 20-04

View the agenda for additional topics to be discussed at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

The meeting will be livestreamed and written public comment will be accepted. There is no live testimony for Board decision item one. Written testimony can be submitted before or after the meeting to oardofForestry@oregon.gov">BoardofForestry@oregon.gov. The board packet and livestream option are available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/aboutbof.aspx.


ODF fire report for Monday, Oct. 19, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/19/20 1:47 PM
October rains have greatly reduced fire danger across large parts of Oregon after an unprecedented wildfire season that highlighted fire risk across the state.
October rains have greatly reduced fire danger across large parts of Oregon after an unprecedented wildfire season that highlighted fire risk across the state.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1072/139269/thumb_2020_09_26-15_43_54_202-CDT.jpg

SALEM, Ore. - Barring significant new wildfires, this will be the last regularly scheduled ODF fire situation report of this year. October rains have allowed the majority of ODF districts and fire protection associations to end fire season. The national fire preparedness level was lowered to 3 last week. With the Holiday Farm Fire now being managed by a Type 3 team, no ODF Incident Management Teams are currently deployed on wildfires.

Only one wildfire start was reported yesterday in Oregon, with no new acres burned reported.   

Check ODF's online public fire restrictions map to see what if any fire restrictions might still be in force for your area.  

2020 Fire Season On ODF-Protected Lands
This fire season there have been 2,027 fires across all jurisdictions in Oregon and 1,221,324 acres burned. On ODF-protected lands, there have been 912 fires, close to the 10-year average of 918. In the past 10 years the average number of acres burned on lands protected by ODF has been 41,426. More than 13 times that amount - 551,816 acres - has burned this year.  

Closures

Santiam State Forest is still closed to the public. Before heading out to hunt or recreate on other state or federal public lands, please check to see if there are any restrictions or closures due to the recent fires. There are still portions of some highways in wildfire areas that are closed. Use ODOT’s TripCheck to plan your route.

 Fire name

 Acres burned

Containment

 Location

Lionshead

204,469

       46%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

193,556

       72%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

173,393

       96%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

138,054

       61%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,542

       95%

20 miles E of Glide

Slater

44,597 in Oregon

       75%

6 SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)


More Information




Attached Media Files: October rains have greatly reduced fire danger across large parts of Oregon after an unprecedented wildfire season that highlighted fire risk across the state.

Virtual events, website offer a look at potential Elliott State Research Forest
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 10/21/20 9:49 AM

A new website and upcoming virtual events offer opportunities to learn more about the potential Elliott State Research Forest and provide feedback.

The State Land Board in December 2018 asked the Department of State Lands and Oregon State University to explore transforming the Elliott State Forest into a publicly owned research forest.

Over the past two years – with input from advisory committees, Tribes, state and local governments, stakeholders, and the public – key elements of a research forest proposal have been drafted.

Draft proposal elements are online now for viewing, feedback
Draft proposal elements are available now on a new Elliott State Forest Research Proposal website. The draft elements include information about:

  • OSU’s approach to research, including the research design that will guide future experiments and management of the forest.
  • OSU’s commitments to a research forest that supports conservation, recreation, education, and local and regional economies.
  • OSU’s commitments to public accountability in forest decision-making and governance, as well as a proposed governance structure.
  • How OSU will financially support the proposed research forest.

Written feedback may be provided via online form, .hansen@state.or.us?subject=Elliott%20State%20Research%20Forest%20Feedback">email, or by postal mail to ESRF Feedback, 775 Summer St. NE, Suite 100, Salem, Oregon 97301. Feedback may also be provided during upcoming virtual events. Feedback should be received no later than Friday, Nov. 13 to be considered.

Virtual events scheduled for October and November
DSL and OSU are hosting six virtual events via Zoom in late October and early November: two public forums and four drop-in events. These events offer two different ways to learn about the proposal, ask questions, and provide feedback.

Public Forums: The forums include presentations from DSL and OSU, a question and answer session, and time for public feedback. The forums are scheduled for Oct. 26 and Nov. 5 at 5:30 p.m.

Drop-In Sessions: The informal drop-in sessions are times when OSU and DSL staff will be available on Zoom to answer questions and receive feedback. Attendees can join in any time during the drop-in session. The drop-in events are scheduled for Oct. 27 and Nov. 4 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. and Oct. 29 and Nov. 6 from noon to 1:30 p.m.

Event links and additional information are available on the ESRF proposal website.

Land Board to consider OSU research forest proposal in December
OSU will present an Elliott State Research Forest proposal to the State Land Board for consideration on Dec. 8.

A successful proposal will be consistent with the Land Board’s vision for the forest, which includes keeping the forest publicly owned with public access; decoupling the forest from the Common School Fund and compensating the fund for the forest; continuing habitat conservation planning to protect species and allow for harvest; and providing for multiple forest benefits, including recreation, education and working forest research.


Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld to hold weekly media briefing
Oregon Employment Department - 10/20/20 12:00 PM

WHO:              David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, Oregon Employment Department

WHEN:            Wed., Oct. 21, 2020 at 1:00 p.m. PT

WHAT:            Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld will hold a video conference media briefing to share updates on unemployment claims processing on Wed. Oct. 21 at 1:00 p.m. PT.

WHERE:         Via Zoom video conference; Members of the media must RSVP for call information by emailing OED_Communications@oregon.gov by 12:00 p.m. PT on Wed., Oct. 21. Video conference information will be provided to all reporters who RSVP.

OTHER:          The Oregon Employment Department is updating a claims processing progress data dashboard daily. Visit this link for week-day updates. A recording of the video conference will be email after the media briefing concludes.

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/930/139298/10.21.20_Media_availability_FINAL.pdf

Los trabajadores de los condados de Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, y Marion podrían ser elegibles para Asistencia de Desempleo por Desastre
Oregon Employment Department - 10/19/20 10:58 AM

DISASTER FEMA DR-4562-OR

Los trabajadores de los condados de Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, y Marion podrían ser elegibles para Asistencia de Desempleo por Desastre

El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon anunció la disponibilidad de Asistencia de Desempleo por Desastre (DUA, por sus siglas en inglés) el 23 de septiembre de 2020 para personas que se encuentren desempleadas, o hayan rebajado sus horas de trabajo de manera substancial o para personas que trabajan por cuenta propia y se encuentren desempleadas como resultado directo de los incendios forestales y los vientos de dirección directa que ocurrieron el 7 de septiembre de 2020. Estas personas tampoco deben calificar para el desempleo estatal regular, para la compensación de Desempleo de Emergencia por la Pandemia (PEUC), otros programas de extensión, o para beneficios de la Asistencia de Desempleo por la Pandemia (PUA).

La Asistencia de Desempleo por Desastre (DUA) es un programa federal que brinda beneficios de asistencia por desempleo temporal a las personas cuyo empleo o trabajo por cuenta propia se ha perdido o interrumpido o cuyas horas de trabajo se redujeron considerablemente como resultado directo de un desastre mayor. El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon administra el programa DUA para el Departamento de Trabajo, Administración de Empleo y Capacitación de los Estados Unidos, en nombre de la Agencia Federal para el Manejo de Emergencias (FEMA). Las personas elegibles para beneficios de desempleo regulares o Asistencia de Desempleo por la Pandemia (PUA) no son elegibles para DUA.

El DUA está disponible para personas elegibles durante semanas de desempleo a partir del 13 de septiembre de 2020. Los beneficios para este desastre estarán disponibles hasta el 20 de marzo de 2021, siempre y cuando su desempleo continúe siendo un resultado directo del desastre mayor. La fecha límite para presentar un reclamo de DUA relacionado con estos incendios es el 23 de octubre de 2020

Además de las personas que perdieron sus trabajos como resultado directo del desastre mayor, DUA puede incluir personas que:

  • trabajaban por cuenta propia y se les impidió realizar dichos servicios como resultado del desastre y el trabajo o el trabajo por cuenta propia eran su principal fuente de ingresos,
  • no pudieron llegar a su trabajo debido al desastre,
  • estaban programadas y se les impidió comenzar a trabajar o trabajar por cuenta propia en el área del desastre,
  • no pudieron trabajar debido a una lesión como resultado directo del desastre, o
  • se convirtieron en jefe de familia debido a un deceso causado por el desastre,
  • Han solicitado y utilizado todos los beneficios de desempleo regulares de cualquier estado, o no califica para beneficios de desempleo regulares o programas de extensión y siguen desempleadas como resultado directo del desastre.

El desempleo es un resultado directo del desastre mayor si el desempleo se debió a:

  • el daño físico o la destrucción del lugar de trabajo;
  • la inaccesibilidad física del lugar de trabajo debido a su cierre por parte del gobierno federal, estatal o local en respuesta inmediata al desastre; o
  • la falta de trabajo o pérdida de ingresos, si, antes del desastre, el empleador o el negocio autónomo recibió al menos la mayoría de sus ingresos de un negocio en el área de desastre mayor que resultó dañado o destruido en el desastre o una entidad en el área de mayor desastre cerrada por el gobierno federal, estatal o local.

Para recibir los beneficios del DUA, toda la documentación requerida debe entregarse cuando presente la solicitud o dentro de los 21 días posteriores a la fecha en que se presentó su solicitud del DUA. Deberá proporcionar documentación adicional, que incluya, entre otros, prueba de empleo en el momento del desastre o prueba de trabajo por cuenta propia en el momento del desastre e información de ingresos para el año fiscal 2019. Específicamente, la documentación requerida incluye un número de Seguro Social y una copia del formulario de impuestos federales sobre la renta más reciente o talones de cheques, o documentación que demuestre que trabajaba o trabajaba por cuenta propia cuando ocurrió el desastre. La documentación para las personas que trabajan por cuenta propia se puede obtener de bancos o entidades gubernamentales, o declaraciones juradas de personas que tengan conocimiento de su negocio.

Se recomienda a las personas afectadas a solicitar DUA a través del Departamento de Empleo de Oregon (OED), que primero verificará si los solicitantes llenan los requisitos para los beneficios estatales de desempleo, PEUC, otros programas de extensión o beneficios del PUA.

Las solicitudes para el DUA están disponibles en inglés, español, ruso, vietnamita y chino simplificado en línea en www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster. Su solicitud puede enviarse por correo a la dirección que se indica a continuación, o puede enviarse en línea en unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us. Incluya las semanas que le gustaría reclamar en su solicitud inicial. Más información está disponible en nuestro sitio web público y páginas de redes sociales. Si tiene preguntas adicionales o para solicitar una solicitud inicial, llame al: 503-570-5000.

Información de contacto:

Dirección:      Disaster Unemployment Assistance Unit

875 Union Street NE

Salem, OR 97311

 

Peléfono:       

503-570-5000

 

Información adicional:

www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster

 

Presente su solicitude n línea:    unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/930/139259/10.19.20_SECOND_Press_Release_DUA_Wildfires_2020_Spanish__FINAL.pdf

Oregon reports 399 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/24/20 12:00 PM

October 24, 2020

Oregon reports 399 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 653, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 399 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 41,739.

The new cases  are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (25), Clatsop (4), Columbia (3), Crook (3), Deschutes (13), Douglas (3), Harney (2), Jackson (33), Jefferson (4), Josephine (1), Klamath (3), Lane (32), Lincoln (4), Linn (10), Malheur (12), Marion (48), Multnomah (99), Polk (5), Umatilla (17), Wallowa (2), Washington (71), and Yamhill (2).

Oregon’s 650th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. and died on Oct. 17, at Grand Strand Medical Center in South Carolina. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 651st COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old woman in Malheur County who tested positive on Oct. 7 and died on Oct. 19. Place of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 652nd COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Oct. 3 and died on Oct. 17, at Tuality Community Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 653rd COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 28 and died on Oct. 22, at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

See table below for total cases, deaths, and negative tests by county.

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

114

3

2176

Benton

436

6

17873

Clackamas

3081

65

73862

Clatsop

241

0

6636

Columbia

256

1

8428

Coos

236

0

8614

Crook

103

2

3033

Curry

57

1

2313

Deschutes

1110

13

37522

Douglas

345

5

15127

Gilliam

11

0

358

Grant

11

0

1019

Harney

23

0

926

Hood River

277

1

5790

Jackson

1650

6

40651

Jefferson

603

9

5540

Josephine

263

3

14322

Klamath

408

3

11688

Lake

34

0

1051

Lane

2326

27

79928

Lincoln

515

13

9725

Linn

798

15

20339

Malheur

1909

38

6215

Marion

5733

108

58403

Morrow

543

6

2026

Multnomah

9055

160

172097

Polk

648

15

11516

Sherman

18

0

384

Tillamook

70

0

3560

Umatilla

3344

44

15223

Union

465

2

5073

Wallowa

42

2

1192

Wasco

347

15

5834

Washington

5681

75

109971

Wheeler

1

0

183

Yamhill

985

15

20805

Total

41,739

653

779,403

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

# # #


Video links added: Oregon reports 550 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths (Photo)
Oregon Health Authority - 10/23/20 2:30 PM
2020-10/3687/139439/Shimi_Sharief.jpg
2020-10/3687/139439/Shimi_Sharief.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3687/139439/thumb_Shimi_Sharief.jpg

October 23, 2020

Oregon reports 550 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 649, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 550 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 41,348. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (9), Clackamas (48), Columbia (3), Coos (5), Crook (7), Curry (1), Deschutes (11), Douglas (3), Grant (1), Harney (1), Hood River (4), Jackson (33), Jefferson (1), Josephine (1), Klamath (1), Lane (52), Lincoln (2), Linn (19), Malheur (13), Marion (57), Morrow (1), Multnomah (135), Polk (3), Umatilla (21), Union (1), Wasco (2), Washington (91), and Yamhill (23).

NOTE: Today OHA reported the highest daily case count since the beginning of the pandemic. Preliminary data show this increase is due to continued widespread community transmission resulting in small clusters and outbreaks across the state.

Today’s case count is again a reminder that Oregonians cannot let their guards down. OHA published new face covering guidance this week, which requires that people consistently wear face coverings while indoors at their workplace or all other places where they will be in contact with people from outside their household. OHA has also asked Oregonians to rethink Halloween – avoid traditional door-to-door trick-or-treating, avoid costume parties with people outside their own households and wear a face covering, because a Halloween mask won’t protect against COVID-19.

“We all need to aggressively adhere to the face covering guidance and always wear a mask,” said Shimi Sharief, MD, OHA senior health advisor. “We know everyone is tired and we all wish this would go away, but the reality is this disease is spreading in Oregon and it’s on all of us to protect ourselves and each other.”

Video links

Here are links to videos regarding today's news release, in English and Spanish, with the Oregon Health Authority's Emilio DeBess, DVM, MPVM.

Media availability today

With today’s case count, media are invited to join OHA senior health advisor Shimi Sharief, MD, at 2:30 p.m. to discuss causes. Please dial 877-226-8189 and enter access code 3589208.

Oregon’s 647th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Oct.12 and died Oct. 21 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 648th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 21 and died Oct. 11 at Adventist Health Portland. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 649th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 27 and died Oct. 18 at Adventist Health Portland. He had underlying conditions.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/3687/139439/Shimi_Sharief.jpg

Oregon Cannabis Commission Governance and Frame Working Subcommittee meets November 4
Oregon Health Authority - 10/23/20 1:46 PM

October 23, 2020

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission’s Governance and Frame Working Subcommittee.

Agenda: TBD.

When: Nov. 4, 1-3 p.m.

Where: By Zoom conference call at 669-254-5252, meeting ID 160 669 4177.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


OHA releases 2021 capitation rates
Oregon Health Authority - 10/23/20 11:34 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 23, 2020

OHA releases 2021 capitation rates

The Oregon Health Authority has finalized the 2021 capitation rates for coordinated care organizations (CCOs). These rates are the per-member-per-month amounts the state pays CCOs to coordinate health care for Oregonians who are members of the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). The rate increase represents a 3.4% rate of growth for 2021.

"As this public health emergency wears on, we are working to ensure we have the necessary funding to provide quality care to more than 1.2 million Oregonians," said David Baden, OHA chief financial officer. "Improving care while controlling costs is as important as ever, as more of our neighbors need access to health coverage through the Oregon Health Plan."

The average net payment in 2021 is $467, which is approximately 3.4% more than the comparable average per-member-per-month payment in 2020.

Due to the passage of HB 2267 in the Legislature’s 2019 session, 2020 rates were recalculated this summer and were applied retroactively to January 2020. The recalculation accounts for changes to CCO member enrollment during the transition from 2019 to 2020 contracts, as well as the unexpected increase in the OHP population due to the public health emergency and the limits the federal government put on Medicaid disenrollment.

There are 12 rate categories for CCOs, which take into account the average cost for members in these specific categories. For example, the state pays CCOs more for members who have disabilities than it does for children because members with disabilities generally have higher health care costs. The rates are also based on average provider rate costs in each region.

A full breakdown of final amended 2021 CCO rates can be found on OHA's website.

# # #


Oregon Cannabis Commission Research and Leadership Subcommittee meets November 12
Oregon Health Authority - 10/23/20 10:43 AM

October 23, 2020

What: A public meeting of the Research and Leadership Subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD.

When: Nov. 12, 1-3 p.m.

