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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Fri. Apr. 20 - 1:17 am
Police & Fire
Media Opportunity April 26th
Beaverton Police Dept. - 04/19/18 1:20 PM

On April 26th, 2018 Beaverton Police will host a media opportunity to film and interview citizens in a police use of force class.  The citizens participating are currently taking our biannual Citizens Academy.  Police use of force is the scheduled topic for April 26th.

The class will have both lecture and hands on scenario based sections.  Media will also be allowed to take part in a use force scenario if desired.  The class will be held at Beaverton Police Station from 6:30-9:30 p.m.  A PIO will be there to facilitate any questions and help with logistical issues that may arise.   

Please call and let the PIO know if you plan on attending so we can make the proper arrangements.  PIO line is 503-969-6502.


Extra 420 DUII Patrols
Beaverton Police Dept. - 04/19/18 9:40 AM

On April 20th, 2018, also known as 420 day, Beaverton Police Department will have
dedicated DUII enforcement officers on the streets.

Officers who are certified as Drug Recognition Experts will also be available to assist in
processing people arrested for a drug related DUII. Drug recognition experts are
certified to recognize the signs and symptoms that all seven drug categories have on the
human body.

Buzzed driving, whether alcohol or drugs, is drunk driving. Beaverton Police
Department urges people who use intoxicating substances to find a sober ride home.




Attached Media Files: press release

Free Child Safety Seat Clinic
Beaverton Police Dept. - 04/18/18 4:30 PM

On April 21st, 2018 Beaverton Police Department, along with Safe Kids Coalition of Washington County and Kuni Auto Center, will be offering a free child safety seat clinic.

The clinic will run from 9:00 AM to 11:30 AM at the Kuni Auto Center located at 3725 SW Cedar Hills Blvd. Beaverton, OR 97005.

Motor-vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death nationwide for children ages 1-12. In 2015, 1,353 children under age 9 were injured in Oregon traffic crashes; six children died. It's estimated that car seats may increase crash survival by 71% for infants under 1 year old, and by up to 59% for toddlers ages 1-4. Booster seats may reduce the chance of nonfatal injury among 4- to 8-year-olds by 45% compared to safety belts used alone.

For more information about the proper fit of a child safety seat please visit https://www.nhtsa.gov/equipment/car-seats-and-booster-seats.

No appointment is necessary so please just drop in. Arriving early is recommended as we sometimes have more vehicles than we can accommodate during the event timeframe. Each car seat check will take approximately 30 minutes.




Attached Media Files: press release

Town Hall on mail theft, identity theft set for April 26 at Riverside Elementary
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/18/18 8:00 AM

The Clackamas County Sheriff's Office and DA's Office will join forces on Thursday, April 26 to host a town hall to discuss the recent rise in mail/package theft and identity theft.

This Oak Grove/Jennings Lodge Town Hall is set for Thursday, April 26th at 6:30 p.m. at Riverside Elementary (16303 SE River Rd., Oak Grove).

Highlights of the town hall will include:

  • A postal inspector discussing how to prevent mail theft and identity theft, as well as what to do if you're a victim
  • An update on our Neighborhood Livability Project, a multi-agency initiative addressing problem houses in Clackamas County
  • An update on the Trolley Trail Watch
  • Discussion of any new issues of note in the Oak Grove/Jennings Lodge area

Invite a neighbor!

For more information on the Town Hall, contact Crime Prevention Officer Sara McClurg at 503-785-5077 or amcc@clackamas.us">saramcc@clackamas.us.

[END]


Sheriff's Office continues enhanced DUII patrols in April
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/17/18 2:39 PM

This April the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office continues to provide increased patrols focused on reducing impaired-driver crashes.

These increased patrols have been getting results: In March, the Clackamas County Sheriff’s removed 44 suspected impaired drivers from the roadway.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), in 2014 there were 9,967 people killed as a result of impaired driving crashes. This staggering statistic amounts to one alcohol-impaired traffic fatality every 53 minutes. Nationally, impaired driver crashes accounted for 31 percent of traffic fatalities in 2014.

The enhanced Sheriff’s Office DUII patrols are designed to help the public avoid these completely preventable tragedies.

The Sheriff's Office also reminds people to exercise extreme caution if using impairing substances while navigating the county's waterways -- and if you do use an impairing substance, please have a sober driver and boat operator.

Everyone can play a role in preventing impaired drivers. If you witness impaired driving, don’t hesitate to report it to your local authorities -- it may save a life.

Please enjoy your time with friends and family as spring weather begins to improve -- and please drive safe and sober.

[END]


Sheriff's Office seeks tips to locate owner of ram found tangled in wire fence, possibly abandoned (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/17/18 1:25 PM
2018-04/624/113657/RamRescue4.jpg
2018-04/624/113657/RamRescue4.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/624/113657/thumb_RamRescue4.jpg

Please reference CCSO Case # 18-011169

The Sheriff's Office is seeking tips as it works to find the owner of a ram found tangled in a shrub and wire fence on a possibly abandoned property off SE Hwy. 212 in Boring.

Just after 1 p.m. on Sunday, April 15, deputies responded to an address on the 27000 block of SE Hwy. 212 in Boring to investigate a report of an abandoned animal. The caller reported seeing an animal -- possibly a goat or sheep -- tied to a fence with no food or shelter at the seemingly abandoned property.

Deputies arrived on scene and located the animal -- which turned out to be a hair sheep ram.

The animal was in dire straits. It was lying on its side, shivering, surrounded by feces, with its right front leg trapped in a small shrub and its horns entangled in a wire fence. The ram had apparently been in that position for some time. An ear tag on the ram had the serial number OR03549 0003.

Deputies freed the ram and found it unable to stand, requiring immediate medical care. A veterinarian was called to the scene. She administered care -- and agreed to keep the ram at Eagle Fern Equine Hospital on a temporary basis until it could be placed with a rescue or new owner. Deputies transported the ram to the equine hospital.

Deputies also checked the property for an owner, but were unable to locate anyone. The property appeared to be uninhabited.

The unlucky ram has been treated and is now safely in foster care.

The Sheriff's Office is pursuing an animal-neglect case -- and needs the public's help to find the ram's owner.

Photos of the ram during and after its rescue are attached.

ADDITIONAL TIPS SOUGHT

Anyone with information on the ram's owner is urged to contact the Sheriff’s Office Tip Line — by phone at 503-723-4949 or by using the online email form at https://web3.clackamas.us/contact/tip.jsp . Please reference CCSO Case # 18-011169.

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/624/113657/RamRescue4.jpg , 2018-04/624/113657/RamRescue3.jpg , 2018-04/624/113657/RamRescue2.jpg , 2018-04/624/113657/RamRescue1.jpg

UPDATED w/ VICTIM ID: Happy Valley PD investigates nail-gun assault at construction site (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/17/18 10:54 AM
Booking photo: Jesus Ascencio Molina
Booking photo: Jesus Ascencio Molina
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/624/113584/thumb_bookingphoto-JesusAscencioMolina.jpg

Please reference CCSO Case # 18-010970


UPDATE (Tuesday, April 17, 2018) -- VICTIM NAME

The victim in this incident can now be identified as Andres C. Marcelo, 24, of Wood Village. He is currently listed in stable condition at the hospital. The victim is requesting NO media interviews at this time.


EARLIER (Saturday, April 14) -- ARREST MADE IN NAIL-GUN ATTACK; SUSPECT HELD ON ATTEMPTED MURDER CHARGE

In the early morning on Saturday, April 14, Clackamas County Sheriff's Office deputies arrested Jesus Ascencio Molina, 24, for the attempted murder of one of his co-workers in yesterday’s nail-gun attack.

Molina's booking photo is attached, and his complete booking info can be found here: https://web3.clackamas.us/roster/#inmates He is currently lodged in Clackamas County Jail on one charge of Assault I and one charge of Attempted Murder. His bail is set at $250,000.


EARLIER (April 13, 2018, 12:45 p.m.) -- Happy Valley Police investigate assault with nail gun at construction site

Just after 10 a.m. on Friday, April 13, 2018, Deputies contracted to the Happy Valley Police Department responded to assault at a house under construction on SE Tranquil St., near SE Morning Dew Rd. in Happy Valley.

One male construction worker was reportedly assaulted by another worker with a pneumatic framing nail gun.

The victim had multiple injuries from nail impacts, and was transported by Life Flight to an area hospital.

The suspect fled the scene on foot and has not been located at this time. The suspect is described as a Hispanic male with a medium build, wearing a camouflage jacket and blue jeans. The suspect was last seen running towards SE 172nd Ave.

Detectives from Happy Valley PD and the Clackamas County Major Crimes Team were called to the scene. Detectives are currently working to identify the suspect.

The suspect and victim know each other, and detectives do not believe there is a threat to the public at this time.

ADDITIONAL TIPS SOUGHT

The Sheriff's Office is seeking additional information in this case. Anyone with information is urged to contact the Sheriff's Office Tip Line -- by phone at 503-723-4949 or by using the online email form at https://web3.clackamas.us/contact/tip.jsp . Please reference CCSO Case # 18-010970.

Two Clackamas County cities -- Happy Valley and Wilsonville -- contract with the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office to provide municipal police services.

[END]




Attached Media Files: Booking photo: Jesus Ascencio Molina

No-questions-asked 'Prescription Drug Take-Back' set for Saturday, April 28 (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/17/18 9:01 AM
2018-04/624/113642/2018-04-28-PrescriptionDrugTurnInFLYER.jpg
2018-04/624/113642/2018-04-28-PrescriptionDrugTurnInFLYER.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/624/113642/thumb_2018-04-28-PrescriptionDrugTurnInFLYER.jpg

Want to safely dispose of unwanted, unused prescription drugs?

The Clackamas County Sheriff's Office will hold a no-questions-asked "Prescription Drug Take-Back" on Saturday, April 28, 2018 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Public Safety Training Center (12700 SE 82nd Ave., Clackamas, OR 97015). [ map: https://goo.gl/maps/1BbSLiNxRy22 ]

Sheriff's Office deputies will be on hand to accept unwanted medications at your driver's-side door.

Prescription medications are among the most commonly abused drugs, so it's important to dispose of them safely after they're no longer needed by the patient. Flushing pharmaceuticals down the toilet can be dangerous both for the community and local wildlife, so take-back programs like this are the best option for disposing of unused prescription drugs.

If you can't make the April 30 event, Clackamas County also has convenient permanent drop-boxes in ten locations around Clackamas County. A full list of drop-box locations can be found in this 2013 press release:

http://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/pressreleases/2013-06-07-CCSOPR-PrescriptionDrugDropBoxes.html

This drug take-back is presented by the Sheriff's Office and Oak Lodge Water Services.

For more information, contact the Sheriff's Office Crime Prevention Unit at 503-785-5077 or by email at imeprevention@clackamas.us">crimeprevention@clackamas.us.

The flyer for the drug take-back is attached in JPG and PDF formats.

This drug take-back is part of the DEA's "National Prescription Drug Take Back Day" campaign. Learn more about the national effort -- and find additional drop-off locations -- at https://takebackday.dea.gov .

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/624/113642/2018-04-28-PrescriptionDrugTurnInFLYER.pdf , 2018-04/624/113642/2018-04-28-PrescriptionDrugTurnInFLYER.jpg

MEDIA OPPORTUNITY: Sheriff's Office hosts 19th annual Child Abuse & Family Violence Summit April 17-20 (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/16/18 1:08 PM
Summit logo 2
Summit logo 2
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/624/113627/thumb_SpashScreen-Tablet-Landscape-BIG.jpg

James Ian McGlothlin, 41, of Portland, was sentenced today to 28 years in federal prison followed by a life term of supervised release for the production of child pornography involving two very young children.

McGlothlin’s federal sentence will run concurrently with a sentence imposed in Clackamas County Circuit Court on March 2, 2018. McGlothlin was sentenced in Clackamas County to 225 months in prison after pleading guilty to three counts of first-degree sexual abuse stemming from his work with disabled children as an instructional assistant for the Oregon City School District.

As detailed in today's press release from the U.S. Dept. of Justice ( https://www.justice.gov/usao-or/pr/former-oregon-city-school-district-teaching-aid-sentenced-28-years-prison-production ), "Investigators first learned of McGlothlin’s actions while investigating an online bulletin board service used to advertise and distribute child pornography. On February 16, 2016, federal agents and members of the Interagency Child Exploitation Prevention Team (INTERCEPT) executed a search warrant at McGlothlin’s residence, where they seized computer equipment, phones, and other digital devices. Forensic examinations of the seized computers revealed thousands of files containing child pornography, including videos and images McGlothlin created himself. One of the victims was an infant. Another was a very young child. Investigators found evidence that McGlothlin sexually abused a number of disabled children he worked with as an instructional assistant in Oregon City. Investigators also found documents McGlothlin wrote which describe, in graphic detail, how he planned to, rehearsed, and sexually abused children."

The McGlothlin case is one of many that will be studied at the 2018 Child Abuse and Family Violence Summit -- which starts Tuesday, April 17 and ends Friday, April 20 at the Red Lion Hotel on the River in Portland, Oregon.

ABOUT THE CHILD ABUSE SUMMIT

The Summit was started in 2000 by Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts. At that time, he was a CCSO detective working child-abuse and child-homicide investigations. He realized they weren't isolated cases -- that instead we were facing a hidden epidemic of violence and abuse.

This led to the founding of the three-and-a-half-day multi-disciplinary conference -- designed for professionals working in the areas of investigations, interviewing, assessment, prosecution, and treatment of child abuse, neglect and domestic violence.

Last year, over 800 attendees, instructors and volunteers gathered from across the United States and around the world for the Summit.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS, AWARDS AND A SPECIAL CONCERT

Keynote speakers at this year's Summit include:

Matthew Sandusky -- In his Tuesday keynote "Undaunted," Sandusky will share his personal and powerful story of overcoming sexual abuse as a child. His presentation will empower the audience with knowledge about the grooming process -- and the telltale signs that can help identify abusers and those being abused. Sandusky is founder and executive director of Peaceful Hearts Foundation, was a victim of childhood sexual abuse from ages 8-17 at the hands of his adopted father, Jerry Sandusky. He is working to turn his traumatic personal experience into a mechanism to prevent childhood sexual abuse and help other survivors heal.

Gael B. Strack, Esq. -- In her Wednesday keynote "The History and Need for Strangulation Training," Strack will provide a national overview of our current understanding of non-fatal strangulation assaults. Police and prosecutors have only recently learned what survivors of non-fatal strangulation have known for years: Many domestic violence offenders and rapists do not strangle their partners to kill them; they strangle them to let them know they can kill them -- any time they wish.

Christopher F. Wilson, PhD. -- In his Thursday keynote "The Neurobiology of Trauma," Wilson will reveal how the brain responds to traumatic threats and high stress. Whether it’s understanding one’s own behavior in a high-stress or traumatic scenario, such as a shooting, or understanding the behavior of victims of crime, it all starts with understanding the brain.

Detective Kevin McNeil -- In his Friday keynote "Summoned: Why This Is More Than Just a Job!," McNeil will talk about the higher calling that is a career spent combatting abuse -- as well as the importance of providing a friendly, supportive environment for victims to talk about their abuse.

On Thursday morning, the Summit will present "Champions for Children" awards to Kelli Russell, Operations Manager at Safety Compass, and members of the Washington State Police Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) task force.

And on Wednesday night, the Summit will once again feature an exclusive concert for attendees featuring rising country star Jackson Michelson.

Photos of Michelson and the keynote speakers are attached.

INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITIES

To set up interviews with professionals and speakers at the Child Abuse Summit, contact Communications Specialist Kim Lippert at t@clackamas.us">klippert@clackamas.us.

MORE INFORMATION

The Summit is hosted by the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office Child Abuse Team and the Domestic Violence Enhanced Response Team (DVERT). The Summit's goal is to educate professionals on the complex issues associated with child abuse and family violence, to broaden each professional's knowledge base in multiple areas, and to increase understanding of the other agencies' roles and responsibilities.

The Summit is presented with the generous support of sponsors including the Oregon Children's Justice Act Task Force, the Oregon State Sheriffs' Association, SEARCH, the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, the Clackamas County Peace Officers' Benevolent Foundation, the Oregon Dept. of Justice, the Clackamas County Multidisciplinary Team, the National Criminal Justice Training Center, Franz, and Bob's Red Mill.

Visit ChildAbuseSummit.com for more information -- including session descriptions, speakers and other activities.

Direct links to more info:

[END]

News-release archive




Attached Media Files: Summit logo 2 , Summit logo 1 , JacksonMichelson , Keynote speaker Gael Strack , Keynote speaker Matthew Sandusky , Keynote speaker Kevin McNeil , Keynote speaker Christopher F. Wilson

Reward Offered to Help Solve an Armed Robbery - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #18-20 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 04/18/18 8:00 AM
2018-04/5183/113665/CS_18-20_Suspect_Photo.jpg
2018-04/5183/113665/CS_18-20_Suspect_Photo.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/5183/113665/thumb_CS_18-20_Suspect_Photo.jpg

The Portland Police Bureau, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to identify the suspect in an armed robbery.

On March 28, 2018, at approximately 5:55 p.m., an unknown suspect committed an armed robbery with a handgun at Adam’s Market, located at 11104 Northeast Sandy Boulevard in Portland, Oregon.

The robbery suspect appears to be a male with tan or light-brown skin, approximately 5’10” to 6’00” tall, 150 to 170 pounds, wearing a dark gray hooded sweatshirt, blue Adidas athletic pants, white/gray shoes, and a Seattle Seahawks hat with a camouflage bill.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved homicide or other felony crime, and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###CSO###




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/5183/113665/CS_18-20_Suspect_Photo.jpg

Update on Apartment Fire at 582 28th St. In Springfield
Eugene Springfield Fire - 04/17/18 8:49 AM

Crews have left the scene. Fire marshals are still investigating.  15 people were displaced from the fire.  See attached details from the emergency alert sent early this morning. The two men also awoke 10 other people by yelling and banging on doors and got them to safety.  The primary occupancy was completely distroyed by the fire and the apartment below suffered water damage. Red Cross assisted with the displaced occupants.The fire is currently under investigation.

On scene of a apartment fire in arrival one unit was fully involved. A worker From across the street saw the fire and notified 911. They heard screaming and found a family of 5 trapped in the second floor. The family tossed a toddler from the second story. They caught her. Then the rest of the family lowered themselves out the window Into the the outreached hands of the two workers along with one dog saving thier lives. Crews are in scene now. Further update coming Address 582 28th st. Springfield
Report: #50235

 


FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Tech Support Fraud (part 2) (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 04/17/18 10:00 AM
Tech Support Fraud - part 2 - slide
Tech Support Fraud - part 2 - slide
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3585/113351/thumb_TT_-_Tech_Support_-_part_2_-_slide_-_April_17_2018.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week, part two of building a digital defense against tech support fraud.

Last week we talked about how the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center – or IC3.gov – is seeing a huge increase in the number of people who are falling victim to “tech support fraud” schemes.

This is a scam in which the fraudster tries to convince you that you need his help fixing your computer or other device. He claims you have some dreaded – and usually non-existent – problem. He will ask you to pay him with a credit or debit card, electronic funds transfer, gift card or even virtual currency. Once you do, he says he just needs you to give him remote access to your device, and he will have that pretend-problem fixed in no time.

This week, we are going to talk about how the fraudsters are now taking this scam one step further.

IC3.gov is seeing cases where the victim receives a notification that she overpaid for some tech support incident and is due a refund. The criminal tells the victim that he can get the money refunded if she gives him remote access to her computer while she logs into her bank account. Now he has access to her bank account, and he can make it appear as if a refund has occurred just by moving her own money between savings and checking. To make matters worse, sometimes he will later tell her that he refunded too much, and he needs her to send some money back to him with an electronic funds transfer or pre-paid card. No matter how it plays out, the victim never received a refund and the criminal now has access to her bank account.

Another trend that IC3 is seeing these days involves criminals who are re-contacting their previous victims, this time pretending to be law enforcement or other government officials. In this case, the fraudster offers to help recover the previous losses, but to do so, he will need funds from the victim to assist with the investigation or to cover fees associated with returning the lost money.

A final trend to watch out for – criminals who pose as collection agencies claiming the victim did not pay for prior tech support services. The victim is often threatened with legal action if he or she does not pay a settlement fee.

So how do you protect yourself?

  • Remember that legitimate customer, security, or tech support companies will not initiate unsolicited contact with you.
  • Legitimate law enforcement and government officials will never ask for money to help victims recover lost funds. If in doubt, hang up, look up a public phone number for that agency, and call to confirm if the supposed investigator is real.
  • Resist the pressure to act quickly. Criminals will use social engineering techniques – including fear – to try to make you act before you think things through.
  • Do not give unknown, unverified people remote access to devices or accounts.
  • Ensure all computer anti-virus, security, and malware protection is up to date.

If you have been victimized by this scam, you can file an online report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office




Attached Media Files: Tech Support Fraud - part 2 - Audio file , Tech Support Fraud - part 2 - slide

Arrest Made in Forest Grove Homicide
Forest Grove Police - 04/19/18 7:41 PM

On April 19, 2018 Forest Grove Detectives with the assistance of the Washington County Major Crimes Team, Washington County Tactical Negotiations Team, Oregon State Police, and the Hillsboro Police Department executed a search warrant in the 100 Block of SE 26th Avenue, in Hillsboro.

Subsequent to the search warrant service, detectives arrested Kamen Richard Baer, age 38, for the murder of Cynthia Lou Belton. Baer, a transient, was lodged at the Washington County Jail.

No further information will be released as this is still an open police investigation.


Forest Grove Police Recover Large Amount of Stolen Disney Merchandise (Photo)
Forest Grove Police - 04/17/18 12:57 PM
Recovered Disney Merchandise
Recovered Disney Merchandise
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3857/113652/thumb_Disney.JPG

On February 14th, 2018 Forest Grove Police received a report that unknown persons had ordered Disney Merchandise worth approximately $35,000 from an online vendor.The transaction was discovered to be fraudulent.

On March 16th, 2018 Forest Grove Police Detectives executed a search warrant in the 1700 block of Covey Run Drive in Forest Grove. Detectives contacted Ryan and Ashley Trapp who reside there with their ten children. Detectives recovered a large amount of Disney merchandise ranging from electronics, clothing, toys, furniture, luggage and even a toaster. Some of the property was found in boxes while other merchandise was being used.

In the days following the search warrant, seized items were inventoried and approximately one third of the stolen property was recovered.

No arrest has been made in this case as it is open and is actively being investigated. The Forest Police Department is seeking the public's help in our attempts to recover the remaining stolen merchandise. If anyone has any information they are encouraged to contact the Forest Grove Police Department at 503-629-0111. 




Attached Media Files: Recovered Disney Merchandise

Sheriff's Office Recognized for ongoing Collaboration with Forest Service (Photo)
Hood River Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/18/18 5:58 PM
Pictured from left to right: Regional Forester Jim Peña USFS, Sheriff Matt English, Undersheriff Brian Rockett, Captain Andy Corriell USFS, Fire Management Officer (Retired) Darren Kennedy USFS, Area Manager Lynn Burditt USFS
Pictured from left to right: Regional Forester Jim Peña USFS, Sheriff Matt English, Undersheriff Brian Rockett, Captain Andy Corriell USFS, Fire Management Officer (Retired) Darren Kennedy USFS, Area Manager Lynn Burditt USFS
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1816/113700/thumb_Regional_Forester_Recognition.jpg

PORTLAND, ORE. -  Recently, the Hood River County Sheriff’s Office was recognized for their efforts and ongoing partnership with the United States Forest Service in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area (CRGNSA).  Sheriff Matt English and Undersheriff Brian Rockett were on hand at the Portland Airport Sheraton to receive the Regional Forester’s Special Recognition Safety Award from Regional Forester Jim Peña.  Officials said this was the first time that an individual or agency outside of the USFS had received an award during the annual event.

Staff from the Sheriff’s office and Scenic Area have been working collaboratively for the last several years to identify problem areas and find solutions, while promoting safety and mitigating risk to visitors of local Federal Forest Lands.  Shared efforts have included public messaging on the web and social media, adding signage to trails that were leading to consistent search and rescues, identifying user trails that needed to be rehabilitated or decommissioned to discourage use due to dangerous conditions, and collectively staffing annual saturation patrols at Eagle Creek to ensure positive public contacts and model safe behavior. The existing partnership was highlighted during the Eagle Creek Fire in September of 2017, with the safe and successful rescue of over 170 people trapped by the fire.

“We are humbled to receive this recognition, which underscores the effectiveness and necessity of established relationships”, said Sheriff Matt English.  English went on to say, “Although we are being recognized for our efforts, this is truly a team with a common goal and that shouldn’t be overshadowed by this award.  We look forward to our continued partnership with the CRGNSA and are sure that our collective efforts will continue to pay dividends for our community and visitors.”

The Hood River County Sheriff’s Office responds to emergencies on forest lands and is responsible for search and rescue on all lands within the contiguous borders of Hood River County.




Attached Media Files: Pictured from left to right: Regional Forester Jim Peña USFS, Sheriff Matt English, Undersheriff Brian Rockett, Captain Andy Corriell USFS, Fire Management Officer (Retired) Darren Kennedy USFS, Area Manager Lynn Burditt USFS

Lebanon Firefighter Respond to House Fire (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 04/19/18 6:07 PM
2018-04/1191/113754/file1-4.jpeg
2018-04/1191/113754/file1-4.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1191/113754/thumb_file1-4.jpeg

Today at approximately 4:30pm Lebanon Fire District was dispatched for a structure fire at 145 Bromil St. A neighbor noticed smoke and fire coming from the rear exterior of the house on the deck. Using a garden hose the neighbor was able to slow the progress of the fire and alert the occupants, who were still inside the home. Lebanon firefighters arrived and removed smoldering decking and siding to completely extinguish the fire. There were no injuries on scene. The fire did not extend into the house or attic. There were a total of 15 personnel, 3 engines, and 3 command officers on scene. The cause of the fire was improperly discarded ashes from a metal fire pit on the patio deck. The damage was estimated at $4000.




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1191/113754/file1-4.jpeg , 2018-04/1191/113754/file1-3.jpeg , 2018-04/1191/113754/file1-2.jpeg

Lebanon Fire District Honors Award Winners at Annual Awards Banquet (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 04/14/18 8:11 AM
Wilamette Valley Public Safety Pipe Band. L-R Kyle Robertson, Scott Casebolt, Jason Adamson
Wilamette Valley Public Safety Pipe Band. L-R Kyle Robertson, Scott Casebolt, Jason Adamson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1191/113598/thumb_pipe_band.jpeg

The Lebanon Fire District honored its own Friday night at the department's annual awards banquet at the Boulder Falls Event Center in Lebanon. The awards were given for rookie of the year, officer of the year, and volunteer of the year, among others.  More than 130 people attended the event.  The program began with a performance by the Willamette Valley Public Safety Pipe Band, a first for this event.  Also of note, Chief Gordon Sletmoe handed out Unit Citations to several members for their role in saving the life of a person at an emergency fire call.  Those members were Jacob Mellander, Daniel Spangler, Candace McHuron, Ken Foster, and Bryce MacLennan. 

Support Volunteer of the Year

Joy Chase

Community Service Award

Jason Read

Rookie of the Year

Timothy Crow

Intern of the Year

Sheri Snook

EMS Award

Engineer Corey Knipstein

Volunteer Officer of the Year

Lieutenant Randy Ringheimer

Career Officer of the Year

Battalion Chief Ken Savage

Volunteer Firefighter of the Year

Isaac Stephens

Career Firefighter of the Year

Jason Adamson

Outstanding Volunteer Member

Nathan Kessler

Outstanding Career Member

Lieutenant Erin Nunes

 




Attached Media Files: Wilamette Valley Public Safety Pipe Band. L-R Kyle Robertson, Scott Casebolt, Jason Adamson

Tip of the Week April 23, 2018
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/19/18 3:40 PM

While many of us are looking forward to enjoying the warmer weather, we must remind ourselves that some of our loved ones may find themselves in an uncomfortable predicament.  It could even result in their death.

We are speaking about our pets who accompany many of us on our trips and errands in a motor vehicle.  We should never leave our pet unattended in a parked car.  On warm days, the temperature in a car can rise to dangerous levels in minutes, even with the windows cracked open.

Here on the Oregon Coast, even on what seems like a cool but sunny day, inside car temperatures can become uncomfortable and even dangerously high enough to cause a pet to suffer heat stroke.  Dogs have a normal body temperature of 101 to 102.5 degrees.  They can withstand a body temperature of 107 to 108 degrees for only a very short period of time before suffering brain damage or even death.  Even immediate emergency care may not save your pet’s life.