Where: By Zoom conference call at 669-254-5252, meeting ID 160 898 0705.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Cannabis Commission Health Equity Subcommittee meets November 10
Oregon Health Authority - 10/22/20 4:46 PM

October 22, 2020

What: A public meeting of the Health Equity Subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD.

When: Nov. 10, 2-3:30 p.m.

Where: By Zoom conference call at 669-254-5252, meeting ID 160 096 5260.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Cannabis Commission Patient Equity Subcommittee meets November 5
Oregon Health Authority - 10/22/20 4:10 PM

October 22, 2020

What: A public meeting of the Patient Equity Subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD.

When: Nov. 5, 1-4 p.m.

Where: By Zoom conference call at 669-254-5252, meeting ID 161 933 7927.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Oregon Cannabis Commission meets November 2
Oregon Health Authority - 10/22/20 3:50 PM

October 22, 2020

What: A regular public meeting of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: Review and vote to finalize recommendation letter; legislative strategy; Cannabis Equity bill; OLCC update – legislative concept; Oregon Medical Marijuana Program procedure change on inspections; vote on amending bylaws; final remarks and next steps; voting on chair and co-chair for 2021; public comment.

When: Nov. 2, 1-4 p.m.

Where: By conference at 669-254-5252, meeting ID 161-464-4853.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and eight members appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Shannon McFadden at 971-673-3181, 711 TTY or shannon.m.mcfadden@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

 


Public Health Advisory Board meets October 27
Oregon Health Authority - 10/22/20 2:15 PM

October 22, 2020

What: An ad hoc meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Discuss the Health Equity Committee recommendations to the Oregon Health Policy Board related to equity and the COVID-19 response.

When: Oct. 27, 4-5 p.m. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom conference call: 669-254-5252, meeting ID 161 427 7278.

Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or a.m.biddlecom@dhsoha.state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


OHA sees 70% increase in Oregon opioid deaths during April, May
Oregon Health Authority - 10/22/20 1:16 PM

October 22, 2020

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA sees 70% increase in Oregon opioid deaths during April, May

Illicit fentanyl appears to be driving spike; connection to pandemic unclear

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority saw an alarming spike in opioid overdose deaths in Oregon this past spring compared to last year, and public health experts believe use of illicit fentanyl and methamphetamine is driving the increase.

Analysts in the Injury and Violence Prevention Section at the OHA Public Health Division found that Oregon saw a nearly 70% increase in the number of overdose deaths during April and May 2020 compared to the same time in 2019. There also was a nearly 8% increase in the number of overdose deaths during the first quarter of 2020 compared to the same period in 2019.

The preliminary data come from the State Unintentional Drug Overdose Reporting System (SUDORS), which includes combined and abstracted data from medical examiners and death certificates.

Additionally, the analysis found, between April and May 2020 there was a 28% increase in overdose deaths, and a more than 15% increase in overdose deaths between March and April. And opioid-involved deaths accounted for almost 73% of total overdose deaths in May 2020.

Of opioid-involved deaths, the data show, fentanyl and heroin continue to be the drugs most frequently involved, and fentanyl-involved deaths accounted for almost 40% of total overdose deaths in May 2020.

The analysis also uncovered a continuing alarming trend in methamphetamine use: Methamphetamine/amphetamine-involved deaths accounted for more than 40% of all overdose deaths in May 2020.

What’s unclear is what effect the COVID-19 pandemic may have had on opioid misuse in Oregon.

“Until more data become available, it is premature to say how much of the spike in overdose deaths is attributable to the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Tom Jeanne, M.D., MPH, deputy state health officer and deputy state epidemiologist at the Public Health Division. “However, the realization that we will be dealing with COVID-19 for some time, and other stressors related to jobs, school and social isolation, may increase feelings of anxiety and depression, and that can lead to a harmful level of alcohol or other drug use.”

OHA continues to monitor and post finalized opioid data on its Prescribing and Drug Overdose Data Dashboard at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/ph/preventionwellness/substanceuse/opioids/pages/data.aspx.

Health officials are reminding people that opioid use disorder can be successfully treated. Those who need help to stop using opioids can talk to their health care providers or view OHA’s list of resources. In addition, Oregon law allows lay people to carry and use naloxone, a medication that can be used to reverse an opioid overdose, on other people. Learn more about naloxone.

Oregon-based nonprofit Lines for Life and OHA recently launched the Safe + Strong Helpline at 1-800-923-4357 (800-923-HELP). The line offers free, 24-7 emotional support and resource referral to anyone who needs it—not only those experiencing a mental health crisis. The Safe + Strong Helpline is a response to needs for emotional support around disasters like COVID-19 and wildfires and was funded by the CARES Act. Callers are routed to a counselor who can provide emotional support, mental health triage, drug and alcohol counseling, crisis counseling or just connection.


Oregon reports 373 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 11 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/22/20 12:03 PM

October 22, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 373 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 11 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed 11 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 646, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 373 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 40,810.

The new cases are in the following counties: Benton (6), Clackamas (25), Clatsop (3), Columbia (1), Coos (2), Crook (6), Deschutes (13), Douglas (8), Harney (3), Hood River (1), Jackson (31), Jefferson (2), Josephine (3), Klamath (3), Lane (29), Linn (6), Malheur (18), Marion (37), Multnomah (81), Polk (3), Umatilla (13), Union (6), Wasco (10), Washington (59), and Yamhill (4).

Oregon’s 636th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Baker County who tested positive on Oct. 4 and died on Oct. 18, at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Idaho. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 637th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Aug. 26 and died on Oct. 13, at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Idaho. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 638th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Sept.15 and died on Oct. 6, at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Idaho. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 639th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 24 and died on Oct. 11, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 640th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 24 and died on Oct.4. Presence of underlying conditions and place of death are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 641st COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Oct. 6 and died on Oct. 20, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 642nd COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Linn County who tested positive on Oct.12 and died on Oct.15, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 643rd COVID-19 death is a 53-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Sept. 27 and died on Oct. 19, at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 644th COVID-19 death is a 57-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Sept.16 and died on Oct. 17, at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Idaho. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 645th COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Oct. 19 and died on Oct. 17, in his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 646th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 11 and died on Oct. 18, at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


OHA reports slight drop in weekly cases
Oregon Health Authority - 10/21/20 3:22 PM

October 21, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA reports slight drop in weekly cases

The Oregon Health Authority released its COVID-19 Weekly Report today.

For the week of Monday, Oct.12 through Sunday, Oct.18, OHA recorded 2,327 new daily cases, a 4% decline from the previous week’s pandemic high of 2,418.

The number of newly tested Oregonians rose to 28,960, as did those who tested positively, to 6.5%.

Twenty-seven COVID-19 associated deaths were reported during the week—compared to 25 during the previous week. And people hospitalized with the virus remained the same at 143.

The age group with the highest incidence of reported infection has been in persons aged 20 to 49. They represent 39% of Oregon’s population and they account for 56% of COVID-19 cases.

Hospitalization and death rates increase with age, with persons 80 or older accounting for 51% of COVID-19 associated deaths.


Oregon reports 331 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/21/20 1:57 PM

October 21, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 331 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 635, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 331 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 40,443.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (1), Clackamas (27), Columbia (2), Coos (4), Crook (2), Deschutes (9), Douglas (7), Harney (2), Hood River (3), Jackson (36), Josephine (1), Lane (40), Linn (6), Malheur (8), Marion (43), Multnomah (56), Polk (2), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (19), Union (2), Wasco (1), Washington (55) and Yamhill (4).

Oregon’s 634th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 10 and died on Oct. 16 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 635th COVID-19 death is a 60-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Sept. 26 and died on Oct.17 at Tuality Community Hospital. She had underlying conditions.


Oregon long-term care facilities can get no-cost COVID-19 vaccines when they become available

Oregon Department of Human Services and Oregon Health Authority are notifying long-term care facilities and small congregate settings that their residents and employees can get no-cost COVID-19 vaccinations when a vaccine becomes available, as part of a partnership between the federal government and two large, commercial pharmacies.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Oct. 16 that it was partnering with CVS and Walgreens to provide on-site COVID-19 vaccinations for residents of long-term care facilities — nursing facilities, assisted living facilities, residential care facilities, adult foster care homes and other community-based care facilities, such as group homes for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Employees also could get the vaccine through this program, but the CDC says they likely would receive it earlier than residents based on a recommendation to prioritize vaccination for health care personnel; any employee who did not already receive the vaccine could be vaccinated through the on-site clinics.

The registration deadline is 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on Oct. 29. Long-term care facilities that opt out of or don’t register for the clinics must provide an alternate plan, such as using their own on-site pharmacy to provide the COVID-19 vaccine to residents and employees, although these facilities would be responsible for all “end-to-end” processes and equipment, such as on-site storage, vaccination and reporting.

“This HHS program will be important in building our state’s vaccination capacity once a vaccine is approved, and it will help facilitate efficient vaccination of the long-term care population,” said Paul Cieslak, M.D., medical director for communicable diseases and immunizations at the OHA Public Health Division. “As a result, it will ease the burden on long-term care facilities for administering the vaccine to protect our most vulnerable population, and on local public health authorities that would otherwise be heavily involved in this process.”

Cieslak noted that 44% of the state’s COVID-19 deaths have been among residents of long-term care facilities.

Nursing homes and skilled nursing facilities can sign up for the on-site clinics at the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) website, but they must first be enrolled in the NHSN COVID-19 Module for Long Term Care Facilities, https://www.cdc.gov/nhsn/ltc/covid19/enroll.html. All other facilities will sign up via this online sign up form. Facilities that opt out of the program may be able to opt in later by emailing eocevent494@cdc.gov.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Oregon reports 346 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/20/20 12:14 PM

October 20, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 346 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 633, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 346 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 40,136. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (28), Columbia (1), Coos (3), Crook (2), Deschutes (3), Douglas (9), Harney (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (10), Jefferson (4), Klamath (4), Lane (42), Linn (13), Malheur (11), Marion (38), Morrow (2), Multnomah (101), Polk (6), Umatilla (10), Wasco (2), Washington (44), and Yamhill (7).

Oregon’s 628th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Oct. 2 and died on Oct. 17 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 629th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Josephine County who tested positive on Oct. 9 and died on Oct. 15 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 630th COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 3 and died on Oct. 14 in her residence. She did not have underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 631st COVID-19 death is a 56-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 29 and died on Oct. 18 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 632nd COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Oct. 10 and died Oct. 17 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 633rd COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Sept. 29 and died on Oct. 17 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Oregon reports 266 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/19/20 2:19 PM

October 19, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 266 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed eight more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 627, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 266 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 39,794.

The new cases are in the following counties: Clackamas (24), Coos (8), Crook (2), Deschutes (15), Douglas (1), Jackson (18), Josephine (1), Lane (40), Linn (2), Malheur (5), Marion (39), Multnomah (68), Polk (3), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (9), Washington (25), and Yamhill (5). Updated information is available about Oregon’s 512th COVID-19 death, a 73-year-old woman in Washington County on Sept. 1.

Due to an updated death certificate, COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 is no longer considered as a cause or as a significant condition that contributed to her death. As a result, OHA is re-numbering our reported deaths starting with 620 today.

Oregon’s 620th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Oct.13 and died on Oct. 17, at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center Riverbend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 621st COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Oct. 11 and died on Oct.16, at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center Riverbend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 622nd COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Oct.11 and died on Oct.17, at McKenzie Willamette Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 623rd COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman in Crook County who tested positive on Oct. 12 and died on Oct. 17, at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 624th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct.11 and died on Oct. 15 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 625th COVID-19 death is 69-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on Oct. 5 and died on Oct 14, at Good Shepherd Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 626th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 21 and died on Oct. 12, at Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 627th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 2 and died on Oct. 13, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.


OHA submits COVID-19 vaccine plan

OHA has submitted its draft plan to the federal government for allocating and distributing a COVID-19 vaccine in Oregon, once a safe and effective vaccine becomes available. The draft plan, sent to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday, Oct. 16, is posted on the OHA website.

The plan is centered around equity, reflecting the state’s values of recognizing historical and contemporary injustices toward communities of color and the disproportionate effects that COVID-19 has had on them. The document represents Oregon’s response to the CDC’s Sept. 16 request of all states to describe how they will manage the distribution of a vaccine.

OHA’s plan is intended to understand Oregon’s existing systems and structures for vaccine delivery. The next steps are to understand how those systems and structures need to be rebuilt to meet the needs of disproportionately impacted communities.

The draft plan prioritizes the need for strong community engagement through partnerships with public health, health care and community organizations that reach and support underserved populations, and addresses the roles that power, privilege and race have played in the state’s response to the pandemic.

OHA’s plan follows federal guidance of a phased approach that assumes a COVID-19 vaccine will be, at the outset, in limited supply and should be focused on individuals critical to the pandemic response, provide direct care and maintain societal function, as well as those at highest risk for developing severe illness.

The plan will allow for broadening of the vaccine’s distribution to other high-risk groups and the general population as more doses become available.

The plan OHA submitted Friday is not final. It is expected to evolve in the months ahead as more is learned about likely vaccines, including safety, effectiveness, side effects, storage, supply, distribution and administration.


OHA revises face covering guidance

OHA has revised its guidance on face coverings to include the following new provisions:

The guidance now requires that people wear face coverings in all private and public workplaces including classrooms, offices, meeting rooms and workspaces, unless someone is alone in an office or in a private workspace.

The revised guidance also requires that people wear face coverings in outdoor and indoor markets, street fairs, private career schools and public and private colleges and universities.

Finally, the revised guidance also recommends wearing a face covering instead of a face shield, except in limited situations when a face shield is appropriate such as when communicating with someone who is deaf or hearing impaired and needs to read lips. COVID-19 is surging again. Oregonians can to lower the risk to themselves, their families and their communities by:

  • Wearing a face covering
  • Keeping 6 or more feet away from others
  • Avoiding large gatherings and limiting social gatherings
  • Frequently washing our hands.

For more information about face coverings and face masks visit healthoregon.org/masks.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Oregon reports 220 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/18/20 9:54 AM

October 18, 2020

Oregon reports 220 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from Saturday, Oct. 17, and remains at 620, Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 220 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 39,532. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (8), Columbia (4), Coos (4), Deschutes (6), Douglas (2), Jackson (21), Josephine (1), Klamath (2), Lane (33), Lincoln (1), Linn (7), Malheur (2), Marion (33), Morrow (1), Multnomah (58), Polk (2), Umatilla (3), Wallowa (1), Washington (22), and Yamhill (6).

 

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

112

2

2097

Benton

416

6

16678

Clackamas

2918

65

70862

Clatsop

235

0

6432

Columbia

247

1

8127

Coos

214

0

8243

Crook

81

1

2930

Curry

56

1

2181

Deschutes

1047

13

35847

Douglas

314

4

14593

Gilliam

11

0

346

Grant

10

0

1001

Harney

13

0

907

Hood River

268

1

5651

Jackson

1492

6

39034

Jefferson

593

9

5380

Josephine

256

2

13687

Klamath

397

3

11378

Lake

35

0

1024

Lane

2091

22

74361

Lincoln

508

13

9496

Linn

741

14

19308

Malheur

1842

33

5970

Marion

5470

105

55897

Morrow

540

6

1972

Multnomah

8520

152

165350

Polk

628

15

10884

Sherman

18

0

379

Tillamook

69

0

3429

Umatilla

3258

43

14651

Union

456

2

4854

Wallowa

40

2

1122

Wasco

332

15

5671

Washington

5365

69

105775

Wheeler

1

0

180

Yamhill

938

15

19875

Total

39,532

620

745,572

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

 

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

# # #


Marine Board Adopts Rules for Willamette River, Proposes Others
Oregon Marine Board - 10/23/20 1:00 PM

The Oregon State Marine Board met virtually on October 21 for their quarterly meeting which was live-streamed from the agency’s Salem office. The Board accepted a petition and opened rulemaking on Prineville Reservoir for a small, no-wake zone; adopted new rules for North and South Twin Lakes in Deschutes County and the Willamette River in the vicinity of Ross Island; and directed staff to propose additional rules for the Lower Willamette River.

In August, the Marine Board received a petition from the Crook County Sheriff’s Office and Prineville Reservoir State Park requesting the Marine Board establish a “No-Wake Zone adjacent to the Prineville Reservoir State Park Marina extending across the Reservoir to the west shore of West Robert’s Bay.” This slow no-wake zone would be in effect from May 1 through October 1. Local rules (Oregon Administrative Rule 250-020-0073) currently prohibit boaters from operating in excess of slow no-wake speed within 200’ of the shoreline on Prineville Reservoir, but the proposed rules would extend that restriction from shore-to-shore near the marina. The agency will solicit written public comments on the proposed rule language in the coming weeks.

The Board also adopted rules that allow for the use of electric motors on North and South Twin Lakes for boaters with disabilities. Boat Operations in Deschutes County (Oregon Administrative Rule 250-020-0091 is now amended to read, “A person must not use a motor to propel a boat unless the motor is electric, the boat is not operated in excess of slow no-wake speed, and the operator of the boat has a disability or operates the boat on behalf of a passenger who has a disability. Documentation of eligibility shall be produced at the request of any peace officer and includes any documentation of disability issued by a federal, state, or county governmental agency.” The proposed rule language reflects direction from the Board and the Board’s ongoing interest in ensuring boating opportunities for all Oregonians.  