The brief stop we plan to make at the store could stretch to 15 minutes or more before we know it.  Our mistake could cost our pet its life.  Leaving the windows cracked won't cool the car enough to protect our beloved pet, even if we have made water available.

Many pets may not care about a trip in the car, but we know that most dogs are excited about car rides.  Most dogs want to go with their owners everywhere, but when the weather turns warm, it may be safer to leave your pet at home or with a trusted friend.

If you observe a pet in a car under this circumstance, call dispatch at 541-265-0777.

For more tips and information, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and on your Smartphone via the “MobilePatrol” app and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/5490/113745/042318-How_Long_Will_You_Be_Gone.pdf

Community Presentations: Cascadia Subduction Zone and Distant Tsunamis
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/19/18 11:40 AM

Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office and the American Society of Civil Engineers are coordinating community presentations focusing on what you need to know and how to prepare for distant tsunamis and the Cascadia subduction zone earthquake.  The events are open to the public, free of charge, nor RSVP needed. We have also included an update from the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) on regional earthquake impacts.

Please see the attached media release for further details on the outreach event date, time and locations.

###

For more information,

Virginia "Jenny" Demaris
Emergency Manager
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office
Emergency Management
is@co.lincoln.or.us" target="_blank">vdemaris@co.lincoln.or.us
(541) 265-4199 Office
 

 




Attached Media Files: ASCE Unprepared Presentation Announcement , Lincoln County Cascadia Community Presentations Announcement , Media Release - Cascadia Community Presentations

Update on Missing Idanha Man
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 04/19/18 2:47 PM

 

Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports the search and rescue efforts continue into locating a missing man from Idanha.

Corey Allan Waterman, 37, from Idanha has not been seen since April 6, and was reported missing to the Sheriffs’ Office on April 8..

Deputies have searched in a private timber area south of Idanha where he was last seen.

Search teams include the Linn County Sheriff’s Office Mounted Posse, K-9 and ground teams and ATVs.  Searchers will be out again tomorrow in hopes of finding clues.

It is possible Waterman is not in this area and citizens are asked to call the Sheriff’s Office if they have seen Waterman or know of his location.

 

Missing Idanha Man

 

Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley reports his deputies are currently searching for a missing person, Corey Allan Waterman, 37, from Idanha.  Waterman was last seen walking up a logging road, off of Church Street in Idanha.

 

Yesterday at 9:08 a.m., Linn County Sheriff’s Office 9-1-1 Dispatch Center received a call from Charles Ray Waterman of Idanha.  Charles said on April 6, 2018, at about 1:30 p.m., his brother Corey went for a walk on a forest road and did not return.  Corey normally takes walks on forest roads, but usually returns in the late evening.  Charles checked with friends and family and he has not been able to locate Corey.

 

Corey is described as 5’7” tall, and 175 pounds with short hair. Corey was last seen wearing brown pants and black boots.  Witnesses do not believe Corey is dressed for the weather conditions.

 

Linn County deputies are in the area and actively looking for Corey.  If you have any information, please call the Linn County Sheriff’s Office at 541-967-3950.

 

 

 

 


Shooting Leaves Two Dead and Another Injured **Update 2** (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/15/18 4:54 PM
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Deputies are currently seeking any information regarding the pictured vehicle.  Originally thought to be a Cadillac Escalade investigators now believe they are searching for a late model red or maroon Ford Expedition.  If you have any information regarding this vehicle or its owner please call MCSO at 503 540 807

Deputies have identified both men killed in yesterday's shootings that occurred in the parking lots at Bar Fly's located at 444 Lancaster Drive NE and near 421 Lancaster Drive NE, in Salem.  They are Tobias Helms-Reese, age 24, of Salem and Tyler Longacre, age 21, of Salem. Autopsies were performed on both men by the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office. For both men it was determined that the cause of death was from a gunshot wound.   

Detectives are continuing to investigate the shootings.  As this is an ongoing investigation, the Sheriff’s Office will not offer any further details at this time.  

The Sheriff’s Office is still asking anyone with information to please call or tip line at 503 540 8079.

A late night shooting has left two men dead and another man injured. April 14th, 2018 at 2:28 a.m., deputies were called to Bar Fly’s located at 444 Lancaster Drive NE on a reported shooting.

When deputies arrived they found two men shot, both men were taken to area hospitals for treatment. Sadly at the hospital one of the men succumbed to his injuries and died, the second man remains in stable condition. A short time later a third man was found deceased in the parking lot of DaVita located at 421 Lancaster Drive NE.

Investigators believe all three men are related to the same incident. Detectives are currently on scene and are working diligently to determine exactly what happened. Investigators are seeking information you may have about a red Cadillac Escalade seen leaving the area at the time of the shooting. If you have any information or details surrounding the shooting please call our tip line at 503 540 8079.

The Sheriff’s Office is being assisted by the Salem Police Department, Keizer Police Department, Marion County District Attorney’s Office and the Marion County Medical Examiner’s Office. 

Media this is a very active investigation and there are no additional details available at this time. A PIO is currently available on scene. If your are responding to the scene please utilize the Road House parking lot to stage any vehicles and equipment. 

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1294/113599/vehofint.jpg

MCSO Investigates Fatal Crash Involving a Motorcycle on NE Sandy Blvd in Fairview **UPDATE #1**
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/15/18 12:56 PM

Update #1:

The involved motorcycle rider in Friday's crash was identified as 20 year-old, Beneamin Buliga of Happy Valley.  The East Multnomah County Vehicular Crimes Team is continuing the crash investigation.

 

###

 

 

On April 13, 2018 at approximately 7:34 p.m. MCSO Deputies respond to an injury crash involving a motorcycle at the 21400 block of NE Sandy Blvd. in Fairview.  On arrival deputies located the adult male rider who was fatally injured.  No other vehicles were involved.  The Vehicular Crimes Team is responding to investigate the crash.  Both directions of NE Sandy Blvd. from Arborcrest Drive to 223rd Avenue will be shut down for several hours while the crash is investigated.  Motorists are advised to use alternate routes until the roadway is reopened.

 

###


Robbery (Photo)
Newport Police Dept. - 04/17/18 9:27 AM
Tyler Gordon
Tyler Gordon
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/5016/113645/thumb_Gordon_Mug_shot.png

On April 16, 2018, Newport Police Department responded to Pacific Communities Hospital on a reported robbery and assault.

 It was reported to the officers two people had been assaulted with pepper spray.

 Investigation revealed the two victims had arranged to meet the suspect in a remote area to complete a drug transaction. During the transaction, Tyler Gordon, 26, of Newport, used pepper spray to incapacitate the victims, then took the victim’s possessions and fled the scene.

Officers located Gordon at a residence on NE 9th Street in Newport at approximately 2230 hours. Officers took Gordon into custody without incident and transported him to the Lincoln County Jail.

Tyler Gordon was arrested on the following charges;

Tyler Michael Gordon, 26 

  • Robbery 2nd Degree
  • Assault 4th Degree
  • Theft 3rd Degree
  • Unlawful use of Mace 2nd Degree



Attached Media Files: Tyler Gordon

Fatal Crash Highway 97 near Klamath Falls -- Update Names Released (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/19/18 9:11 AM
2018-04/1002/113717/Hwy_97_Crash.jpg
2018-04/1002/113717/Hwy_97_Crash.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1002/113717/thumb_Hwy_97_Crash.jpg

Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Wednesday morning’s fatal crash on Highway 97 north of Klamath Falls. 

On Wednesday, April 18, 2018, at approximately 7:40am, OSP Troopers and First Responders were dispatched to the report of a two vehicle crash on Highway 97, near milepost 266.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a gold Buick Century operated by Timothy KENYON, age 27, from Klamath Falls, was attempting to turn onto Highway 97 from Algoma Road.  However, for unknown reasons, KENYON turned directly in front of a Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV), which was traveling northbound on Highway 97.  The CMV, operated by Robert GRIFFITH, age 32, from Central Point, was unable to avoid the collision and crashed into the Buick.

KENYON was ejected from the Buick and was pronounced deceased at the scene. The passenger of the Buick, Cassandra DAVIS, age 28, from Klamath Falls, was transported to the hospital with minor injuries.  GRIFFITH was not injured.

Highway 97 was closed for about seven (7) hours with a detour put in place by Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT).  OSP was assisted by the Klamath County Sheriff’s Office, Klamath County Fire District and ODOT.

Photograph courtesy of OSP.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1002/113717/Hwy_97_Crash.jpg

Oregon State Police, Portland Bureau of Environmental Services and EPA joint investigation into unlawful wastewater discharge
Oregon State Police - 04/19/18 8:33 AM

On April 19, 2018, the Oregon State Police (OSP), with assistance from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and The Portland Bureau of Environmental Services executed a criminal search warrant at the business of Oregon Oils, Inc. located at 2515 NW 28th Ave, Portland, Oregon. The joint OSP and EPA investigation began in early February of 2018 after investigators learned about possible violations of the State and Federal laws pertaining to wastewater treatment and discharges. The City of Portland administers an industrial wastewater discharge permit for the facility and is assisting with the effort.

This case remains under investigation by the OSP and the EPA. Inquiries about the investigation can be directed to the Oregon State Police’s Captain Tim Fox, at (541) 419-8843.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Oregon State Police and the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality work in partnership to investigate and enforce Oregon’s Environmental laws. You can report pollution complaints to the DEQ Hotline at 1-888-997-7888 or to the Oregon State Police at 1-800-452-7888.


Jackson County Grand Jury Indicts Man on Sex Charges (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/18/18 11:06 PM
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On April 17, 2018, a Jackson County Grand Jury indicted eighteen year old Daniel Michael Cooley on one count of Rape in the first degree, one count of Unlawful Sexual Penetration in the first degree and one count of Sexual Abuse in the first degree. The charges are related to a several month long investigation by the Oregon State Police in multiple counties.  The current charges involve a juvenile female who was reportedly under 11 years old at the time some of the offences occurred.

Cooley was arrested on March 14, 2018, in Josephine County where he remains lodged on a $100,000 bail. On March 20, 2018, a Josephine County Grand Jury indicted Cooley on two counts of Sexual Abuse in the first degree and one count of Unlawful Sexual Penetration in the second degree. 

The investigation is ongoing and additional charges may be forthcoming in separate counties. Anyone with information regarding this case is encouraged to contact Oregon State Police Detective Bryan Scott at (541) 618-7957.     




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1002/113710/Cooley.png

Fatal Crash Highway 97 near Klamath Falls (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/18/18 2:02 PM
2018-04/1002/113694/Hwy_97_Crash.jpg
2018-04/1002/113694/Hwy_97_Crash.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1002/113694/thumb_Hwy_97_Crash.jpg

Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Wednesday morning’s fatal crash on Highway 97 north of Klamath Falls. 

On Wednesday, April 18, 2018, at approximately 7:40am, OSP Troopers and First Responders were dispatched to the report of a two vehicle crash on Highway 97, near milepost 266.

Preliminary investigation revealed that the driver of a gold Buick Century was attempting to turn onto Highway 97 from Algoma Road. However, for unknown reasons, the driver turned directly in front of a Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV), which was traveling northbound on Highway 97.  The CMV was unable to avoid the collision and crashed into the Buick.

The driver of the Buick was ejected from the vehicle and was pronounced deceased at the scene. The passenger of the Buick was transported to the hospital with minor injuries.  The driver of the CMV was not injured.

Names of those involved are being withheld pending next of kin notification. 

Highway 97 is still currently closed with a detour put in place by Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT).  Motorists should check www.tripcheck.com for traffic updates.  OSP was assisted by the Klamath County Sheriff’s Office, Klamath County Fire District and ODOT.

Photograph courtesy of OSP

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1002/113694/Hwy_97_Crash.jpg

John Day Man Killed in Vehicle Crash in Deschutes County (Photo)** Update on ages***
Oregon State Police - 04/16/18 2:24 PM
2018-04/1002/113615/Crash_Photo_Hwy_20_MP_4.jpg
2018-04/1002/113615/Crash_Photo_Hwy_20_MP_4.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1002/113615/thumb_Crash_Photo_Hwy_20_MP_4.jpg

Update on Ages

David Rausch's age is corrected to 33 and Kevin Faber's age should read 55 years old.

 

###

 

On Sunday, April 15, 2018, at about 5:45pm, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle fatal crash on Highway 20E near milepost 3.5 in Deschutes County.

Preliminary investigation revealed a blue Dodge 2500 pickup, being driven by David RAUSCH, age 23, of Bend, was traveling westbound on Highway 20E approaching Hamby Road.  A maroon Mercury Mystique, driven by Kevin FABER, age 44, of John Day, was southbound on Hamby Road at the stop sign for Highway 20E. Faber suddenly pulled out in front of the Dodge pickup and was Faber’s vehicle was struck on the driver’s side door.  FABER suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Faber’s passenger, Dalena Norton (age 43 from John Day) suffered from non-life threatening injuries and was treated at a local hospital. Neither Rausch nor his passenger, Clayton Coe (age 56 from Bend) sustained any injuries.

Highway 20E was closed for approximately one hour following the crash and then opened to one lane for an additional hour and a half.  Bend Police Department, Bend Fire, ODOT, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office and the Deschutes County Medical Examiner’s Office assisted OSP.

###




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1002/113615/Crash_Photo_Hwy_20_MP_4.jpg

Oregon State Police Seeks Public Assistance in Arson Investigation from a Fire in Northeast Salem (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/15/18 9:18 PM
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On April 15, 2018 at approximately 3:00 a.m., Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a house fire in Northeast Salem. After preliminary investigation, the fire has been ruled an arson.

Detectives and emergency personnel responded to 3552 Ward Drive NE in Salem for a report of a house fire at the location. It was soon learned there were actually two separate fires. Fires were found at the residence and the barn at the location. The fire at the residence was contained to a single bedroom and the barn was fully engulfed and was a complete loss. There were no reported injuries.

The investigation determined the fire was suspicious and deemed it an arson investigation. The residence has been known to be occupied by transients and it is unknown who was the last to occupy both locations.

The Oregon State Police is seeking the public assistance regarding this case.  Anyone who has known people to frequent this location is asked to call the Oregon State Police at (800)  452-7888 and refer to case number SP18-135992. Detective Scott Yunker is the lead detective on this case.

The Oregon State Police was assisted by Oregon State Fire Marshall Office, Keizer Fire Department, Marion County Fire District One, and the Marion County Sheriff’s Office.

 

###




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1002/113606/output-7.jpg , 2018-04/1002/113606/output-6.jpg , 2018-04/1002/113606/output-5.jpg

Grants Pass Man Killed in Vehicle Crash on Highway 260 (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 04/14/18 12:01 PM
2018-04/1002/113601/20180413_160701.jpg
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On Friday April 13, 2018, at about 2:42 p.m., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle fatal crash on Highway 260 near milepost 13. 


Preliminary investigation revealed that a black Chevrolet C15 pickup, operated by Luther Masumoto, age 70, of Grants Pass, was traveling northbound on Highway 260 when he attempted to pass a dump truck traveling in the same direction.  The driver side tires entered the ditch and the driver lost control of the vehicle, crossed both lanes of traffic and entered the northbound embankment and struck a tree. Masumoto suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene. 

Highway 260 was reduced to one lane for approximately two hours following the crash. OSP was assisted by Josephine County Sheriff’s Department, Josephine County Rural Metro Fire and ODOT. Speed is being considered as a contributing factor of the crash.




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1002/113601/20180413_160701.jpg

Suspect Arrested In Connection to April 7th Shooting (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 04/19/18 5:06 PM
Jacauree T Walker
Jacauree T Walker
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On Wednesday, April 18, 2018, members of the Portland Police Bureau Detective Division's Assault Detail and Multnomah County Parole and Probation Office arrested 21-year-old Jacauree T. Walker in connection with an April 7th shooting investigation.

This investigation began on April 7, 2018, at 8:20 p.m., when East Precinct and Transit Division officers responded to the report of a shooting at the 82nd Avenue Transit Station, located at 1515 Northeast 82nd Avenue.

When officers arrived at the transit station, they contacted several witnesses and a person believed to be the intended victim of the shooting.

Based on information gathered during the investigation, officers believe Walker was involved in a verbal altercation with an adult male passenger on a TriMet bus traveling on 82nd Avenue. When the bus arrived at the 82nd Avenue Transit Station, Walker and the passenger exited the bus. While the passenger and Walker were at the transit station, Walker reportedly fired a handgun at the passenger. The passenger was not struck by gunfire and Walker fled the scene prior to police arriving.

During the investigation, officers and detectives gathered surveillance footage from TriMet surveillance cameras, as well as additional information from witnesses. Walker was identified as the suspect in this shooting investigation. On Wednesday, April 18, 2018 Multnomah County Parole and Probation officers located and arrested Walker on a probation violation related to a previous conviction of Possession of a Forged Instrument.

Assault Detail detectives lodged Walker at the Multnomah County Jail. Upon review of this investigation, the Multnomah County District Attorney's Office issued the following charges: Attempt Murder, Attempt to Commit a Class A Felony, Unlawful Use of a Weapon (two counts), Felon in Possession of a Firearm, and Unlawful Possession of a Firearm.

Anyone with information about this investigation should contact Detective Arjay Dran at 503-823-0483 or Arjay.Dran@portlandoregon.gov

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Jacauree T Walker

Shooting Investigation Thursday Morning in Portland's Lents Neighborhood - No Known Injuries
Portland Police Bureau - 04/19/18 11:00 AM
On Thursday, April 19, 2018, at 7:49 a.m., East Precinct officers responded to the report of a shooting in the 9200 block of Southeast Henry Street.

Officers arrived in the area and located an occupied residence that was struck by gunfire, as well as two parked and unoccupied vehicles that were damaged by the gunfire. During the investigation, officers also learned a dog, which was located in the home at the time of the shooting, was struck by gunfire and sustained injuries as a result of the shooting. The dog was transported to a veterinary hospital by private vehicle for treatment of injuries that are not believed to be life-threatening. There were no other reported injuries as a result of this shooting.

Officers canvassed the area, looking for suspects and evidence. During the canvass, officers located evidence of gunfire on the roadway in the 9200 block of Southeast Henry Street.

Officers and investigators continue to investigate this shooting and there is no suspect description to provide at this time in the investigation.

Based on the preliminary information, the Gang Enforcement Team will be conducting the investigation. Anyone who witnessed this shooting or who possesses video surveillance footage of the shooting is asked to call Detective Meghan Burkeen at 503-823-2092 or Meghan.Burkeen@portlandoregon.gov

The Portland Police Bureau works closely with Enough is Enough PDX, a community-led campaign aimed at encouraging people to take a stand against gang violence in the area.

For more information about Enough is Enough PDX and how you can get involved, please visit https://www.facebook.com/EnoughIsEnoughPDX

Additional information about Enough is Enough PDX and other City efforts addressing youth violence can be found at the Office of Youth Violence Prevention, http://www.portlandonline.com/safeyouth/

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information about any unsolved homicide is eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,500. Information about any other unsolved felony crime is eligible for a cash reward of up to $1,000.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###PPB###

UPDATE #3: Suspect Identified in CNT and SERT Incident (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 04/18/18 9:49 PM
Gabriel J Sandoval
Gabriel J Sandoval
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3056/113692/thumb_F4A6730A-93C1-4C7C-A6D9-012B70EA9EBB.jpeg
The suspect involved in a Special Emergency Reaction Team and Crisis Negotiation Team call-out has been identified as 27-year-old Gabriel J. Sandoval.

This incident started at 11:23 a.m. on Wednesday, April 18, 2018 in the 5500 block of Northeast 55th Avenue when North Precinct officers responded to a community member's request to perform a welfare check. The incident concluded at 5:33 p.m., today when Sandoval was taken into custody by members of the Special Emergency Reaction Team.

Sandoval was lodged at the Multnomah County Jail for warrants related to charges of Failing to Perform the Duties of a Driver Causing Injury, Felon in Possession of a Firearm, Interfering with a Police Officer, Attempt Burglary in the Second Degree, and Robbery.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

The suspect who fled from North Precinct officers and barricaded himself in an apartment at the Villas de Mariposas North, located at 5205 Northeast Killingsworth Street, has been taken into custody.

SERT and CNT have taken a wanted suspect into custody. Members of SERT and CNT worked for approximately four and one-quarter hours to safely apprehend this suspect.

Community members impacted by this search are able to return to their homes at this time.

Traffic in the area of Northeast Killingsworth Street and Northeast 52nd Avenue may be impacted for the next 30 minutes as equipment is moved from the area.

Students attending Trinity Lutheran Church School and Albina Head Start on Northeast Killingsworth Street have been connected with their parents and guardians.

The suspect's identity will be released once he is lodged at the Multnomah County Jail.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

Members of the Special Emergency Reaction Team (SERT) and Crisis Negotiation Team (CNT) are continuing to attempt to locate and take into custody a suspect who has multiple felony warrants and is believed to be armed.
 
This incident started on Wednesday, April 18, 2018, at 11:23 a.m., when North Precinct officers responded to the request to perform a welfare check at a residence in the 5500 block of Northeast 55th Avenue.  
 
When officers arrived at the location and attempted to contact occupants of the residence, a male ran from the location.  Officers learned the male who ran from the location had multiple warrants for his arrest and may be armed.  During the initial investigation, officers established a perimeter around the neighborhood and continued to gather information.  Additional officers searched the residence and performed a welfare check; it was determined there were no injured persons inside the apartment.
 
As officers continued to search for the suspect, officers learned he likely entered and was hiding in an apartment in the 5200 block of Northeast Killingsworth Street.  Members of Crisis Negotiation Team and Special Emergency Reaction Team responded to the location to attempt to take the suspect into custody.   Negotiators with the Crisis Negotiation Team are attempting to contact and negotiate with the suspect who is believed to be inside. 
 
Officers are assisting some residents of the Villas de Mariposas North, located at 5205 Northeast Killingsworth Street.

During the incident, community members should stay away from the immediate area.  Northeast Killingsworth Street remains closed between Southeast 52nd Avenue and Southeast 55th Avenue.
 
Parents and guardians who are picking up their children because of the end of the school day at Trinity Lutheran Church should come to the south side of the school.  Parents and guardians should drive east on Northeast Emerson Street from Northeast 52nd Avenue.  The gate to the parking lot has been opened and students may be picked up on the south side of Trinity Lutheran Church.

Albina Head Start, located at 5249 Northeast Killingsworth Street, will remain on lockout at this time. Students will not be released from the location while this incident is occurring.
 
###PPB###
 
###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

The Portland Police Bureau's Special Emergency Reaction Team (SERT) and Crisis Negotiation Team (CNT) are responding to the area of the 5500 block of Northeast 55th Avenue to assist officers with a neighborhood search for a wanted and possibly armed suspect.

The area affected by this police incident is between Northeast 49th Avenue to Northeast 52nd Avenue from Northeast Killingsworth Street to Northeast Church Street. Community members should stay away from the area during this incident.

Northeast Killingsworth Street is closed from Northeast 49th Avenue to Northeast 52nd Avenue.

Albina Head Start and Trinity Lutheran School have been placed on lock-down during the neighborhood search.

The Public Information Officer (PIO) is responding to the scene and will provide updates when they become available. At this time interested media should stage near the intersection of Northeast 57th Avenue and Northeast Killingsworth Street.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Gabriel J Sandoval

Police Bureau Aware of Hate Speech Fliers Circulating in Community (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 04/18/18 9:14 AM
2018-04/3056/113667/PPB_Everyone.jpg
2018-04/3056/113667/PPB_Everyone.jpg
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The Portland Police Bureau has been made aware that there are some anti-Jewish leaflets being distributed in the Portland area.

The Police Bureau is aware that these types of leaflets, while not specifically calling for violence, may create fear and uncertainty in the community and can lead to others committing violence on behalf of an ideology.

The Portland Police Bureau is asking that any information about who may be distributing these leaflets to be shared by email at crimetips@portlandoregon.gov

Any member of the community who needs to report an emergency is asked to call 9-1-1. For non-emergent information, people are asked to call the Police Non-Emergency Line at 503-823-3333.

The Bureau investigates all reported incidents of bias crimes and encourages any member of our community who is the victim of such a crime to contact law enforcement. Under Oregon law, bias crimes are defined as any criminal act that targets a victim based on the suspect's perception of the victim's race, color, religion, sexual orientation, disability, or national origin. Detectives work to determine whether or not bias elements are present during the reported crime that align with Oregon law as defined in ORS:

ORS 166.165 - Intimidation in the First Degree - https://www.oregonlaws.org/ors/166.165

ORS 166.155 -- Intimidation in the Second Degree - https://www.oregonlaws.org/ors/166.155

If you have been the victim of a bias crime assault, immediately call 9-1-1. If you have been the victim of a bias crime, such as vandalism or graffiti, please call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

To learn more about bias crime investigations, please visit http://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/article/423009

The Bureau has several community advisory groups and outreach opportunities for community members and police officers to come together. Advisory groups include the Portland Muslim Community Police Council, the Alliance for Safer Communities, the African American Advisory Council, and the Slavic Advisory Council. To learn more about these advisory groups and the Bureau's commitment to the Portland community, please visit http://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/30379

Additionally, the City of Portland is a partner in Portland United Against Hate, which is a community initiated partnership of Community Based Organizations, Neighborhood Associations, concerned communities and the City. To learn more, please visit https://www.portlandoregon.gov/oni/72583

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2018-04/3056/113667/PPB_Everyone.jpg

Suspect Detained During Stabbing Investigation in Portland's Old Town/ Chinatown - One Person Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 04/18/18 8:54 AM
On Wednesday, April 18, 2018, at 8:02 a.m., Transit Police Division and Central Precinct officers responded to the report of a stabbing at the Union Station Transit Station, located at 500 Northwest 5th Avenue.

When officers arrived on scene they immediately provide emergency first aid to the adult male victim. Emergency medical responders arrived on scene and provided medical aid and transported the victim to the hospital by ambulance for treatment of what are believed to be serious but non-life-threatening injuries.

As officers continued the investigation, they located a suspect near the crime scene. The suspect was taken into custody without incident and will be identified if and when he is lodged at the Multnomah County Jail.

Based on preliminary information, officers believe the suspect and victim were involved in a disturbance during which time the victim sustained injuries likely caused by a sharp bladed instrument.

Detectives with the Portland Police Bureau Detective Division's Assault Detail and Criminalists with the Forensic Evidence Division are responding to assist with this investigation.

Anyone with information about this incident should contact the Assault Detail at 503-823-0479.

Check TriMet.org/alerts for updates regarding TriMet service disruptions at the Union Station Transit Station, located at 500 Northwest 5th Avenue.

###PPB###

Suspect Arrested After Officers Respond to Reports of Gunfire in Portland's Gateway Neighborhood -- No Known Injuries (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 04/18/18 8:03 AM
High Capacity Magazine
High Capacity Magazine
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3056/113671/thumb_High_Capacity_Magazine_041718.JPG
On Tuesday, April 17, 2018, at 10:54 p.m., East Precinct officers responded to the report of gunfire in the 1100 block of Northeast 99th Avenue.

As officers responded to the area, multiple callers contacted the Bureau of Emergency Communication (BOEC) and provided a description and last known location of the possible suspect in this shooting. Officers searched the area for the suspect and any victims.

During the search, officers located a man lying on the roadway in the 1400 block of Northeast 99th Avenue. The man lying on the roadway matched the suspect description provided by witnesses. Officers approached the man, took him into custody and requested medical personnel respond to assess the man for possible injuries sustained at the time of the reported shooting. Emergency medical personnel arrived and provided the man medical aid and transported him to an area hospital by ambulance for a minor injury. Upon assessment by medical personnel it was determined the man had not sustained any injuries indicating he was struck by gunfire.

As officers canvassed the immediate area where the man was located, a firearm with a high capacity magazine was located and seized. Officers also located evidence of gunfire in the 1100 block of Northeast 99th Avenue. Officers did not locate any property damage as a result of this shooting during a search of the area.

Based on information learned during the investigation, officers believe the suspect fired multiple rounds from the firearm that was recovered at the scene and at some point fell to the ground and remained on the ground until officers arrived at the scene.

After medical assessment at an area hospital, officers lodged the suspect to the Multnomah County Jail.

No gunshot victims were found at the scene or arrived at area hospitals in connection with this shooting.

The suspect in this shooting has been identified as 43-year-old Jeuan J. Marks. Marks was lodged at the Multnomah County Jail on charges of Unlawful Use of a Weapon, Unlawful Possession of a Firearm, Felon in Possession of a Firearm, and Possession of Methamphetamine.

Based on preliminary information, the Portland Police Bureau Tactical Operation Division's Gang Enforcement Team responded to lead the investigation. Anyone with information, including surveillance footage, of this shooting should contact Gang Enforcement Team investigators at 503-823-4106.

The Portland Police Bureau works closely with Enough is Enough PDX, a community-led campaign aimed at encouraging people to take a stand against gang violence in the area. For more information about Enough is Enough PDX and how you can get involved, please visit https://dev.portlandoregon.gov/police/news/%3Ca%20href=">https://www.facebook.com/EnoughIsEnoughPDX

Additional information about Enough is Enough PDX and other City efforts addressing youth violence can be found at the Office of Youth Violence Prevention, https://dev.portlandoregon.gov/police/news/%3Ca%20href=">http://www.portlandonline.com/safeyouth/

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: High Capacity Magazine , Firearm with High Capacity Magazine , Jeuan J Marks

Store Robbed Tuesday Night on SE 82nd Ave - No Injuries or Arrest
Portland Police Bureau - 04/17/18 10:10 PM
On Tuesday, April 17, 2018, at 9:06 p.m., East Precinct officers responded to the report of a robbery at the Plaid Pantry, located at 6440 Southeast 82nd Avenue. 

Officers arrived at the store and learned a suspect entered the location and demanded money while implying he possessed a gun.  After obtaining one carton of cigarettes the suspects left the location without incident. 

Responding officers searched the neighborhood but did not locate anyone matching the suspect's description.  The suspect was described as a white male, five feet ten inches tall, with a medium to stocky build.

There are no surveillance images available for public release at this time. 

Investigators with the Portland Police Bureau Detective Division's Robbery Detail will continue this investigation. Anyone with information about this incident is asked to contact Robbery Detail detectives at 503-823-0405. 

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.  Information about any unsolved homicide is eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,500. Information about any other unsolved felony crime is eligible for a cash reward of up to $1,000. 

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects.

Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers. 

Submit an anonymous tip:  Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips. 

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823 ">https://www.p3tips.com/823 ">https://www.p3tips.com/823  Call 503-823-HELP (4357) 

###PPB###

UPDATE: The Missing 20-Year-Old Man Was Located
Portland Police Bureau - 04/17/18 2:22 PM
Kayleb Epperson was safely located after community members contacted Portland State University Campus Police. PSU Campus Police contacted Epperson and have reunited him with his family.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

The shorts Epperson was last seen wearing are described as dark grey and not blue as originally released.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BEOLOW###

The Portland Police Bureau's Missing Persons Unit is asking for the public's help to locate 20-year-old Kayleb Epperson. On Tuesday, April 17, 2018, at 3:16 a.m., North Precinct officers responded to the Shilo Inn Rose Garden, located at 1506 Northeasat 2nd Ave, on the report that Epperson was missing.

Epperson is described as a white male, 6'3" tall, 180 pounds, with brown hair, and brown eyes. Epperson was last seen wearing a dark grey shorts. A picture captured of Epperson as he walked in the Shilo Inn has been provided with this press release.

Epperson is not familiar with the Portland metropolitan area.

Anyone who sees Epperson should immediately call 9-1-1 so officers can check his welfare.

Anyone with non-emergent information should contact Detective Heidi Helwig at Heidi.Helwig@portlandoregon.gov

###PPB###

Officers Arrest Two Suspects During Traffic Stop Related to Illegal Drug and Firearm Possession (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 04/17/18 12:37 PM
Mark T Goldsby
Mark T Goldsby
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3056/113655/thumb_Mark_T_Godlsby.jpg
On Monday, April 16, 2018, at 10:36 p.m., a North Precinct officer performed a traffic stop on a gray Nissan Altima near the intersection of Northeast 72nd Avenue and Northeast Killingsworth Street.

During the traffic stop, the officer learned the vehicle was associated with recent reports of mail theft. As the officer continued the traffic stop, she recognized the passenger of the vehicle, later identified as 41-year-old Mark T. Goldsby, as a suspect in a previous firearms investigation from March 8, 2018. During the March investigation, Goldsby ran from officers, but was ultimately arrested and transported to jail. Days after this arrest and after Goldsby had been released from jail, neighbors near where the incident had occurred, contacted police to report they had found a firearm on their property. As officers reviewed surveillance footage from March 8, 2018, they observed that the suspect had thrown an object onto the property prior to being arrested. Based on this new information, Goldsby was taken into custody on April 16, 2018 in connection with the March 8 investigation into the illegal possession of a firearm.

The driver of the vehicle, 37-year-old Marci A. Harris, was also taken into custody after officers located a firearm, suspected stolen mail, and a substance they believed to be methamphetamine inside the vehicle. These items were located and seized during an inventory search of the vehicle. When officers inspected the firearm involved, they learned it was reported stolen in 2006.

Harris was booked into the Multnomah County jail on charges of Possession of Methamphetamine, Felon in Possession of a Firearm, Mail Theft, and Theft in the Second Degree by Receiving. Goldsby was lodged into the jail on two counts of Felon in Possession of a Firearm, Unlawful Possession of a Firearm, Theft in the First Degree by Receiving, and a Parole Violation for a previous conviction of Murder.

Anyone with information about Harris or Goldsby should contact Officer Derek Carmon with the Portland Police Bureau Tactical Operation Division's Gun Task Force at Derek.Carmon@portlandoregon.gov

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Mark T Goldsby , Marcie A Harris , April 16 Evidence , March 8 Evidence

Chief Outlaw Selects New Executive Team; Promotes Captains (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 04/16/18 11:52 AM
2018-04/3056/113626/RyanLee_AC_Apr2018.jpg
2018-04/3056/113626/RyanLee_AC_Apr2018.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3056/113626/thumb_RyanLee_AC_Apr2018.jpg
On Monday, April 16, 2018, Chief Danielle Outlaw announced the new executive team for the Portland Police Bureau. She has selected Captain Bob Day, currently assigned to the Training Division, as the new Deputy Chief; Acting Captain Ryan Lee, currently assigned to Central Precinct, as the Assistant Chief/Operations Branch; and Jami Resch, currently assigned as the Acting Commander of North Precinct, as Assistant Chief/Investigations. Assistant Chief Chris Davis will remain in the Chief's Office as Assistant Chief/Services.

"Thank you to the community stakeholders who took part in the comprehensive process to select the new Deputy Chief. These selections were made after careful thought and consideration," said Chief Outlaw.

"These individuals have demonstrated leadership, creativity in the use of resources and ideas to get the job done, and willingness to make changes when and where they are needed. I am confident they will help implement my vision and goals for the Bureau and develop new leaders for the future.

"My sincere thank you to Assistant Chief Chris Uehara for his leadership and dedication to community engagement. He fully understands our need to reach out and build relationships and I appreciate his commitment. Thank you also to Acting Assistant Chief Dave Hendrie for stepping up to lead the Investigations Branch these past few months and playing a critical role when asked."

In addition, the Chief will promote the following Lieutenants to the rank of Captain:

Michael Frome
Erica Hurley
Peter Mahuna
Wendi Steinbronn

More information about lieutenants and sergeants promotions and assignments will be announced later this week. The new assignments are effective May 3, 2018.

The Chief also made changes to the Bureau's organizational structure. The Criminal Intelligence Unit will now report to the Chief's Office; and the Rapid Response Team, Canine Unit and Reserves Unit will report to the Tactical Operations Division. A new organizational chart can be found here: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/article/250329

A bio for Captain Bob Day can be found here: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/article/680633

Bios for the Assistant Chiefs can be found here: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/article/680634

Photos are attached to this release.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: 2018-04/3056/113626/RyanLee_AC_Apr2018.jpg , 2018-04/3056/113626/JamiResch_AC_Apr2018.jpg , 2018-04/3056/113626/ChrisDavis_AC_Apr2018.jpg , 2018-04/3056/113626/BobDay_DC_Apr2018.jpg

CORRECTION: Shooting Investigation Early Sunday Morning in Portland's Mount Scott-Arleta Neighborhood - No Known Injuries
Portland Police Bureau - 04/15/18 5:38 PM
The locations struck by gunfire early Sunday morning were an occupied residence and the Mount Scott Park Center for Learning, located at 6148 Southeast Holgate Boulevard, not a church as originally released.

The Bureau regrets this error.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL RELEASE BELOW###

On Sunday, April 15, 2018, at 3:15 a.m., East Precinct officers responded to the report of a gunfire in the 6100 block of Southeast Holgate Boulevard.

Officers arrived in the area and searched for victims, suspects, witnesses and any evidence of gunfire. During a canvass of the neighborhood, officers located a residence and the Mount Scott Park Center for Learning in the 6100 block of Southeast Holgate Boulevard that were struck by gunfire.

Officers checked both locations and determined no one was injured in either location. No gunshot victims were found at the scene or arrived at area hospitals in connection with this shooting.

At this time no suspects have been located in connection with this shooting investigation. There are no suspect descriptions to provide the public at this time in the investigation.

Based on preliminary information, the Portland Police Bureau Tactical Operation Division's Gang Enforcement Team will continue this investigation. Anyone with information, including surveillance footage, of this shooting should contact Gang Enforcement Team investigators at 503-823-4106.

The Portland Police Bureau works closely with Enough is Enough PDX, a community-led campaign aimed at encouraging people to take a stand against gang violence in the area. For more information about Enough is Enough PDX and how you can get involved, please visit https://dev.portlandoregon.gov/police/news/%3Ca%20href=">https://www.facebook.com/EnoughIsEnoughPDX

Additional information about Enough is Enough PDX and other City efforts addressing youth violence can be found at the Office of Youth Violence Prevention, https://dev.portlandoregon.gov/police/news/%3Ca%20href=">http://www.portlandonline.com/safeyouth/

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous. Information about any unsolved homicide is eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,500. Information about any other unsolved felony crime is eligible for a cash reward of up to $1,000.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers. Submit an anonymous tip: Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://dev.portlandoregon.gov/police/news/%3Ca%20href=">https://www.p3tips.com/823 

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###PPB###

Officers Arrest Suspect After Assault with Knife in the Pearl District - One Person Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 04/15/18 11:11 AM
On Sunday, April 15, 2018, at 5:02 a.m., a Central Precinct officer was in the area of Northwest Naito Parkway and Northwest 9th Avenue when she observed a person in distress.

As a Central Precinct officer was responding to an unrelated call for service she drove by a black Cadillac CTS near the intersection of Northwest Naito Parkway and Northwest 9th Avenue. When the officer drove by the Cadillac, she heard an occupant calling for assistance. The officer immediately positioned her patrol vehicle to contact the occupants of the Cadillac and requested additional officers respond to the area.

Officers performed a traffic stop and contacted the occupants of the Cadillac. When the vehicle stopped the adult female victim exited the vehicle and informed officers she had been stabbed. The suspect exited the driver's door of the vehicle and was taken into custody without incident.

Emergency medical personnel responded to the scene and treated the victim for the injury. The victim did not require transport to an area hospital by ambulance for her injury.

During the preliminary investigation, officers learned the victim and suspect - the only occupants of the Cadillac - were involved in an altercation in the vehicle. The driver reportedly assaulted the victim with a knife during the altercation.

During a search, officers located and seized a knife inside the Cadillac.

Members of the Portland Police Bureau Detective Division's Assault Detail responded to lead the investigation.

The suspect has been identified as 69-year-old Curtis C. Watkins. Watkins was lodged at the Multnomah County Jail on charges of Assault in the Second Degree and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.

Anyone with information about this incident or Watkins should contact Detective Michael Greenlee at 503-823-0416 or Michael.Greenlee@portlandoregon.gov

###PPB###

Police Bureau Seeks Public's Input On Directives (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 04/15/18 12:30 AM
Pilcy Manual
Pilcy Manual
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3056/113589/thumb_Policy_Manual.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau directs member action through the establishment of policy, procedure, and rule, as found within Directives. The Bureau is in the process of reviewing all of its Directives and seeks public comments.

Currently, the Bureau is asking for the community's feedback regarding the following Directive(s).

1st Universal Review period: 4/15/18-4/30/18
Directive 660.10 Property and Evidence Procedures

Community members are encouraged to read these Directives at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/59757 and follow the link at the bottom of the draft to provide comments. This webpage also enables community members to sign up for email notifications when new or revised directives are posted.


###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Pilcy Manual

Marijuana Dispensary Robbed Thursday Evening in Portland's South Portland Neighborhood - No Arrests and Injuries
Portland Police Bureau - 04/14/18 9:13 AM
On Friday, April 13, 2018, at 9:00 p.m., Central Precinct officers responded to the report of a robbery at the Zion Cannabis Dispensary, located at 2331 Southwest 6th Avenue. 

Officers arrived at the dispensary and learned a suspect entered the location and demanded money while implying he possessed a firearm and knife. After obtaining an undisclosed amount of cash the suspect left the location without incident. 

Responding officers searched the neighborhood but did not locate anyone matching the suspect's description.  The suspect was described as a white male, approximately 35-years-old and five feet eight inches tall.

There are no surveillance images available for public release at this time. 

Investigators with the Portland Police Bureau Detective Division's Robbery Detail will continue this investigation. Anyone with information about this incident is asked to contact Robbery Detail detectives at 503-823-0405. 

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.  Information about any unsolved homicide is eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,500. Information about any other unsolved felony crime is eligible for a cash reward of up to $1,000. 

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects.

Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers. 

Submit an anonymous tip:  Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips. 

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823 ">https://www.p3tips.com/823 ">https://www.p3tips.com/823  Call 503-823-HELP (4357) 

###PPB###

Officers Arrest Suspect After Carjacking in Portland's Mill Park Neighborhood (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 04/14/18 7:49 AM
Carl E Hollingquest
Carl E Hollingquest
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3056/113597/thumb_E7282478-BEDD-4F39-80BF-09BB3F24A884.jpeg
On Friday, April13, 2018, at 11:14 p.m., East Precinct officers responded to the report of a carjacking in the 700 block of Southeast 130th Avenue.

When officers arrived at the location of the robbery, they learned a suspect approached the victim as she was seated in the driver seat of her maroon Nissan Pathfinder. The Pathfinder was parked in a driveway. As the victim was seated in the vehicle, the suspect approached the Pathfinder, implied he had a weapon and demanded the vehicle. The victim exited the vehicle at which time the suspect entered and drove away in the stolen Pathfinder without incident.

As the investigation continued, officers provided the description of the stolen Pathfinder to officers throughout the city.

At 11:42 p.m., Friday evening, a North Precinct officer located the stolen Pathfinder being driven near Northeast 148th Avenue and Northeast Sandy Boulevard. Officers attempted to stop the driver and stolen vehicle, but the suspect continued driving west on Northeast Sandy Boulevard. Officers pursued the vehicle. Near the intersection of Northeast 102nd Avenue and Northeast Sandy Boulevard, officers utilized a pursuit intervention technique (PIT) and a box-in maneuver to stop the vehicle. Once officers stopped the vehicle, the driver continued to try and drive away, but officers were able to successfully prevent the vehicle and suspect from fleeing in the vehicle. Officers took the suspect into custody.

Members of the Portland Police Bureau Detective Division's Robbery Detail responded to assume the investigation.

The suspect has been identified as 26-year-old Carl E. Hollingquest. Hollingquest was lodged at the Multnomah County Jail on charges of Robbery in the First Degree, Robbery in the Second Degree, Unlawful Entry into a Motor Vehicle, Possession of Cocaine, Possession of Methamphetamine, and a probation violation for a previous conviction of Possession of Dangerous Drugs.

Anyone with information about Hollingquest should contact the Robbery Detail Detective Tracy Chamberlin at 503-823-4783 or Tracy.Chamberlin@portlandoregon.gov

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Carl E Hollingquest

Bureau of Emergency Communications Annual Awards Ceremony
Portland/Mult Co 9-1-1 - 04/16/18 9:50 AM

Date: April 16, 2018

Location: City Bible Church - in the chapel, 9200 NE Fremont Street, Portland OR 97220

Time: 6:30 PM

BOEC recognizes the outstanding efforts by its employees over the past year.  Awards include:

Telecommunicator of the Year

Supervisor of the Year

Outstanding Team Member

Critical Incident Awards

Stork Awards

Lifesaver Awards

Champ Award

- - - Media are welcome to attend - - -


Local law enforcement agencies to host drug take back sites
Salem Police Dept. - 04/17/18 1:41 PM

Salem and Keizer’s law enforcement agencies are partnering with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for the twice-a-year Drug Take Back Day on Saturday, April 28 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at various locations in the Salem-Keizer area.

Public information officer Lieutenant Treven Upkes shared, “We’re pleased to be working with the Keizer Police Department and the Marion County Sheriff’s Office to have convenient locations available for residents to get rid of expired, unused or unwanted prescription meds.”

The Salem locations include:

  • Marion County Sheriff’s Office, Roth’s Fresh Market, 702 Lancaster DR NE, in the parking lot
  • Salem Police Department, Peace Plaza, 500 block of Commercial ST SE, at the bus turnout

Residents in Keizer will find officers from the Keizer Police Department set up at Schoolhouse Square, 5013 River RD N.

“These events give residents a chance to clean out their cabinets and drawers of meds which may be expired or are no longer used,” explained Upkes. “Better to let us collect and destroy these items properly than have the drugs end up contaminating the soil or surface or ground water due to improper disposal. We also don’t want them landing in the wrong hands.” By securely storing and disposing of no longer needed prescriptions, accidental poisonings can be prevented and drug abuse deterred.

Officers will accept unused or unwanted prescription drugs (including veterinary meds), over-the-counter medicine, and any unknown tablets and capsules. All medications should be remain in their original containers, if possible.

Items which will not be accepted at collection sites include:

  • Needles and syringes
  • Thermometers
  • Medical waste of any type
  • Non-medical over-the-counter products
  • Nutritional supplements
  • Bath or hygiene products
  • Leaking liquid containers
  • Insect repellent

Additionally, medications from pharmacies, assisted living facilities, and medical clinics or facilities cannot be accepted.

For a list of year-round prescription disposal boxes provided by local law enforcement agencies, visit the Marion County Health Department website at http://bit.ly/MCHDResources. The Marion County Health Department, a public safety partner, has ample information on drug and substance abuse prevention and available resources for adults, teens, and families.

#S#P#D


Police investigate shooting
Salem Police Dept. - 04/16/18 10:35 AM

On Monday, April 16, 2018, at approximately 8:30 a.m., Salem Police officers responded to a call of a shooting. Upon arriving in the 1200 block of Lancaster Dr SE, officers located a juvenile male suffering from a non-life-threatening gunshot wound. The male was transported to Salem Health for treatment.

At this time the investigation is on-going, but we do not believe there is a threat to the general public and do not believe that the shooting occurred where the victim was located. Due to the initial call, Houck Middle School was placed on lockdown status until officers, working with School District staff, determined there was no direct threat to the school. 

Investigators are in the early stages of determining what occurred and updates will be released when information becomes available.

###


Sandy & Estacada Police Log 4-8-18 to 4-14-18
Sandy Police Dept. - 04/16/18 6:52 PM

See Attached Bulletin




Attached Media Files: Bulletin

Increased DUI enforcement in SW Washington (Photo)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 04/19/18 4:31 PM
2018-04/385/113748/DUI_Ad_500x500.jpg
2018-04/385/113748/DUI_Ad_500x500.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/385/113748/thumb_DUI_Ad_500x500.jpg

Vancouver, Wash. –On April 21, 2018, the Vancouver Police Department and the Clark County Sheriff’s Office will have additional officers enforcing DUI laws in an effort to keep drunk, drugged and high drivers off the road.  Officers, who are also drug recognition experts, will be among those conducting these increased DUI patrols.  

These additional DUI enforcements are possible thanks to a grant from the Washington Traffic Safety Commission, which covers the overtime costs for the additional officers, as well as high visibility marketing in support of Target Zero, Washington’s strategic roadmap for eliminating traffic fatalities and serious injuries by 2030.  

If you are driving and see a suspected impaired driver, call 911.

For more information on these DUI emphasis patrols visit our DUI Enforcement page: https://www.cityofvancouver.us/police/page/dui-enforcement .

 

###

The Vancouver Police Department is seeking applicants for Entry and Lateral Police Officers. If you are interested in a career with us, visit https://www.cityofvancouver.us/police/page/how-do-i-become-vancouver-police-officer.

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/385/113748/DUI_Ad_500x500.jpg

Vancouver Police Officer wins national Police Activities League award (Photo)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 04/19/18 2:04 PM
2018-04/385/113741/IMGP3367.JPG
2018-04/385/113741/IMGP3367.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/385/113741/thumb_IMGP3367.JPG

Vancouver, Wash. –The Vancouver Police Activities League (PAL ) received notification this week that the National Association of Police Athletic/Activities League, Inc. (National PAL) selected Vancouver Police Officer Julie Ballou as the winner of their April Law Enforcement Officer of the Month award. Through these awards, National PAL recognizes individuals in the PAL Network who inspire their PAL colleagues and friends, and who are steadfast in their service to their communities.

Here is the excerpt from the National PAL media release:

“Officer Julie Ballou of the Vancouver Police Department in Vancouver, Washington is the April PAL Law Enforcement Officer of the Month. Officer Ballou has spent the last ten years as an engaged member of the PAL Community, first serving as a boxing coach, and then as a PAL board member and mentor. Officer Ballou represents the patrol officers on the board, coaches the police team for the annual Hoopin’ with Heroes Charity Basketball game (where Police play against Firefighters), mentors several PAL teens, and has adopted a classroom as part of the PAL Patrol program. Every day Officer Ballou goes above and beyond, with a contagious passion for helping her community”.

Vancouver Police Chief James McElvain said, “Officer Ballou is extremely deserving of this award. Her ongoing commitment to serving youth in our community and her dedication to the Vancouver Police Activities League is truly inspiring”.

For more information on the Vancouver Police Activities League visit www.vancouverpal.org.

For more information on National PAL visit www.nationalpal.org.

 

###

 

The Vancouver Police Department is seeking applicants for Entry and Lateral Police Officers. If you are interested in a career with us, visit https://www.cityofvancouver.us/police/page/how-do-i-become-vancouver-police-officer.




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/385/113741/IMGP3367.JPG , 2018-04/385/113741/Ballou_Orchards.jpg , 2018-04/385/113741/IMGP3391.JPG

Deputies Arrest 17 People During Two-Day Proactive Enforcement Mission (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 04/19/18 2:57 PM
Booking Photos
Booking Photos
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1128/113739/thumb_Booking_Photos.jpg

April 19, 2018 – During a two-day proactive enforcement mission, members of the Washington County Sheriff’s Office Criminal Apprehension Team arrested 17 individuals for outstanding warrants and being out of compliance on sex offender registration.

Between the dates of April 17 and April 18, 2018, members of the Washington County Sheriff’s Office Criminal Apprehension Team (referred to as “CAT”), in partnership with the U.S. Marshals Service, conducted an enforcement mission focused on sex offender registration compliance checks and arrest warrant enforcement.

During the two-day mission in Washington County, Criminal Apprehension Team members conducted dozens of home visits, warrant, and compliance checks. Seventeen people were arrested as a result of the enforcement mission. 

The highly trained deputies assigned to the Criminal Apprehension Team track and arrest offenders wanted for serious felony crimes. They also verify that registered sex offenders in the county remain in compliance with the laws and their registration requirements. 

The Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the U.S. Marshals Service for their assistance on this important mission aimed at keeping the community safe.

A complete list of the arrested individuals and their charges are as follows:

  • Alex Nguyen, 26 of Portland, parole violation warrant
  • Amie Davis, 36 of Beaverton, failure to appear warrant (three counts)
  • Barry Westbrook, 56 of Beaverton, Clatsop County arrest warrant
  • Daniel Thompson, 27 of Beaverton, probation violation warrant
  • Denny Ghim, 48 of Tigard, failure to appear warrant (two counts)
  • Dwayne Snyder, 54 of Beaverton, out of compliance sex offender registration
  • Dylan Farris, 20 of Forest Grove, sexual abuse (10 counts) secret indictment warrant
  • Heather Handy, 22 of Beaverton, failure to appear warrant (four counts)
  • Jazman Ellett, 28 of Aloha, felon in possession of a firearm warrant
  • Jesse Banks, 30 of Portland, Clackamas County arrest warrant 
  • Justin Owens, 24 of Garden Home, failure to appear warrant (two counts)
  • Kevin Williams, 51 of Tigard, failure to appear warrant
  • Michelle Piercy, 48 of Portland, aggravated theft (three counts) and criminal mistreatment (three counts) secret indictment warrant
  • Missy Hernandez-Martinez, 28 of Cornelius, probation violation warrant
  • Tanya Lane, 33 of Beaverton, parole violation warrant
  • Zachariah Truman, 28 of Hillsboro, out of compliance sex offender registration and parole violation warrant



Attached Media Files: PDF of Media Release , Booking Photos , CAT Logo

Medical
Three new trustees join Good Samaritan Foundation board (Photo)
Legacy Health - 04/18/18 2:03 PM
Paul Holden
Paul Holden
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/419/113695/thumb_PaulHoldenPIC.jpg

PORTLAND, ORE. – Paul Holden, Marc Fovinci and Bill Jones have joined the Good Samaritan Foundation board of trustees.

Holden is a senior manager with Moss Adams LLP and leads the firm’s health care regulatory reporting and cost reimbursement practice. His team serves health care providers throughout the western United States and Pacific Rim. He graduated from Linfield College with an accounting degree in 2003. He is a former board member of the Oregon chapter of the Healthcare Financial Management Association and former trustee of The Northwest Academy.

Fovinci is a CFA, a principal and portfolio manager at Ferguson Wellman Capital Management and head of the firm’s fixed income team. Before joining Ferguson Wellman in 1991, he was a senior investment officer for the Washington State Investment Board. He earned a mechanical engineering degree from Stanford University and an MBA from the University of Washington.

Jones is a retired teacher who worked for the Hillsboro School District. He is a Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center volunteer and a former volunteer services representative to the Good Samaritan Foundation board of trustees.

The foundation advocates and raises funds for Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center, which is part of Legacy Health – the largest local, nonprofit health care provider in Oregon and Southwest Washington.

Founded in 1875, Legacy Good Samaritan is a nationally acclaimed, full-service medical center with renowned doctors in heart care, cancer care, neurology, ophthalmology, weight-loss surgery and more. Located within the hospital, Legacy Rehabilitation Institute of Oregon (RIO) provides comprehensive inpatient medical and therapy programs for adults from across the Pacific Northwest.

                For more information about Good Samaritan Foundation, contact 503-415-4700 or visit www.legacyhealth.org/giving.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Press Release (PDF) , Paul Holden , Marc Fovinci , Bill Jones

IMCU strikes gold in prestigious nursing award
Salem Health - 04/19/18 7:22 AM

Salem, Ore. — Salem Hospital’s Intermediate Care Unit has earned the Gold Beacon – the highest level award given by the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. This makes Salem Health one of only four hospitals in Oregon to hold this designation. The AACCN awards Beacons at bronze, silver and gold levels.

The Beacon recognizes excellence in patient care, collaboration, and work environments with high staff morale. Beacon honorees are also known for their emphasis on evidence-based care and low hospital-acquired infection rates. High patient satisfaction with pain management and respect for cultural diversity are other strong measures.

The IMCU includes 95 staff and 25 physicians from various specialties: registered nurses, certified nurse assistants, care managers, pharmacists, wound care specialists, dietitians, plus physical, occupational and speech therapists.

 “To achieve gold, we are simply putting into words our daily care practices, staffing effectiveness, continuous improvement and leadership structures,” said IMCU nurse manager Sheila Loomas. “We collaborate to provide high quality care and are very proud of our team. Reaching gold means that our outcomes have exceeded our previous silver levels – and, we often exceed national benchmarks.”

Salem Health’s critical care staff have a strong Beacon history. The intensive care unit was the first Oregon hospital to earn this award in 2006 – then earned three more consecutive Silver Beacons, awarded about every three years. The ICU is currently working on its fifth application. The cardiovascular care unit earned its first Silver Beacon in 2013 and is in the process of applying for another.

About Salem Health Hospitals and Clinics: It comprises hospitals in Salem and Dallas, a medical group of primary and specialty care providers, a Level II Trauma Center, plus other affiliated services. Visit us at www.salemhealth.org; “Like” us on www.facebook.com/salemhealth; follow us on Twitter: @salemhealth; and view us at www.youtube.com/salemhealth.