After a vibrant and candid discussion on the multitude of stakeholder concerns on the Lower Willamette River, the Board took multiple actions. Rules were adopted that extend the Holgate Channel slow no-wake zone to include the entire channel, as it was previously unregulated north of the mouth of Ross Island Lagoon. The Board also adopted rules that create seasonal pass-through zones directly north and south of Ross Island. In these pass-through zones, boat speed is not limited, but towed watersports are restricted and personal watercraft (jet ski) operators are prohibited from prolonged use above 5 mph.

After adoption of the rules described above, the Board also directed staff to propose two additional regulations for the Lower Willamette. The first was to extend the adopted pass-through zones to also include the area between the two, therefore creating one large pass-through zone between the Hawthorne Bridge and the southern tip of the Waverly Marina. The second was to enact 100 ft. slow no-wake buffers around all docks and on-water structures between the Waverly Marina and Willamette Falls.

Additionally, wakeboarding and towing of inflatables would be restricted within 200 feet of these structures, and wake surfing would be restricted within 300 feet. The agency will solicit comments on the proposed regulations beginning on December 1, and the Board will formally vote, and potentially adopt, this second set of regulations at their next meeting scheduled on January 27, 2021

To view the agenda and other meeting materials visit https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/info/Pages/Board-and-Public-Meetings.aspx. The meeting can be viewed on the Marine Board’s YouTube channel.

                                                                       ###


Wildfire Recovery Update 10.23.2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 10/23/20 4:21 PM
2020-10/3986/139445/DLY_2509.jpg
2020-10/3986/139445/DLY_2509.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3986/139445/thumb_DLY_2509.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Oct. 23, 2020, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Phoenix, Ore. - October 9, 2020 - Damage from the Almeda wildfire. Photo by David Yost/FEMA
File: 2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2428.jpg

Glide, Ore. - October 22, 2020 - New growth emerges from the remains of the Archie Creek Fire in the Umpqua National Forest. Photo by David Yost/FEMA
File: DLY_2509.jpg




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/3986/139445/DLY_2509.jpg , 2020-10/3986/139445/2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2428.jpg

Wildfire Recovery Update 10.21.2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 10/21/20 5:20 PM
2020-10/3986/139368/Air_monitor_-_RAD_monitor_-_contractor_in_full_PPE_at_property_in_Phoenix.jpg
2020-10/3986/139368/Air_monitor_-_RAD_monitor_-_contractor_in_full_PPE_at_property_in_Phoenix.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3986/139368/thumb_Air_monitor_-_RAD_monitor_-_contractor_in_full_PPE_at_property_in_Phoenix.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Oct. 21, 2020, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

PHOTO CAPTIONS: 
File name: C:fakepathField crews in full PPE at property in Phoenix.jpg
Phoenix, Ore. --- October 19, 2020 -- EPA crews in full PPE gear removing hazordous waste at a propety in Phoenix, Ore. 

File name: C:fakepathAir monitor - RAD monitor - contractor in full PPE at property in Phoenix.jpg
Phoenix, Ore. -- A licensed EPA contractor in full PPE at a property in Phoenix, Ore.  

 


 




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/3986/139368/Air_monitor_-_RAD_monitor_-_contractor_in_full_PPE_at_property_in_Phoenix.jpg , 2020-10/3986/139368/Field_crews_in_full_PPE_at_property_in_Phoenix.jpg

EPA Stands Up Second Wildfire Recovery Response Staging Area at Oregon State Fairgrounds and Expo Center in Salem
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 10/21/20 4:05 PM

Contact:   Mark MacIntyre/USEPA/206-553-7302/ e.mark@epa.gov">macintyre.mark@epa.gov

As the next step in Oregon’s wildfire rebuilding and recovery,  the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been asked by the Federal Emergency Management Agency(FEMA) and the State of Oregon to collect household hazardous materials from burned properties to protect residents and to ensure these materials are disposed of properly and safely.

To accomplish this task and aid Oregon’s recovery, EPA is now assembling teams and setting up a temporary equipment staging area to help residents in Marion County and surrounding counties recover from the fire and begin rebuilding their lives. This Response Staging Area will be similar to the one recently established in Central Point, Oregon, as part of EPA’s operations in Jackson County.

The Response Staging Area will occupy 5.4 acres of a parking area within the Oregon State Fair and Expo Center, located at 2330 17th Street NE, in SalemAdditional, satellite “Transfer Station” areas are being planned for other areas as cleanup operations expand and accelerate.

The staging area is expected to be operational by October 26, 2020. EPA is deeply grateful for the State Fair, State of Oregon and City of Salem’s assistance and flexibility, allowing EPA’s Response Staging Area to temporarily share the fairgrounds property and assist the community in recovery.

EPA and their contractors will operate the facility, which will be secured 24 hours a day, where response workers will evaluate, organize and consolidate materials that EPA field teams will be recovering from burned properties in the area. It will also serve as the main assembly, assignment and dispatch point for agency responders and contractors each morning as they head to area worksites.

To protect workers and neighbors, air monitors will be used around the work site to be sure asbestos fibers and other harmful chemicals are not released to the air. In addition, locals may see the workers in HAZMAT suits to protect them from prolonged exposure to potentially harmful materials. EPA response officials ask everyone except authorized personnel to avoid the area due to the expected volume of vehicle traffic and construction activity over the next few months.

Fire-affected Oregon property owners now have a dedicated phone number - 541-225-5549 - to ask questions about EPA’s work at their property or to provide additional details about their property that will help speed the EPA removal work. The hotline offers service in both English and Spanish. Property owners now have another tool, the EPA Fire Recovery Story Map to view work progress in the area and get the latest information available about their property.

EPA and state officials want to stress that Response Staging Areas are NOT Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) drop-off centers for the community. Only authorized personnel will be allowed access to the site. Residents should contact their city or county recycling coordinators or public works departments to learn more about HHW collection services in their area.

Once the materials and containers arrive on site in sealed plastic containers and packaging, they will be inspected, organized and secured for shipment. They will be removed promptly by truck to be safely disposed of at a licensed & permitted disposal facility. Materials handled at the site may include:

  • BBQ & outdoor stove propane tanks
  • Cylinders, contents unknown, that can be transported safely
  • Batteries, ballasts, full and partial containers of household chemicals
  • Pool chemicals and household cleaners, polishes, varnish solvents and degreasers

The Response Staging Area is expected to operate between 7:00 am and 7:00 pm, seven days a week, for approximately two months. EPA expects moderate levels of vehicle activity during operating hours, there will be bright lights illuminating the area for safety and unfortunately some unavoidable noise. Response officials are thanking local residents in advance for their patience and understanding during the construction, operation and dismantling of the facility when EPA’s work in the area is complete.

EPA’s Response Staging Area is part of federal, state and local actions responding to the recent tragic wildfires, aimed at helping Oregon residents recover and rebuild their lives.  For more information about the Wildfire Response please visit:  Wildfire.oregon.gov/cleanup

#  #  #


EPA begins Step 1 Household Hazardous Waste removal operations in Jackson County, Oregon
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 10/20/20 9:42 AM

Recovery work expected to take place between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m., seven days a week

(Salem, OR – October 20, 2020)  At the request of the State of Oregon and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has begun the work to survey, remove and dispose of household hazardous waste (HHW) from properties in eight counties affected by the Oregon wildfires. This HHW removal is Step 1 of the overall response and is available at no cost to property owners.  

Fire-affected Oregon property owners now have a dedicated phone number - 541-225-5549 - to ask questions about EPA’s removal of household hazardous waste at their property or provide additional details about their property that will help speed the EPA removal work. The hotline offers service in both English and Spanish.

The removal of household hazardous waste is required before the property can be cleared of ash and debris. Property owners who have not already completed a “Right of Entry” (ROE) form with their county are strongly encouraged to do so to help speed cleanup operations in their area. See: Oregon’s Wildfire Cleanup website for more information on the needed forms.

EPA cleanup crews are now assessing and removing household hazardous wastes including products like paint, cleaners, solvents, pesticides, fuel, oil, batteries, and pressurized tanks.  

Once completed, EPA will post a sign indicating they’ve completed Step 1. See: Jackson County’s Wildfire Recovery website to sign your ROE for household hazardous waste removal.

EPA never asks for personal information like your immigration status, Social Security number, or bank account numbers. Property owners can visit Oregon’s Wildfire Resources for Home and Business Owners for tips on rebuilding after Steps 1 and 2 are complete. 

#  #  #


Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update - Oct. 19, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 10/19/20 9:47 PM
2020-10/3986/139282/2020-01-10_4562_ORFires_GatesUtility_PL_03.jpg
2020-10/3986/139282/2020-01-10_4562_ORFires_GatesUtility_PL_03.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3986/139282/thumb_2020-01-10_4562_ORFires_GatesUtility_PL_03.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Oct. 19, 2020, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Gates, Ore. - October 1, 2020 - Utility workers working in and around the Gates Oregon area repairing telephone lines and rebuilding the electrical grid. Photo by Patsy Lynch/FEMA
File name:  2020-01-10_4562_ORFires_GatesUtility_PL_03.jpg

Lyons, Ore. - October 16, 2020 - A volunteer at the Mari-Linn School distributes food donated by the Department of Agriculture for families in need in Lyons, Oregon. Photo by Patsy Lynch/FEMA
File name: 2020-16-10_4562_Mari-linnfood_PL_01.jpg

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/3986/139282/2020-01-10_4562_ORFires_GatesUtility_PL_03.jpg , 2020-10/3986/139282/2020-16-10_4562_Mari-linnfood_PL_01.jpg

Salmonberry Trail meeting set for Nov. 6
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 10/22/20 10:00 AM

The Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency (STIA) will meet virtually to discuss the proposed Salmonberry Trail corridor 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Nov. 6. The public can view the proceedings via https://bit.ly/stiavideo .

Items to be discussed include updates on the Salmonberry Trail Foundation and status of the current River and Canyon Segment planning study and the 2021 meeting schedule and budget.

The proposed Salmonberry Trail is an 86-mile corridor that follows the Port of Tillamook Bay Railway and ends in Banks. The proposed route connects eight cities and two counties, passing by the Oregon coastline, fisheries, farmland and the Oregon Coast Range.

STIA was established to promote and facilitate coordinated direction and guidance in the planning, development and maintenance of the multi-use trail.

Individuals who need accommodations to participate, or anyone who would like to submit public comment for board members to review, should contact Dennis Wiley at 503-986-0723 or dennis.wiley@oregon.gov. at least three days prior to the meeting.


ATV Advisory Committee meets Nov. 5 via conference call
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 10/20/20 10:00 AM

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department’s (OPRD) All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Advisory Committee will meet 9 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Nov. 5.

On the agenda: ATV program and safety updates, ATV permit sales and trends, proposed Class IV ATV classification and operator requirement changes along with other committee and legislative updates.

Members of the public will be able to listen to the call; instructions on how to attend will be available online prior to the meeting on the committee meeting webpage: oregon.gov/oprd/ATV/Pages/ATV-committee.aspx#2. Public comments can be received via email at atv.safety@oregon.gov until 5 p.m. Nov. 4, 2020.

The ATV Advisory Committee consists of 17 members who represent various state and federal agencies along with several user groups. Learn more about the Oregon ATV Program at OregonOHV.org.

Individuals who need special accommodations to listen to the presentation, or need information in alternative formats, should contact Jeff Trejo, OHV Safety Education Coordinator, at 503-586-9622 or ejo@oregon.gov">jeff.trejo@oregon.gov at least three days in advance.


Oregon Heritage Commission to meet November 2
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 10/19/20 2:37 PM

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet via teleconference on November 2 at 9am. The agenda includes the results of the Disaster Resilience Pilot Project with Cottage Grove, update on the digitization partnership with the Oregon State Library, updates on the Oregon Heritage MentorCorps, and updates from commissioners. The meeting is open to the public and the agenda includes an opportunity for public comment.  

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. For more information, contact coordinator Katie Henry at 503-877-8834 or katie.henry@oregon.gov.

Commission meetings are open to the public and their agendas include opportunities for public comment. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For call-in details and the agenda or more information about the commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org.


Combined Commission Decisions Lead to Rate Increase for NW Natural Customers Starting November 1
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 10/19/20 1:16 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) recently approved a rate decrease as part of the annual purchased gas adjustment filing, and a rate increase as the result of a general rate revision and corporate activity tax filings by the utility. The combined adjustments lead to an average rate increase of 2.88 percent for NW Natural customers effective November 1, 2020. The combined rate impact by customer type is indicated below:

  • Residential Customers - The monthly bill of a typical customer will increase by $2.21, or 4.22 percent.
  • Commercial Customers - The monthly bill of a typical customer will increase by $9.29, or 3.74 percent.
  • Industrial Customers - The monthly bill of a typical customer will increase by $16.70, or 0.43 percent.

“We recognize that authorizing any increase in rates at a time when Oregonians are dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic will present challenges for some customers,” said Megan Decker, PUC Chair. “The PUC has been working in close partnership with utilities and consumer advocates to ensure protections are in place to mitigate these hardships. We encourage customers to reach out to NW Natural to learn about options for assistance.”

Below is a breakdown of the two separate decisions made by the PUC that led to the overall increase in rates highlighted above.

Purchased Gas Adjustment – Overall decrease

The PUC approves annual adjustments to each regulated natural gas service provider’s rates to reflect changes in the actual cost of wholesale priced natural gas, known as the Purchased Gas Adjustment (PGA). This allows companies to pass through their actual cost of purchasing gas to customers without a markup on the price. This year, the PUC approved an overall decrease in revenues of $25.18 million, or 1.7 percent for NW Natural customers, when compared to 2019 company gross revenues.

Rate Revision and Corporate Activity Tax (CAT) Filings Approved in a Comprehensive Stipulation– Overall Increase

The PUC recently approved a $45.8 million, or 7.4 percent increase for non-gas costs in a general rate proceeding. NW Natural originally proposed an increase of $71.4 million or 11.5 percent in revenues. The parties to the rate proceeding reached an overall settlement, which the PUC approved and reduced NW Natural’s original request by more than $25.6 million. The settlement also provides that NW Natural may begin collecting the CAT, a new tax on all businesses having a certain level of commercial activity in Oregon, increasing customer rates an additional $3.15 million.

NW Natural’s increase in costs is largely driven by moving the Company’s new operations center, increased operations and maintenance costs, investments in information technology systems and software, replacement of a gas dehydration system, expenses attributable to inflation, work force-related costs, increases in the costs of providing utility service, and the collection of the corporate activity tax.

To increase energy efficiency and save on bills, customers are encouraged to:

  • Turn down thermostats to save up to 3 percent for each degree. A programmable thermostat that reduces heat at night or when no one is home can lower heating bills by 5 to 10 percent.
  • Update low-efficiency furnaces and water heaters with higher-efficiency models. 
  • Fully insulate homes to realize up to 30 percent savings on a heating bill. 
  • Clean or change the furnace filter once a month during the heating season. 
  • Conduct an online Home Energy Review through the Energy Trust of Oregon.
  • Ask their natural gas service provider about bill payment assistance programs.

 

NW Natural serves approximately 680,000 customers in northwest Oregon.

About the PUC
The Public Utility Commission of Oregon (PUC) regulates customer rates and services of the state’s investor-owned electric, natural gas and telephone utilities, as well as select water companies. The PUC’s mission is to ensure Oregon utility customers have access to safe, reliable, and high quality utility services at just and reasonable rates. This is done through robust analysis and independent decision-making conducted in an open and fair process.

# # #


State Library Board Meeting, November 6, 2020
State Library of Oregon - 10/23/20 8:44 AM

Salem, Ore – The State Library Board will meet from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on Friday, November 6, 2020 online. This is a public meeting; those who would like to attend should contact Cory Horton at y.horton@slo.oregon.gov">cory.horton@slo.oregon.gov. Ann Malkin of Bend will chair the meeting.

Sign language interpretation will be provided for the public if requested 48 hours before the meeting; notice 72 hours before the meeting is preferred. Handouts of meeting materials may also be requested in alternate formats 72 hours before the meeting. Requests may be made to Cory Horton at y.horton@slo.oregon.gov">cory.horton@slo.oregon.gov.

Agenda

9:00 a.m.        Approval of the Minutes – August 2020 meeting                                                  Malkin

9:05                Reports of Board Chair & Members                                                                      Malkin                             

9:45                 Report of the State Librarian                                                                            Patterson

10:00              Quarterly Performance Report                                                                          Patterson

10:05              Budget Report                                                                                                   Patterson

10:20              Strategic plan status report                                                                               Patterson

10:45              Open Forum

10:55              Break

11:05              Ready to Read Grant appeals                                                                             Nielsen

11:15              LSTA Advisory Council Update                                                                            Nielsen

11:25              Appointments to the Board Advisory Councils                                         Nielsen/Bruton                      

11:30              Staff presentation: Duplication on Demand                                                          Bruton

11:45              Board Meeting schedule for 2021                                                                         Malkin

12:00              Adjournment                                                                                                         Malkin

Any person may address the State Library Board at this meeting on any topic.