Utilities
PacifiCorp wind expansion advances with Wyoming approval
Pacific Power - 04/16/18 10:50 AM

Contact: Bob Gravely                                                             FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   

(503) 813-7282                                                                       April 16, 2018

 

PacifiCorp wind expansion advances with Wyoming approval

 State commission approves settlement around “Energy Vision 2020” plan

 

Portland, Ore, April 16, 2018 – The Wyoming Public Service Commission on Thursday approved PacifiCorp moving ahead with a significant wind and transmission expansion plan that would add enough new wind energy to power more than 400,000 homes by 2020.

 

In a bench decision, the Wyoming PSC approved a settlement agreement between PacifiCorp, the Wyoming Industrial Energy Consumers, the Wyoming Office of Consumer Advocate and the Interwest Energy Alliance on the new wind and transmission portions of PacifiCorp’s Energy Vision 2020 proposal. The commission also approved the Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCNs) that are needed for construction of the Wyoming-based projects.

 

“Approval by the Wyoming commission marks a key step forward for our plan to significantly expand the amount of cost-effective renewable energy serving customers,” said Stefan Bird, president and CEO of Pacific Power, the unit of PacifiCorp that serves customers in Oregon, Washington, and Northern California.

 

As part of the settlement agreement, a previously announced 161 MW wind project in Uinta County, WY will no longer be included in the initiative. PacifiCorp also agreed to additional customer protections in the event of cost overruns as part of the agreement.

 

Included in the approved settlement are three new Wyoming wind projects that will provide a total 1,150 MW of new wind, which represents about a 60 percent expansion of PacifiCorp’s current owned and contracted wind fleet, as well as a 140 mile high-voltage transmission line in Wyoming that will help more wind energy connect to PacifiCorp’s transmission system.

 

In addition to the new wind projects and transmission line, the company’s Energy Vision 2020 initiative would upgrade, or “repower,” the company’s existing wind fleet in Wyoming, Washington and Oregon with longer blades and newer technology to boost output and extend the life of the projects.

 

The repowering plan is being considered separately by the Wyoming commission and is still pending. Components of the plan also are still waiting state regulatory approval in Utah, Oregon and Idaho.

 

Pending approval from state commissions, acquisition of rights of way, and receipt of permits, construction on the wind and transmission projects is expected to start in 2019.

 

The Energy Vision 2020 projects were identified in the company’s 2017 Integrated Resource Plan as the most cost-effective option to meet customers’ energy needs over the next 20 years. Completing the projects by 2020 will allow customers to realize the full benefit of production tax credits and provide a net savings for customers over the life of the projects.

 

Visit the following link for more information about Energy Vision 2020. www.pacificorp.com/ev2020  

 

 

 

###


PGE seeks approval for new renewable power program to help customers advance Oregon's clean energy goals
PGE - 04/16/18 8:00 AM

Six metro area mayors support the program to allow large energy users to purchase renewable power sourced directly from local facilities at a competitive price


PORTLAND, Ore. — Portland General Electric filed an application Friday with the Oregon Public Utility Commission seeking approval for a new program to help accelerate Oregon’s transition to a clean energy future and achieve state and local goals for climate change and renewable energy. The program has the endorsement of six mayors who represent the largest cities in PGE’s service area.

If approved, the program will create a new, voluntary option for large business and municipal customers to support cost-effective local and regional renewable power development by working with PGE to purchase it directly from a new solar, wind or other renewable energy facility.

“This is part of PGE’s ongoing commitment to leading the way to a clean energy future for Oregon,” said Maria Pope, PGE’s president and CEO. “Many of our customers have ambitious clean energy and sustainability goals — while at the same time wanting to keep prices affordable. This is another way we can meet their needs.”

The proposed program would deliver power to participating large customers at a price that reflects the actual cost of producing and delivering the energy from a specific facility, and it would be self-supporting to assure that no costs would be shifted to non-participating customers. Similar program models are operating successfully in utility service areas across the country.

For more information about the proposed program, click here.

The mayors of Portland, Salem, Gresham, Hillsboro, Beaverton and Milwaukie signed on to the submitted testimony urging the OPUC to support PGE’s filing.

Quotes from the six Oregon mayors supporting PGE’s new proposed renewable power offering for large business and municipal customers:

“Portland’s 100 percent Clean and Renewable Energy Resolution set the vision for our city to achieve aggressive climate goals and strengthen support for new renewable energy projects in our region. PGE’s proposed Green Tariff would allow us to take that to the next level, giving us a powerful solution for the City to meet our renewable energy supply goals for our operations, and support the economic vitality of the renewable energy sector in our area,” said Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler.

“Climate change is the most serious issue our species has ever faced. Converting our energy production to renewable sources and away from adding greenhouse gases to our atmosphere is a critical part of the solution. I applaud the efforts of PGE to move more aggressively in that direction. I look forward to the city of Milwaukie being able to access electricity from 100 percent renewable sources as a step towards our powerful goal of being a Net Zero City by 2040,” said Milwaukie Mayor Mark Gamba.

“I am excited about PGE’s Green Tariff program because innovative options like this can help Beaverton achieve our climate action goals,” said Beaverton Mayor Denny Doyle.

“We believe in increasing sustainable options to meet the energy needs of Hillsboro residents, businesses, and community groups, and we wholeheartedly support PGE’s choice to expand its local, renewable energy sources,” said Hillsboro Mayor Steve Callaway.

“I am pleased to support the proposed PGE Green Tariff program because it offers Salem residents, businesses, and community members additional options to support local renewable energy resources,” said Salem Mayor Chuck Bennett.

“In Gresham, we are always searching for creative proposals that have all the right shades of green, in terms of positive outcomes for the environment, and the opportunity to save taxpayer funds. I think this new tool shows a lot of promise to do just that,” said Gresham Mayor Shane Bemis.


Transportation
Mike Bomar to join Port of Vancouver USA as Director of Economic Development (Photo)
Port of Vancouver - 04/19/18 9:07 AM
Mike Bomar headshot
Mike Bomar headshot
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1489/113716/thumb_MikeBomar.jpeg

VANCOUVER, Wash. – The Port of Vancouver USA has hired Mike Bomar as its Director of Economic Development. Bomar joins the port May 1.

Bomar has been supporting growth and development in Southwest Washington for more than a decade. Prior to joining the port, he served as president of the Columbia River Economic Development Council, led the Southwest Washington Contractors Association and worked in government affairs for the Building Industry Association of Clark County.

“Mike brings a unique combination of skills and experience to the position of Director of Economic Development, including deep expertise and intuitive knowledge of our community,” said port CEO Julianna Marler. “We’re excited to have him join the port team and look forward to working together to cultivate our future as a premiere public port and a great community partner.”

Bomar’s responsibilities will include sustaining strategic partnerships with public, private and non-profit organizations, and developing economic opportunities that create jobs and enhance regional prosperity through commercial and industrial development, transportation planning and land use planning.

Bomar holds a bachelor’s degree in Political Science and Communications from the University of Washington and a master’s degree in Public Affairs from Washington State University Vancouver.

                                                                                                                                                        – POV –

The Port of Vancouver USA is one of the major ports on the Pacific Coast, and its competitive strengths include available land, versatile cargo handling capabilities, vast transportation networks, a skilled labor force and an exceptional level of service to its customers and community. For more information, please visit us at www.portvanusa.com.




Attached Media Files: Mike Bomar headshot

Federal
State Department to host town hall on modernizing the Columbia River Treaty Regime
Bonneville Power Administration - 04/17/18 3:50 PM

State Department to host town hall on modernizing the Columbia River Treaty Regime

The U.S. Department of State announced on April 10 that it would host a town hall April 25 on upcoming negotiations between the United States and Canada to modernize the Columbia River Treaty Regime. The Town Hall, which is free and open to the public, will take place from 5-7 p.m. at the Historic Davenport Hotel in Spokane, Washington. For more information or to submit questions in advance, please email iaRiverTreaty@state.gov">ColumbiaRiverTreaty@state.gov. Press inquiries should be directed to ess@state.gov">WHAPress@state.gov.

The full news release from the State Department follows:

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Office of the Spokesperson
For Immediate Release
MEDIA NOTE
April 10, 2018

Town Hall on Modernizing the Columbia River Treaty Regime

U.S. Columbia River Treaty Negotiator Jill Smail will lead a Town Hall on April 25, 2018, as the United States and Canada prepare to begin negotiations to modernize the Columbia River Treaty regime.  The Town Hall, which is free of charge and open to the public, will take place at the Historic Davenport Hotel in Spokane, Washington, from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.  At this event, U.S. government representatives will provide a general review of the upcoming process and plans for engaging the region.  They will also take questions from the public; feel free to send questions in advance to iaRiverTreaty@state.gov">ColumbiaRiverTreaty@state.gov.  A call-in number will be available upon request for those unable to attend in person.

The United States recognizes the valuable and dedicated efforts of the tribes, state and local government representatives, stakeholders, and members of the public in contributing to the U.S. Entity Regional Recommendation for the Future of the Columbia River Treaty after 2024.  Consistent with the Regional Recommendation, key United States objectives include continued, careful management of flood risk; ensuring a reliable and economical power supply; and better addressing the ecosystem in a modernized treaty regime. 

For further information, please email iaRiverTreaty@state.gov">ColumbiaRiverTreaty@state.gov.  For press inquiries, please email ess@state.gov">WHAPress@state.gov.


History-Making Scout Camporee to be Hosted at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site
Fort Vancouver National Historic Site - 04/19/18 9:23 AM

The National Park Service is pleased to announce that Fort Vancouver National Historic Site will host the 2018 Camporee of the Fort Vancouver District of the Cascade Pacific Council, Boy Scouts of America: "Road to Fort Vancouver: The Trappers." The Camporee will take place on April 27 through April 29, 2018.

"The National Park Service has a long-standing relationship with the Boy Scouts of America. Our organizations share the goals of instilling the value of resource stewardship and conservation in young people, and recognize that our young are our nation's leaders of tomorrow. Both the Boy Scouts and the National Park Service aim to educate youth about our nation's most precious natural and cultural resources and parks," said Tracy Fortmann, Superintendent of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site.

The Camporee will showcase exciting scouting skills that connect to the nationally-significant fur trade and military history of Fort Vancouver. "We are anticipating that 350 scouts will be in attendance at this historic Camporee," said David Carsten, Camporee Chief. "This will be a celebration of how scouts can come together with the National Park Service, the Cowlitz Tribe, and many other partners to engage youth in the nearly 200-year history of Fort Vancouver."

The Camporee will also host a leadership-training program for scout-aged girls who are interested in becoming part of the scouting program. Girls will learn scouting essentials and compete with the other scouts in the activities of the Camporee. "The Cascade Pacific Council is an early adopter of family scouting, which will include girls aged 11-17 in the scouting program scheduled for February 2019," said Mike Filbin, Fort Vancouver District Chairman. "The Fort Vancouver District is taking the initiative to prepare these girls to take on leadership roles in scouting and in life."

Scouts and scouting leadership will begin arriving at the national park on Friday afternoon, April 27, and will be staying overnight both Friday and Saturday nights. The scouts will camp on the historic Parade Ground in the same locations where U.S. Army soldiers camped on bivouac in the 19th and early 20th centuries. On Saturday, April 28, 2018, there will be a full day of fun, educational, and competitive opportunities for scouts at various stations, where scouts demonstrate their skills in orienteering, Chinook trade language, fire building, lashing, trade axe, bucksaw, and plants and animals.

The Cowlitz Tribe has collaborated with the Fort Vancouver District to kick off the Camporee on Saturday morning with its renowned drumming group, tribal elders, and religious leaders. During the day, tribal members will teach the Chinook jargon trade language to the scouts. Tanna Engdahl, Female Religious Leader for the Cowlitz Tribe stated, "The Cowlitz Tribe continues to master its own history coming back to this fort as a sovereign tribe under its own flag. We come to stand with the youth of this nation at a time when girls are joining the scouting movement. This is an amazing trifecta of time when one views an ancient people in a historic fort overseeing a major shift in a century of scouting. The change-agents of the future will be seen here."

Scouts who provide three hours of service to the national park and attend the Camporee will earn the National Park Service Scout Ranger patch. Many scouts have already accomplished these service hours earlier in the spring of 2018. "We are exceedingly pleased that so many scouts have provided service hours to the park so far, including orchard maintenance, painting, trash pickup, and other important work that really helps us and can instill the value of work and stewardship for these boys and young men," said Alex Patterson, Chief of Maintenance of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site.

In addition, The Eatery at the Grant House, which is also open during the Camporee, is sponsoring a Dutch Oven Cook-Off for the scouts and adult scouters. As the sponsor, The Eatery at the Grant House will provide the ingredients for the cook-off as well as the judges. Each team will be required to cook an authentic 1845 dessert using the spices and ingredients that were available at Fort Vancouver in the early 19th century.

While the camporee events are not open to the public, the national park will still be open during the event. The public can still visit the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site Visitor Center, the reconstructed fort, and Pearson Air Museum. The public is also encouraged to watch the events from a safe distance and cheer on the scouts! If members of the public are interested in learning more about scouting opportunities in general, there will be information available at the picnic shelter adjacent to the national park's visitor center.


Entangled Puget Sound whale largely freed after unusual chain of events (Photo)
NOAA Fisheries - 04/17/18 3:54 PM
Underwater view of grapple holding tracking buoy on entangled gray whale in Puget Sound. Credit: SR3/Cascadia Research Collective
Underwater view of grapple holding tracking buoy on entangled gray whale in Puget Sound. Credit: SR3/Cascadia Research Collective
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/6149/113663/thumb_underwater_right_side_with_grapple_placement_and_buoy_lightened.jpg

A gray whale entangled in fishing gear in Puget Sound on April 13 was largely freed over the weekend after a response team fitted the whale with a tracking buoy, which then serendipitously caught on a yacht's rudder and pulled off some of the entangling fishing gear, according to marine mammal entanglement experts that tracked the whale.

An alert captain of the M/V Kittitas ferry on the Mukilteo-Clinton crossing north of Seattle first spotted the gray whale with fishing gear trailing behind it on Friday. The report was relayed to NOAA Fisheries, which then activated its Large Whale Entanglement Response Network. The Network is comprised of Agency trained and permitted responders including a team from Sea Life Response, Rehabilitation and Research (SR3), and Cascadia Research Collective.

Since the weather on Friday was too windy for a safe response, the team began a search early Saturday morning, which turned into the wettest April 14 on record, according to Dr. Cliff Mass, University of Washington Meteorology Department. Late in the day, in heavy rain and fog, the team found the whale, attached a satellite tracking buoy and photographed the whale underwater to better understand the entanglement, which is critical to ensuring all of the life-threatening gear can be removed.

The fishing gear, which may have been from a crab trap, wound around the whale’s body. The line held one float tight to the left side of the whale’s mouth and then exited the right side of the whale’s mouth, trailing underneath the right flipper to a second float positioned just forward of its tail flukes. At sunset Saturday, the team suspended the rescue effort, but attached a satellite tracking buoy to the whale. The tracking buoy would allow the team to track the whale through the night and find it again the next morning to remove the fishing gear entangling the animal.

In an unusual turn of events, the tracking signals stopped overnight, suggesting the tracking buoy was being held underwater. Since they had no signal to follow, the response team on Sunday broadly searched areas where the whale had been seen on Saturday. Cascadia Research searched from an airplane.

About noon on Sunday, the team received new signals from the tracking buoy indicating the buoy was on land near Port Hadlock, which was confusing. Soon, a call came through the SOS-WHALe Hotline from the owner of a vessel assist company. He said that his company had retrieved the tracking buoy with some of the original entangling gear after finding it caught on the rudder of a yacht Sunday morning.

The vessel owner reported seeing the whale swim under his boat and heard the tracking buoy hit the hull while the whale surfaced just off the side of the boat. The whale then rolled and surfaced twice while swimming northbound afterwards. Responders believe that the entangling fishing gear by chance caught on the rudder, which unfortunately pulled loose the telemetry buoy, and thankfully cut the entangling line and removed one of the floats from the fishing gear. 

Based on the eyewitness account and the gear collected, the whale is apparently still carrying a single float from the remaining fishing gear on the left side of its head with fishing line exiting the right side of its mouth in a "clean bitter end" – meaning it can easily pass through the mouth and the baleen. This configuration commonly comes off over time – and is considered not life-threatening

A comparison of the unique markings on this whale to Cascadia’s long-term catalog of gray whales did not find a match, indicating it was not part of the Pacific Coast Feeding Group that regularly feeds in the spring-fall in the Pacific Northwest, or the local group of Sounders gray whales that return each spring to the waters around Whidbey Island. 

Team members are hoping to spot the whale again to tell if any entangling fishing gear remains, and to check its health. They are asking whale watchers and boaters to keep a look out and call 1-877-SOS-WHALe or hail the Coast Guard on Channel 16 if they see this or any other entangled whale.

Last week an entangled gray whale died and washed ashore on the outer coast of Washington, a sober reminder that not all whales are as lucky as this one to have been spotted and reported promptly. If you come across an entangled whale, it is extremely important to keep an eye on the animal at a safe distance (to protect yourself and avoid scaring off the whale).  Take photos and video, and call 1-877-SOS-WHALe. If possible, it is helpful to remain with the whale until a trained and experienced team arrives.  Although whales are large, it can end up feeling like looking for a very large needle in a very large haystack – our oceans.

As a reminder, only permitted and trained personnel under NOAA Fisheries' Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program (permit # 18786-02) are authorized to respond to entangled whales. Attempting to disentangle a whale without training and authorization is not only dangerous to the responder but also the whale. 




Attached Media Files: Underwater view of grapple holding tracking buoy on entangled gray whale in Puget Sound. Credit: SR3/Cascadia Research Collective , Underwater view of entangled gray whale in Puget Sound. Credit: SR3/Cascadia Research Collective , Responders prepare to throw a grapple to attach a tracking buoy to an entangled gray whale in Puget Sound Saturday, April 14. Credit: SR3/Cascadia Research Collective

Researchers investigate entangled whale on Long Beach Peninsula (Photo)
NOAA Fisheries - 04/17/18 8:21 AM
A young gray whale entangled in lines from a crab trap stranded last week on the Long Beach Peninsula. Credit: John Weldon/NOAA Fisheries
A young gray whale entangled in lines from a crab trap stranded last week on the Long Beach Peninsula. Credit: John Weldon/NOAA Fisheries
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/6149/113635/thumb_IMG_5381.jpg

Researchers from the West Coast Marine Mammal Stranding Network’s northern Oregon and southern Washington section completed a necropsy Sunday on a yearling male gray whale that stranded on southern Washington’s Long Beach Peninsula after becoming entangled in lines from a crab trap.

The ropes from the trap wound through the whale’s mouth, around one of its pectoral flippers and its tail, and likely caused the whale’s death, the research team from Portland State University and Cascadia Research Collective concluded. The young whale suffered extensive hemorrhaging where the ropes had rubbed against its body.

The whale stranded on a remote beach on the Long Beach Peninsula’s Ledbetter Point in recent days and was reported to the West Coast Marine Mammal Stranding Network on Friday. NOAA Fisheries coordinates the network, which is made up of non-profits, state agencies, biologists and volunteer organizations along the West Coast.

“The whale was in good body condition,” said Debbie Duffield, a professor of biology at Portland State University who coordinates involvement in the Stranding Network. “The entanglement appears to have caused its death.”

The lines entangling the whale were attached to the buoy from a crab trap, which carried a tag issued by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. NOAA Fisheries will work with WDFW to identify the owner of the trap to learn more about where the trap was located and where and for how long the whale was entangled.

NOAA Fisheries has tracked increased numbers of whale entanglements on the West Coast in recent years.

NOAA Fisheries has provided funding to support efforts by West Coast fishermen, marine mammal researchers and others to develop new gear and practices that may help reduce the risk of whale entanglements. An Oregon Whale Entanglement Working Group convened by Oregon Sea Grant has also been seeking solutions. Information from entanglements such as this one may help inform the discussions, Duffield said.

NOAA Fisheries has joined state fish and wildlife departments on the West Coast to issue a best practices guide for crab fishing to reduce the chances of entanglements. Humpback whales and gray whales were the most common species to become entangled.

West Coast gray whales are part of the eastern North Pacific stock, which is considered fully recovered from historic whaling and was removed from the federal list of threatened and endangered species in 1994. The eastern North Pacific stock is estimated at about 20,000 whales.

 




Attached Media Files: A young gray whale entangled in lines from a crab trap stranded last week on the Long Beach Peninsula. Credit: John Weldon/NOAA Fisheries , Responders look over a gray whale stranded on the southern Washington Coast. Credit: John Weldon/NOAA Fisheries

State
DPSST Corrections Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/19/18 9:39 AM

For Immediate Release                                          

April 19, 2018

Contact:              Mona Riesterer
                              (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Corrections Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Tuesday, May 8, 2018.  The meeting will be held in the Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon.  The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities.  A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658 and Participant code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Approval of Meeting Minutes

Approve the minutes of the February 13, 2018 Corrections Policy Committee meeting.

3.  Review of Pilot Curriculum – BPP76

Presented by Chris Enquist

4.  Quarterly Review of DOC BCC

Presented by Robert Sigleer

5.  ORS 183.405 – Five Year Review of Agency Rules Adopted Information Update

Presented by Jennifer Howald

6.  Proposed Rule Changes for OARs 259-007-0010, 259-008-0070, 259-009-0070, 259-020-0200, 259-060-0300 and 259-061-0300; Board Disapproval of a Policy Committee Recommendation

Presented by Jennifer Howald

7.  Administrative Closures-Corrections

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

8.  Edison, James DPSST #38290 – Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Corrections Certifications; Department of Corrections – PRCI

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

9.  Lagao, Mario DPSST #53203 – Basic Corrections Certifications; Department of Corrections-EOCI

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

10. Hanson, Shawn K. DPSST #58352 – Application for Training and Subsequent Certification; Department of Corrections – CCCF

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

11. Beers, Tyler DPSST #58455 – Application for Training and Subsequent Certification; Department of Corrections – EOCI

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

12.  Department Update

13.  Next Regularly Scheduled Meeting – August 14, 2018 at 1:30 p.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Corrections Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


DPSST Criminal Justice Management/Executive Certification Workgroup Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/19/18 9:26 AM

For Immediate Release                                          

April 18, 2018

Contact:              Linsay Hale

                              503-378-2427

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Criminal Justice Management/Executive Certification Workgroup will hold a regular meeting on April 26, 2018 at 1:30.  The meeting will be held at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE Salem, Oregon 97317. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Agenda Items:

  1. Discussion regarding Supervisory, Management and Executive level training for criminal justice professionals – Dr. Steve James, Washington State University
  2. Next Steps

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Criminal Justice Management/Executive Certification Workgroup members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Oregon Law Enforcement Career Fair - Looks to Fill 500 Vacancies (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 04/18/18 2:23 PM
2018-04/1187/113696/Recruitment_Photo_2018_C.jpg
2018-04/1187/113696/Recruitment_Photo_2018_C.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1187/113696/thumb_Recruitment_Photo_2018_C.jpg

The Oregon Association of Chief of Police, Oregon State Sheriff’s Association, Oregon Peace Officers Association, and the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) are pleased to host the Oregon Law Enforcement  Career Fair at the Oregon Public Safety Academy at 4190 Aumsville Highway SE in Salem on Friday, April 20, 2018  and Saturday, April 21, 2018.  Both days will run from 10 am to 2 pm and more than three dozen agencies will be in attendance.

DPSST Director Eriks Gabliks said "across the state law enforcement agencies are looking to hire men and women from diverse backgrounds who are problem solvers interested in engaging with community members to help make communities safe.  With baby boomers getting ready to retire, there are more than 500 current vacancies and there will be many more to follow as more than 1,000 currently employed police, corrections and parole and probation officers and 9-1-1 operators around Oregon will be eligible to retire over the next three years.”

Gabliks said “The event will run from 10 am to 2 pm on both days and will not only allow interested applicants (friends and family members) to meet representatives from dozens of law enforcement agencies but also find out about the various career opportunities available that range from police, corrections and parole and probation officers; 9-1-1 operators; lab and evidence technicians; crime analysts; forensic chemists; nurses; and many others.  Specialties such as K-9, explosives technicians, marine patrol, tactical, and motor patrol will also be on hand to answer questions and display their equipment.”

Both days of the two-day event will also feature three panel discussions - Why Policing in 2018; Women in Law Enforcement; Military to Law Enforcement: Continuing to Serve.  Gabliks said "In previous years the panel discussions have been well attended and have allowed applicants (and friends and family members) interested in career opportunities to hear first-hand from those currently working in the field what to expect, what a day is like, what challenges and rewards they have experienced, what they wished they would have known when they applied, etc.  Each session includes active question and answer sessions."

A new statewide law enforcement careers webpage is a great tool for interested applicants, OregonPoliceJobs.com  Gabliks said “This is a new webpage that is an amazing tool that will help get the word out on what is available around the state at a centralized location"  

For more information http://www.oregon.gov/dpsst/HR/PublishingImages/2018%20Career%20Fair.pdf

Attachments included – 3 photos  




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1187/113696/Recruitment_Photo_2018_C.jpg , Photo , Career Fair flyer

New grants fund key veteran service projects across the state (Photo)
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 04/18/18 10:01 AM
ODVA logo
ODVA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/1082/113680/thumb_Department_Horiz.jpg

The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs this week awarded grants totaling more than half a million dollars to fund key projects that will improve veterans’ access to transportation, housing, health care and other vital services across the state.

The grants are funded through the Veteran Services Grant Fund, a new program established by the Legislature during the 2017 session. Based on the funding available, the evaluation committee selected 10 outstanding proposals from nonprofit, governmental and community organizations that are already providing significant and much-needed services to Oregon veterans and their families.

“Our partners are our greatest asset,” said Mitch Sparks, ODVA acting director. “They are doing amazing and innovative work to ensure all of our veterans have access to the care and benefits they deserve, and we are thrilled to be able to support and expand that work.”

The response to this new grant program was remarkable, as a total of 59 grant proposals were submitted, with requests in excess of $5.3 million — almost 10 times the amount of funding available.

Sparks said the response clearly highlights the large community of organizations who are doing important work for veterans statewide, as well as the many critical needs that still exist.

“This is a starting point,” Sparks said. “Through this process, we now have first-hand information that details the gaps in local services, with proposed solutions directly from the providers in those areas. We will be sharing this information with our legislative partners, and we are hopeful this program will be renewed for another round of funding.”

The Veteran Services Grant Fund receives funding from Lottery revenues, as authorized by Measure 96, which Oregon voters approved overwhelmingly in 2016. ODVA and its partners in the veteran community are grateful for the continued support and bipartisan leadership of Gov. Kate Brown, the Legislature and citizens across the state.

The complete list of grant awardees and their projects may be found here: www.oregon.gov/odva/Connect/Documents/Grants/2017-Veteran-Services-Grant/VeteranServicesGrantRecipients.pdf.




Attached Media Files: ODVA logo

Southwest Oregon Regional Forest Practices Committee will meet in Medford May 2
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/19/18 10:07 AM

News Release

Date:     April 19, 2018

Contact:

Nick Hennemann, Public Affairs Specialist, Salem, 503-910-4311
Kyle Abraham, Private Forests Division, Salem, 503-945-7473

 

SALEM, Ore.—The Southwest Oregon Regional Forest Practices Committee will meet Wednesday, May 2, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Inn at the Commons, 200 N. Riverside Avenue, Medford.

Agenda items that the committee will discuss and may take action on include:

  • Private Forests Division update
  • Siskiyou streamside literature review
  • Tethered logging
  • Marbled Murrelet rule analysis
  • Food plots rulemaking
  • Incentives


This is a public meeting and everyone is welcome. The agenda includes time for public comment at the beginning of the meeting. The meeting space is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting. For more information about attending the meeting please contact Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.
 
Regional Forest Practices Committees are advisory groups made up of forest landowners and the public who advise the board on current forestry issues and forest management approaches. Additional information about Regional Forest Practices Committees is available at: https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/RFPC.aspx.
 
###
 


Oregon Board of Forestry meets April 25 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/18/18 8:37 AM

News Release

Date:  April 18, 2018

Contact:  Megan Ehnle, Board of Forestry Executive Support, Cell: 503-302-5603

 

Salem, ORE – The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet in Salem on April 25. The meeting is open to the public and a public comment period is on the agenda.

The meeting is scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. and end at approximately 5 p.m. The meeting will be held in the Tillamook Room, Administration Building C, at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, located at 2600 State St., in Salem.

Agenda items include:

  • Oregon Department of Forestry Fiscal Report – An update on the agency’s current financial status.
  • 2019 – 21 Biennial Budget Policy Packages – Presenting the agency’s proposed policy option packages for the 2019 – 21 biennium.
  • Agency Initiative: 2019 – 2021 Agency Biennial Budget Request – Status update on the agency initiative development, including the draft framework and strategy to finalize the work for the Board to consider at the upcoming June meeting.
  • Update from the USDA Regional Forester, PNW Research Station Director, and Oregon State Forester – Updates on the ongoing partnership that include the 2017 fire season close-out, Good Neighbor Authority, fire season preparedness, and joint research topics.
  • Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee testimony – FTLAC comments and information on state forests.
  • Northwest Oregon State Forests Management Plan – State Forests Division staff will present proposed building principles, definitions of financial viability and conservation, and a modified FMP Content Table.
  • Forest Practices Act (FPA) Rule Enforcement Policy Review/Rule Process Relating to Marbled Murrelet Sites – Private Forests Division staff will present an overview of a draft Technical Report for Marbled Murrelets and seek direction to move forward with an expert review of the report.
  • Tillamook Forest Heritage Trust – Overview of the history, mission, and key programs of the trust, and recommending the Board endorse the trust’s strategic plan.

Agenda materials are available at www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/BOFMeetings.aspx.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling the department’s Public Affairs Office, at least 48 hours in advance, at 503-945-7200.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/AboutBOF.aspx.

###

 


Oregon Board of Forestry Subcommittee on Federal Forests meets April 24 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 04/18/18 8:31 AM

News Release

Date:  April 18, 2018

Contact:  Megan Ehnle, Board of Forestry Executive Support, Cell: 503-302-5603

 

Salem, ORE – The Oregon Board of Forestry Subcommittee on Federal Forests will meet in Salem on April 24. The meeting is open to the public and a public comment period is on the agenda.

The meeting is scheduled to begin at 3 p.m. and end at approximately 5 p.m. The meeting will be held in the Santiam Room, Operations Building D, at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, located at 2600 State St., in Salem.

Agenda items include:

  • An overview of the Federal Forest Restoration Program, Good Neighbor Authority and HB 4118
  • Information and discussion about priorities for fuel reduction treatments
  • An update and review of current federal policy work

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling the department’s Public Affairs Office, at least 48 hours in advance, at 503-945-7200.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/AboutBOF.aspx.

 

###


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon March 2018 News Release
Oregon Employment Dept. - 04/17/18 10:00 AM

Oregon’s Solid Job Growth and Low Unemployment Rate Continue in March

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 4.1 percent in February and March. For 15 consecutive months, the rate has been close to 4.1 percent, its lowest level since comparable records began in 1976. The U.S. unemployment rate was also 4.1 percent in both February and March. The economy continues to expand as reflected by record highs in Oregon’s civilian labor force (2,132,000 individuals) and total employment (2,043,000 individuals).

In March, Oregon’s nonfarm payroll employment grew by 4,200 jobs, following a revised gain of 700 jobs in February. Recent growth was somewhat stronger than during much of 2016 and 2017 when growth averaged 3,700 jobs per month.

In March, retail trade added 2,400 jobs, due to stronger hiring patterns than normal during the first three months of the year. These gains followed somewhat lackluster holiday hiring in retail at the end of 2017. In the past 12 months, the retail components adding the most jobs were motor vehicle and parts dealers (+1,000 jobs) and food and beverage stores (+1,000 jobs).

Manufacturing rebounded in March, adding 1,200 jobs, following a loss of 900 in February. Oregon’s manufacturing sector is growing, adding 4,200 jobs over the past 12 months. Durable goods manufacturing picked up the pace of hiring in recent months. Its growth was led by computer and electronic product manufacturing, which added 2,100 jobs over the past 12 months.

Professional and business services was the only other major industry with a notable over-the-month job change in March. It added 800 jobs, putting this large industry back on a track of modest expansion. Within the past 12 months it added 2,800 jobs, or 1.2 percent.

Total nonfarm payroll employment grew by 41,000 jobs, or 2.2 percent, since March 2017. Oregon is adding jobs faster than the U.S. rate of 1.5 percent.

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the March county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, April 24th, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for April on Tuesday, May 15th.

Notes:
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted except for the component industries within retail trade and manufacturing.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

Effective with the January 2018 data, employment of Oregon’s approximately 17,000 home care workers are counted in private health care and social assistance instead of state government. The change was due to legislative action clarifying that for purposes of workforce and labor market information, home care workers are not employees of state government. The reclassification affects private sector and government monthly change figures for January 2018 and will affect over-the-year change figures through December 2018. It does not affect total payroll employment levels.

The pdf version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For the Deaf and Hard of Hearing population, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.

 




Attached Media Files: Employment in Oregon March 2018

Health Aspects of Kindergarten Readiness Technical Workgroup meets April 20 in Wilsonville and by webinar
Oregon Health Authority - 04/19/18 4:41 PM

April 19, 2018

Contact: Jennifer Uhlman, 503-939-5267, .m.uhlman@state.or.us">jennifer.m.uhlman@state.or.us  (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Aspects of Kindergarten Readiness Technical Workgroup meets April 20 in Wilsonville and by webinar

What: A public meeting of the Health Aspects of Kindergarten Readiness Technical Workgroup

When: April 20, 2-5 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E., Wilsonville

The public may also attend by webinar or by conference call at 877-848-7030, participant code 695684. Register for the webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6656206289436141313.

Agenda: Welcome and introductions; reflections from March meeting; scope and work plan refresher; review draft conceptual framework; review draft criteria for measure recommendations; public comments open at 4:45 p.m.

Details: For more information including a full agenda, please visit the technical workgroup’s website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/KR-Health.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•         Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•         Written materials in other languages

•         Braille

•         Large print

•         Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Melisa Otrugman at 503-689-5238, 711 TTY, ugman@state.or.us">melisa.z.otrugman@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

# # #


Toxic Free Kids Program Rules Advisory Committee to meet April 23, May 9, May 14
Oregon Health Authority - 04/18/18 4:25 PM

April 18, 2018

Toxic Free Kids Program Rules Advisory Committee to meet April 23, May 9, May 14

What: A series of public meetings of the Toxic Free Kids Program Rules Advisory Committee (RAC) to implement requirements set forth by SB 478 of the 2015 legislative session

Agenda: Provide background information and purpose of RAC; review the rulemaking process; review draft rule language; request input and feedback; discuss next steps

When: April 23, 9 a.m.-noon via teleconference; May 9, 9 a.m.-noon (in person); May 14, 9 a.m.-noon (in person, if needed)

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The meeting on May 9 will be in Room 1E; the May 14 meeting if necessary, will be in Room 1B. The public may attend any or all all of the three meetings by telephone conference call at 888-363-4735, participant code 1027039.

Who: The Toxic Free Kids Rules Advisory Committee includes representation of Oregon Environmental Council, The Toy Association, Oregon Business and Industry, American Chemistry Council, Oregon Health Authority, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Multnomah County Department of Health, Metro Regional Government, Washington Department of Ecology.

Program contact: Justin Waltz, 971-673-1217, justin.waltz@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Justin Waltz, 971-673-0429, 711 TTY, or Justin.Waltz@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2JWo7Mf


Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee to meet April 26 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 04/18/18 2:36 PM

April 18, 2018

Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee to meet April 26 in Portland

What: A regular public meeting of the Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee

When: April 26, 1-2:30 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1C, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Please note that space is limited.

Who: The Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee is appointed by the Governor and comprised of private organizations and state agencies dedicated to the reduction of the harmful impact of Oregonians’ tobacco use.

Details: Agenda items include: updates on the tobacco retail evaluation, Tobacco 21 and compliance checks; and a Tobacco Metrics Accountability Work Group update.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Barnard at 971-673-1347, 711 TTY or ah.barnard@state.or.us">sarah.barnard@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2vsu4xa


Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee quarterly meeting April 23
Oregon Health Authority - 04/18/18 2:00 PM

April 18, 2018

Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee quarterly meeting April 23

What: The state Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee is holding its quarterly meeting. This meeting will cover Dental Pilot Project #100, “Oregon Tribes Dental Health Aide Therapist Pilot Project.”

Agenda: Review site visit findings; review project modification request; discuss next site visit; discuss modification of administrative rules for Dental Pilot Project program.

When: April 23, 10 a.m. to noon. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1A, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference line: 888-273-3658, participant code 76-64-09

Background: Dental Pilot Projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce, and efficacy by teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; develop new categories of dental personnel; accelerate the training of existing categories of dental personnel; or teach new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

Program contact: Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sing language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Kowalski at 971-673-1563, 711 TTY or ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 

http://bit.ly/2HciSX0

 

 


Attend a public meeting this week to help shape the future of the Oregon Health Plan
Oregon Health Authority - 04/17/18 11:11 AM

April 17, 2018

Attend a public meeting this week to help shape the future of the Oregon Health Plan

PORTLAND, Ore. – The Oregon Health Authority is holding a series of public meetings to gather suggestions that will help shape the future of the Oregon Health Plan (OHP).

The first meeting is this Friday, April 20, and two others will follow on consecutive Saturdays:

  • Portland – Friday, April 20, 9-11 a.m., Mercy Corps Northwest, 43 SW Naito Parkway
  • The Dalles – Saturday, April 21, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wahtonka High School, 3601 West 10th Street
  • Woodburn – Saturday, April 28, 9 a.m. to noon, Legacy Health Wellspring Conference Center, 1475 Mt. Hood Ave.

Anyone is welcome, and advance registration is appreciated.

Spanish language interpretation services will be available at the meetings. If you need interpretation in another language or have a request for accommodation, please contact Stephanie Jarem at em@state.or.us">stephanie.jarem@state.or.us.

The Oregon Health Plan and coordinated care organizations

At the meetings the public can make suggestions to improve the Oregon Health Plan and coordinated care organizations (CCOs).

CCOs are independent organizations that contract with the state to provide health care for nearly 1 million Oregonians on OHP.

CCOs were formed in 2012 with a commitment to improve care and save taxpayers money.

Since then, CCOs have saved taxpayers an estimated $2.2 billion, reduced emergency room visits, and improved health care.

But improvements are still needed in several areas, including:

  • Better access and treatment in mental health and addiction medicine
  • Finding new ways to limit growth in health care spending
  • Paying providers for improving quality rather than for each visit or test
  • Providing better access to housing, transportation, education, and other health-related services
  • Reducing language and cultural barriers that affect access to health care

The next CCO contracts start in 2020, but OHA is taking public comment now to help inform those contracts.

# # #


Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet April 20 in Wilsonville
Oregon Health Authority - 04/17/18 9:25 AM

April 17, 2018

Contact: Heather Johnson, 503-508-8276, .n.johnson@state.or.us">heather.n.johnson@state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet April 20 in Wilsonville

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority Metrics and Scoring Committee

When: April 20, 9 a.m. to noon. Public testimony will be heard at 9:10 a.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room 211, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville

Attendees can also follow the presentation by webinar and listen to discussion by phone. Register for the webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/7438627555801803523. Conference line: 888-204-5984, participant code 1277-166. The telephone will be unmuted during public testimony.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda and updates; public testimony; program planning, electronic health records and screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (EHR-SBIRT); oral health measures; CCO 2.0 update

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/hpa/analytics/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #
 

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Heather Johnson at 503-508-8276, 711 TTY, .n.johnson@state.or.us">heather.n.johnson@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2Hvg1f7


Conference of Local Health Officials meets April 19 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 04/16/18 9:27 AM

April 16, 2018

Conference of Local Health Officials meets April 19 in Portland

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO)

Agenda: Public Health Advisory Board Committee updates; discussion of proposed 2019-21 Public Health Modernization priorities; update on Tobacco Prevention and Education Program accountability metrics and program element; OHS fiscal monitoring information; local public health authority (LPHA) updates; Intergovernmental Agreement for Financing of Public Health Services equipment inventory requirements.

When: April 19, 9:30-11:30 a.m. The meeting is open to the public. No conference call option is available for the public.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon Street, Room 1E, Portland

The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs, and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147 (ORS 431.340).

Program contact: Danna Drum, 971-673-1223, um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 971-673-1223, 711 TTY or um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2H0B3CS


Oregon Lottery to Present 7-Eleven with $89,000 Selling Bonus Check
Oregon Lottery - 04/19/18 12:19 PM

Portland couple won $8.9 million Oregon’s Game Megabucks jackpot in March

WHO: Oregon Lottery officials

WHEN: 2 p.m., Friday, April 20, 2018

WHERE: 7-Eleven, 4250 NE 122nd Ave., Portland OR

WHAT: Oregon Lottery officials will present an $89,000 selling bonus check to representatives of 7-Eleven for selling an $8.9 million Oregon’s Game Megabucks ticket. Lottery officials will also be handing out a limited number of free Scratch-its at the event.

BACKGROUND: William Breese of Portland won $8.9 million in March when his ticket matched the numbers on the Oregon’s Game Megabucks drawing. He found out he had won the prize after picking up a relative from the airport and stopping for groceries. He will not be in attendance on April 20.

VISUALS: Oregon Lottery officials will present an over-sized ceremonial check to representatives of 7-Eleven and will also distribute a limited amount of free Scratch-it tickets to patrons of the store.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned over $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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Hood River Woman tops Veggie Burger with $33,000 Prize (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 04/16/18 11:06 AM
Linda Breeze with her mom May and daughter Sarah
Linda Breeze with her mom May and daughter Sarah
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/4939/113622/thumb_Linda_Breeze_family.JPG

April 16, 2018 - Salem, Ore. –Linda Breeze of Hood River won nearly $33,000 playing Keno while enjoying a night out with her mom.

Breeze took her mom, May, to the Hood River Eagles Lodge for burger night and played a few Keno games during the event.

“As I was putting toppings on my veggie burger, I looked up and saw all my numbers hit,” Breeze said. “I didn’t even know what the jackpot was, all I knew is that I won. I was so excited I couldn’t eat my burger.”

Breeze said she uses the same numbers that she picked at random, because she feels they are lucky.

Breeze brought her mother with her to the Oregon Lottery’s Wilsonville Payment Center when she claimed her $32,857.10 Keno 8-Spot prize. Breeze played Special Keno, which means she won $25,000 when she matched all eight numbers and then the 8-spot Rolling Jackpot of $7,857. When players play the Keno 8-Spot, if no one has selected all eight numbers drawn, the rolling jackpot continues to grow.

“My daughter, Sarah, and I will probably go shopping with the winnings,” Breeze said. “We do our shopping in Hood River to keep it all local.”

During the 2015-17 biennium in Hood River County, where Breeze lives, more than $10 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education and watershed enhancement projects.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

 

 




Attached Media Files: Linda Breeze with her mom May and daughter Sarah

Wake Sports Rules Advisory Committee Meeting April 25
Oregon Marine Board - 04/18/18 7:50 AM

The Oregon State Marine Board is holding a Wake Sports Rules Advisory Committee (RAC) meeting on April 25, at the Marine Board office, 435 Commercial St. NE, in Salem.  The meeting will begin at 3 pm.

The RAC is meeting to assist in developing statewide rule proposals to increase safety and reduce boating concerns related to wake sport boat operation within 200 feet of the shoreline and objects in the water.  The committee will also assist in the assessment of a fiscal impact of any proposal.

The public is invited to attend and observe by coming to the agency; however, public comment will not be accepted at this time.  A formal public comment period will be opened at the appropriate time during the rulemaking process.

To view the agenda, or listen to the audio recording after the meeting, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/info/Pages/Board-and-Public-Meetings.aspx

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Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council to meet May 4 in Klamath Falls
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 04/19/18 12:57 PM

The Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) will meet 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on May 4 at Klamath Falls City Hall, 500 Klamath Ave., Klamath Falls. The meeting will be open to the public. 

On the agenda: presentations from local trail advocates and land managers about area trail projects; an update on the Oregon Office of Outdoor Recreation; a presentation on the review of the Umpqua River Greenway designation application; a discussion of the Doug Newman Award nominee; and the committee’s vision for trails statewide.

ORTAC was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and to promote non-motorized trail recreation and development in Oregon. The council’s seven volunteer members are appointed by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Commission and represent the five Oregon congressional districts. ORTAC meets four times annually in different locations across the state. 

For more information about the meeting or ORTAC contact Nicole Sprecher, Administrative Support Specialist, at 503-986-0968, echer@oregon.gov">nicole.sprecher@oregon.gov. Individuals that require special accommodations to attend the meeting must contact Nicole Sprecher at least three days in advance.


Statewide Database Licensing Advisory Committee Meeting May 1, 2018
State Library of Oregon - 04/19/18 10:14 AM

The Statewide Database Licensing Advisory Committee (SDLAC) will meet on Tuesday, May 1, 2018 from 9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. PST at the State Library of Oregon. The agenda is included.

This is a public meeting; those who would like to attend should contact Arlene Weible, 503-378-5020 or arlene.weible@state.or.us, so that appropriate arrangements may be made.

The SDLAC advises the State Library and the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Advisory Council on the Statewide Database Licensing Program, and its membership is representative of school, public, tribal and academic libraries. The current member list is available at: http://oregon.gov/OSL/LD/technology/sdlp/index.shtml.

 

Questions or concerns can be addressed to Arlene Weible, 503-378-5020 or arlene.weible@state.or.us.


Counties/Regional
First-installment 2018 property tax payments due Monday, April 30, 2018
Clark Co. WA Communications - 04/18/18 9:08 AM

Vancouver, Wash. -- Clark County Treasurer Doug Lasher reminds residents that first-installment 2018 property taxes are due on Monday, April 30.

“If you have not received your 2018 first-installment tax statement or have lost it, please visit our website at www.clark.wa.gov/treasurer or contact the Treasurer’s Office at 564.397.2252 for a duplicate statement,” Lasher said.

The Treasurer’s Office is located on the second floor of the Public Service Center at 1300 Franklin St. Office hours are Monday – Friday, 9 am to 4:30 pm.

Taxpayers may pay property taxes online using a credit or debit card or from their checking or savings account. Credit/debit card payments are assessed a 2.39% convenience fee, and payments from electronic checking and savings accounts will carry a $1 transaction fee.

To make a payment, go to www.clark.wa.gov/treasurer/payment-options, or call 1.877.778.4606. To register to receive your tax statement electronically and manage your property taxes online, go to www.clark.wa.gov/ezPropertyTax.

Payment transactions must be completed by midnight, Monday, April 30, to avoid interest charges.

Tax payments can be mailed to the Clark County Treasurer, Caller Box 35150, Seattle, WA 98124-5140. Tax payments must be postmarked by Monday, April 30, 2018, to avoid interest charges.  Taxpayers are encouraged to use the return envelope and payment coupon provided with their statement to mail their payments.


Clark County performance audit receives national award
Clark Co. WA Communications - 04/17/18 9:35 AM

Vancouver, Wash. ??' The Association of Local Government Auditors, ALGA, has selected Clark County Auditor’s 2017 Facilities Management Audit of High Risk Material Management report for the Knighton Distinguished Award.  

The Knighton Award program recognizes the best performance audit reports in each of five size categories.  Reports are evaluated for their potential impact, clear communication, evidence and persuasiveness of conclusions. Judges also considered the audit’s focus on efficient and effective government.

Clark County’s audit received the Distinguished Knighton Award in the Small Shop Category. In making the award, judges commented that the style and format of the report communicated results efficiently and implemented recommendations will reduce risk to the county.

This is the fourth time in as many years that Audit Services has been recognized by ALGA for its audit reports. The previous honors included two Exemplary Audit Awards and with the addition of this year’s, two Distinguished Audit Awards.    

“We are proud of our Audit Service team’s accomplishments,” said Auditor Greg Kimsey. “Their 2017 collaborative work with Facilities Management has aided in promoting a secure work environment and increasing accountability over county assets. We thank the Association of Local Government Auditors for this year’s recognition and reaffirm our commitment to promoting accountability and efficiency within Clark County.”

Clark County performance auditor Arnold Pérez, who led the audit, will accept the award at the association’s national conference in May.

This year’s Distinguished Award report, Facilities Management Audit of High Risk Material Management, and the other Knighton Award-winning audit reports can be viewed at https://www.clark.wa.gov/auditor/audit-reports or obtained by calling 564.397.4795.


Parks Advisory Board seeks applicants to succeed departing youth members
Clark Co. WA Communications - 04/17/18 7:52 AM

Vancouver, Wash. –Clark County is recruiting two teenagers for the Parks Advisory Board to replace its youth members who will depart for college later this year.

Two new youth representatives will serve on the seven-member board in a non-voting capacity during the 2018-2019 school year.

County youth, ages 14 to 19, are encouraged to apply. Applicants should be:

  • Interested in public service and, more specifically, in parks, recreation and open space.
  • Prepared to serve on the parks board for at least one year.
  • Available to attend monthly board meetings and arrange their own transportation.

The Parks Advisory Board advises the Clark County Council and county staff on parks planning, acquisition, development and related issues. More information about the parks board is available on the county’s website, www.clark.wa.gov/public-works/parks-advisory-board.

The advisory board meets from noon to 2:30 pm the second Friday of each month. The board typically meets in the Bud Van Cleve Community Room at Luke Jensen Sports Park, 4000 NE 78th St., which is served by C-TRAN’s Route 78.

Interested youth should submit a brief letter of interest and résumé, if available, to Alyssa Weyhrauch, County Manager’s Office, P.O. Box 5000, Vancouver, WA 98666-5000 or email at auch@clark.wa.gov">alyssa.weyhrauch@clark.wa.gov.

Application deadline is 5 pm Friday, May 18, 2018.


Cities
Green and Clean day of service tackles Gresham Main City Park
City of Gresham - 04/18/18 9:00 AM

GRESHAM, OR. – The City of Gresham will partner with the Tsuru Island Gresham Japanese Garden for the fifth annual Green and Clean Day of Service at Main City Park, 219 S Main Avenue, on April 28 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Community members are invited to help with a variety of spring cleaning landscape and maintenance projects.

Main City Park is home to the Tsuru Island Japanese Garden, a ¾ acre island featuring evergreens, pruned pines and azaleas, statues and art. The garden was built by hand by volunteers, who continue to devote their time to create an oasis of beauty in the middle of downtown Gresham. Main City Park also includes an off-leash dog run, playgrounds, horseshoe pits, skate park, two Little League baseball diamonds, Gresham Heroes Memorial and access to Johnson Creek and the Springwater Trail.

All ages and fitness levels are welcome to come help spruce up the park for all to enjoy. Food and entertainment to follow from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.

For more information, and to RSVP, visit www.GreshamOregon.gov/Green-and-Clean or call 503-618-2482.


City of Salem Budget Committee Meetings Begin April 25
City of Salem - 04/19/18 2:00 PM

Salem, Ore. — On Wednesday, April 25, at 6 p.m. in City Council Chambers, the City of Salem Citizen Budget Committee will hold the first of three Budget Committee meetings. After receiving community input on the City’s estimates for revenue, the cost of services and capital projects, the budget committee will then develop a recommended budget for City Council to consider during a public hearing in June. The $596.7 million budget will focus on the priorities of the Salem Strategic Plan and the 2018 Council Policy Agenda, including sustaining City services, reducing homelessness, public safety and supporting the Salem economy. It also includes environmental priorities identified by City Council, such as a greenhouse gas inventory.

The two additional budget committee meetings will be held in Council Chambers on May 2 and May 9. The public is encouraged to attend or watch the committee meetings. All meetings will be live-streamed on cable channel 21, Capital Community Television’s YouTube Channel, and the City of Salem’s Facebook page.

Learn more about the Citizen Budget Committee, see meeting minutes and agendas, or view current committee openings by visiting cityofsalem.net/Pages/citizen-budget-committee.aspx.


City receives $300K donation for new homeless day center
City of Vancouver - 04/17/18 8:00 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The City of Vancouver announced Monday it has received a $300,000 donation from the CE John Company, Inc. for operations of a new homeless day center.

The donation comes as the City starts space planning work for the day center, which will be located at 2018 Grand Blvd. Construction is expected to be completed this summer, with the partner agencies and service providers moving in as soon as September.

“The CE John Family has given to this community for decades, both publicly and anonymously,” said Mark Osborne, CE John Company, Inc. board member and managing partner. “This project grabbed our chairman Jim John’s attention and we, as a Board of Directors, prompted by Jim’s urging, felt it was time for a local business to step up to the plate and begin to combat the ever-increasing homelessness epidemic affecting our community.”  

The Grand Boulevard day center will replace the existing temporary day center at Friends of the Carpenter on West 20th Street in downtown. The new center will be open seven days a week from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. and is expected to serve an average of 74 people per day. It will offer people who are homeless a variety of services, including restrooms, showers and laundry, storage for personal belongings, mail, phone charging stations and clothing, plus mental health counseling, case management, job search assistance, transportation assistance, limited food service, and more.

“Though tackling this issue is a complex process with numerous stakeholders, we feel strongly that sitting back and doing nothing was not an option,” said Osborne. “From Clint and Gloria John on down to the third, and now fourth generation, we believe in giving back to the community you live and work in. We feel strongly that the City of Vancouver has a clear and precise plan in place and it is our hope that our gift of $300,000 will begin a movement in Vancouver that spurs other developers, businesses, and philanthropists to give to this cause. Vancouver is a gem, and we at CE John believe it is a calling for us to not only protect but enhance the quality of life for all community members.”

“It is heartwarming to see this level of commitment to a project that will benefit our City’s most vulnerable citizens,” said City of Vancouver Community Development Manager Peggy Sheehan. “Support from engaged community members like Jim John, and the entire CE John organization, help to make vitally important projects like the day center a reality.”

The donation to the day center was facilitated through the Community Foundation for Southwest Washington, a grantmaking public charity dedicated to connecting people who care with causes that help strengthen the lives of people in our community. For more information on the Community Foundation, please visit. www.cfsww.org.

For more information about the new day center, visit www.cityofvancouver.us/daycenter.

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Weather Permitting, NE 18th Street Paving Ahead
City of Vancouver - 04/16/18 11:02 AM

Weather permitting, contractors for the City of Vancouver’s Northeast 18th Street Improvement Project plan to begin the task of paving later this week, Wednesday, April 18 or Thursday, April 19. Dry weather and warmer temperatures are critical for top layer paving, and it will take at least several days of good weather to pave a project of this size, from Four Seasons Lane to about Northeast 136th Avenue. 

The city is upgrading this section of the Northeast 18th Street corridor with added travel lanes, an improved traffic signal system, street lights, and bike and pedestrian facilities. Construction began in early 2017, and is now nearing completion.

Tapani Underground Inc. of Battle Ground is the city’s contractor for the project. General work hours are 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Friday, though hours may be extended to as late as 8 p.m. and include weekends if needed. Schedules can change as the weather changes. Drivers should watch for message boards and be prepared for delays and lane closures. Allow additional time to get through active construction zone areas. If possible, use an alternative route to avoid the paving activity.

Construction of this segment of the Northeast 18th Street is estimated at about $12.5 million, funded with $6.5 million in federal grants approved through the local Regional Transportation Council (RTC), $4 million in Washington state grants, and $2 million in local resources.

Northeast 18th Street was originally built as a narrow two-lane rural road. Improvement of the corridor to urban standards has been a regional priority since the late 1970s, when it was part of unincorporated Clark County and identified as a major east-west arterial.

More information about the project can be found at www.cityofvancouver.us/18thStreet. Watch for paving changes and other alerts on the Public Works Facebook page and on Twitter (@VanPubWorksUS).

 


City seeks volunteers for Building-Fire Code Commission
City of Vancouver - 04/16/18 8:16 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The City of Vancouver is seeking three volunteers interested in serving on its Building-Fire Code Commission (BFCC).  Applications must be received by 5 p.m. Monday, May 14.

To apply online, visit www.cityofvancouver.us/boards. To request an application or for more information, contact Michelle Bartley in the City Manager’s Office by mail at City Hall, P.O. Box 1955, Vancouver, WA 98668-1995, by email at artley@cityofvancouver.us">michelle.bartley@cityofvancouver.us or by phone at 360-487-8607.

The BFCC is a volunteer commission of at least five members that makes recommendations to the Vancouver City Council about changes to, or adoption of, building and fire codes. Commission duties include:

  • Conduct public meetings as needed to complete commission business
  • Investigate building code, fire code and construction-related issues  
  • Recommend construction and fire prevention regulations related to Title 16 and 17
  • Review all proposed new codes or changes to existing building and fire code and make recommendations to the council prior to its action
  • Hear and resolve disputes related to building and fire code

The BFCC is “on call” and meets as needed, with one mandatory meeting per year. City residency is not a requirement. The vacancies are for a six-year, full-term position expiring in 2024. Preference will be given to people with background and/or experience in engineering, architecture or fire prevention fields.