NOTE:  The times of all agenda items are approximate and subject to change.


Counties/Regional
MEDIA ALERT: Drive-through flu vaccinations with COVID testing kicks off this week in Clackamas County
Clackamas County - 10/21/20 2:26 PM

Media invited to preview clinic 2:30 p.m. Thursday Oct. 22, 2020; clinic opens to public at 3:30 p.m.

What: Clackamas County Public Health along with Vaccinate Clackamas is holding seven FREE drive through flu vaccination clinics with COVID-19 testing available at most of the clinics.

County health officials say flu shots are a critical step this year for more than just your own health. Slowing the spread of flu will help reserve healthcare resources for COVID patients.

Media avail: Pre-opening: 2:30-3:30 p.m.; Clinic open to public 3:30-6:30 p.m.

Who: Kim La Croix, Clackamas County Public Health Manager

When: Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020

Where: Molalla High School, 357 E. Francis St., Molalla, OR 97038

Additional clinics: A list of all Clackamas County flu vaccination clinics is online at www.clackamas.us/publichealth/immunizations.html


Public Health urges residents to avoid gatherings and take precautions to slow the spread of COVID-19
Clark Co. WA Communications - 10/23/20 4:58 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – It has come to the attention of Clark County Public Health that multiple large public events have been planned for this weekend in Vancouver and Camas.  

Washington State Department of Health and Clark County Public Health do not condone these events and encourage all residents to take precautions to protect themselves and others against COVID-19.

COVID-19 cases in Clark County are increasing, and continued spread prevents our businesses, schools, and community events from reopening. Wearing cloth face coverings, practicing physical distancing, and avoiding gatherings, especially indoors, are proven ways to slow the spread of the virus.

Working together, our community can slow the spread of COVID-19. 


Clark County seeks applicants for Clean Water Commission
Clark Co. WA Communications - 10/21/20 11:11 AM

Vancouver, Wash. –Clark County is seeking applicants to fill one open position on the Clean Water Commission.

Terms for the open position begin January 2021 and end December 2023.

The nine-member advisory group makes recommendations to the Clark County Council about services, policies and financing needed to meet federal and state requirements for water quality and stormwater management improvements.

Applicants can live anywhere in Clark County. Unincorporated residents and people with analytical skills and/or experience with environmental issues are encouraged to apply.

The commission meets 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of every other month, beginning in January. Currently, public meetings are being held via WebEx video conferencing. Once in-person public meetings resume, they will be held in conference room 698 in the Public Service Center, 1300 Franklin St.

Interested residents must submit a letter and résumé to Jeff Schnabel, Clark County Clean Water Division, P.O. Box 5000, Vancouver, WA 98666-5000 or by email at cleanwater@clark.wa.gov.

The application deadline is noon Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020.

More information on the Clean Water Commission is available on the county’s website, www.clark.wa.gov/public-works/clean-water-commission.

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Clark County Sheriff's Office shooting range moves to Camp Bonneville
Clark Co. WA Communications - 10/20/20 2:37 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Following a discussion with the Clark County Council, the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, or CCSO, will move its shooting range facility from English Pit to Camp Bonneville effective Jan. 1, 2021.

The current location of the Sheriff’s English Pit shooting range on Northeast 192nd Avenue has become less viable due to increased development in the area. CCSO’s second range facility at Camp Bonneville, located in east Clark County is an ideal facility for law enforcement training as it is in a rural area where the site of the firing range is a good distance away from the main gate and homes. The location also currently serves as a shooting range facility for FBI training. The remainder of the site, which is managed by Clark County Public Works is still closed to the public.

Camp Bonneville was originally used as a U.S. Army training facility. The Army closed Camp Bonneville in 1995, and several years later transferred ownership of the 3,840-acre property to Clark County.

The Camp Bonneville reuse plan approved in 1998 and revised in 2003 and 2005, includes firing ranges in one of nine approved elements. The reuse plan specifically offers the use of the site by CCSO and, if needed, additional range construction when the English Pit range site becomes unavailable due to increased development. CCSO, FBI and Clark County Public Works are working together to coordinate the move.

While the Sheriff’s firing range at English Pit will be closed, a second firing range on the site will remain open to the public.  

For more information, go to the county’s website at https://clark.wa.gov/sites/default/files/media/document/2020-10/101420_CCSOShootingRange_0.pdf.


County reschedules virtual forums on 2019 Community Needs Assessment
Clark Co. WA Communications - 10/20/20 1:53 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Community Services has rescheduled four virtual feedback forums to discuss and hear thoughts from residents about its community needs survey conducted late last year.

The forums will be in three languages and registration is required. The updated dates are:

All forums will be two hours long and will have small group discussions.

The virtual forums: A Portrait of Clark County – Needs of a Community, were originally scheduled for late October. Anyone who signed up for the previously scheduled dates will receive an email notification regarding the new dates and what to do if they need to cancel.

The confidential survey asked residents who are low-income about their family’s needs. Community Services will share data from the survey, and participants will have a chance to provide feedback and share their opinions on the findings.

Community Services is required to conduct a community needs assessment every three years. The results are used to help prioritize which programs and services will be funded in our community with Community Service Block Grant awards.

For more information, go to https://clark.wa.gov/community-services/community-action.


UPDATE: County, Woodland, Camas seek applicants to serve on Clark County Arts Commission
Clark Co. WA Communications - 10/20/20 11:43 AM

Please note the update to the email for the business position below.

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County and the cities of Woodland and Camas are accepting applications to fill three positions on the Clark County Arts Commission.

The county is looking for a volunteer to fill the position for a member of the business community. Camas and Woodland are looking to fill the seats representing their respective jurisdictions.

All terms are four years in length and begin immediately. The commission typically meets at 5:30 pm the first Tuesday of the month on the sixth floor of the Public Service Center, 1300 Franklin St. However, meetings are currently virtual due to the pandemic.

The Arts Commission is made up of 11 volunteer members. Each participating city appoints one member and the county manager appoints three members representing the arts, arts education and business communities.

The commission advises and collaborates with the county council and city councils and reports accomplishments to the community. Members advocate for the arts in the community, at public hearings, budget hearings and other public forums.

Here is how to apply for the open positions:

Application deadline is 5 pm, Friday, Nov. 20, 2020.

Learn more about the Clark County Arts Commission at https://www.clarkcountyartscommission.com/.


Clark County Law Library offers new civil lawsuit self-help kit
Clark Co. WA Communications - 10/20/20 10:43 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Law Library has a new Starting a Civil Lawsuit self-help kit available for purchase. The kit is part of a series of form kits that include instructions on various court filings.

This new kit includes forms and instructions to start a civil lawsuit in Superior Court against a person. It does not cover procedures after the initial filing and is not intended for District Court.

“The kits cost $15 which includes tax, we are selling them by mail while our office is closed,” said Law Librarian Maria Sosnowski. “Full cost is $27 including the kit, shipping and handling, credit card fee, and sales tax.”

To learn more about this kit and other self-help kits that are available, go to the self-help form kits page at https://clark.wa.gov/law-library/self-help-form-kits on the Law Library website.

To order a kit, call and leave a message and contact information at 564.397.2268 or email to rary@clark.wa.gov">lawlibrary@clark.wa.gov.


Marion County Weekly Wildfire Recovery Update - Oct. 21, 2020
Marion County - 10/20/20 3:30 PM

On Wednesday, October 21, 2020, the Marion County Board of Commissioners and Public Works Director Brian Nicholas will provide an update on wildfire recovery in the Santiam Canyon and answer questions about recovery efforts. The wildfire update will immediately follow the commissioners’ regular board session, which begins at 9:00 a.m. The wildfire recovery update is expected to begin between 9:45 a.m. and 10:00 a.m.   

The board session and wildfire update will be held in the Senator Hearing Room of Courthouse Square located at 555 Court St. NE, Salem, OR. The wildfire update will also stream live on the Marion County, OR Facebook page (@MarionCountyOR).

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, we will only be allowing one media representative per outlet. Once the room has reached capacity, no additional media partners will be permitted to enter. Questions may be submitted in advance to PIO2@co.marion.or.us. Questions will also be accepted during the media via Facebook during the wildfire update.


Marion County 2020-21 Property Taxes
Marion County - 10/19/20 10:54 AM

Marion County tax statements will be mailed Monday, October 19, 2020, and should arrive in property owner mailboxes shortly thereafter. Tom Rohlfing, Marion County Assessor, certified the 2020-21 Property Tax Roll on October 13, 2020.

As of the January 1, 2020 valuation date, the aggregate Real Market Value (RMV) of all property countywide increased by 4.87% from last year, to $53.15 billion. Real Market Value is the estimated amount in cash that could reasonably be expected to be paid for a property by an informed buyer to an informed seller.

Escalating values of residences and residential land located in cities and towns contributed to the increase, jumping the total RMV to $24.32 billion or 5.82% increase from 2019. The total value of rural property, including acreage homes, farms, and forest lands, also showed continued growth with a total RMV of $11.77 billion or 4.34% increase from 2019. Commercial and industrial properties have shown a slightly slower growth with a total RMV of $14.42 billion or 2.95% increase from 2019.

Due to Measure 50 benefits, some homeowners will experience much smaller tax increases than the preceding figures suggest. The typical unchanged home will experience only a 3% increase in assessed value no matter where they are located in the county. However, changes in tax rates due to new or expiring bonds will significantly affect owners in selected communities.

Assessed Value countywide grew by 4.21% to $27.62 billion, standing at just 51.96% of total Real Market Value. A big factor in the gap between market and assessed values, of course, is due to the Measure 50 limit of 3% annual growth in the Maximum Assessed Value of unchanged property. However, 13,293 properties receive sharply reduced assessed values and taxes due to farm or forest special assessment, and 17,681 properties receive full or partial tax exemptions. The city of Hubbard will see tax increases of about 9% due to new Hubbard Rural Fire Protection Local Option Levy.   

Primary beneficiaries of Marion County property taxes are schools, the community college, and educational service districts receiving (46.13%) of the total. Other major recipients include cities (22.53%), Marion County government (17.30%), and fire districts (6.22%). Urban renewal districts receive about (3.29%). These percentages are similar to last year. 

For the residents of the Santiam Canyon, please accept our deepest sympathies for the tragedies endured as a result of the Beachie Creek and Lionshead Fires. We know many of you have experienced great loss as a result of these fires. Marion County follows state law in tax assessment following damages by fire or Acts of God. Real market value of property affected by the wildfires will be reflected on property tax statements next year. People who have experienced a loss to taxable property will need to submit an Application for Property Tax Proration by June 30, 2021, to potentially get their current year property taxes prorated.

Mr. Rohlfing encourages property owners to promptly review their tax statement for accuracy. This includes checking for correct ownership, mailing, and location addresses. To aid with this, the Assessor’s Office provides a wide array of information on its website, including more detailed information about how each property is assessed.  The property records portion of the Assessor’s Office website allows you to search multiple ways, including a map search tool to help locate properties.

Taxes are due by November 16, 2020, to receive the 3% discount and avoid interest charges. Owners with questions, or who feel changes are needed, should contact the Assessor’s Office at 503-588-5144. Those who disagree with the Real Market Value placed on their property are encouraged to request a review prior to filing an appeal. If the property owner still does not agree with the value once the review is completed, instructions on the back of the tax statement describe how to appeal to the local Board of Property Tax Appeals, comprised of community volunteers.


Marion County Wildfire Debris Cleanup Right of Entry deadline extended to October 23, 2020
Marion County - 10/19/20 10:36 AM

Salem, OR – Marion County has extended the deadline to submit Right of Entry forms by one week to allow state and federal partners to clean wildfire debris from private properties. Forms should be completed by property owners and turned into Marion County no later than Friday, October 23, 2020. Forms are available at bit.ly/MCRightofEntry.

Teams from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and their contractors are arriving in Oregon to begin removal of household hazardous waste (HHW) from properties damaged or destroyed by wildfire. The removal of HHW is the first in a two-step cleanup process, and is funded by FEMA and the State of Oregon with no cost to property owners.

Removal of HHW from properties in Marion County is scheduled be begin by November 2, 2020. However, many property owners have not completed the Right of Entry (ROE) form, which slows efforts to remove the waste.

"Without the ROE form, we will not be able to help people begin the process of rebuilding," says Brian Nicholas, Marion County Emergency Management Director. "If you know anyone that has lost their home in the fires, please ask them to complete the form, which will allow us to include their property in the cleanup effort."

Marion County wants to emphasize that if a property owner completes the ROE, which is recommended, no federal, state, or local agency will attempt to recoup money from insurance allocated for the rebuilding of homes. For insurance policies that include specified coverage for debris removal and a specified debris removal coverage limit, agencies may seek reimbursement for debris cleanup, but only up to the debris removal coverage limit stated in the policy.

The state will not attempt to recoup any money from insurance of property owners who have been given a lump sum payment by their insurance for all cleanup and rebuilding costs and the policy does not include specified debris removal coverage or a specified debris removal coverage limit until after their home is rebuilt. In rare instances, property owners may have funds remaining which FEMA may seek. This is simply because FEMA cannot pay for any cleanup costs that are already covered by insurance.

"The state-wide wildfire debris cleanup effort led by FEMA and the State of Oregon is the best way for property owners to get their sites cleaned up at the lowest cost, and it's the only program available to assist uninsured property owners at no cost to them," says Nicholas. "If you choose to cleanup yourself, you must still comply with DEQ regulations for asbestos and lead disposal and you will have to bear all uninsured costs on your own."

The Right of Entry form and additional information regarding wildfire recovery are available at www.MCWildfireRecovery.net. For answers to Right of Entry questions or help completing the form, call the Marion County Right of Entry helpline at (503) 365-3140.


Cities
City of Battle Ground Invites Public to Participate in Shoreline Master Program Review
City of Battle Ground - 10/22/20 2:18 PM

The City of Battle Ground is undertaking a periodic review of its Shoreline Master Program (SMP) as required by the Washington State Shoreline Management Act.  Areas within the city with a shorelines designation are located in the southeast quadrant of the city and border Salmon Creek.

The city adopted its current SMP in 2012. The focus of this periodic review is on consistency with changes to state law made since its adoption. The review will also address consistency with the city’s comprehensive plan and development regulations, and overall usability of the SMP.

The public is invited to review and engage with city staff and other stakeholders throughout the SMP review process. Project documents, meeting announcements, and other resources are posted to the city’s Shoreline Master Program website page at www.cityofbg.org/374/Shoreline-Master-Program.

A presentation on the Shorelines Master Program update will be held during the October 28th Planning Commission meeting.   Planning Commission meetings are always open to the public.  The meeting begins at 7:00 p.m. and is held remotely via Zoom.  A meeting agenda with instructions on how to participate are available online at www.cityofbg.org/AgendaCenter/ViewFile/Agenda/_10282020-457.

Public meetings and review will continue into 2021, with a goal to adopt the updated SMP by June of 2021.


Welcome Back Wednesday (Photo)
City of Fairview - 10/21/20 12:38 PM
Welcome Back Wednesday Logo
Welcome Back Wednesday Logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/2060/139355/thumb_small_color.png

Fairview is Open for Business

The Welcome Back Wednesday campaign is a new initiative by the Fairview Community Engagement Committee to support local businesses that have been adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The goal is to get the word out and let the community know that these businesses are here, and are open for business.

Starting October 28 and continuing each week through December, up to two participating businesses will be highlighted and will receive 10 coupons ($10 each) to give to the first 10 customers that visit their business. The coupons are only valid for that Wednesday and the City will reimburse the business for any redeemed coupons. 

This campaign is limited to local restaurants, small retail and personal care service businesses that have a store front in the City of Fairview. Go to FairviewOregon.gov/WBW each week to see which participating businesses are being highlighted. Be one of the first 10 customers to visit and get up to $10 off a service or purchase.  




Attached Media Files: Welcome Back Wednesday Logo

Participate in Newberg's Virtual Economic Opportunities Analysis Open House
City of Newberg - 10/22/20 11:58 AM

(NEWBERG, OR) – Starting October 22, 2020, the City of Newberg invites residents and community members to participate in a virtual open house on the City’s Economic Opportunities Analysis (EOA). The EOA is part of the City’s effort to determine if an Urban Growth Boundary (UGB) expansion is needed to ensure the needed land for future employers and residents in Newberg. The virtual open house, which can be found at www.NewbergOregon.gov/EOAopenhouse, will close on November 6, 2020.

The virtual open house will take participants through an interactive website where they can learn more about the EOA, economic development, and why the analysis is important for Newberg. Participants will be asked to answer surveys throughout the interactive website including questions on living in Newberg, what priorities the City should be focusing on, and the types of businesses the City should actively be recruiting to the area.

The EOA is informed in part by the recently completed 2019 Riverfront Master Plan and the  2016 Newberg Downtown Improvement Plan and 2019 Newberg Economic Development Strategy. The main goals of the project include updating the buildable lands inventory for commercial and industrial land, understanding how forecasted population increases will impact Newberg, developing strategies to best utilize existing land, and more.

More information about the Economic Opportunities Analysis can be found on the City’s website. A Citizens Advisory Committee has been established to provide feedback to the project consultant, staff, Planning Commission, and City Council on the project. The virtual open house is an opportunity for all community members to provide input on a project that will directly impact future development in Newberg.