One of the primary objectives of the recruitment effort is to recruit individuals whose qualifications relate well to the construction industry and the duties of BFCC. Vancouver City Council recognizes that a diverse and well-qualified commission representing different aspects of construction industry will be beneficial to the city and the community. Individuals with background in construction and/or codes, particularly in the area of fire code/fire prevention, are encouraged to apply. Having a BFCC member with expertise in the area of fire code/fire prevention will benefit the commission by expanding its knowledge base.

For more information about the City’s boards and commissions, please visit www.cityofvancouver.us/boardsandcommissions.

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Statement from Bureau of Environmental Services on enforcement action today regarding joint investigation into unlawful wastewater discharge
Portland Bureau of Environmental Services - 04/19/18 3:05 PM

This statement is a supplement to Oregon State Police's news relase from 8:33 a.m.:titled OREGON STATE POLICE, PORTLAND BUREAU OF ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES AND EPA JOINT INVESTIGATION INTO UNLAWFUL WASTEWATER DISCHARGE: 

 

The Oregon State Police, suspecting possible violations of environmental regulations, executed a court-issued search warrant at the Oregon Oils facility located at 2515 NW  28th Avenue today (April 19, 2018). 

The City of Portland is cooperating in that effort because it administers an industrial wastewater discharge permit for the facility.

Today, the City issued a notice of termination effectively suspending the company’s permit to discharge wastewater to the City system.  Because an investigation is ongoing  the City cannot comment on current or past violations to that permit.  

Further questions should be directed to the Oregon State Police’s spokesperson Captain Tim Fox, at (541) 419-8843.


Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge restoration to benefit salmon, wildlife, people; project includes summer-long Springwater Corridor closure (Photo)
Portland Bureau of Environmental Services - 04/18/18 12:27 PM
Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge Photo credit: Mike Houck
Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge Photo credit: Mike Houck
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/5703/113687/thumb_Oaks_Bottom.png

A major restoration project this summer will help bring salmon back to Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge, improve habitat for other wildlife and enhance the viewing experience for people. The project involves the closure of a portion of the Springwater Corridor.

Construction begins July 1 and extends through October 31, which is the “in water work window,” the time frame set by the state to minimize impacts to federally-protected threatened salmon.

During those four months, a section of the Springwater Corridor trail will be closed in the area of Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge.

To help the public safely navigate this closure, partner agencies today released a bicycle map identifying options on newly improved routes on each side of the river: See www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/oaksbottom.

The map features:   the Willamette Greenway on the west side which extends from the Sellwood Bridge to South Waterfront and connects to downtown Portland; the new SE 19th Avenue neighborhood greenway on the east side will be completed this spring and connects to the Tilikum Bridge.  In addition to those newly improved routes, many other options exist in the city’s extensive bicycle network.

“Springwater Corridor is one of Portland’s most popular bicycle and pedestrian trails and Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge is a point of pride in a city that values nature,” said Mike Jordan, Environmental Services director. “Project partners wish to notify the public early and often about the summer closure, options for alternate routes, and the importance of the restoration project. The City has enlisted the might and dollars of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to reconnect the river and refuge for native salmon and create healthy habitat for all wildlife that rely on the refuge.”

The habitat restoration project is a collaborative effort between the City of Portland’s Bureau of Environmental Services and Portland Parks & Recreation and the federal United States Army Corps of Engineers, which will manage construction.  The project will remove a small pipe culvert that blocks salmon and replace it with a large open bottom passage that will allow salmon to access the wetland refuge for food and rest from the Willamette River.

During construction, crews commissioned by the Corps will cut open the berm that supports the trail and adjacent railroad tracks, leaving a large gap as crews remove and replace the culvert.

In addition, the project will improve the water flow in the refuge’s tidal slough channels to benefit all wildlife, including the 175 species of birds that use the protected area.  Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge, established in 1988, is one of only two wildlife refuges in the city and the largest remaining natural area in the lower Willamette River floodplain. The site is managed by Portland Parks & Recreation.

Crews also will remove invasive plants, build a wildlife viewing platform next to the trail to improve the viewing experience for people and replant the area next spring with 8,500 native trees and shrubs.

The Corps is paying $4.9 million, or 65 percent, of the $8.8 million project cost, with the City paying the remainder.

The Oaks Bottom habitat restoration project is one of a series of collaborative restoration projects between the city and the Corps. The agencies recently restored Westmoreland Park and Crystal Springs Creek, which is now designated a city salmon sanctuary. Next is a major project in Tryon Creek - the agencies have received authorization from Congress but are awaiting funding to remove a culvert that is blocking salmon access to that area’s prime habitat. 

For more information, visit the project website: www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/oaksbottom

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Attached Media Files: A large open bottom culvert will replace a small pipe culvert to allow salmon to travel between the river and refuge , Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge Photo credit: Mike Houck , 2018-04/5703/113687/jpeg-_bike_map.JPG

Courts/District Attorneys
Man receives 88 month prison sentence after violent attack in downtown Portland (Photo)
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 04/17/18 3:55 PM
2018-04/5769/113664/Evidence_1_-_Matthew_Owen_-_236895.jpg
2018-04/5769/113664/Evidence_1_-_Matthew_Owen_-_236895.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/5769/113664/thumb_Evidence_1_-_Matthew_Owen_-_236895.jpg

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced an 88 month prison sentence for Matthew Lee Owen after a 12-person jury found him guilty of two counts of assault in the second degree in connection with an attack that happened on September 26, 2017 in downtown Portland.

The jury returned its guilty verdict on January 11, 2018. Sentencing was set over to allow for a pre-sentence investigation to be conducted.

On April 13, 2018, Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Leslie M. Roberts sentenced the defendant to 88 months in prison.

At trial, Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Todd Jackson presented evidence that showed on September 26th, 2017 at approximately 7:30 p.m., officers assigned to the Portland Police Bureau were waived down at the corner of Southwest 4th Avenue and Southwest Washington Street. There, they saw a woman on the corner screaming with a large amount of blood coming from her face.

During the trial, the jury learned that the victim, who was homeless, had been playing her guitar midblock on Southwest 4th Avenue between Southwest Washington Street and Southwest Stark Street.  The victim made a mistake while playing a song, which prompted the defendant, who had been listening, to call her an explicit name.  The jury heard that the victim held out her arm and wagged a finger at the defendant telling him to stop using that kind of language.  The defendant then grabbed her arm and threw her to the ground.

Multiple witnesses testified that they saw the defendant repeatedly stomp the victim’s face into the pavement while she was on the ground. Evidence presented to the court showed that at the time, the defendant was wearing heavy hiking boots with a composite toe.

“This violent, unprovoked attack continued until witnesses were able to distract the defendant enough to allow the victim to escape,” said Deputy District Attorney Todd Jackson. “The victim in this case suffered extensive injuries that ultimately required facial surgery to repair. She was traumatized by what happened and the recovery for her has been difficult.”

The woman’s injuries included damaged teeth, multiple facial bones being broken, and a portion of her lower lip being completely detached.

Media: A photo of the defendant’s boot, which was entered into evidence during trial, is being included with this press release.

 

##MCDA##

Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/5769/113664/PR-18-19-Matthew_Lee_Owen.pdf , 2018-04/5769/113664/Evidence_1_-_Matthew_Owen_-_236895.jpg

Vehicle assault and fourth impaired driving conviction earn Salem woman 30 month prison sentence.
Polk Co. Dist. Att. Office - 04/18/18 1:35 PM

DALLAS (OR) – Stephanie Ambrose, 48, of Salem, appeared in Polk County Circuit Court on April 16 and pled guilty to Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants, Assault, Failure to Perform the Duties of a Driver, Reckless Driving, Criminal Mischief, and Driving with a Suspended License. She was sentenced by Polk County Circuit Judge Monte Campbell to 30 months in prison and had her drivers license suspended for life.

Ms. Ambrose was arrested by Salem Police in December of 2017 after driving away from a location in which she had crashed into several vehicles, injuring one of the occupants. Officers investigating the crash observed that Ms. Ambrose was visibly impaired at the scene. Ms. Ambrose had three prior convictions for DUII for incidents between 2015 and 2017.

The case was investigated by the Salem Police Department and prosecuted by the Polk County District Attorney’s Office.

 

 

 

 


Washington County Agencies Announce Opening of Digital Forensics Laboratory
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 04/19/18 4:34 PM

HILLSBORO, Ore. – The Washington County District Attorney’s Office is proud to join with our partners in announcing the official opening of the Washington County Digital Forensic Laboratory (WCDFL). The WCDFL is a partnership of multiple agencies, including the Washington County DA’s Office, Washington County Sheriff’s Office, Washington County Community Corrections, Hillsboro Police Department, and Beaverton Police.

Over the past several years, participating agencies have worked collaboratively to develop a jointly operated digital lab that will help police officers and prosecutors gather computer and digital evidence in criminal investigations and ultimately help our community obtain more timely justice. With this new resource investigators will obtain evidence more quickly and prosecutors will develop stronger cases. The WCDLF will also allow probation officers to better supervise offenders and hold them accountable to conditions of supervision.

The WCDLF will provide significant assistance in investigations of crimes against vulnerable victims and crimes that threaten community safety. These crimes include child abuse, elder abuse, financial fraud and identity theft, domestic violence, home burglaries, and sexual assault cases. In the current digital age, digital “footprints” can be present in any crime. A digital device often provides key evidence to corroborate the statement of a crime victim, show a suspect’s state of mind or location, and even prevent future crimes. Recent examples of successful investigations involving digital evidence include a child sex trafficking case where the defendant used a cell phone to sexually exploit a teenage girl; in another case, digital evidence revealed the defendant’s plan to murder her victims; in another case, digital evidence revealed where a defendant was storing child pornography in the cloud; and of course, the list goes on.

This jointly operated digital lab is designed to serve all Washington County residents and law enforcement agencies. The immediate benefits to our community include increased access to digital forensic services and fiscal responsibility. The high cost of digital forensics equipment and training has often been a challenge to individual police agencies equipping digital forensic labs.  The WCDFL combines resources to avoid the unnecessary duplication of forensics tools and share operational costs among several agencies. Additionally, Washington County communities that previously could not afford digital forensics tools will now have access to state-of-the-art equipment purchased by larger police agencies.

An additional benefit to our community is that investigators assigned to the WCDFL have expertise in examining and analyzing both mobile devices, such as cell phones and tablets, and computers, including desktops and laptops. These specialists will be an asset to investigations concerning a wide variety of offenses. Further, they will be available to collect and preserve digital evidence from crime scenes and provide investigators all across Washington County with expert knowledge and analysis.

Finally, we want to recognize Washington County Facilities and Information Technology Services for their hard work in helping to make the physical lab a reality. These teams deserve high praise and recognition for their hard work in building the WCDFL quickly and with minimal cost to taxpayers

 




Attached Media Files: News release , News release - pdf

Colleges & Universities - Public
Get your kids outdoors at nature camps (Photo)
Clackamas Comm. College - 04/19/18 4:52 PM
Nature Spy logo
Nature Spy logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/29/113752/thumb_ELC_summer_camp_logo.png

OREGON CITY – Children can grow their love of nature at one of the summer camps Clackamas Community College is offering at its Environmental Learning Center (ELC) in Oregon City. The recently restored ELC wetland, fed by underground springs and stormwater runoff, provides critical habitat for wildlife and water quality improvement, making it the ideal location to study wetland habitat.

Nature Spy Camp: Incoming first-fifth graders will enjoy a variety of fun activities, including exploring the on-site wetland, identifying the critters that live there, learning to be good stewards of the environment, making crafts and playing games. After participating in all four days of camps, participants will be registered as ELC Nature Spies and receive an official membership packet.

  • Grades 1-2: Cost is $215 and dates are June 25-28 or July 23-26, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
  • Grades 3-5: Cost is $235 and dates are July 9-12 and July 30-Aug. 2, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Teen Nature Academy: Incoming sixth-eighth graders have their own camp where participants do hands-on environmental lab activities, engage with the college faculty and visit college classes. The week culminates with each camper creating their own personal digital story (video production), using photos that were taken throughout the week.

  • Grades 6-8: Cost is $245 and dates are July 16-19 or Aug. 6-9, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

The ELC is located at 19600 Molalla Ave., Oregon City. For more information and to register, visit www.clackamas.edu/ELC/kids. For more information, call 503-594-3015.

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Attached Media Files: Nature Spy logo

Have fun and earn college credit this summer (Photo)
Clackamas Comm. College - 04/19/18 4:51 PM
Learn about auto body repair in one of Clackamas Community College’s career and technical education summer camps.
Learn about auto body repair in one of Clackamas Community College’s career and technical education summer camps.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/29/113751/thumb_CTE_Summer_Camps.JPG

OREGON CITY – Clackamas County students entering ninth-12th grade can earn college credits while having fun in one of Clackamas Community College’s free, hands-on summer camps!

Choose from one of four career and technical education summer camps:

  • Horticulture: This hands-on class will teach students how to prepare and use common kitchen herbs in a variety of edible forms. (Clackamas Community College, Oregon City campus)
  • Industrial technology: Experience different trades and technology, such as auto body repair, manufacturing, welding and wildland fire. (Clackamas Community College, Oregon City campus)
  • Health sciences: Learn about health care careers, ethical and legal responsibility and infection control. (Clackamas Community College, Oregon City campus)
  • Invention: Discover the art of invention through hands-on activities using laser cutters and 3D printers. (Sabin-Schellenberg Professional Technical Center, Milwaukie)

“High school students will get a taste of college and be able to explore some of CCC’s programs, without having to pay the tuition typically associated with college credits,” Jaime Clarke, CCC director of education partnerships, said.

Camps will be held June 18-22, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Lunch will be provided and transportation assistance is available.

Each camp has limited space and will use a weighted lottery for placement. Priority placement will be given to historically underrepresented students (students of color, students with disabilities, students with low socio-economic status and students with limited access to accelerated college credit courses).

To register, visit www.clackamas.edu/CTE-Summer-Camps. For more information, call 503-594-3161 or email hsconnections@clackamas.edu.

-30-




Attached Media Files: Learn about auto body repair in one of Clackamas Community College’s career and technical education summer camps.

WSU Vancouver to present four top awards at 2018 commencement (Photo)
WSU Vancouver - 04/19/18 12:42 PM
2018-04/48/113735/Fortin_Dale.jpg
2018-04/48/113735/Fortin_Dale.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/48/113735/thumb_Fortin_Dale.jpg

VANCOUVER, WASH. — Washington State University Vancouver will present its 2018 awards for research, student achievement, service to WSU Vancouver, and teaching at this year’s commencement ceremony on May 5. Chancellor Mel Netzhammer will present medallions to the following:

Chancellor’s Award for Research Excellence—Cheryl Schultz, associate professor of biological sciences

Chancellor’s Award for Student Achievement—Navaraj “Raj” Lamichhane, graduating senior in business administration with a Professional Sales Certificate

Chancellor’s Award for Service to WSU Vancouver—Steve Horenstein, founder and managing member, Horenstein Law Group, and chair of the campus Advisory Council

Students’ Award for Teaching Excellence—Dale Fortin, research assistant professor, integrative physiology and neuroscience

CHANCELLOR’S AWARD FOR RESEARCH EXCELLENCE

Each year, WSU Vancouver gives its highest research honor to recognize a faculty member’s exemplary research quality and quantity as well as positive influence on the broader community.

This year’s awardee is Cheryl Schultz, associate professor of biological sciences, whose environmental research is helping to protect at-risk species through improved conservation practices. Schultz, head of WSU Vancouver’s Conservation Biology research group, focuses on butterflies as a model system for endangered species. She explores the ecology of at-risk populations and how to translate scientific knowledge into on-the-ground practices that protect the environment while enabling those who live in a place to use its resources.

In 2017, Schultz and her frequent collaborator, Elizabeth Crone of Tufts University, published a study that documented the rapid decline of western monarchs and made worldwide headlines. Her main focus, however, is not so much to assess risks but to be part of the solution, and her studies have generated much hopeful news.

Several nature reserves adopting study recommendations have made great strides in restoring land for butterfly habitat, reducing weeds and enhancing nectar resources. Schultz and Crone are currently studying the viability of various species on Department of Defense lands. The research will lead to activities designed expressly to improve land stewardship.

“I want to leave people with a sense of the possible,” Schultz said. “It’s not going to happen overnight, but we can do this.”

Schultz joined WSU Vancouver in spring 2003. She earned her bachelor’s degree in biology and environmental studies at Bowdoin College in Maine, and her Ph.D. in zoology at the University of Washington.

CHANCELLOR’S AWARD FOR STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

The student achievement award annually recognizes one student’s love of learning, persistence to overcome barriers in pursuit of academic goals, leadership potential and involvement in campus life.

When Raj Lamichhane started college as a transfer student at WSU Vancouver in January 2016, he lost no time making his mark on campus. To pay for college, he pursued scholarships, grants and campus work opportunities. He was secretary of the student senate in 2016/17 and is currently a Student Ambassador and Student Affairs intern. He served as president of the International Students Association, volunteered with the Student Diversity Center, and helped bring Diwali, a Hindu festival of lights, to the campus.

Orphaned at a young age, Lamichhane grew up at Bright Horizon Children’s Home School and completed high school and two years of college in Nepal. Beverly Questad, an English teacher from Vancouver who was volunteering in Nepal, helped him come to the United States to continue his education.

Lamichhane has distinguished himself not only with service and hard work but with his ability to articulate his goals and enlist people to help in the cause. A natural leader, he is unafraid to be proud of his accomplishments and humble enough to recognize the role of “luck and miracles” in his success.

Lamichhane hopes to use his new degree in business administration to work in the renewable energy field and ultimately to improve the quality of life in his home country, Nepal.

CHANCELLOR’S AWARD FOR SERVICE TO WSU VANCOUVER

Given periodically, the award for service recognizes selfless dedication and commitment to the WSU Vancouver community.

Decades ago, Vancouver native and attorney Steve Horenstein recognized the need for access to higher education in Southwest Washington and helped bring it to fruition through WSU Vancouver. Since then, he has remained a powerful advocate for the university, serving as a member of the WSU Vancouver Advisory Council since 1995 and chair since 2004. He has donated and raised money for scholarships and helped strengthen ties between the university and the community.

The list of his contributions goes on: enlisting community support for expansion of educational offerings, including transition to a full-service, four-year university and graduate school; garnering support for new construction; supporting collaboration between local schools, the high-tech industry and WSU Vancouver; and, of course, being an enthusiastic attendee at campus events. Beyond the campus, he helped start several civic and business institutions, including the Columbia River Economic Development Council, and has served on several nonprofit boards.

Horenstein, founder and managing member of Horenstein Law Group in Vancouver, lends his expertise as a speaker to help students and the community understand the intricacies of business, real estate, land use and government relations. He holds a law degree from Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland.

STUDENTS’ AWARD FOR TEACHING EXCELLENCE

Students honor a faculty member each year with the teaching excellence award. The award recognizes exceptional dedication to students and infectious enthusiasm for the subject matter.

Dale Fortin’s students say he makes learning fun. That’s high praise for such a complex subject—neuroscience—but Fortin hopes his students will become as passionate as he is about it.

In Fortin’s classes, passion goes hand in hand with a spirit of inquiry. He focuses on developing critical thinking and problem-solving skills. He encourages questions, discussions and interaction. His students say he inspires them to work hard and learn more than they ever expected. He also participates in neuroscience outreach enabling WSU Vancouver students to share science with the community.

Fortin helps budding scientists gain the confidence to pursue challenging research. He speaks frankly of errors he has made in his own experiments, to show that sometimes assumptions are wrong and, while disappointing, can lead to new opportunities. He wants students to understand what went wrong, set aside their frustrations and move forward.

In addition to teaching at WSU Vancouver, Fortin is a senior research associate at the Vollum Institute at Oregon Health & Science University. His students have opportunities to visit the labs of practicing scientists to get a taste of what a research career is like.

Fortin earned a bachelor’s degree at Plymouth (N.H.) State College, a master’s degree at Springfield College in Massachusetts, and a Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut.

COMMENCEMENT DETAILS

Commencement will be held at 1 p.m. May 5 at the Sunlight Supply Amphitheater located at 17200 NE Delfel Road, Ridgefield, WA 98642. The event is free and open to the public. No tickets are required.

ABOUT WSU VANCOUVER

As one of six campuses of the Washington State University system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/48/113735/Fortin_Dale.jpg , Steve Horenstein , Navaraj “Raj” Lamichhane , Cheryl Schultz

WSU Vancouver to host cultural arts and music festival
WSU Vancouver - 04/18/18 1:34 PM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Students from Washington State University Vancouver will host “Coug-A-Palooza,” a cultural arts and music festival from 2 to 10 p.m. April 28. The festival will be held at 3Peaks Public House and Taproom at 24415 NE 10th Ave, Ridgefield, WA 98642. The event is open to the public.

Purchase tickets at the Office of Student Involvement, Firstenburg Student Commons on the WSU Vancouver campus, 14204 NE Salmon Creek Avenue, Vancouver, WA 98686. Price of admission is $5 for students and $10 for non-students. Tickets will be available at the door for an increased price of $5.

Coug-A-Palooza will feature entertainment by Bollywood, Hula and Folklorico dancers, performances from Young Lit Hippy, Ekoh and DJ Matt Lindsey. Activities will include “Wine and Canvas,” lantern making and henna tattoos. No outside food or drinks are allowed, but a cash bar and food will be available on site. Guests are invited to bring blankets or lawn chairs. ADA-accessible parking is available.

For more information, call Megan Thomas at 360-546-9522.

About WSU Vancouver

As one of six campuses of the Washington State University system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

# # #


Clean Providence Academy or make floral arrangements with Cougs in the Community
WSU Vancouver - 04/16/18 2:23 PM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Join Washington State University Vancouver alumni, students, staff and friends at two Cougs in the Community events on April 28 and May 1.

Providence Academy Cleanup – 9 a.m. to noon April 28

Volunteers will help clean the historic attic of The House of Providence (The Academy) in downtown Vancouver, at 400 East Evergreen Blvd., #105. Bring your spades, shovels, rakes, brooms and gloves to help clean, plant flowers and rake bark. The Blind Onion will provide pizza for volunteers. Volunteers will receive a free T-shirt while supplies last.

For more information or to RSVP, visit https://events.vancouver.wsu.edu/cougs-community-providence-academy-cleanup.

May Day Flowers – noon to 5 p.m. May 1

Volunteers will help make floral arrangements and deliver them to Golden Grads—those who graduated from WSU 50 years ago or more. The event will begin in Dengerink Administration Building, Room 129. Volunteers will receive a free T-shirt while supplies last.

For more information or to RSVP, https://events.vancouver.wsu.edu/cougs-community-may-day-flowers-0.

Contact Jessica Wells with questions about either event at .wells@wsu.edu">jessica.r.wells@wsu.edu or 360-546-9600.

About WSU Vancouver

WSU Vancouver is located at 14204 N.E. Salmon Creek Ave. in Vancouver, east of the 134th Street exit from either I-5 or I-205, or via C-Tran bus service. Parking is available at meters or in the Blue Daily Pay Lot for $3; $1.50 after 5 p.m.

As one of six campuses of the Washington State University system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

# # #


Multnomah Co. Schools
Centennial School District Governing Board Meeting Notice for April 18, 2018
Centennial Sch. Dist. - 04/18/18 7:37 AM

Following the Centennial School District Budget Committee meeting scheduled for April 18, 2018 at 7:00 pm, the Governing Board members will meet in executive session pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(i) re: evaluation of superintendent. This session will be to complete their discussion of the superintendent's evaluation that was initially begun on February 28, 2018.


Groundbreaking April 25 for new North Gresham Elementary School
Gresham-Barlow Sch. Dist. - 04/19/18 9:52 AM

Gresham-Barlow School District to break ground for replacement elementary school

What: The Gresham-Barlow School District will hold a Groundbreaking Ceremony to mark the start of a construction of our new replacement school for North Gresham Elementary School. The project is being funded by the 2016 school bond.

Speakers:

School Board Chair Kris Howatt and Vice Chair Sharon Garner

Superintendent Dr. Katrise Perera

Mayor Shane Bemis

Gresham Chamber of Commerce President Stayce Blume

North Gresham Elementary Principal Tracy Klinger

Date: Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Time: 2 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Where: North Gresham Elementary School Campus

             1001 SE 217th Avenue

             Gresham, OR  97030

Information about the North Gresham Elementary School Project:

More information about the project can be found on the Gresham-Barlow School District school bond webpage at:

https://www.gresham-barlowbond.org/portfolio-items/north-gresham-elementary-2/

Information about the 2016 GBSD School Bond:

In November of 2016, Gresham-Barlow School District voters approved a $291.17 million bond for capital construction improvements across the district. The school bond funds two replacement schools—East Gresham Elementary and North Gresham Elementary and major renovations of Gresham High School and Sam Barlow High School. The bond also funds improvements at every school in the district that will increase student and staff safety, improve access to modern technology, address chronic overcrowding, and upgrade and update aging schools and classrooms.

More information about the GBSD 2016 school bond can be found at: www.gresham-barlowbond.org


Saturday, April 21, 2018 Special Session for Public Comment Agenda
Parkrose Sch. Dist. - 04/18/18 8:16 PM

The Parkrose Board of Education of School District No. 3, Multnomah County, Oregon, will convene in a Special Session for Public Comment on Saturday, April 21, 2018 in the Boardroom at the Parkrose District Office located at 10636 NE Prescott St., Portland, Oregon at the hour of 3:30 p.m. Parkrose School District Board of Education wants to hear from their community. This forum is open to the public. We hope you attend and ask questions, make comments or just sit and listen. We will ask speakers to fill out a Citizen Comment card and follow policy BDDH-AR-Public Participation. Speakers may offer objective criticism of school operations and programs but the Board will not hear complaints concerning specific school personnel. The agenda is posted on the Parkrose School District Website at https://v3.boardbook.org/Public/PublicHome.aspx?ak=1000205.

De solicitarse, habrá intérpretes disponibles. Llame al 503-408-2135 (mencione su idioma y espere a un intérprete).

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Interpreters available upon request, call 503-408-2135 (please state your language and hold for an interpreter).

 




Attached Media Files: Flyer

Monday, April 23, 2018 Executive & Regular Board Business Meeting Agenda
Parkrose Sch. Dist. - 04/18/18 7:57 PM

The Parkrose Board of Education of School District No. 3, Multnomah County, Oregon, will convene in an Executive & Regular Board Business Meeting on Monday, April 23, 2018 in the Boardroom at the Parkrose District Office located at 10636 NE Prescott St., Portland, Oregon at the hour of 6:30 pm. The Board will receive reports from the High School Associated Student Body, Superintendent’s Office, Human Resources, Student Services and the Business Office. They will hear presentations from FBLA and NSBA attendees along with recognizing teachers for their outstanding service. They will take action on consent agenda items, a revision to the 2018-19 district calendar and possible PERS Pension Bonds. The Board will report/discuss items of Board Business including: community solutions, committee reports, legislative update, color caucus, select a graduation speaker, recap the Ed Foundation auction and recap the April 21st meeting for public comment. Twice during each Regular Board Business meeting time is set aside to hear Citizen Comments, see policy attached to agenda for further details. The agenda is posted on the Parkrose School District Website at https://v3.boardbook.org/Public/PublicHome.aspx?ak=1000205.

 


Notice of Budget Committee Meetings - Proposed Budget - FY 2018-2019
Parkrose Sch. Dist. - 04/16/18 4:07 PM

The Multnomah County School District #3 / Parkrose School District will hold a public meeting to discuss the budget for the fiscal year July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2019.

The meetings will take place on the following dates:

April 18, 2018: Organizational Budget Committee Meeting/Testimony Received. The purpose of the meeting is to receive the budget message and to receive comment from the public on the budget. This is a public meeting where deliberation of the Budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the Budget Committee. 

May 2, 2018 & May 16, 2018: Budget Committee Meetings (if and as needed). This is a public meeting where deliberation of the Budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the Budget Committee. Meetings will conclude on either of these dates if the Budget committee takes action to approve the 2018-19 Proposed Budget. 

All meetings will be held in the Board room at 6:30 pm at Parkrose School District, 10636 NE Prescott St. Portland, OR 97220. 

A copy of the budget can be inspected or obtained after April 18, 2018 at 10636 NE Prescott St., Portland, OR 97220, between the hours of 8:00am and 5:00pm. This notice is also published on the District’s website at http://www.parkrose.k12.or.us/ pursuant to ORS 294.426(5) – (on Home Page under District Info). 