The virtual open house is available at www.NewbergOregon.gov/EOAopenhouse. Community members have two weeks to interact with the website and supply answers to the provided surveys. Questions about the virtual open house or the Economic Opportunities Analysis can be sent to City of Newberg Community Development Director Doug Rux at ux@NewbergOregon.gov">Doug.Rux@NewbergOregon.gov.

To hear more news from the City of Newberg, follow along on Facebook, Twitter, or at the City Website: www.NewbergOregon.gov


Russ Thomas Hired as Public Works Director for the City of Newberg (Photo)
City of Newberg - 10/20/20 1:45 PM
Russ Thomas
Russ Thomas
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/5235/139314/thumb_Russ_Thomas.jpg

(NEWBERG, OR) – The City of Newberg is pleased to announce that Russ Thomas has been selected as the new Public Works Director for the City of Newberg. Thomas started with the City as a Laborer and has worked in numerous capacities of increasing responsibility during his 41 years serving the City of Newberg. He has worked as the Public Works Maintenance Superintendent since 1997, and was asked to fill the role of Interim Public Works Director upon Jay Harris’ departure at the beginning of April 2020.

The Public Works Director provides leadership and direction to the Public Works Department with responsibility for a full range of public works services through three main divisions: Maintenance, Operations, and Engineering. With Thomas’s long tenure with the City and a vast amount of operational experience, he will be able to provide consistent and innovative leadership.

Thomas has “done it all” in Newberg Public Works. During his career, he has served as a Laborer, Crew Chief, and Superintendent in the Maintenance division and as a Plant Manager and Supervisor in the Operations division. He has built a reputation as a reliable, knowledgeable leader who always seeks to “do more than expected” in each role. Thomas is well thought of by his peers, having served as the Director of the Oregon Utility Notification Center and as President for the Oregon Chapter of the American Public Works Association. In 2019, Thomas was nominated for a National Top Ten Leaders of the Year award through the American Public Works Association.

A long-term resident of Newberg, Thomas has also been heavily involved in the community, serving as the Chairman for the Newberg Old Fashioned Festival, President of the Newberg High School Booster Club, coaching Varsity Baseball at Newberg High School, and coaching Newberg Little Guy Football.

28 individuals applied for the Public Works Director position through a nationwide recruitment conducted on the City’s behalf by The Novak Consulting Group. Newberg City Manager Dan Weinheimer said of Thomas, “Russ stood out among other applicants for his knowledge of Newberg, focus on customer service, adaptability, and dedication to serving our community. He’s a respected leader and has great ideas about how we can continue to improve Public Works service delivery to residents.”

Russ Thomas commented on his new position with the City stating, “I am humbled by the support shown to me by the city staff, and the city manager’s confidence in selecting me as the next Public Works Director. I am excited to be able to continue the work on the solid foundation, programs, and forward looking plans that prior directors have set in motion for the City. I look forward to working with the outstanding public works department staff, and serving my community and its citizens, as we continue the important work to operate and maintain the City’s infrastructure, develop and construct improvements, and plan for our future needs and growth to help enhance the city’s livability and quality of life.”

Thomas, who was serving as the interim Public Works Director, will begin his work as the Public Works Director immediately.

To hear more news from the City of Newberg, follow along on Facebook, Twitter, or at the City Website: www.NewbergOregon.gov




Attached Media Files: Russ Thomas

City Commission Release Independent Investigation Report of Mayor Dan Holladay
City of Oregon City - 10/21/20 9:42 PM

On Wednesday, October 21, 2020, the Oregon City Commissioners made public a report from Watson Law, Lori Watson, Esq. reviewing the Commission’s request for an investigation of Mayor Dan Holladay’s potential violation of Executive Order No. 20-12 “Stay Home, Save Lives.”

Find the report and summary of the report at the bottom of this page https://www.orcity.org/community/city-commission-release-independent-investigation-report-mayor-dan-holladay

Oregon City Commissioners directed the City Manager to waive attorney-client privilege and release the report unredacted.

The investigation report is one part of the Commission’s actions, on Sunday, April 26, 2020 Commissioners affirmed “Stay Home, Save Lives” Executive Orders and on July 1, 2020, Commissioners passed a vote of no-confidence in Mayor Holladay.

 

The City Commissioners including the Mayor are committed to being transparent with the public by providing the release of this information.

 

https://www.orcity.org/community/city-commission-release-independent-investigation-report-mayor-dan-holladay


Apply Now: Additional Grant Funding Available for Area Small Businesses and Non-Profits Impacted by COVID-19
City of Salem - 10/20/20 11:30 AM

Salem, Ore. – Additional grant opportunities are now available for local small businesses and non-profits impacted by COVID-19. The City of Salem has approximately $150,000 in Business Oregon grant funding available for Salem businesses and non-profits. Business Oregon also recently made available an additional $1.2M for businesses in the Mid-Willamette Valley. If you are a Salem-area business or non-profit that has not yet accessed this funding, you can do so now.

  • City of Salem COVID Grant Funding: If you have not already applied for, or been notified, regarding the Salem’s allocation of Emergency Business Assistance Grants, you can apply online on the City of Salem’s website. Businesses or 501.c3 organizations with 0-25 employees can access up to $25,000, if impacted by the emergency closure order or have experienced a 50% decline in revenue, since March 2020. Businesses that previously received federal loans and grants, including Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL) or Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) funding through the CARES Act, are eligible, but must reduce the maximum grant amount by the amount of CARES Act funding received. Additional funding requirements are available on the City’s website.
  • Regional COVID Grant Funding: Businesses and non-profits with 0-25 FTE can access up to $50,000, if impacted by the emergency closure order or have experienced a 25% decline in revenue, since March 2020. Grant awards will not be reduced by the amount in Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) funding/Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL) received, if less than $100,000. Businesses can apply online through Willamette Workforce Partnership.

Businesses can access both City of Salem and Regional COVID Grant Funding if they meet the requirements. To determine if you’re eligible, email ants@cityofsalem.net">SalemGrants@cityofsalem.net or call 503-540-2480 or 503-540-2435. For questions in Spanish, email ants@cityofsalem.net">SalemGrants@cityofsalem.net or call 503-540-2303.

#   #   #

The Oregon Legislature, in partnership with the Governor, allocated $22.5 Million of federal CARES Act funds for the purpose of providing financial assistance to small businesses adversely affected by economic conditions as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic, including three rounds of Emergency Business Assistance Program grants.


City of Salem Center 50+ launches WOW Van (Wellness on Wheels) (Photo)
City of Salem - 10/19/20 3:53 PM
Salem Health, United Way of the Mid-Willamette Valley, P3 Health Partners Oregon, and Home Instead Senior Care Celebrate with City of Salem Mayor and Staff Over WOW Van Partnership
Salem Health, United Way of the Mid-Willamette Valley, P3 Health Partners Oregon, and Home Instead Senior Care Celebrate with City of Salem Mayor and Staff Over WOW Van Partnership
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Monday, October 19, 2020

MEDIA CONTACT:
503-763-3459 | media@cityofsalem.net

City of Salem Center 50+ launches WOW Van (Wellness on Wheels) to keep seniors connected to their community through life-enriching activities and services

Salem, Ore., -- Salem’s Center 50+ now offers mobile wellness services. With the support from Salem Health, United Way of the Mid-Willamette Valley, P3 Health Partners Oregon, and Home Instead Senior Care, Center 50+ now delivers socially distanced wellness services to area seniors.

Front porch visits from the Wellness on Wheels (WOW) Van include fitness, nutrition, mobility and wellness programming, activities, lifelong learning instruction, social checks ins, and technology tutoring.

The WOW Van was inspired through the work of the Age-Friendly Salem Initiative and meets the goals of keeping seniors socially connected, engaged in their community, and able to remain safe and healthy in their homes for as long as possible.

“Our service partners and contributors to this project understand our senior populations and unique needs. We are tremendously thankful for their support and I applaud Center 50 + for their excellent work in shaping and delivering programming for our older adults,” said City Manager Steve Powers.

In recent years, Center 50+ has made a concerted effort to follow the World Health Organization’s call for instigating an Age-Friendly Community which helps communities prepare for a rapidly aging population and pay attention to the environmental, economic, and social factors that influence the health and well-being of older adults.

In addition to the WHO initiative, Center 50+ recognizes the importance of delivering services to older adults whose mobility and aptitude to travel around Salem has decreased because of the ongoing COVID -19 pandemic.

“The WOW Van will be a significant asset to the Center 50+ staff for scheduling home visits with our clients,” said Marilyn Daily who manages operations and programming for the center. “Everyone on our staff is excited about the possibilities of this service and eager to bring classes and companionship to those who need it most.” 

To find out more about the WOW Van residents are encouraged to email  Connect50plus@cityofsalem.net or to visit the Center 50+ website

About Center 50+
Center 50+ is Salem’s premier non-membership community center providing programs and services to adults age 50 and older and their caregivers. Although the Center is temporarily closed to the public due to Covid-19, programs and services continue to be offered throughout the community.  Center 50+ serves more than 850 people a day and hosts more than 150 programs and activities each term. 

####

 

 

                 




Attached Media Files: Salem Health, United Way of the Mid-Willamette Valley, P3 Health Partners Oregon, and Home Instead Senior Care Celebrate with City of Salem Mayor and Staff Over WOW Van Partnership

Cryptosporidium Monitoring Update: Detections from routine monitoring in the Bull Run. Customers do not need to take any additional precautions at this time.
Portland Water Bureau - 10/22/20 1:08 PM

Since 2017, the Portland Water Bureau has detected low levels of Cryptosporidium from routine monitoring. These detections are more common during the rainy season and not unexpected after the recent rains. Results from recent monitoring were received from the Bull Run Watershed intake for Cryptosporidium, a potentially disease-causing microorganism. One Cryptosporidium oocyst was detected in the 50-liters collected on Sunday, Oct. 18. Prior to this detection, Cryptosporidium was last detected from the Bull Run Watershed intake on July 5, 2020, when one oocyst was detected from the 50-liters sampled.

The Bull Run watershed is Portland’s primary source of drinking water. The Portland Water Bureau does not currently treat for Cryptosporidium, but is required to do so under drinking water regulations. Portland is working to install filtration by September 2027 under a compliance schedule with Oregon Health Authority. In the meantime, Portland Water Bureau is implementing interim measures such as watershed protection and additional monitoring to protect public health. Consultation with public health officials has concluded that at this time, customers do not need to take any additional precautions.

Exposure to Cryptosporidium can cause cryptosporidiosis, a serious illness. Symptoms can include diarrhea, vomiting, fever and stomach pain. People with healthy immune systems recover without medical treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people with severely weakened immune systems are at risk for more serious disease. Symptoms may be more severe and could lead to serious or life-threatening illness. Examples of people with weakened immune systems include those with AIDS; those with inherited diseases that affect the immune system; and cancer and transplant patients who are taking certain immunosuppressive drugs.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has estimated that a small percentage of the population could experience gastro-intestinal illness from Cryptosporidium and advises that customers who are immunocompromised and receive their drinking water from the Bull Run Watershed consult with their healthcare professional about the safety of drinking the tap water. The Portland Water Bureau and Burlington, City of Gresham, City of Sandy, City of Tualatin, Green Valley, GNR, Hideaway Hills, Lake Grove, Lorna Domestic Water, Lusted, Palatine Hill, Pleasant Home, Raleigh, Rockwood, Skyview Acres, Tualatin Valley, Two Rivers, Valley View and West Slope Water Districts receive all or part of their drinking water supply from the Bull Run. To learn if your drinking water comes from Bull Run, please contact your local drinking water provider.

The public and the media are encouraged to view all sampling results posted to the City’s website at portlandoregon.gov/water/cryptoresults. The bureau will notify the media and public immediately should further test results indicate a risk to public health and precautions are necessary.

Customers with questions regarding water quality can call the Water Line at 503-823-7525.

ABOUT THE PORTLAND WATER BUREAU

The Portland Water Bureau serves water to almost a million people in the Portland area. Portland’s water system includes two great water sources, 53 tanks and reservoirs, and 2,200 miles of pipes. With 600 employees working on everything from water treatment to customer service, the Water Bureau is committed to serving excellent water every minute of every day.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/1240/139396/Crypto_Press_Release_10222020.docx

Courts/District Attorneys
Update: Former Marion County Sheriff's Office Deputy Sean Banks
Marion Co. Dist. Attorney's Office - 10/19/20 6:41 AM

On October 17, 2020 at 11:21am the Wilsonville Police Department responded to the scene of an apparent suicide at The Guest House Inn in Wilsonville, Oregon.  Upon arrival, officers found former Marion County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Sean Banks deceased. A Clackamas County Medicolegal Death Investigator responded to the scene to investigate.  The result of that investigation is not available at this time.  Any inquiries should be directed to the Wilsonville Police Department.

Banks has a pending criminal case in Marion County Circuit Court for criminal charges issued by a Marion County Grand Jury on March 8, 2019.  The criminal case will be dismissed.

 

Previously sent March 8, 2019
Grand Jury Indicts former Marion County Sheriff's Office Deputy Sean Banks

Today a Marion County Grand Jury returned a 25 count indictment of former Marion County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Sean Banks with charges including theft, official misconduct, and tampering with physical evidence between June 2014 and April 2018.  Banks was originally arraigned on July 27, 2018 on a five count District Attorney's information alleging the theft of five firearms during a 2015 death investigation.  A criminal investigation led by the Salem Police Department and the Oregon Department of Justice has been ongoing since, uncovering additional criminal conduct.  

Subsequently, Banks was arrested by the Salem Police Department and is currently being held at the Linn County Jail with $200,000 bail.  

As this criminal case is pending, the Marion County District Attorney's Office cannot release further details at this time. 

If you believe you have additional information related to the investigations of Banks, you can contact the Oregon Department of Justice Criminal Division at (503)378-6347.


Driver in fatal I-84 crash charged with manslaughter, DUII
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 10/23/20 1:24 PM

October 23, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that Brian Gardner is accused of recklessly causing the death of another person after driving impaired against the flow of traffic on Interstate 84.

Gardner is charged with one count of manslaughter in the second degree, two counts of driving under the influence of intoxicants, and one count of reckless driving.

According to court documents, just before 4 a.m. on October 22, 2020, law enforcement responded to a head-on crash that occurred on I-84 eastbound under the ramp to I-205.

Officers learned a Dodge Ram 1500, operated by Gardner, crashed head-on into an eastbound vehicle operated by Devontay Rhodes.

During the investigation, law enforcement overheard Gardner tell one of the paramedics that he snorted cocaine, according to court documents.

Furthermore, hospital staff reported later Gardner’s blood alcohol content of .134%, according to court documents.

Law enforcement obtained video of the crash from a UPS truck’s dashboard camera. The video showed Rhodes’ vehicle driving normally in the left lane shortly before the crash occurred, according to court documents. The driver of the truck reported one of the involved vehicles flipped and that the crash was caused by a wrong way driver.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time pursuant to the Oregon Rules of Professional Conduct.

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime. Gardner is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

 

#MCDA#


Media Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/5769/139435/PR-20-183-Brian_Gardner.pdf

Victim's knee half severed in alleged bias crime assault
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 10/21/20 3:03 PM

October 21, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that Clayton Briggs, 24, is charged following an alleged bias crime assault that involved a machete.

Briggs is charged with one count of assault in the second degree, one count of unlawful use of a weapon, one count of menacing, and one count of bias crime in the first degree.

According to the indictment, Briggs caused physical injury to the victim because of his perception of the victim’s race and/or skin color.

This investigation started on October 12, 2020 when Portland Police responded to a stabbing in the 3600 block of Southeast 65th Avenue.

According to court documents, officers arrived and located the victim inside an apartment unit with his pant leg soaked in blood. He told officers that he had no sensation beneath the knee. The victim told police Briggs hit him four times with a machete.

During the investigation, law enforcement learned Briggs and the victim got into an argument the day prior that continued into October 12th.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time.

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime. Briggs is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office was an active participant of the Oregon Attorney General’s Hate Crimes Task Force and helped draft the language that was in Senate Bill 577. The law, which went into effect on July 15, 2019, renamed the crime of “intimidation” to “bias crime,” added gender identity to the list of protected categories and removed the requirement that two or more people commit the crime in order to make it a felony in certain circumstances.

All potential bias crime cases, whether they are a felony or misdemeanor, are reviewed by the Violent Crimes Unit within the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office. If a misdemeanor crime is issued, the felony-level attorney will retain the case.

If you are the victim of a bias crime assault or you are witnessing one, immediately call 9-1-1. If you are the victim of a bias crime and the suspect is no longer present or if you have information about a bias crime committed in the past, call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

 

 

#MCDA#


Media Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/5769/139363/PR-20-181-Clayton_Briggs.pdf

Registered sex offender accused of sexually abusing minor
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 10/20/20 2:10 PM

October 20, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that 47-year-old Kenneth Grochowski, a registered sex offender, is accused of having sexual contact with a minor.

Grochowski is charged with 12 counts of sexual abuse in the second degree, three counts of using a child in a display of sexually explicit conduct, one count of unlawful sexual penetration, one count of online sexual corruption of a child in the first degree and one count of luring a minor.

It is alleged that Grochowski sexually abused the minor multiple times and that on one occasion he used force; that he obtained recordings of the minor in a display of sexually explicit conduct and engaged in online communications with the minor to solicit sexual contact. This alleged conduct occurred in between 2017 and 2020, according to court documents.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office.

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime. Grochowski is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

 

#MCDA#


Media Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/5769/139319/PR-20-180-Kenneth_Grochowski.pdf

Colleges & Universities - Public
Western Oregon University waives admission application fee for freshmen and transfer students (Photo)
Western Oregon University - 10/22/20 1:10 PM
Sign at south entrance to Western Oregon University campus in Monmouth
Sign at south entrance to Western Oregon University campus in Monmouth
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1107/139397/thumb_RMT48035.JPG

MONMOUTH, Ore. – Western Oregon University (WOU) has announced several admissions policy changes, effective immediately. There is no application fee for freshman and transfer students until Sept. 1, 2021. Also, high school seniors and transfer students can self-report their cumulative grade point average when completing their admissions application.

 

“Western Oregon University recognizes that students are facing challenges with regard to their college search process,” said WOU Admissions Director Rob Findtner. “Families across Oregon and beyond are dealing with financial hardship and uncertainty. The elimination of the application fee removes a financial barrier and encourages students to apply for admission.”

 

Admitted students will be required to provide final official transcripts prior to enrolling at WOU. Students who wish to receive consideration for WOU scholarships must provide official transcripts by February 1 as the WOU scholarship application is due March 1.

 

“WOU also recognizes the pandemic has impacted our K-12 and higher education partners on many fronts, including the processing of official transcript requests,” Findtner said. “The opportunity for students to self-report their cumulative grade point average will alleviate the concerns associated with providing WOU an official transcripts at the time of application. The policy change also expedites the processing and response time for the Admissions office.”

 

Freshman admission will be based upon a student’s self-reported cumulative grade point average and their high school courses. WOU does not require the submission of ACT or SAT scores for freshmen. Transfer students are asked to provide their cumulative grade point average for each college or university attended when completing their application. Transfer admission will be based upon a student’s academic performance and the successful completion of college-level mathematics and writing courses. The application fee waiver does not apply to post-baccalaureate, non-admit, international, or graduate students.

 

WOU’s Admissions office is hosting several online events. The events listing is available here: https://network.wou.edu/portal/campus_visit

 

About Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University, founded in 1856 and located in Monmouth, is the state’s oldest public university. Serving approximately 4,500 students, WOU is a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution with nearly 75 percent of the student population being from Oregon. A significant portion of attendees are members of under-represented groups, veterans or non-traditional students. WOU is Oregon’s campus of choice for those seeking a transformative education in a supportive, student-centered learning community where classes are taught by faculty. Together we succeed.




Attached Media Files: Sign at south entrance to Western Oregon University campus in Monmouth

Multnomah Co. Schools
Centennial School District Governing Board Work Session Meeting Notice, Wednesday, October 21, 2020 at 6:30 p.m.
Centennial Sch. Dist. - 10/19/20 6:42 PM

The Centennial School District Governing Board will hold a meeting, Wednesday, October 21, 2020 at 6:30 p.m. via the Zoom app. This is a work session. Items of interest include a CSD Bond update.

To access the meeting use the link below:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84496026124?pwd=SmVpSUhOVkFVSFFUcCtQL2oyeVJwdz09
Passcode: 780003

To join by phone dial one of the following numbers.
1 669 900 9128 or 1 253 215 8782
If prompted enter the following information:
Webinar ID: 844 9602 6124
Passcode: 780003

NOTE: Please allow time for resolution of technology issues if the meeting does not immediately begin at the scheduled start time. Your patience is appreciated.

For more information contact Pamela Jordan at, dan@csd28j.org">pamela_jordan@csd28j.org or 971-219-3755.

 

 

 

 


Monday, October 26, 2020 Virtual Executive & Business Meeting 
Parkrose Sch. Dist. - 10/21/20 7:27 PM

The Parkrose Board of Education of School District No. 3, Multnomah County, Oregon, will convene in a Virtual Executive & Business Meeting on Monday, October 26, 2020 online virtually with Zoom at the hour of 6:30 pm. 

The agenda is posted on our website at: https://www.parkrose.k12.or.us/index.php?id=275

Please click this URL to join: https://zoom.us/j/94961285856 or join by phone: 1-253-215-8782 Webinar ID: 949 6128 5856

If you wish to submit a public comment during this Board Meeting please fill out this electronic public comment form before "Reading of Public Comments" on the agenda: https://forms.gle/5sUjRZjxJikqmqVg9

For those of you who cannot participate virtually we will post a recording of the meeting on our website at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXajhxrPxMclOQ6J00JUszQ.

Questions welcomed, please email: questions@parkrose.k12.or.us or leave a voice message at 503-408-2100.


Clackamas Co. Schools
Lake Oswego School Board Passes Two Resolutions Advocating Return to In-Person Learning
Lake Oswego Sch. Dist. - 10/21/20 8:58 AM

Resolution of the Lake Oswego School Board Regarding State Guidance

Resolution of the Lake Oswego School Board Regarding Planning for A Return to School

Oct. 21, 2020, Lake Oswego, OR -- The Lake Oswego school board of directors at the board meeting Monday, Oct. 19, passed two resolutions advocating Lake Oswego School District (LOSD) continue efforts to bring students to school in-person following the latest health and safety guidance.

Resolution of the Lake Oswego School Board Regarding State Guidance, which is addressed to State of Oregon Governor Kate Brown, expresses appreciation for the governor indicating that she and the Oregon Health Authority will reevaluate Covid-19 health metric guidance; and asks her to prioritize the return of students that are disproportionately impacted by continued school closures. The Lake Oswego board of directors approved this resolution in a vote of 4 to 1.

Resolution of the Lake Oswego School Board Regarding Planning for A Return to School, which is addressed to the LOSD Superintendent Dr. Lora de la Cruz, expresses the expectation that the superintendent will continue to work with teachers and staff members to prioritize in-person instruction and services for the students who need it most, while limiting the risk of Covid-19 transmission, and build a clear pathway for a return of all students as state guidelines allow. The Lake Oswego board of directors approved this resolution unanimously.

Following are both approved resolutions in full:

RESOLUTION OF THE LAKE OSWEGO SCHOOL BOARD REGARDING STATE GUIDANCE

WHEREAS, the Lake Oswego School District is a learning community dedicated to creating a culture of belonging and educational excellence; and

WHEREAS, the Lake Oswego School District prioritizes becoming an antiracist organization, creating a culture of belonging, achieving equitable academic outcomes, promoting health and resiliency, and teaching and practicing sustainability; and

WHEREAS, the Lake Oswego School District endeavors to make decisions that are informed by and centered around students; and

WHEREAS, there are undeniable educational and mental health setbacks to all students as a result of school closures, but disproportionately to students with disabilities, Black, Indigenous and students of color, students experiencing financial hardships, and students who haven’t yet mastered the English language; and

WHEREAS, elementary school students are mastering foundational learning skills that will be required for success in secondary grades and beyond, and the impacts of prolonged distance learning may impede their ability to do so; and

WHEREAS, our communities have requested students be permitted to attend in-person schooling if doing so can be done safely; and 

WHEREAS, Superintendent Dr. de la Cruz and her administrative team have already taken significant steps to advocate for and plan toward a safe, thoughtful and phased approach to returning students to school buildings; and 

WHEREAS, best practices following science exist and are attainable in Lake Oswego School District to safely support the return of teachers, staff, administrators, and students in our care; and

WHEREAS, the Lake Oswego School District is committed to ensuring that the provision of special education services and accommodations for students experiencing disability is in full compliance with Individual Education Plans and 504 Plans for all students experiencing disabilities, including timely identification and assessment of at-risk students currently not identified and receiving services.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Lake Oswego School Board wishes to thank Governor Kate Brown for reevaluating the metrics that have been put into place to determine whether students may return to Oregon public schools; and

BE IT RESOLVED, that the Lake Oswego School Board encourages Governor Kate Brown to prioritize a return to school buildings for students bearing the disproportionate impacts of school closures across all grade levels, as noted above, through the establishment of an exception process, provided that appropriate health and safety protocols are implemented to mitigate transmission of COVID-19 and are approved by the Local Public Health Authority; and

BE IT RESOLVED, that the Lake Oswego School Board encourages Governor Kate Brown to prioritize the return of all elementary students in grades K through 5, with an ultimate goal of returning all students to school, by establishing metrics that align with our neighboring states, or delegating authority to local school districts to decide when it is appropriate for these students to return to school.

ADOPTED this 19th day of October, 2020

RESOLUTION OF THE LAKE OSWEGO SCHOOL BOARD REGARDING PLANNING FOR A RETURN TO SCHOOL

WHEREAS, the Lake Oswego School District is a learning community dedicated to creating a culture of belonging and educational excellence; and

WHEREAS, the Lake Oswego School District prioritizes becoming an antiracist organization, creating a culture of belonging, achieving equitable academic outcomes, promoting health and resiliency, and teaching and practicing sustainability; and

WHEREAS, the Lake Oswego School District endeavors to make decisions that are informed by and centered around students; and

WHEREAS, there are undeniable educational and mental health setbacks to all students as a result of school closures, but disproportionately to students with disabilities, Black, Indigenous and students of color, students experiencing financial hardships, and students who haven’t yet mastered the English language; and

WHEREAS, elementary school students are mastering foundational learning skills that will be required for success in secondary grades and beyond, and the impacts of prolonged distance learning may impede their ability to do so; and

WHEREAS, our communities have requested students be permitted to attend in-person schooling if doing so can be done safely; and 

WHEREAS, Superintendent Dr. de la Cruz and her administrative team have already taken significant steps to advocate for and plan toward a safe, thoughtful and phased approach to returning students to school buildings; and 

WHEREAS, best practices following science exist and are attainable in Lake Oswego School District to safely support the return of teachers, staff, administrators, and students in our care; and

WHEREAS, the Lake Oswego School District is committed to ensuring that the provision of special education services and accommodations for students experiencing disability is in full compliance with Individual Education Plans and 504 Plans for all students experiencing disabilities, including timely identification and assessment of at-risk students currently not identified and receiving services.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Lake Oswego School Board directs Superintendent Dr. de la Cruz to prioritize in-person instruction and services for students bearing the disproportionate impact of school closures, as noted above, to the extent practical while taking appropriate steps to mitigate transmission of COVID-19 among teachers, staff, administrators, and students in line with state guidelines; and

BE IT RESOLVED, that the Lake Oswego School Board directs Superintendent Dr. de la Cruz to accelerate planning efforts for a safe return to school buildings for all grades with immediate planning for K through 5, within state guidelines, while taking appropriate steps to mitigate transmission of COVID-19 among teachers, staff, administrators, and students.

ADOPTED this 19th day of October, 2020

For more information, please contact LOSD Director of Communications Mary Kay Larson at sonm@loswego.k12.or.us">larsonm@loswego.k12.or.us.

###

 


Clark Co. Schools
Hockinson School District Board of Directors Regular Meeting
Hockinson Sch. Dist. - 10/23/20 2:57 PM

Date:

Monday, October 26, 2020

Time:

7:00 p.m. Regular Meeting

Address:

See the HSD Website http://www.hocksd.org (top of the page) for a Zoom link to join the meeting.

 

Public comment will be received, during the meeting, through Zoom.

Policy 1400 Meeting Conduct, Order of Business, and Quoru


Help Others with the SOCKtober Sock Drive! (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 10/22/20 9:00 AM
Last year, RISE students were able to collect socks in person, but this year, they will host a drive-through drop-off event instead.
Last year, RISE students were able to collect socks in person, but this year, they will host a drive-through drop-off event instead.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/889/139381/thumb_Socktober2.jpg

Thursday, October 22, 2020 – Ridgefield, WA – It’s time for the third annual SOCKtober sock drive!  Students in the RISE (Reaching Independence through Structured Education) class at Union Ridge Elementary School are holding a sock drive for the Ridgefield Family Resource Center, and you can help.

SOCKtober is a national movement to let kids help others in a tangible way.  Homeless shelters and aid agencies across the country are seeing huge increases in need due to COVID, and as winter approaches, socks are one of the most requested and least donated items.  The Ridgefield SOCKtober drive allows RISE students, who are on the autism spectrum or face other challenges, to volunteer in a meaningful way to help their community. 

In previous years, RISE students went class to class through the school, pulling a big wagon to collect donations.  This year, they will make it safe and easy for community members to donate by holding a two-day drive-through drop-off on Friday, October 23, and Tuesday, October 27th, from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m., at Union Ridge Elementary.  Rally the Raptor, the mascot of the Ridgefield Raptors West Coast League baseball team, will kickstart the event from 12:45 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. on Friday. 

Teacher Stephanie Brown’s students work together to run every element of the donation drive.  They make and color posters to promote the event, and they sort socks to graph and track how many are collected.  They have also been learning about empathy and poverty as part of their Social and Emotional Learning by reading books like Those Shoes by Maribeth Boelts and Still a Family by Brenda Reeves Sturgis.  Using the SOCKtober drive across multiple subjects helps reinforce their learning in a hands-on and interesting way. 

Each year the students collect hundreds of pairs of socks for area agencies, and their collections are supplemented with a grant from Bombas.  Bombas is a sock company that donates one pair of socks for every pair purchased; they distribute those socks around the country through a grant program.  Last year, Brown received 1,000 pairs of socks from Bombas.  The RISE class has been approved for another grant this year, and those socks will arrive in November.   

Brown is proud of her students, who are among the most impacted students in the Ridgefield School District, and how hard they work to make SOCKtober a success. 

Her students are happy to have a fun and easy way to help others, and she is glad to show them that anybody and everybody can make a positive difference in their community.  You can help the RISE class by bringing new socks of any size or style to donate to the SOCKtober sock drive. 

The SOCKtober drive-through sock drop-off will be this Friday, October 23, and Tuesday, October 27th from 12 to 5 in the car lane by the parking lot at Union Ridge Elementary, 330 N. 5th Avenue, Ridgefield.

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Attached Media Files: Last year, RISE students were able to collect socks in person, but this year, they will host a drive-through drop-off event instead. , The RISE students drew and colored the poster to promote their SOCKtober sock donation drive.

School board approves equity resolution
Vancouver Sch. Dist. - 10/21/20 3:00 PM

The Vancouver Public Schools Board of Directors unanimously approved a resolution condemning racism and establishing policy directives on equity. Resolution 869, approved at the Oct. 13 school board meeting, outlines major features of the board’s commitment to the districtwide equity initiative. 

The resolution calls for the creation of an equity work group, completion of an equity audit and future adoption of a district equity policy and procedure. Additionally, to support the board’s goals of diversity, equity and inclusion, policies will be revised or developed in the areas of curriculum; instruction; recruitment, hiring and placement of staff; operations and school climate and culture.

“This resolution is an important step in our commitment to address racial inequities in our school system,” said Board President Wendy Smith. “We know this is the right work. It’s critical that every student in VPS feels valued, respected and safe.”

The work is underway. VPS has formed an equity advisory committee composed of representatives from the community. Next steps include school meetings with students, families and staff members; culture and climate surveys; and an audit to review practices and policies through an equity lens.


Cowlitz Co. & Lower Columbia (WA) Schools
Community Invited to Virtual Ribbon Cutting for Kelso High Gymnasium
Kelso Sch. Dist. - 10/19/20 12:51 PM

Kelso High School is hosting a Virtual Ribbon Cutting to unveil the new gymnasium floor on Thursday, October 22 at 6:30 pm. The community is invited to join the celebration, streamed live on Facebook at @KelsoSchools and on Instagram at @hilanderasb.

Planned and organized by the school’s Associated Student Body (ASB) officers, highlights of the ceremony include lighting up the center “K” saved from the old floor, which is now hung in the main hallway by the auditorium, and a performance from the Kelso High School drumline. Present for the event will be Kelso High School coaches and one senior athlete from boys basketball, girls basketball, volleyball, cheer, and wrestling. Also in attendance will be special guest, Ray Berg. Berg was the Kelso High School Girls Basketball Head Coach from 1983 to 2005 and taught at Huntington Middle School from 1972 to 2005.

Replaced with funds from the passage of the 2018 local bond, the previous gymnasium floor was in in use for 50 years, since the 1970-71 school year.


Private & Charter Schools - Portland area
Oregon Virtual Academy
Oregon Virtual Academy - 10/21/20 7:12 AM

NOTICE OF REGULAR MEETING OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

OCTOBER 27, 2020 @ 6:30 p.m.

 via teleconference 1-720-707-2699 Ext. 526309737# and via Zoom at https://us02web.zoom.us/j/5033141592


PR Agencies
Salem City Club Virtual Informed Voter Series Considers Campaign Finance, Oregon Measure 107 - (Noon Oct 23)
VanNatta Public Relations - 10/18/20 1:04 PM

The Salem City Club will present its fourth program of the 2020 Informed Voter Series on October 23. The program will be a debate on the pros and cons of Measure 107. Portland public interest attorney Dan Meek, who represents Honest Elections Oregon, will speak in support of the measure. Kyle Markley, a member of the Oregon Libertarian Party, will speak in opposition.