Reynolds School District Superintendent Finalist Selected
Reynolds Sch. Dist. - 04/16/18 2:02 PM

>>FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE<<

Superintendent Search:  Finalist Selected

Fairview, OR

DATE:    Monday, April 16, 2018

The Reynolds School District Board members are pleased to announce they have selected Dr. Danna Diaz as the finalist in their search for a new Superintendent position. The Board has entered into contract negotiations with Dr. Diaz and she is expected to start July 1, 2018 as retiring Superintendent Dr. Linda Florence leaves her position at the end of the 2017-18 school year.

Dr. Diaz is currently the Superintendent of Schools for San Juan Island School District in Friday Harbor, WA.  She holds a doctoral degree in Education Administration from University of Texas, a master’s degree in Pre-School Education from University of Houston, and a bachelor’s degree from University of Marcy Hardin-Baylor.  Previous to working with San Juan Islands School District, she was Assistant Superintendent of El Paso Independent School District (20,000 students), Director of Student Engagement at Fort Worth Independent School District (80,000 students), Regional Superintendent of the School District of Philadelphia (130,000 students), and Statewide Technical Assistance Provider and Education Specialist at Dallas Independent School District (157,000 students).  She also was Elementary Principal in Round Rock, TX, District Bilingual Coordinator in La Porte, TX, and bilingual elementary teacher in Houston, TX and Pasadena, CA. 

Executive recruitment consultants McPherson & Jacobson, LLC initially reviewed 33 applicants from 17 different states who applied for the open position and offered eight highly qualified candidates for the board to review.  The board narrowed that selection to four they invited for the interview process.  Candidates were interviewed by the board and met with various stakeholder groups including administrative personnel, staff union groups, parent groups, students, and community partners during the week of April 9-13, 2018.  The board received sealed comments and input from each stakeholder group on the four candidates, which were carefully reviewed during their six hours of deliberation on Saturday, April 14, 2018. 

“We are thrilled the various stakeholder groups were able to offer us valuable input during the process of choosing the finalist for the Superintendent position,” said Reynolds School Board Chair Joe Teeny.  “With the qualifications and skills Dr. Diaz will be bringing to our district along with the positive connection and feedback she received from the stakeholder groups, we are confident in her ability to lead our district for years to come.” 

For more information on the process of selecting a new Superintendent of Schools, please visit the Reynolds School District website at www.Reynolds.k12.or.us and click on the Superintendent Search link.

 




Attached Media Files: Reynolds School District Superintendent Finalist Selected

Clark Co. Schools
Kindergarten orientations begin May 17, enroll now (Photo)
Battle Ground Sch. Dist. - 04/18/18 3:43 PM
A kindergartner at Tukes Valley Primary works on an art project
A kindergartner at Tukes Valley Primary works on an art project
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/20/113702/thumb_IMG_3597.JPG

Calling the Class of 2031! Kindergarten orientations are coming up soon in Battle Ground schools, so don’t wait to enroll! Online enrollment is now open for kindergartners who will attend Battle Ground Public Schools for the 2018-19 school year. Once enrolled, students and their families will be invited to attend a kindergarten orientation at their school.  

Kindergarten orientations will be held at:

  • Captain Strong Primary, May 24, 5-7 p.m.
  • Daybreak Primary, May 17, 6-7 p.m.
  • Glenwood Heights Primary, May 31, 5:30-7:00 p.m.
  • Maple Grove K-8, May 24, 3:30-4:30 p.m.
  • Pleasant Valley Primary, May 30, 5:30-7:00 p.m.
  • Tukes Valley Primary, May 31, 6:00-7:00 p.m.
  • Yacolt Primary, May 31, 6:00-7:00 p.m.

These orientations are a time for you and your child to get to know your school and to learn more about the kindergarten program. Enrolling your child prior to these orientations is a key step in being prepared for the school year, and helps the district plan for the number of teachers it will need to serve our youngest students. 

Any child who will be five years old before Sept. 1, 2018 is eligible to enter kindergarten in the fall. To enroll, parents will need proof of their child's birth date (such as a birth certificate) and a signed and completed Washington state Certificate of Immunization Status form.

Full-day kindergarten will be offered at all primary schools so that students can benefit from the advantages of a developmentally appropriate, program. Parents can find out which school their child will attend by using the district's online boundary map at www.battlegroundps.org or by calling the district boundaries office at (360) 885-6577.


2018-19 School Calendar
School will begin next year on Wednesday, Aug. 29. A list of key dates for the 2018-19 school year, including breaks and holidays, is available on the district website: http://www.battlegroundps.org/about-us/school-calendars. 

Links:
Online enrollment for kindergartners is now open:
http://www.battlegroundps.org/parents-and-students/k12-enrollment

Learn which school your child will attend:
http://www.battlegroundps.org/parents-and-students/boundaries

Key dates for the 2018-19 school year:
http://www.battlegroundps.org/about-us/school-calendars

1-2-3 Grow and Learn:
http://www.battlegroundps.org/blog/1-2-3growandlearngroupsletyouobservewonderandlearnwithyourchild




Attached Media Files: A kindergartner at Tukes Valley Primary works on an art project

Help BGPS staff 'Stuff the Bus' (Photo)
Battle Ground Sch. Dist. - 04/18/18 3:32 PM
2018 'Stuff the Bus' poster
2018 'Stuff the Bus' poster
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/20/113701/thumb_Stuff_Bus_Poster_2018.jpg

Public School Employees (PSE) of Battle Ground wants to give back to the community! Join members of the district's classified union on Saturday, May 5 at the Battle Ground Walmart and Fred Meyer stores from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. to help them ‘Stuff the Bus.’

PSE members will be collecting non-perishable food items, personal hygiene supplies, paper products, and cash donations during their annual event. Items collected will be delivered to the North County Community Food Bank.

Community partners for the event are Battle Ground PSE, Cascade Student Transportation, Walmart, and Fred Meyer. Several groups of volunteers will be on hand to help during the event, including students and parents from River HomeLink, members from Battle Ground High School’s Air Force Junior ROTC program, and high school students from CAM Academy and Prairie High School.

“Stuff the Bus” is an opportunity to help make a difference in our community. See you on the bus!




Attached Media Files: 2018 'Stuff the Bus' poster

Battle Ground Public Schools hosts annual plant and greenhouse sales (Photo)
Battle Ground Sch. Dist. - 04/17/18 2:08 PM
The greenhouse at Battle Ground High School is ready for the annual plant sale
The greenhouse at Battle Ground High School is ready for the annual plant sale
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/20/113659/thumb_DSCN2849.JPG

A variety of annual and perennial bedding and flowering plants, as well as vegetable starts and hanging baskets grown by high school students in Battle Ground Public Schools’ greenhouses, will be available for purchase at upcoming public sales. Money raised from these sales supports the district's horticulture and Future Farmers of America (FFA) programs and welding teams.

Students from Battle Ground High School; Prairie High School; the Center for Agriculture, Science, and Environmental Education (CASEE); and the FFA program grow tens of thousands of plants each year. Some of these plants are used in landscaping projects on school campuses, while the rest are sold at annual public sales.

Community members are encouraged to arrive early for the best selection and bring boxes to carry purchased plants. Upcoming sales will be held:

Center for Agriculture, Science, and Environmental Education (CASEE)
Saturday, April 28 and Sunday, April 29
10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
CASEE Center, 11104 N.E. 149th Street, Brush Prairie

Held in conjunction with NatureScaping of SW Washington's Bare Root trees, shrubs and perennials sale, CASEE will be selling northwest native trees and shrubs. Prices are $3, $5 and $10. Cash only, please.

Battle Ground High School
Saturday, May 5 and Sunday, May 6
9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
BGHS greenhouses, 300 W Main St., Battle Ground

There more than 15,000 plants for sale this year, including hanging baskets, perennial flowers,  bedding plants, vegetables, berry plants and nursery stock. Cash or checks only, please. Customers are also welcome to walk through and see the demonstration garden named after Paddy Hough. It includes aquaculture, tissue culture, hydroponics, trellised fruit trees, and several perennial fruits that aren’t common in a Pacific Northwest garden. Cash or check only.  

Prairie High School Plant Sale
Saturday, May 5 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Prairie High School greenhouse, 11311 NE 119th St., Vancouver

Shop a large selection of hanging baskets, grasses, vegetables, herbs, flowers, trees and succulents. Cash or check only.




Attached Media Files: The greenhouse at Battle Ground High School is ready for the annual plant sale

Battle Ground schools' CTE programs prepare students for life after high school (Photo)
Battle Ground Sch. Dist. - 04/16/18 1:30 PM
Seniors BayLee Saldino (left) and Kaitlyn Rose (right)
Seniors BayLee Saldino (left) and Kaitlyn Rose (right)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/20/113628/thumb_BayLee_Saldino_and_Kaitlyn_Rose.JPG

For Prairie High School senior Isabel Hidalgo, taking Career and Technical Education (CTE) classes opened up a world of opportunities. As a sophomore, Hidalgo was still unsure of what career path she wanted to pursue after high school. That all changed when she took a Health Science class from teacher Melissa Levine. Levine's experiences working in the healthcare field inspired Hidalgo to work toward becoming a medical doctor, and she chose to take the Health Sciences pathway at Prairie.  

The CTE term is applied to high school classes in skilled trades, applied sciences, modern technologies and career preparation. The classes provide hands-on training in skills that help students get jobs or prepare them to continue their educations beyond high school.

Battle Ground Public Schools' mission is to empower all students to reach their highest potential through innovative, creative and supportive learning environments. The district’s CTE offerings and related club activities are highly effective in achieving this mission.

According to the Association for Career and Technical Education, the average high school graduation rate for students in CTE programs is 93 percent, compared to an average national graduation rate of 80 percent. CTE students are also significantly more likely than their non-CTE counterparts to develop problem solving, research, math, communication, time management and critical-thinking skills during high school. In addition to helping prepare students academically, CTE programs provide opportunities for students to gain experience and build confidence for life after high school.

As a sophomore, Hidalgo joined the Health Occupation Students of America (HOSA) club, where she competed in medical terminology and CPR contests against her high school peers. Last year, Hidalgo finished fourth overall in a state CPR competition.  

“Getting hands-on experience through competitions, the blood drives we host, and classes that are practical and interesting has opened up so many doors,” Hidalgo said. “It’s not so much that doors were closed, it’s that I didn’t even know the doors existed.”

After finishing high school this year, Hidalgo plans to study biology at the University of Portland in the fall, and has her sights set on attending medical school after that. Her goal is to specialize in children’s cancer and immunotherapy; options that she learned about from her experiences in CTE classes and competitions.

"Students in CTE programs are more connected to their interests and see how those interests can translate into a career,” said Cindy Arnold, the district’s Director of Career and Technical Education. "CTE classes help students prepare to find and get jobs right out of high school, and also gives them the skills to be successful in college."

Battle Ground High School senior Adriana Esparza agrees. Before joining the Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFJROTC), Esparza wasn’t sure what she wanted to do after graduation. In less than two years in the CTE program, she says that her involvement with the AFJROTC program has provided clarity of her career goals.

“Before I joined the JROTC program, I had no idea if I even wanted to go to college,” Esparza said. Now, she plans to get a degree in psychology with the goal of becoming a clinical psychologist in the military. She also plans to continue ROTC in college and become a commissioned officer in the Air Force.

“It’s special to have a program that helps develop each student’s individual strengths while also teaching the core value of ‘service before self’ and stressing the importance of community,” Esparza said. “Junior ROTC is an amazing option that I’d strongly encourage any student to explore.”

Prairie High School seniors BayLee Saldino and Kaitlyn Rose have taken several agriculture classes together and are both members of the school’s Future Farmers of America (FFA) club. Saldino and Rose echoed the sentiment that their CTE classes and club activities build confidence and teach practical skills that are useful during and after high school.

“After I moved here from California halfway through my freshman year, I was very shy and quiet,” Saldino said. “That’s not the case anymore. Not only did I make great friends through FFA and my agriculture classes, but the public speaking and presentations I had to give helped me open up and be confident.”

Saldino said she always knew that she was interested in working with animals, but her CTE experiences have informed her decision to focus on animal behavior and wildlife rehabilitation.

Kaitlyn Rose runs the Eagle Fern summer horse camp and says that her FFA experience has taught her the record keeping and facilities care skills to transform a fun hobby into more of a business opportunity.

“You’re always moving, delegating, and having to step up and take responsibility as a leader in the greenhouse and in the labs,” Rose said. “Everyone shows steady improvement over time, and you can definitely see people’s confidence building as they develop leadership skills.”

Rose herself has demonstrated that confidence and growth, recently placing second at an FFA job interviewing skills competition in the Evergreen school district and preparing to participate in the state competition in Pullman next month.   

Battle Ground's middle and high school students can choose from 200 CTE courses across 36 content areas including: agriculture, food and natural resources; architecture and construction; arts, audio/video technology and communications; business management and administration; education and training; finance; government and public administration; hospitality and tourism; human services; information technology; law, public safety, corrections and security; manufacturing; health services; marketing; science, technology, engineering and mathematics; and transportation, distribution and logistics.

Visit www.battlegroundps.org/district/career-and-technical-education for more information.




Attached Media Files: Seniors BayLee Saldino (left) and Kaitlyn Rose (right) , Isabel Hidalgo (right) with fellow senior Elizabeth Gushtyuk (left)

MEDIA ALERT: Community Conversations About Youth and Opioids in Clark County
ESD 112 - 04/18/18 11:29 PM

WHAT

Prevent Coalition is hosting a spring coalition meeting and public forum for community members and a panel of experts from public health, neuroscience, prevention, intervention and law enforcement to discuss the real issues with youth opioid use in Clark County and identify solutions for prevention and intervention.

 

WHERE

The event is free and open to the public on Thursday, April 19, from 3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. at ESD 112 Conference Center (2500 NE 65th Ave Vancouver, WA 98661)

 

WHY

Seventy-one percent of all drug poisoning deaths in Clark County are opioid related, according to data pulled earlier this year by Clark County Public Health. The Prevent Coalition aims to reduce the toll opioids are taking on our community by taking targeted action throughout April on awareness, conversation, and prevention.

 

WHO

Panelists for the coalition meeting and public forum include:

  • Adiba Ali, Epidemiologist with Clark County Public Health
  • Jim Jensen, Clinician with InAct, a program of Volunteers of America
  • Denise Livingston, Prevention Intervention Specialist with ESD 112
  • David Helgeson, Ph.D., MHP, CDP with Juvenile Recovery Court / School Based Services at Lifeline Connections
  • Gerardo Gutierrez School Resource Officer with Mountain View High School

Local video makes sense of academic testing (Photo)
ESD 112 - 04/18/18 12:51 PM
Miz Teach-A-Lot, aka Hough Teacher Amelia Peachey, raps about SBAC
Miz Teach-A-Lot, aka Hough Teacher Amelia Peachey, raps about SBAC
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/487/113689/thumb_SBAC_rapStill2.jpg

As students enter a season of state-mandated testing, Educational Service District 112 has released a catchy music video that takes some of the mystery out of the process.

“Teacher’s got SBAC”—pronounced “S-BAC”—is a rap performed by staff and students at Vancouver’s Hough Elementary School. As they rap, dance and beatbox across the screen, they share some of the reasons behind state assessments and the benefits of taking them. (Watch video here: http://bit.ly/EduSpeakSBAC)

(SBAC stands for the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, a multi-state group that developed the tests that are used in Washington and many other states.)

“Schools throughout Washington use state assessment results to make improvements in teaching and learning,” said Mike Nerland, ESD 112 assistant superintendent of Teaching and Learning. “Assessment results provide information that allow schools to identify strengths and gaps in curriculum and instruction. They also give educators data that enable them to design teaching strategies to boost student achievement.”

The video launches ESD 112’s “EDU-speakin’ to me?!” video series on social media. EDU-speakin’ is a creation of the agency’s Communications and Public Engagement department.

“One day we were talking about how confusing education terms can be for us as parents of school-age children—even though we work with this jargon every day at ESD 112,” said communications manager Sarah Coomber.

“So we thought, ‘What if we made learning education jargon fun?’” said graphic designer and copywriter Melissa Burt.

Soon they were brainstorming with communications manager Michele McKeag Larsen and video producer Rose Yandell, targeting topics that might help parents feel more comfortable in school conversations and conferences.

So far the EDU-speakin’ group has tackled Common Core/CCSS, DIBELS, magnet schools, NGSS, STEM/STEAM, BYOD and SBAC—with more to come. The videos are available at https://www.esd112.org/eduspeak/ and will be featured on social media throughout the spring. 

To make sure the project is answering a real need, the EDU-speakin’ group shared one video and survey with ESD 112 colleagues. Of 65 respondents, 70.8 percent said they also have been confused by various education terms, and 21.5 percent more admitted to having been “somewhat” confused.

When they shared the same survey with families in Hockinson School District, they found that out of 45 respondents, 64.4 percent have been confused and 26.7 percent have been “somewhat confused.”

“We knew we were on to something,” said Larsen. “Now we’re on a mission to make public education understandable to everyone.”




Attached Media Files: Miz Teach-A-Lot, aka Hough Teacher Amelia Peachey, raps about SBAC , The Fresh Principal of Vancouver, aka Hough Principal Steve Vance, raps with his backup dancers

ESD 112 team receives prestigious state award (Photo)
ESD 112 - 04/16/18 9:21 AM
Web developer Laura Martin holds the President's Award, flanked by ESD 112 team and board members.
Web developer Laura Martin holds the President's Award, flanked by ESD 112 team and board members.
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A trio from the Educational Service District 112 Communications Team has received the 2018 President’s Award from the Association of Educational Service Districts (AESD), a network of all nine of the state’s ESDs.

Lori Oberheide, Assistant Superintendent of Communications and Community Engagement; Heidi Barnes, Director of Creative and Web Development; and Laura Martin, Web Developer, were honored at the AESD Annual Conference in the Tri-Cities April 12-14. AESD President Rick Anthony presented the award on behalf of the organization for “appreciation of extraordinary work, support and dedication.” The team rebranded the AESD several years ago and most recently built and launched a new website for the organization. Visit https://www.waesd.org/ to see more.    




Attached Media Files: Web developer Laura Martin holds the President's Award, flanked by ESD 112 team and board members.

Public invited to Student Showcase of Evergreen Public Schools Career and Technical Education Programs
Evergreen Sch. Dist. - 04/19/18 8:58 AM

Career and Technical Education (CTE) at Evergreen Public Schools invites the community to learn about the CTE experience at a Student Showcase on April 30, 2018. 4:30 to 6:00 p.m. at Henrietta Lacks Health and Bioscience High School, 9105 NE 9th Street, Vancouver WA.

Evergreen Public Schools middle and high school students enrolled in CTE coursework will demonstrate, exhibit, and talk about the things they have been learning this school year. Projects in game design, architecture, photography, medical science, floral design, veterinary science, environmental science, robotics, manufacturing, and other subjects will be featured in an open-house format. There will be opportunities to tour some of the state-of-the art medical instruction classrooms at Henrietta Lacks High. Admission is free.

“This is the first time CTE has hosted a district-wide student showcase,” said College, Career, and Technical Education Director, Susan Dixon. “It should be a great way for parents and students to learn about the opportunities to engage in creative and technical subjects in high school that could prepare them for potential careers.” Dixon encourages middle school students and parents, especially, to attend.

About CTE:  CTE prepares learners for the world of work by introducing them to workplace competencies, and makes academic content accessible to students by providing it in a hands-on context. Over 125 CTE courses in Evergreen Public Schools allow students to explore high-wage, high-skill, high-demand careers in emerging industries. Forty-nine of these courses also fulfill core requirements for graduation. Students have the opportunity to earn college credits while taking many of the courses offered in CTE. The 2016 graduation rate among Evergreen Public Schools CTE students was 90%. Nationally, about 12.5 million high school and college students are enrolled in CTE pathways. To learn more, go to evergreenps.org/departments/CCTE.


Harlem Wizards to honor twins in advance of Wednesday game at Union High School
Evergreen Sch. Dist. - 04/16/18 11:40 AM

The Harlem Wizards, a traveling basketball performing group, will be playing at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday, April 18 at Union High School, to benefit Harmony Elementary PTA.  However, two new special players will be “signed” by the team earlier in the day: a set of six year-old twins, Adrian and Declan Reagan

Adrian and Declan were scheduled to start Kindergarten at Harmony Elementary this past fall. But as the first day of school got closer, it was clear that only Adrian would be in class as Declan was recovering from a bone marrow transplant to fight off his second occurrence of Acute Myeloid Leukemia. The July 2017 transplant appeared initially successful, but his cancer returned again in October 2017. This past January, he had another bone marrow transplant, but his cancer again returned and he is now in Hospice Care. 

The Wizards organization said it couldn’t stop thinking about the Reagan family once they heard the story, and arranged for the special presentation on Wednesday morning at 9:25 a.m. at Harmony Elementary. Declan will join Adrian, and Adrian’s entire Kindergarten class, as the Wizards players welcome their new “teammates,” sign them to player contracts, and present them with special team jerseys.  The Reagan family will also be special guests at the evening’s benefit basketball game.

Members of the media are invited to attend the “signing “ ceremony which will begin at 9:25 a.m., Wednesday April 18,  (check in at 9:10 a.m. at the Main office) at Harmony Elementary (17404-A NE 18th Street, Vancouver, 98684).


Hockinson musicians bring home bouquet of honors (Photo)
Hockinson Sch. Dist. - 04/18/18 10:26 AM
The HHS Wind Ensemble competes at the CBC Band Festival.
The HHS Wind Ensemble competes at the CBC Band Festival.
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After a whirlwind of a weekend, Hockinson High School’s musicians brought home a treasure trove of awards.

“This is one of the most successful weekends I can remember for our program,” said HHS band director Corey McEnry.

On Thursday, the HHS Jazz Band won first place in its division, plus first place in sight reading at the University of Portland Jazz Festival. Trombonist Riley Lyons won the award for best soloist.

On Friday, the Wind Ensemble received a gold medal at the Columbia Basin College Band Festival in Pasco, Washington. One judge called theirs “the most captivating performance of the day.” Flutists Liz Lindsley and Rebekah Soft were both recognized for outstanding solos.

On Saturday, the Jazz Band won first place in its division of the jazz portion of the CBC festival. Trombonist Riley Lyons and drummer Erik Hawkins were recognized for outstanding solos, and the rhythm section—Zeke Dodson on guitar, Briell King on piano, Isaac Zora on bass and Erik Hawkins on drums—and the sax section—Olivia Gaines, Sydney Henwood, Jack Broer, Tanner Linton and Brian Schauer—were named outstanding rhythm and saxophone sections for the AA division. 

The band also was one of three out of more than 30 selected to compete for the Sweepstakes Award, the best band of the entire festival, regardless of division. HHS did not win this match, but it was an honor to be nominated alongside the winner, Mead High School of Spokane, and Hanford High School.

HHS also won the Outstanding Instrumental Department award for the AA division, an award given to the school with the highest combined scores for Jazz Band and Concert Band. HHS has won this award four times—in 2009, 2013, 2016 and 2018.

“This is a particularly special award for us,” McEnry said. “It shows that we are a well-rounded program with talented musicians throughout all bands.” 




Attached Media Files: The HHS Wind Ensemble competes at the CBC Band Festival. , The HHS Jazz Band competes at the Columbia Basin College Band Festival. , The HHS Jazz Band competes at the University of Portland Jazz Festival.

Hockinson students head to world robotics competition (Photo)
Hockinson Sch. Dist. - 04/17/18 9:43 AM
Team Mean Machine celebrates its Pacific Northwest Division robotics championship.
Team Mean Machine celebrates its Pacific Northwest Division robotics championship.
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A robot named Atlas is taking some Hockinson students—and their teammates from Camas and Washougal high schools—to Houston, Texas this week.

After winning the Pacific Northwest District FIRST Robotics Championship over spring break, Team Mean Machine emerged undefeated this year in district competition. Now the team, officially known as FIRST Robotics Team 2471, will spend Wednesday to Sunday in Houston competing with 400 other teams from around the world.

“People around the world have been watching our matches (online) and are expecting a lot from us, and I think we’ll deliver,” said team member and Hockinson High School junior John Lange.

Atlas the robot also has won the industrial design award in all three district meets this season, which were hosted at Wilsonville, Lake Oswego and Portland.

FIRST Robotics teams receive their rulebook at the beginning of January and are allowed seven weeks to build and program their robots. They prepare the machine to accomplish a variety of tasks, such as tossing blocks with accuracy and lifting other robots.

“The kids spend easily 15 to 20 hours a week in those seven weeks,” said Michelle Lange, a team chaperone and John’s mom.

Then the robot is boxed up until just before competitions begin, when the team has several hours to make tweaks.

John credits many factors for the team’s success this year:

“It’s partially because we’ve been around so long, and part of it goes to our sponsors and mentors constantly helping us learn and giving us resources to push our boundaries,” he said. “I think part of it is our dedicated student base. They give up being on the basketball team or other activities for robotics.”

The team, which has been active for 11 years, now has approximately 30 members from the three high schools and nearly three dozen sponsors that make their efforts possible. The HHS members who are headed to Houston are Kyle Abbas, Jordan Berg, Caelan Heimbuch, John Lange, Tyler LeDoux and Josh Martsolf.

Information about the team and Atlas is available at https://team2471.org/. Matches are livestreamed at www.thebluealliance.com. Team Mean Machine will be competing in the Turing Division.  




Attached Media Files: Team Mean Machine celebrates its Pacific Northwest Division robotics championship.

Cowlitz Co. & Lower Columbia (WA) Schools
Woodland High School selected as a National Model of Excellence as the Culinary Arts capture the minds of Woodland Public Schools students of every age (Photo)
Woodland Sch. Dist. - 04/16/18 4:00 PM
Kimberly Miller helps a Culinary Arts student prepare a squid for an upcoming calamari dish.
Kimberly Miller helps a Culinary Arts student prepare a squid for an upcoming calamari dish.
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Monday, April 16, 2018-Woodland, WA-Students throughout Woodland Public Schools learn how to prepare, cook, and serve food in a variety of classes, clubs, and events for students from third grade through high school.

In the past few weeks, Woodland High School was selected as a SkillsUSA National Model of Excellence; Woodland Middle School’s food services staff helped an eighth grader cook a recipe for the entire school; and Woodland Intermediate School students competed in the annual Future Chefs of America competition.

Woodland High School selected as a SkillsUSA National Model of Excellence from more than 17,000 chapters.

Woodland High School’s SkillsUSA program was selected as one of only 24 Models of Excellence from the organization’s more than 17,000 school chapters nationwide. Models of Excellence chapters are selected based on the demonstration of the intentional learning of personal, workplace, and technical skills outlined in the SkillsUSA Framework for Student Development.

In June, two finalists from Woodland High School’s team will travel to Kentucky where they will participate in on- and off-camera interviews, attend an awards dinner at the Kentucky Derby Museum, and be recognized at an awards ceremony in front of an audience of more than 16,000 students, instructors and business leaders.

“The National Model of Excellence is one of the highest awards bestowed on chapters by SkillsUSA which is among the largest student organizations for Career and Technical Education,” said Timothy W. Lawrence, Executive Director for SkillsUSA. “These select chapters define excellence across the board, serving as models for other chapters to emulate to strengthen their local programs.”

Kimberly Miller, a Career and Technical Education (CTE) Teacher and coach for the SkillsUSA team at Woodland High School, stresses the hard work of her team’s students as the reason for their success. “We always ask for feedback from the judges at SkillsUSA events so we can improve year-over-year,” Kim explained. “One of our returning teammates brought a lot of experience which really helped the team win; I’m so pumped and so excited for their success!”

Woodland High School’s SkillsUSA chapter will receive a grant of up to $4,000 from the program’s sponsor, Lowe’s Home Improvement. You can find out more about the SkillsUSA program by visiting their website at www.skillsusa.org.

Woodland Middle School serves an eighth grader’s chicken lasagna.

After eating lasagna for lunch one day, Ruth Richards, an eighth grader, asked Tonya Henderson, Woodland Middle School’s lead cook, if she could bake her family’s chicken lasagna recipe for a school lunch. “I thought it was a great idea to have a student involved with lunch preparation,” said Tonya. “We’re here for the kids and we want to cook what they want to eat!”

Ruth received permission from the school to prepare her chicken lasagna with the help of the cafeteria staff. “My friends and family gave me the idea to volunteer to make this recipe for my classmates because I love cooking,” she said. “I like how much fun it is to prepare and cook food, plus it can give you career skills for when you’re older.”

The recipe was a raving success with the students, with so many students selecting it for lunch that the cafeteria ran out. “I really love serving the food we prepare,” said Tonya. “I like seeing the looks on the kids’ faces and seeing those smiles!”

Woodland third and fourth graders compete in the Future Chefs of America event.