Campaign finance reform has been on the minds of Oregonians for years. A long history of actions and non-actions has designated Oregon as one of the five states that places no limits on how much people can give to campaigns. The central reason for this designation is a 1997 Oregon Supreme Court opinion that said campaign contributions amounted to free speech, and so could not be limited.

Dan Meek, a graduate of Stanford Law School, has practiced law in Portland since 1987. Before that, he was a law clerk to Chief U.S. District Judge James Burns, legal counsel at the California Energy Commission, and the staff director of two subcommittees in the U.S. Congress. Meek represents groups and individuals that sponsor ballot measures in Oregon, including Honest Elections Oregon, Common Cause, League of Women Voters, STAR Voting, FairElections Oregon, groups advocating the creation of People's Utility Districts (PUDs), Citizens for Safe Water, and others.  On election law matters, he has represented groups in court and before the Oregon Legislature and agencies, including Common Cause, the Oregon Progressive Party, and the Pacific Green Party.  Meek and colleague Linda Williams are co-founders and co-chairs of the Independent Party of Oregon.

Kyle Markley is a Libertarian political activist and five-time candidate for elected office.  He serves on the Libertarian Party of Oregon's board of directors and founded the Statements for Liberty PAC, which helps Libertarian candidates get published in the Voters' Pamphlet.  Markley was a member of the 2015-2017 Joint Interim Task Force on Campaign Finance Reform. Markley's educational background is in computer science, and he has worked in an engineering role at Intel for more than 20 years.

The Informed Voter Series will take place on Zoom. To access the webinar, go to https://salemcityclub.com/, click the tab that says “Events,” click “Register” for any of the Informed Voter Series events listed, and once you register, your spot will be reserved for the event. You will then be sent a link for the Zoom Webinar. Meetings are free for members and $5 for nonmembers.

Here is the upcoming program schedule:

  • November 13, 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM: Election Wrap-Up and Analysis with political scientist Dr. Ed Dover
  • December 11, 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM: The Year in Poetry - Featuring  Salem Poets and Their Work.

Organizations & Associations
Greater Vancouver Chamber Welcomes New Employee (Photo)
Greater Vancouver Chamber of Commerce - 10/21/20 2:10 PM
2020-10/3339/139329/AmandaHoughton_GVCC.jpg
2020-10/3339/139329/AmandaHoughton_GVCC.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3339/139329/thumb_AmandaHoughton_GVCC.jpg

PRESS RELEASE 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

October 20, 2020 

 

GREATER VANCOUVER CHAMBER WELCOMES NEW EMPLOYEE TO THE DEVELOPMENT TEAM

 

VANCOUVER, Wash. – The Greater Vancouver Chamber welcomes new team member, Amanda Houghton, the Chamber’s newest Membership Relations Manager, working to develop the membership base by bringing new and emerging industries as well as longstanding businesses into Chamber membership.  

Houghton attended Clark College and Portland State University earning a Bachelor’s Degree in Communications & Business. Houghton comes to the Chamber with experience in event management both through owning her own business and working at Portland Spirit Cruises & Events. Most recently Houghton was a Sales & Marketing Executive at ilani. During her time at ilani, Houghton managed events of 5 to 2,500 guests, hosting the region’s industry leaders and professionals, awards ceremonies, nonprofit events, and auctions. 

Houghton will not only assist in the onboarding and retention of Chamber members, but she will also work to promote and curate Chamber partnerships that benefit local organizations and business owners. Houghton has a passion for working collaboratively to create memorable experiences and lasting impressions for local businesses. 

Vice President of Membership & Operations, Janet Kenefsky, adds "Amanda has a great deal of experience and success working with a variety of businesses whose focus was to enhance their visibility, profitability and industry recognition. It was clear from our first meeting that in addition to the skills she brings to the table, Amanda has a passion for Clark County, nonprofits and its business community. As the Chamber continues to grow and expand our programs, educational opportunities, advocacy and events, we looked for the right professional who was ready to bring our membership top-notch communications and services. I’m confident Amanda will become a valued resource for our membership and Chamber team, and I invite any current member or future-member to reach out and start a conversation with her.” 

For members interested in partnering with the Chamber to promote their business and grow in the community, connect with Amanda Houghton at AHoughton@VancouverUSA.com for more information. 

 

The Greater Vancouver Chamber of Commerce (GVCC)?is a non-profit organization founded in 1890, aimed at advancing and strengthening the regional business community through member services, public affairs advocacy and community building. The Chamber is a supportive alliance of diverse member businesses, individuals and organizations, working together toward long-term business prosperity. GVCC is the heart of Clark County’s business community, advocating for sound, sensible and dynamic policies that ensure a vital economic climate while improving Southwest Washington’s infrastructure and quality of life. For more information, please visit?VancouverUSA.com

 

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Attached Media Files: 2020-10/3339/139329/PR_-_Chamber_Welcomes_New_Team_Member_(Amanda).pdf , 2020-10/3339/139329/AmandaHoughton_GVCC.jpg

Greater Vancouver Chamber and Economic Development Council Distribute $8.1 Million in CARES Act Funding for Clark County Businesses & Nonprofits (Photo)
Greater Vancouver Chamber of Commerce - 10/21/20 11:10 AM
Hero Image
Hero Image
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3339/139351/thumb_Website_Header.png

For Immediate Release 

PRESS RELEASE 

October 21, 2020 

 

GREATER VANCOUVER CHAMBER AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL DISTRIBUTE $8.1 MILLION IN CARES ACT FUNDING FOR CLARK COUNTY BUSINESSES AND NONPROFITS 

 

VANCOUVER, Wash. (October 21, 2020) – Using CARES Act dollars, Clark County has funded an additional round of $8.1 million in grants to support Clark County businesses and nonprofits with up to 100 employees. The Greater Vancouver Chamber of Commerce (GVCC) is collaborating with the Columbia River Economic Development Council (CREDC) to administer the new grant, which will provide additional funds of up to $30,000 for each business or nonprofit to support COVID-19 response and recovery efforts.  

Upon meeting eligibility requirements, funds of up to $30,000 will be distributed to local businesses and nonprofits located in Clark County. These entities must have a public-facing facility, with up to 100 employees currently with the company or nonprofit. To learn more and apply, visit CREDC.org/COVID19Grants or VancouverUSA.com/COVID19Grants

The applications are now open and will be accepted on a rolling basis until November 1st or until funds are exhausted, which ever one comes first. The CREDC and GVCC strongly encourage businesses that previously applied for the Working Washington Small Business Emergency Grant (WWSBEG) or the Clark County Main Street Support Program (CCMSSP) through CREDC to apply for this additional round of funding—whether the business received an award or not as this grant increases the amount of funding a business can receive to a total of $30,000. 

 

Additionally, the Chamber is providing a program designed to support businesses affected by the pandemic while providing discounts to consumers. Through the Keep It Local - Clark County initiative, companies can receive funding to cover twice the monetary value of a 50% discount offered to their customers. The funding will be allocated before the promotions. Note: Funds received as part of this grant or the Keep It Local - Clark County initiative may not exceed $30K in total funding received. If you would like to take part in this program, please check the appropriate box when you apply. 

Grant funds can be used to cover expenses connected to the COVID-19 emergency and necessary to continue/re-open business operations. Eligible expenses can include, but are not limited to, payroll, consulting, marketing and training, rent, supplies utility bills and office equipment. John McDonagh, President/CEO of the Chamber adds, “this is a significant amount of money for a local business. This particular grant will cover a wider scope of expenses than some of the other grants that were either restricted to payroll or rent.” Expenses must have been incurred from March 1st through November 30, 2020. 

Applications are only being accepted through either CREDC.org/COVID19Grants or VancouverUSA.com/COVID19Grants. CREDC and GVCC are individual granting entities collaborating to administer this grant through separate agreements with partners at Clark County. 

Applicants will receive a confirmation email within 48 business hours of submission. Due to the volume of requests, specific information about individual applications will not be included. If selected as a finalist, businesses and nonprofits can expect to hear back from CREDC or GVCC by the week of November 9, 2020 with next steps on how to accept the grant.  

Direct questions to the CREDC team info@credc.org or the GVCC team at Chamber@VancouverUSA.com" target="_blank">YourChamber@VancouverUSA.com

 

About CREDC 

Since 1982, the Columbia River Economic Development Council (CREDC) has served as Clark County’s leading economic development organization, connecting companies to the resources they need to expand or locate in the region. As a private-public partnership, we leverage the expertise and collaboration of over 140 investors and strategic partners to advance the economic vitality of Clark County while maintaining our exceptional quality of life. www.credc.org 

 

About GVCC 

The Greater Vancouver Chamber of Commerce (GVCC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1890, aimed at advancing and strengthening the regional business community through member services, public affairs advocacy and community building. The Chamber is a supportive alliance of diverse member businesses, individuals and organizations, working together toward long-term business prosperity. GVCC is the heart of Clark County’s business community, advocating for sound, sensible and dynamic policies that ensure a vital economic climate while improving Southwest Washington’s infrastructure and quality of life. For more information, please visit?VancouverUSA.com

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Attached Media Files: Infographic , Press Release , Hero Image

M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Awards $4.7 Million to Washington Nonprofits
M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust - 10/19/20 8:07 AM

The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust has released its Summer 2020 Grants Report.

  • This report includes 65 grants to nonprofits serving the Pacific Northwest totaling $12.2 million.
  • In total, 22 grants were awarded to organizations serving the state of Washington totaling $4.7 million.
  • A list of sample grants can be found in the release below or on our website here.
  • The full list of grants can be found here.

October 19, 2020

For Immediate Release

An Optimistic Spirit – Summer 2020 Grants Report

In many ways, it feels like 2020 just will not give us a break.

We’ve all discussed at length the unprecedented challenges this year has brought to our communities. As summer faded to fall, we were struck with yet another once-in-a-generation tragedy as the Pacific Northwest was ravaged by wildfires that caused destruction on a scale we’ve not seen in decades. Lives were lost. Homes and businesses were destroyed. Entire communities were decimated.

Yet in the face of painful moment after painful moment, we find reason for hope and optimism. As every new challenge has arisen, no matter how daunting, we have seen individuals and organizations lining up on the front lines to address it in ways that serve the common good of their community.

  • Fire fighters and first responders rushing into harms way to serve and protect individuals and families.
  • Providing shelter and emergency supplies to those forced to evacuate.
  • Researching new vaccines and treatments for a deadly virus.
  • Safely serving meals and providing to those who are hungry.
  • Putting their own lives at risk to treat the sick.
  • Collecting and sharing food with families who have lost income.
  • Identifying ways to continue to offer safe facilities for vulnerable children and families.
  • Finding innovative ways to keep educating and inspiring children and families in days of social distancing.

The resilient spirit of the Pacific Northwest and the commitment of individuals and families throughout our communities to stand up and contribute to the positive change we so desperately need is heartwarming and inspiring. We see this in innovative collaborations, like the partnership between ecologists and fire practitioners studying firefighting behavior at Sycan Marsh. We see this as communities have rallied to connect and bring resources to families in need through the My NeighbOR effort. We see this as our friends at the Foraker Group bring together business and nonprofit leaders to share strategies to move the nonprofit sector forward.

Our team recently had the opportunity to see this spirit on display as our board reviewed our most recent collection of grant applications, including dozens of incredible nonprofits finding innovative and sustainable ways to serve the diverse needs of our region. At this meeting our Trustees approved 65 grants totalling $12,252,138 to nonprofits serving Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington and across the Pacific Northwest. We have pulled a few example stories below and you can find a full list of these grants here.

As we enter the final weeks of 2020 and prepare for a season of generosity and giving, we are hopeful for the future and eager to see what other ways individuals across our region can help partner and contribute to the common good.

To our newest grantees, our existing partners and all organizations and individuals that are tackling the difficult work of supporting individuals and families throughout our region so that all communities have an opportunity to flourish and thrive, we say THANK YOU!

- Steve Moore

Executive Director, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust

Alaska

  • Children and adults in Alaska will receive increased mental health support as Alaska Behavioral Health (formerly Anchorage Community Mental Health Services) expands and renovates its facility.
  • The expansion of Camp K by Camp Fire Alaska will increase its ability to serve youth and teens while also improving the camp’s infrastructure to reliably serve future campers for generations to come.
  • The Church of Love, a vibrant community gathering space, will be significantly renovated by Cook Inlet Housing Authority, increasing accessibility and strengthening the space to serve for generations to come.
  • New equipment purchased by University of Alaska Fairbanks will help researchers gain increased precision in their work to better understand oceanic ecosystem productivity.

Idaho

Montana

  • Patients with serious illnesses and their families will have increased access to housing following the construction of the new Harold & Carmen Poulsen Legacy Housing space within the Great Falls medical corridor.
  • Reach Out and Care Wheels will add a new Executive Director, helping expand its efforts to provide wheelchairs to those in need.
  • New staff at Trust Montana will help steward properties and secure affordable housing and community assets for generations to come.

Oregon

  • Camp Ukandu will be able to offer more children diagnosed with cancer and their families a true summer camp experience through the introduction of new staff.
  • More girls will have the opportunity to learn about entrepreneurship as the Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington add new staff.
  • In4All will hire new staff to help serve and support more students of color and students living in poverty.
  • Preteen and teen girls in Lane and Linn Counties struggling with trauma and behavioral health challenges will receive increased support as Ophelia’s Place adds staff.
  • New staff at St. Mary’s Home for Boys will help the organization help prepare young men to flourish and thrive after graduating high school.

Washington

  • Students will have access to new equipment and training programs following a grant to Black Pilots of America.
  • A new gymnasium built by the Boys and Girls Clubs of Snohomish County will provide increased programming offerings for children and teens in Granite Falls.
  • Vulnerable, at-risk and underserved youth will receive increased support as the Center for Children and Youth Justice adds new staff.
  • New administrative technology will help College Success Foundation serve more underrepresented, low-income students as they seek to graduate high school, graduate from college and transition to a successful career.
  • New staff at the Feiro Marine Life Center will help accelerate plans to expand its work and programming.
  • Stolen Youth will add new staff, allowing the organization to increase its programs combatting human trafficking.
  • The Woodland Park Zoo will update and expand their highly popular Northern Trail exhibit, serving more children and families.

Pacific Northwest

  • Interfaith Youth Core will hire new staff to help bring a message of unity and collaboration to the Pacific Northwest.

About M. J. Murdock Charitable Trust

The Murdock Trust, created by the will of the late Melvin J. (Jack) Murdock, provides grants to organizations in five states of the Pacific Northwest—Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington—that seek to strengthen the region’s educational, spiritual and cultural base in creative and sustainable ways. Since its inception in 1975, the Trust has awarded more than 6,700 grants totaling more than $1 billion. For more information, find the Murdock Trust on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and on our website.

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M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Awards $3.1 Million to Oregon Nonprofits
M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust - 10/19/20 8:01 AM

The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust has released its Summer 2020 Grants Report.

  • This report includes 65 grants to nonprofits serving the Pacific Northwest totaling $12.2 million.
  • In total, 20 grants were awarded to organizations serving the state of Oregon totaling $3.1 million.
  • A list of sample grants can be found in the release below or on our website here.
  • The full list of grants can be found here.

October 19, 2020

For Immediate Release

An Optimistic Spirit – Summer 2020 Grants Report

In many ways, it feels like 2020 just will not give us a break.

We’ve all discussed at length the unprecedented challenges this year has brought to our communities. As summer faded to fall, we were struck with yet another once-in-a-generation tragedy as the Pacific Northwest was ravaged by wildfires that caused destruction on a scale we’ve not seen in decades. Lives were lost. Homes and businesses were destroyed. Entire communities were decimated.

Yet in the face of painful moment after painful moment, we find reason for hope and optimism. As every new challenge has arisen, no matter how daunting, we have seen individuals and organizations lining up on the front lines to address it in ways that serve the common good of their community.

  • Fire fighters and first responders rushing into harms way to serve and protect individuals and families.
  • Providing shelter and emergency supplies to those forced to evacuate.
  • Researching new vaccines and treatments for a deadly virus.
  • Safely serving meals and providing to those who are hungry.
  • Putting their own lives at risk to treat the sick.
  • Collecting and sharing food with families who have lost income.
  • Identifying ways to continue to offer safe facilities for vulnerable children and families.
  • Finding innovative ways to keep educating and inspiring children and families in days of social distancing.

The resilient spirit of the Pacific Northwest and the commitment of individuals and families throughout our communities to stand up and contribute to the positive change we so desperately need is heartwarming and inspiring. We see this in innovative collaborations, like the partnership between ecologists and fire practitioners studying firefighting behavior at Sycan Marsh. We see this as communities have rallied to connect and bring resources to families in need through the My NeighbOR effort. We see this as our friends at the Foraker Group bring together business and nonprofit leaders to share strategies to move the nonprofit sector forward.

Our team recently had the opportunity to see this spirit on display as our board reviewed our most recent collection of grant applications, including dozens of incredible nonprofits finding innovative and sustainable ways to serve the diverse needs of our region. At this meeting our Trustees approved 65 grants totalling $12,252,138 to nonprofits serving Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington and across the Pacific Northwest. We have pulled a few example stories below and you can find a full list of these grants here.

As we enter the final weeks of 2020 and prepare for a season of generosity and giving, we are hopeful for the future and eager to see what other ways individuals across our region can help partner and contribute to the common good.

To our newest grantees, our existing partners and all organizations and individuals that are tackling the difficult work of supporting individuals and families throughout our region so that all communities have an opportunity to flourish and thrive, we say THANK YOU!

- Steve Moore

Executive Director, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust

Alaska

  • Children and adults in Alaska will receive increased mental health support as Alaska Behavioral Health (formerly Anchorage Community Mental Health Services) expands and renovates its facility.
  • The expansion of Camp K by Camp Fire Alaska will increase its ability to serve youth and teens while also improving the camp’s infrastructure to reliably serve future campers for generations to come.
  • The Church of Love, a vibrant community gathering space, will be significantly renovated by Cook Inlet Housing Authority, increasing accessibility and strengthening the space to serve for generations to come.
  • New equipment purchased by University of Alaska Fairbanks will help researchers gain increased precision in their work to better understand oceanic ecosystem productivity.

Idaho

Montana

  • Patients with serious illnesses and their families will have increased access to housing following the construction of the new Harold & Carmen Poulsen Legacy Housing space within the Great Falls medical corridor.
  • Reach Out and Care Wheels will add a new Executive Director, helping expand its efforts to provide wheelchairs to those in need.
  • New staff at Trust Montana will help steward properties and secure affordable housing and community assets for generations to come.

Oregon

  • Camp Ukandu will be able to offer more children diagnosed with cancer and their families a true summer camp experience through the introduction of new staff.
  • More girls will have the opportunity to learn about entrepreneurship as the Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington add new staff.
  • In4All will hire new staff to help serve and support more students of color and students living in poverty.
  • Preteen and teen girls in Lane and Linn Counties struggling with trauma and behavioral health challenges will receive increased support as Ophelia’s Place adds staff.
  • New staff at St. Mary’s Home for Boys will help the organization help prepare young men to flourish and thrive after graduating high school.

Washington

  • Students will have access to new equipment and training programs following a grant to Black Pilots of America.
  • A new gymnasium built by the Boys and Girls Clubs of Snohomish County will provide increased programming offerings for children and teens in Granite Falls.
  • Vulnerable, at-risk and underserved youth will receive increased support as the Center for Children and Youth Justice adds new staff.
  • New administrative technology will help College Success Foundation serve more underrepresented, low-income students as they seek to graduate high school, graduate from college and transition to a successful career.
  • New staff at the Feiro Marine Life Center will help accelerate plans to expand its work and programming.
  • Stolen Youth will add new staff, allowing the organization to increase its programs combatting human trafficking.
  • The Woodland Park Zoo will update and expand their highly popular Northern Trail exhibit, serving more children and families.

Pacific Northwest

  • Interfaith Youth Core will hire new staff to help bring a message of unity and collaboration to the Pacific Northwest.

About M. J. Murdock Charitable Trust

The Murdock Trust, created by the will of the late Melvin J. (Jack) Murdock, provides grants to organizations in five states of the Pacific Northwest—Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington—that seek to strengthen the region’s educational, spiritual and cultural base in creative and sustainable ways. Since its inception in 1975, the Trust has awarded more than 6,700 grants totaling more than $1 billion. For more information, find the Murdock Trust on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and on our website.

###


Meals on Wheels People Recruiting 500 Volunteers to Serve as Friendly Chatters for Thanksgiving Day
Meals on Wheels People - 10/19/20 7:40 AM

Thanksgiving meal deliveries to homebound seniors are going to look a little different this year. Because of the ongoing pandemic, Meals on Wheels People will not be delivering meals on Thanksgiving Day. All homebound seniors who request a holiday meal will receive one earlier in the week along with their regular weekly meal delivery. But we want to ensure that no senior will be lonely on Thanksgiving Day, so we are recruiting 500 volunteers to make calls to homebound elderly on Thanksgiving as part of our Friendly Chats program.

Meals on Wheels People launched the Friendly Chats program in the spring. To ensure the safety of both volunteers and homebound participants, we moved to a once-a-week, no-contact delivery model. While this was more efficient, it also reduced the face-to-face contact so important to reduce social isolation among the elderly. We recruited more than 1,000 individuals to make calls to homebound participants once or twice a week just to chat. Thousands of homebound elderly have registered for the program and it has proven to extremely popular.

In addition to Thanksgiving Day Friendly Chatters, Meals on Wheels People is recruiting bi-lingual volunteers who would like to become regular Friendly Chatters. In addition to Spanish, Russian and Mandarin Chinese, volunteers who speak Vietnamese, Hmong, Farsi and other languages are encouraged to apply. To volunteer, go to mowp.org/volunteer.

About Meals on Wheels People: Meals on Wheels People has been changing lives, one meal at a time, since 1970. We provide more than a meal to thousands of older adults in the greater Portland metro area. Our service not only alleviates hunger and social isolation, but allows seniors to live independently with dignity in their own homes. Aging in place reduces depression, falls and hospitalization as well as the high cost of institutional care. For more information, visit: mowp.org.


Media Preview for OMSI's Newest Feature Exhibit: The Life & Legacy of Genghis Khan
OMSI - 10/20/20 12:37 PM

(PORTLAND, Ore.) Journey back 800 years and discover how a controversial leader and his family impacted history as they created the world’s largest land empire. Authentic artifacts, animated maps and immersive displays tell the story of one of the world’s most controversial leaders at The Life & Legacy of Genghis Khan, the latest exhibit to open at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI). 

Explore the largest single collection of 13th-century Mongolian artifacts ever assembled—including gold jewelry, weaponry, silk robes, religious relics, and more—and see Mongolian culture brought to life with daily live music, artistic, and dance performances.

This world-class exhibit invites visitors to examine the facts and consider the many perspectives of Genghis Khan, who Time magazine and The Washington Post named "The Most Important Person of the Last Millennium.”

WHAT
OMSI is hosting an exclusive media-only preview event of its latest feature exhibition: The Life and Legacy of Genghis Khan. Media will have access to the exhibit prior to its opening to the public.

WHEN
Friday, Oct. 23, 9-10 a.m.

WHERE
The event takes place in OMSI’s Feature Hall. Media can meet with John Farmer in the main lobby between 8:45 and 9 a.m.

HEALTH PRECAUTIONS
For media attending the preview, please wear a face covering while in the building (we ask that you not remove it while interviewing) and maintain a respectful social distance from others (at least six feet).  
 


BREAKING: Governor subverts public process with last-minute Executive Order
Oregon Farm Bureau - 10/23/20 12:22 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Anne Marie Moss, ie@oregonfb.org">annemarie@oregonfb.org, 503.399.1701

BREAKING: Governor subverts public process with last-minute Executive Order

October 23, 2020, SALEM, OREGON: Oregon Farm Bureau is dismayed by the Governor’s decision to release a last-minute Executive Order extending the rules for employer-provided agricultural housing and shocked that the Governor would add criminal penalties to the enforcement of these rules.

Adoption of the original temporary COVID-19 rules for agriculture allowed no meaningful public input and resulted from an activist petition, not from any public health or scientific experts. Using an Executive Order to extend these rules subverts the public process yet again.   

There has not been an identified “outbreak” of COVID-19 in agricultural housing since the beginning of the pandemic, even before the temporary rules were adopted. OR-OSHA’s data shows that of the 11,617 complaints made to the agency, and subsequent violations found, agriculture represents only 33. Almost all of these cases were minor, such as not having enough posters displayed. The Oregon Health Authority has made it clear that social gatherings off-site are the major driver of continued spread of COVID-19, not on-farm employment and housing.

Outbreaks are actively occurring off-site in community-based and other housing. Because of bed-spacing, prohibition of bunk beds, and other technical requirements, the temporary rules reduced the amount of safe on-farm housing and pushed employees out into unregulated environments. Farmworker advocates acknowledge that community-based and off-site housing doesn’t require social distancing, yet this housing has not been the subject of increased regulation, scrutiny, or criminal penalties. OFB agrees with the need to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 in housing, but believes there is a way to protect employees without displacing them.  

The Governor’s staff informed agricultural leaders of the Executive Order less than 24 hours before it was to be issued and would not share the text of the order with just hours to go before implementation. The use of an 11th hour Executive Order guarantees that no official public comment will be heard, no stakeholder perspectives will be taken into account, and it also subverts the requirements of the Oregon Administrative Procedures Act.  

Oregon’s farm families and the organizations that represent them have been working to make a positive difference in the fight against COVID-19 since March, including proactively discussing with OR-OSHA how best to protect farmworkers during this crisis. The state’s unfounded focus on agriculture hurts both farmers and their employees, while also diverting resources away from areas where COVID-19 spread is actually occurring.

Executive Orders must be reserved for true public health emergencies, not the subversion of public process. We are disappointed with today’s release of an Executive Order that will do little to promote the health and wellbeing of our most vulnerable communities and circumvents the required public process. 

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“Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Barb Iverson comes from a multigenerational family farm from Woodburn, raising industrial hemp, grass seed, squash, vetch seed, hazelnuts, wine and table grapes, and operating the Wooden Shoe Tulip Festival, which attracts over 160,000 visitors each year. Iverson is OFB’s 17th president.


Oregon Food Bank Welcomes Chi Nguyen as Interim Deputy CEO (Photo)
Oregon Food Bank - 10/23/20 2:00 PM
Chi Nguyen
Chi Nguyen
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/620/139421/thumb_Chi_Nguyen.jpg

Former APANO Executive Director will succeed longtime anti-hunger leader Leslie Sampson, who retires in December  

Oregon Food Bank is delighted to announce that Chi K. Nguyen will serve as the organization’s Interim Deputy Chief Executive Officer. Nguyen will take on the new role beginning November 2, in preparation for the retirement of 15-year Oregon Food Bank veteran Leslie Sampson. 

A mission-driven leader and the former Executive Director of Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon (APANO), Nguyen brings significant leadership experience from her work with APANO and as the founder of two small businesses. Nguyen has long been active in local and state government and policy, serving on the Governor’s Racial Justice Council and the Salem Area Mass Transit District Board. She has also represented King City, Oregon as a City Councilor.

“We are so honored to welcome Chi Nguyen to the Oregon Food Bank team — and couldn't be more excited about the combination of professional leadership and lived experience she brings to our efforts to emerge stronger from the crises our communities face,” shared CEO Susannah Morgan. “We are also saddened and overjoyed for Leslie Sampson to embark on her next chapter. The Oregon Food Bank community is incredibly grateful for her many years of dedication and accomplishment. We will continue to build upon the strong foundation she helped to create, pushing forward to end hunger for good.”

In addition to her leadership in the business, government and non-profit sectors, Nguyen brings important lived experience and perspective to the Oregon Food Bank leadership team — as an immigrant, an Asian-American and a multilingual speaker fluent in English, Vietnamese and French. She will play an integral role in advancing Oregon Food Bank’s mission to end hunger and its root causes.

Nguyen will serve through June 30, 2021 and will report to CEO Susannah Morgan. Her duties will include leading strategic implementation at Oregon Food Bank and overseeing two of OFB's departments, Operations and Partnerships and Programs. 

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About Oregon Food Bank

At Oregon Food Bank, we believe that food and health are basic human rights for all. We know that hunger is not just an individual experience; it is also a community-wide symptom of systemic barriers to employment, education, housing and healthcare — including racism, sexism and transphobia.

That’s why we work systemically to achieve our mission to end hunger and its root causes: we foster community connections to help people access nutritious food; and we build community power to dismantle systems and policies that drive hunger and poverty.




Attached Media Files: PDF , Chi Nguyen

REACH Community Development and Bienestar team up on a new development in Cornelius, OR
REACH Community Development - 10/20/20 9:00 AM

October 20, 2020 - REACH is excited to announce a collaboration with fellow non-profit Bienestar to create new affordable homes in Cornelius!  Bienestar is a Community Development Corporation whose mission is to build housing, hope, and community for Latinxs, immigrants, and all families in need.

Together, REACH and Bienestar aspire to model a more inclusive and collaborative approach to affordable housing development through the creation of Plaza Los Amigos. This new development in Cornelius, OR, Washington County’s most diverse town, will create 113 affordable apartment homes. In addition, 16 apartments will be reserved for formerly unhoused individuals, and provide specialized intensive resident services. 

“Individually, we would not be able to do this project, but together we can make new communities like this a reality,”  said REACH Housing Development Director, Alma Flores.  "We hope this will be the first of many collaborations as we explore further development opportunities."

This innovative partnership will leverage REACH’s housing development and financing capacities and Bienestar’s creative approach to community-driven design and deep relationships in Cornelius. Once complete, Bienestar will be the long-term owner and steward of the community.

Plaza Los Amigos has already cleared the first step towards financing an affordable project by securing $12.8M in local funding from Washington County’s Metro Affordable Housing Bond funds.

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About REACH - Since 1982, REACH has built innovative and affordable housing for low-income families and individuals in the metropolitan region. REACH develops and manages affordable housing and provides supportive services to our residents, as well as free home repairs to senior homeowners. Today, REACH’s portfolio includes over 2,400 units, including single-family homes, apartment buildings, and mixed-use developments located across the Portland Metro Region and SW Washington. More information available at http://reachcdc.org.

About Bienestar - Bienestar is a Community Development Corporation and 501c3 non-profit organization based in Washington County with a focus on providing culturally specific, bilingual services for Latinx, farmworker, immigrant, and other households in its affordable housing properties in Cornelius, Forest Grove, Hillsboro, and unincorporated Washington County, as well as one property in Columbia County. Bienestar currently houses 509 families (approximately 2,000 residents) within its 12 affordable properties. Furthermore, it provides bilingual wrap-around resident services to those same families as well as an additional 110 households served through a joint agreement with the Housing Authority of Washington County at Willow Creek Crossing Apartments in Hillsboro.


Christmas at The Grotto 2020 (Photo)
The Grotto - 10/21/20 8:32 AM
2020-10/3176/139336/Nativity_3484.jpg
2020-10/3176/139336/Nativity_3484.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/3176/139336/thumb_Nativity_3484.jpg

2020 Christmas Celebration

The Grotto’s Christmas celebration will be different this year.

We will not host our usual evening lighting event (The Christmas Festival of Lights) due to Covid-19 and our concern for the health and safety of our guests, volunteers, staff and neighbors.

However, we invite everyone to join us for Christmas at The Grotto during our usual daytime hours, where we will share and celebrate the true meaning of Christmas.

All activities on the lower level are free to everyone, our gift to the community.

Beginning the day after Thanksgiving and continuing through New Year’s Day, visitors can:

  • Visit the Nativity
  • Walk the path and listen to the story of the birth of Jesus
  • Write wishes and prayers on the Trees of Hope
  • Visit the Chapel of Mary
  • Light a candle
  • Take a holiday photo in one of the great photo op spots
  • Do some Christmas shopping in The Grotto Gift Shop

Additionally, those who purchase admission to our scenic Upper Gardens will enjoy some special seasonal decorations.

There will be extra outdoor activities on the weekends, which will be announced soon. Visit The Grotto's website thegrotto.org in the upcoming days.

For more information, contact events@thegrotto.org.

Virtual Advent Celebration

The Grotto will also be hosting a daily Virtual Advent Celebration, which will include activities, reflections, music, memories and much more. This will be particularly enjoyable for those who love the Festival of Lights, which we hope will return next year.

Anyone interested in participating in the Virtual Advent Celebration can sign up at thegrotto.org to receive the daily emails during Advent.

The Virtual Advent Celebration will begin on the first day of Advent.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/3176/139336/Nativity_3484.jpg

Science on Tap Online -- The Neuroscience of Real Life Monsters: Psychopaths, CEOs, and Politicians (Photo)
Via Productions - 10/23/20 10:00 AM
2020-10/4849/138961/life_Monsters.jpg
2020-10/4849/138961/life_Monsters.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/4849/138961/thumb_life_Monsters.jpg

Date: Thursday, Oct 29th, 2020

Time: 7 p.m.

Location: Register on Zoom

Tickets: $5 suggested donation (Support us on Patreon or make a one-time donation here)

Event Website: https://www.scienceontaporwa.org/events/online_oct_29_psychopathy/

Just in time for the election!

Why do some people live lawful lives, while others gravitate toward repeated criminal behavior? Do people choose to be moral or immoral, or is morality simply a genetically inherited function of the brain? Research suggests that psychopathy as a biological condition explained by defective neural circuits that mediate empathy, but what does that mean when neuroscience is used as evidence in criminal court?

Forensic psychiatrist Dr. Octavio Choi will explore how emerging neuroscience challenges long-held assumptions underlying the basis—and punishment—of criminal behavior.

Visit our Facebook or YouTube page 7pm on Thursday for the live show (refresh until you see the video post), or watch the high quality version on Zoom (register above).

Recorded live shows are available on our YouTube channel within a day or two.


Science on Tap is a science lecture series where you can sit back, drink a pint, and enjoy learning. Listen to experts talk about the science in your neighborhood and around the world. You don't have to be a science geek to have fun--all you need is a thirst for knowledge! For more information on this event or about Science on Tap, visit Science on Tap OR WA.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/4849/138961/life_Monsters.jpg