Third and fourth graders from Woodland Intermediate School competed in this year’s Future Chefs of America event by making their favorite Asian Fusion cuisine. Sodexo, Woodland Public Schools’ food services partner, organizes the event each year, featuring a different theme for the foods the students prepare. “We want to teach students healthy eating habits while also showing them that preparing food can be fun,” said Laura Perry, Nutrition Services Director for Woodland Public Schools. “This year’s event was so much fun that we’re opening the event to fifth graders from the middle school next year!”

High School students taking Culinary Arts classes volunteered along with school food services employees to help each competing student prepare their meal. Students prepared enough of their recipes for attending parents and community members to sample each recipe, as well as creating a special presentation plate. Chef Dave Williams, Sodexo's Regional Chef, helped each participant select from a variety of small vegetables and herbs to highlight the colors and presentation of their dishes.

Students made a variety of recipes including Element Sason by Joshua Castellonos, a third grader; Cucumber Sushi by Treb Lawley, a fourth grader; Asian Slaw with Peanut Dressing by Valentina Wood, a third grader; and this year’s winning dish – Cauliflower Power Fried Rice with Side Kick of Sausage by Laynie Comstock, a fourth grader.

“My mom’s an art teacher, so I really like the creativity that comes from experimenting with the way food looks and tastes,” said Laynie, this year’s winner who also participated in last year’s event. “I love being in the kitchen helping to make dinners at home with my sister and parents.” Laynie received a special prize basket including cooking supplies, her own utensils, and a variety of other culinary goodies. All participating students received special chef hats and cooking smocks used during the event as souvenirs.

The Importance of Culinary Arts and Career Technical Education (CTE).

Kim Miller teaches Woodland High School’s Culinary Arts classes. She emphasizes the importance of CTE classes which provide students with both career and life skills. “There’s a shortage in all CTE fields right now, so taking courses in any CTE program can teach students skills that can lead to very successful careers,” she said. “Even if my students don’t enter the Culinary Arts as a career, we all have to eat and we should always eat beautiful, healthy, tasty food!”

Kim particularly enjoys teaching students who have never tried to cook food before taking her class. “Some of my students have gone on to become professional chefs,” she said. Kim also encourages students to try foods outside their comfort zone. “One of our class rules is that you have to try everything you cook – if you don’t try a new food, you won’t know if you like it!”

Kim offers the following tip for anyone hesitant to try new food: “Always smell the food first before trying it,” she advised. “Smell is such an important part of eating; if you find the smell of a new food appealing, you’ll likely enjoy it!”

###




Attached Media Files: Kimberly Miller helps a Culinary Arts student prepare a squid for an upcoming calamari dish. , Laynie Comstock (right), fourth grader, won the Future Chefs of America event with her Cauliflower Power Fried Rice with Side Kick of Sausage recipe. , Third and fourth graders competed in the annual Future Chefs of America event. , Ruth Richards, an eighth grader (left), volunteered to cook her chicken lasagna recipe for the entire school, selling out the day it was served. , Kimberly Miller (far right) teaches Culinary Arts and other Career and Technical Education classes at Woodland High School while also coaching the school's SkillsUSA Team, recognized as a National Model of Excellence.

Private & Charter Schools - Portland area
St. Mary's Academy Students Win Three Garaventa High School Essay Awards (Photo)
St. Mary's Academy (Downtown) - 04/19/18 9:15 AM
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Portland, Ore.-- For the third year in a row, St. Mary’s Academy students received three of the five awards for the Garaventa Center Catholic High School Essay Contest. This incredible achievement demonstrates the intellect and talent of St. Mary’s Academy’s students as well as the school’s emphasis on integrating concepts of faith and spirituality into its curriculum.

The theme of the 2017-2018 Garaventa Center Catholic High School Essay Contest was “Notes to My 12-Year-Old Self” and was open to students in their junior year at St. Mary’s Academy. This essay contest was completely voluntary and students worked on these reflective essays during their own time. To encourage and support students in the writing process, the St. Mary’s Academy English Department held a special meeting to provide students with tools, information and examples to guide their work. Faculty members also made themselves available outside of class to provide feedback and support to help students be successful in this endeavor.

Students’ essays were judged by a faculty panel who selected four essays that would represent St. Mary’s Academy in this competitive essay contest. Once their essays were submitted, St. Mary’s Academy students’ work was judged against that of their peers attending Catholic high schools in the states of Alaska, Hawai’i, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington. Each student’s essay went through a blind judging process, meaning that individuals evaluating their work were not aware of the students’ names or school affiliation. This shows that the written works alone are enough to speak to the brilliance and writing abilities of each student.

“It is a great honor to have three recipients of this prestigious award for a third year in a row. This achievement demonstrates the talent and dedication of our students and their ability to reflect on complex spiritual and intellectual topics related to their lives,” said St. Mary’s English teacher, Sara Salvi.     

St. Mary’s proudly took home three out of the five awards granted to this year’s competitors. Madeleine Adriance and Abby Place received honorable mentions and a $250 prize for their essays entitled “Piece by Piece” and “Gain the Whole World” respectively. Katherine Bloch received one of two first place awards for her essay “Define Me?” along with a $500 prize. In addition to her award, Katherine Bloch will have her essay read by professional actors in a podcast that will be available on iTunes as well as the Garaventa Center’s website.

The Garaventa Center for Catholic High School’s Essay Contest is an annual competition that encourages participants to integrate faith and reason into a personal essay. St. Mary’s Academy applauds this year’s award winners for their excellence, talent and creativity in meeting this challenge.  

# # #

At St. Mary's Academy, We Believe. Located in the heart of downtown Portland, Oregon, St. Mary's Academy is the state's premier all-girls high school and the oldest continuously operating school. Founded in 1859 by the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary, St. Mary's Academy serves over 700 young women in grades 9-12. The school's college acceptance rate is 100% and SMA students achieve, excel and are recognized locally, regionally and nationally in academic fields, the arts, athletics, community services and extra- and cocurricular activities. www.stmaryspdx.org

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/86/113718/Garaventa_Awards.jpg

Organizations & Associations
Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Five in Canby
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 04/16/18 10:34 AM

Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on April 16, 2018, at approximately 8:10 a.m. in the 10000 block of New Era Rd. in Canby, Oregon. The fire affected five, including two adults, three children and pets.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.


Chess for Success celebrates 25 years with a Game Changer Luncheon (Photo)
Chess for Success - 04/19/18 3:53 PM
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Portland, OR – Chess for Success is a non-profit organization that teaches chess to children in high-poverty schools. Chess for Success would like to announce the Game Changer Luncheon annual fundraiser on April 26th at the Hilton Portland. The doors will open at 11:30, with the program starting at 12:00 p.m. Business and community leaders from Portland and beyond will be in attendance to support and celebrate the 25th Anniversary.

The keynote speaker is Shemia Fagan. Thanks to great Oregon schools, Shemia was able to put herself through college and law school. Today, Shemia is running to represent East Portland in the Oregon Senate. When Shemia isn’t fighting for issues that matter to Oregonians, she’s polishing her 1991 Oregon State chess championship trophy and passing on the tradition of chess to her children.

Richard Meeker, President of City of Roses Media Company, and Founder of Willamette Week’s Give!Guide will emcee the event. With a special guest appearance by Guadalupe Guerrero, Superintendent of Portland Public Schools.

The mission of Chess for Success is to help children develop the skills necessary for success in school and in life through learning chess. During the 2017-2018 school year, Chess for Success reached over 3,800 students in 78 school clubs in Oregon and Southwest Washington. Chess for Success also organizes the state chess tournament, and a variety of other tournaments. To find out more information about Chess for Success or to buy tickets to the event, visit their website at www.chessforsuccess.org.




Attached Media Files: 2018-04/1811/113746/IMG_0200.jpg , 2018-04/1811/113746/IMG_0165.jpg , Shemia Fagan

CREDC Appoints Max Ault as Interim President (Photo)
Columbia River Economic Development Council - 04/19/18 9:28 AM
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VANCOUVER, Wash. (April 19th, 2018) – At a regular meeting Thursday morning, the Columbia River Economic Development Council (CREDC) Board appointed Max Ault as Interim President beginning May 1st. The organization’s current President, Mike Bomar, will be transitioning to the Port of Vancouver, as their Director of Economic Development. Bomar has served as President since December of 2013.

Max Ault, currently the organization’s Executive Vice President, joined the team in 2014 as Business Development Manager, and has had increasing responsibilities in the organization over the past four years. including overseeing business growth initiatives, ranging from start-up assistance to major employer expansion projects, as well as representing the organization to the public, in addition to strategic partner and stakeholder groups when the President is not available.

“Max Ault has become synonymous with Economic Development in Clark County. His hard work and dedication to this community has earned him a strong reputation among our many private, public, and non-profit partners. We look forward to his leadership in continuing the strong momentum toward accomplishing the goals of our Economic Development Plan”, stated Casey Wyckoff, CREDC Board Chair.

“I’m honored and humbled by the opportunity to serve such a strong and engaged group of community leaders”, Ault said. “Our team depends on many others to make these plans work, and it’s great to feel the strong support for our mission.”

Ault will function as the chief executive officer (responsible for developing the Council’s strategic direction and work plan as adopted by the Board of Directors) and chief operating officer (responsible for implementing the Council’s work plan.) The President reports to the Board of Directors and is supervised by the Chairman of the Board and Executive Committee. Ault will serve as interim for up to 12 months while the Board determines the options for a permanent replacement.

A lifelong resident of Clark County, Mr. Ault holds a Bachelor’s degree in Public Affairs from Washington State University Vancouver and resides in Vancouver. Ault is a recipient of the General George C.Marshall Public Leadership Award, current participant in Leadership Clark County, and holds a number of civic leadership positions with area nonprofits and educational institutions.

About CREDC

The Columbia River Economic Development Council (CREDC) has served as the leading economic development organization for Clark County since 1982, connecting companies to the resources they need to succeed. As a nonprofit private-public partnership, we leverage the expertise and collaboration of over 150 actively engaged investors and strategic partners to advance the economic vitality of Clark County.

www.credc.org





Attached Media Files: 2018-04/3735/113721/CREDC_Appoints_Ault_as_Interim_President.pdf , 2018-04/3735/113721/Max_headshot_2017.jpeg

Evergreen Habitat for Humanity and Lowe's call on women across Vancouver, WA to get involved in their community during National Women Build Week 2018 (Photo)
Evergreen Habitat for Humanity - 04/16/18 10:09 AM
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VANCVOUER, WA (APRIL 16, 2018) – For the 11th year, Habitat for Humanity and Lowe’s are engaging women nationwide to work together to build Habitat homes during this year’s National Women Build Week from May 5-13. In preparation for the build week, Evergreen Habitat for Humanity and Lowe’s in Orchards are hosting “how to” clinics to equip volunteers with knowledge and skills in construction and home interior, basic safety techniques, and what to expect when building a Habitat home.

 

“We’re excited to partner with Lowe’s to educate, inspire, and empower women to advocate and help Habitat homeowners love where they live through building or improving an affordable place they can call home,” said Josh Townsley, Executive Director of Evergreen Habitat. “We want to engage women of all skill levels to join their friends, families, and neighbors to build up their communities and lend a hand to Habitat by signing up for build clinics so they will be equipped on the build site.”

 

“Lowe’s is in the business of helping people improve and maintain their homes,” said James Frison, Lowe’s Director of Community Relations. “Lowe’s Heroes have helped build hundreds of Habitat homes across the country and National Women Build Week is another chance for Lowe’s to reinforce our long-standing commitment to Habitat, Women Build, and communities where our employees and customers live and work.”

 

Clinics are being held nationwide for women interested in volunteering with Habitat homeowners and fellow women volunteers during this year’s National Women Build Week.

 

Locally, Lowe’s will host clinics in Vancouver, WA at 11413 NE 76th St, Vancouver, WA 98662 on the following dates:

 

How to Safely Use Hand and Power Tools and How to Install Insulation and Drywall

Date: April 27th            Time: 3pm-5pm            

AND

Date: April 28th            Time: 10am-12pm

 

To sign up for a clinic, volunteers should contact Evergreen Habitat for Humanity at 360-737-1759.

 

From May 5th through the 12th, local volunteers will work on Evergreen Habitat’s current construction site, McKibbin Commons. This is a ten home subdivision that Habitat is half-way through building. During National Women Build Week, local volunteers will be installing insulation and hanging sheetrock for two homes that are currently under construction.

 

National Women Build Week, a nationwide initiative created by Habitat for Humanity and Lowe’s in 2008, has brought together more than 117,000 all-women construction volunteers to build or repair homes with nearly 5,000 families over the past 10 years. This year, Lowe’s donated nearly $2 million to Habitat for Humanity to support the 2018 National Women Build Week, which is set to take place in 300 communities nationwide.

 

Habitat and Lowe’s encourage all women to volunteer—no construction skills or experience in Habitat builds necessary. To learn more about National Women Build Week, visit Habitat.org/wb.

 

Since Lowe’s national partnership with Habitat for Humanity began in 2003, the home improvement company has committed more than $63 million to Habitat and helped nearly 6,500 families improve their living conditions.

 

About Evergreen Habitat for Humanity

Since 1991, Evergreen Habitat for Humanity has worked to improve living conditions for low-income Clark County residents. People in our community, and all over the world, partner with Habitat for Humanity to build or improve a place they can call home. Habitat homeowners achieve the strength, stability, and independence they need to build a better life for themselves and their families. 

 

About Lowe’s in the Community

Lowe’s, a FORTUNE® 50 home improvement company, has a 60-year legacy of supporting the communities it serves through programs that focus on K-12 public education and community improvement projects. In the past decade, Lowe’s and the Lowe’s Gives Foundation together have contributed more than $300 million to these efforts, and for more than two decades Lowe’s Heroes volunteers have donated their time to make our communities better places to live. For the latest news, visit Newsroom.Lowes.com or follow @LowesMedia on Twitter.

 

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Attached Media Files: 2018-04/3419/113614/IMG_3449.jpg

Free Clinic of Southwest Washington Receives $2,083 from Group Health Foundation
Free Clinic of SW Washington - 04/18/18 9:07 AM

VANCOUVER, Wash., Apr. 18, 2018 - The Free Clinic of Southwest Washington has been awarded $2,083 from Group Health Foundation to support the clinic’s immunization program for children and adults.

In 2017, the Free Clinic’s immunization program served more than 870 uninsured children and adults in Southwest Washington.  The program helps save patients’ lives and protects others in schools and businesses by limiting the spread of infectious diseases.

“We greatly appreciate the support from Group Health Foundation,” says Barbe West, executive director of the Free Clinic. “Through the immunization program, our  volunteers provide essential care to improve health and enhance the quality of life for our patients.”

About the Free Clinic:

The Free Clinic of Southwest Washington provides free, compassionate, quality health care to children and adults who are otherwise unable to obtain such services. The Free Clinic offers medical, dental, vision and specialty care services from 500 volunteer professionals. The Free Clinic is funded by the local community, and all donations stay in Southwest Washington. For more information about the Free Clinic of Southwest Washington, visit our website: freeclinics.org.


Friends of the Carpenter to Host Presentation on Homelessness and Affordable Housing on April 29
Friends of the Carpenter - 04/16/18 11:36 AM

Vancouver, WA – Friends of the Carpenter (FOC) will host a presentation on homelessness and affordable housing, presented by Faith Partners for Housing, on Sun. April 29, 2:30 p.m. at FOC, 1600 W 20th St.

The event will include a 60-minute presentation by the local group Faith Partners for Housing to learn how people of faith are taking action to address homelessness and affordable housing issues in our community.  A question and answer dialog will follow.

“We hope members of the community can join us at the Friendship Center to hear more about what faith communities in Vancouver are doing today and can do in the future to address the critical shortage of housing in our community,” said Tom Iberle, executive director.

Refreshments will be served.  Please RSVP by April 23 to istine@friendsofthecarpenter.org" target="_blank">Christine@friendsofthecarpenter.org.

About FOC

Friends of the Carpenter was incorporated in Vancouver, WA in Oct. 1998 and began as a vision of a practical outreach of simple welcome and personal interaction between volunteers from the church and people living in poverty. Since the beginning, regular contact has been made with the homeless and poor persons of our community through woodworking events scheduled throughout the community and which, today, are held at FOC’s Friendship Center. Our mission: Friends of the Carpenter is a non-profit, faith-based day facility that provides safety, structure and purpose for vulnerable members of our community. Learn more at friendsofthecarpenter.org.

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Girl Scouts Honor Earth Day with Service Projects Throughout Oregon and SW Washington (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Ore. and SW Washington - 04/19/18 2:18 PM
GSOSW Campers
GSOSW Campers
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Girl Scouts Honor Earth Day with Service Projects Throughout Oregon and SW Washington

PORTLAND, Ore. – April 19, 2018 – This weekend, local Girl Scouts will roll up their sleeves and honor Earth Day by participating in service projects throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington.

“Through Girl Scouting, girls develop a lifelong respect and love for the Earth,” says Karen Hill, CEO of Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington. “Earth Day service projects, camping and other outdoor adventures with Girl Scouts help girls understand their relationship to the Earth, and the vital role they have in caring for it and conserving it for future generations.”

BEAVERTON, OR—Parks and Trails Preparation

Troop 40110 will help to inspect parks and trails throughout the Tualatin Hills Parks and Recreation District in order to identify areas that need attention before the summer season. Girl Scouts will also complete trash pickup during their inspections.

CLACKAMAS, OR—Cemetery Clean-Up

Girl Scout Service Unit 11 (Milwaukie, Clackamas and Gladstone, Oregon) will join SOLVE for Weekend Cemetery Clean Up at Clackamas Pioneer Cemetery in Clackamas, OR. Clean up will include debris, tree branches and blackberry removal and mulch spreading.

KLAMATH FALLS, OR—Clean-Up along the OC & E Woods Line State Trail

Girl Scout Service Unit 65 (Klamath, Lake and Harney counties) will join SOLVE, along with other community organizations, to do litter clean-up along the OC & E Woods Line State Trail in Klamath Falls. Girl Scouts will focus on the portion of the trail that spans from Washburn to Altamont.

SHERWOOD, OR—Garden Preparation and Spring Nature Mandala

Together with the Sherwood Rotary Club, members of Girl Scout Troop 45496 prepared and weeded the garden at the Our Table Cooperative. At 9 a.m. on the morning of April 22 (prior to an Earth Day Celebration), girls from Troop 45496 will create a spring nature mandala around the peace pole at Our Table Cooperative. Mandala-making is an ancient art form—traditionally, mandalas are bright and vibrant mosaics representing the universe, made from colored sand or rice. Nature mandalas, like those made by Troop 45496 will be made from found items including leaves, pine cones, shells, stones and flowers from the Girl Scouts’ own gardens. The Earth Day celebration at Our Table Cooperative takes place on April 22, from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

UMATILLA, OR and PASCO, WAImproving Habitat at McNary National Wildlife Refuge

On April 21, Girl Scouts from Service Unit 22 (Gilliam, Morrow, Umatilla and Wheeler counties in OR) will work with the Army Corps of Engineers to clean-up a local pond in West Park, part of the McNary National Wildlife Refuge in the Columbia Basin, minutes from the Tri-Cities of Washington (Kennewick, Pasco and Richland, WA). Local Girl Scouts—from the Pendleton and Hermiston areas of Oregon—will plant Coyote Willows and Cottonwood trees, remove invasive Russian Olive trees, and help make the wildlife area more habitable for the many species of animals that live there. In addition, they will remove debris and rubbish around the wildlife park. Afterwards, the girls will get to travel to the Bechtel National Planetarium, at Columbia Basin College, in Pasco, WA, to hear a special presentation about the life of trees.

STEVENSON, WA—Camp Arrowhead 70th Anniversary, Tree-Plantings and Trail Restoration

More than 80 Girl Scouts and their family members and friends will commemorate Earth Day and celebrate the 70th Anniversary of Camp Arrowhead, located in Stevenson, Washington—in the Columbia River Gorge area—with tree-plantings and trail restoration on April 21-22, 2018. Attendees are traveling from Englewood, CO; Boardman, OR; the Portland/Willamette Valley area; Westchester, CA; Seattle, WA; and Irrigon, OR to attend the celebration. Three trees—a Douglas Fir, a Mountain Hemlock and a Western Red Cedar—will be planted at Camp Arrowhead to help commemorate Earth Day as well as celebrate 70 years of outdoor skill-building, friendships and appreciation for nature.

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OUTDOOR PROGRAMMING

To learn more about GSOSW’s local outdoor programming, please visit: http://www.girlscoutsosw.org/en/camps/explore_our-camps.html. Additional information about outdoor programming in Girl Scouts, including 34 outdoor skill-building badges, can be found at: https://www.girlscouts.org/en/our-program/our-program/outdoors.html.

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON | GSOSW

Our council serves 13,955 girls in 38 counties with the help of over 10,000 volunteers. Girl Scouts is proven to help girls thrive in five key ways as they: Develop a strong sense of self; Display positive values; Seek challenges and learn from setbacks; Form and maintain healthy relationships; Identify and solve problems in the community. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.

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Attached Media Files: GSOSW Earth Day Service Projects Press Release , GSOSW Campers , Camp Arrowhead Fun Patch , Camp Arrowhead , Happy Earth Day Girl Scouts , Girl Scouts Fall Nature Mandala

Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington Commemorate Earth Day and Celebrate the 70th Anniversary of Camp Arrowhead, April 21-22, 2018 (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Ore. and SW Washington - 04/17/18 6:08 PM
Camp Arrowhead Celebrates 70 Years
Camp Arrowhead Celebrates 70 Years
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Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington Commemorate Earth Day and Celebrate the 70th Anniversary of Camp Arrowhead, April 21-22, 2018 (Photos and PDFs Attached)

PORTLAND, Ore. – April 18, 2018 – Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington (GSOSW) will commemorate Earth Day and celebrate the 70th Anniversary of Camp Arrowhead, located in Stevenson, Washington—in the Columbia River Gorge area—with tree-plantings and trail restoration on April 21-22, 2018.

Three trees—a Douglas Fir, a Mountain Hemlock and a Western Red Cedar—will be planted at Camp Arrowhead to help commemorate Earth Day as well as celebrate 70 years of outdoor skill-building, friendships and appreciation for nature. There will be a special dedication of one of the trees to a longtime GSOSW volunteer and special friend of Camp Arrowhead.

“Thousands and thousands of girls have built outdoor skills and made memories here,” says Allie Roberts, Outdoor Program Manager for Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington. “Whether a girl attended camp for one summer or came back year after year, her time on this mountain had an impact. She learned to care for the environment here. She made lifelong friends here. She discovered her own strengths and leadership potential here. Those lessons last.”

That lasting impact will continue this summer, when more than 340 Girl Scouts will experience archery, climbing, canoeing, white water rafting, llama trekking, hikes up Dog Mountain and other outdoor adventures.

ARROWHEAD SPRING 2018 FAMILY/TROOP WORK PARTY—April 21, 2018  [Registration is now closed.]
On Saturday, April 21, 2018, more than 100 volunteers will help prepare Camp Arrowhead for the summer camp season. Activities will include cleaning, installing furniture, sweeping and more.

“More than 100 volunteers--Girl Scouts and their family members and friends--will work together to help prepare Camp Arrowhead for the Summer camp season,” says Eileen Skidmore, Volunteer with Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington. “This is a special place for many of us – 3 generations of my family have camped at Arrowhead and we love working to help preserve it.”

[Registration is now closed.]

CAMP ARROWHEAD 70TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION—April 22, 2018  [Registration is now closed.]

WHO:          80+ community members, camp alumni, camp staff alumni, Girl Scouts and their family members and friends.

WHAT:        An event to commemorate Earth Day and celebrate the Camp Arrowhead 70th Anniversary, featuring slide shows, camp sing-alongs, tree-plantings and trail restoration as well as activities such as rock-climbing, archery, canoeing and hiking.

FOOD:       Sandwiches, salads, chips and refreshments will be provided and there will be cake for the celebration.

WHEN:      Sunday, April 22, 2018 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

WHERE:   Camp Arrowhead, Stevenson, WA 97648

[Registration is now closed.]

INTERESTED MEDIA—PLEASE R.S.V.P.

Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington’s Director of Program, Sarah Brown, and Outdoor Program Manager, Allie Roberts, as well as Girl Scouts, Girl Scout alumna and volunteers, will be available on-site for media interviews at Camp Arrowhead on the day of the events (April 21-22, 2018).

Interested media should R.S.V.P. in advance by emailing communications@girlscoutsosw.org.

ABOUT CAMP ARROWHEAD
Camp Arrowhead, located in Stevenson, Washington, is open to all girls entering grades 1-12, no camping or Girl Scout experience required. Programs range from classic camp (swimming, campfires and cookouts) to specialty programs in water sports, hiking and trekking. Families can visit www.girlscoutsosw.org/camp to see available programs or sign up. Financial assistance is available.

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OUTDOOR PROGRAMMING

To learn more about GSOSW’s outdoor programming, please visit: http://www.girlscoutsosw.org/en/camps/explore_our-camps/camp_arrowhead.html

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON | GSOSW

Our council serves 13,955 girls in 38 counties with the help of over 10,000 volunteers. Girl Scouts is proven to help girls thrive in five key ways as they: Develop a strong sense of self; Display positive values; Seek challenges and learn from setbacks; Form and maintain healthy relationships; Identify and solve problems in the community. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.

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Attached Media Files: GSOSW Earth Day and Camp Arrowhead 70th Anniversary PRESS RELEASE 04 18 2018 , Program for GSOSW Earth DAy and Camp Arrowhead 70th Anniversary 04 22 2018 , Camp Arrowhead Celebrates 70 Years , GSOSW Camp Arrowhead Commemorative Fun Patch_Alone , GSOSW Camp Arrowhead Commemorative Fun Patch , Happy Earth Day GSOSW

Oregon organizations oppose House farm bill (Photo)
Oregon Food Bank - 04/19/18 8:51 AM
2018-04/620/113714/Partners_for_a_Hunger_Free_Oregon.jpg
2018-04/620/113714/Partners_for_a_Hunger_Free_Oregon.jpg
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Harsh time limits on food assistance would increase hunger in Oregon

Organizations across Oregon are calling on U.S. Representatives to reject a Farm Bill that was passed yesterday by the U.S. House Agriculture Committee.

The bill dramatically increases the number of SNAP participants subject to harsh time limits, including underemployed parents with children over 6 years-old, and adults up to age 60 facing career changes due to shifts in the economy.

 “Taking away food assistance from people struggling to find work is cruel, and incompatible with Oregon’s values,” said Annie Kirschner, Executive Director for Partners for a Hunger-Free Oregon.  “It’s wrong and we will not stand for it. The bill would increase hunger in Oregon and across America by punishing millions of people by taking away or lowering SNAP benefits.”

 “We know that people using SNAP are doing everything they can to provide for their families,” said Susannah Morgan, CEO of Oregon Food Bank. “As a mother myself, it’s difficult for me to think about parents losing the SNAP benefits they count on to help feed their children—especially while living under the stresses of poverty.”

If harmful SNAP cuts are implemented, private charities like Oregon Food Bank simply could not make up the difference. According to a Feeding America analysis, SNAP provides 12 meals for every 1 meal that Feeding America’s national network of food bank provides.

The bill cuts $23.1 billion from Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, commonly known as food stamps) benefits over the next 10 years. SNAP helps 1 in 6 Oregonians have enough to eat during tough economic times. The majority of SNAP participants are children, seniors, and people with disabilities.

Congress must recognize that large numbers of their constituents, in every part of the country, are struggling—in urban, suburban, and rural areas especially. We must help people rise out of hunger and poverty by increasing the number of well-paying jobs that provide real opportunity and stability for people, and increasing the amount of assistance available through SNAP, not cutting and restricting access to food.

Groups are calling on Congress to oppose this harmful bill and instead, work on a bipartisan basis to reduce hunger in Oregon and across the United States of America.

 

Archdiocese of Portland

“Jesus called us to feed the hungry and show special concern for those who are poor. In the story of the Last Judgment, Jesus reminds us that one of the fundamental measures of our lives will be how we cared for people in need: "For I was hungry and you gave me food" (Mt 25:35).

When faced with tens of millions still unsure about how they will put food on the table, robust funding of SNAP and other that feed hungry families must be prioritized. For they were hungry and Congress ensured that they were fed.”

 

Keith Thomajan, President and CEO, United Way of the Columbia-Willamette

“Growing pressures on vulnerable and working-class families make it very hard to meet daily basic needs in our region. We know that 53% of Oregonians getting SNAP are families with children and that this support plays a critical role in stabilizing these families. As a champion for children, United Way of the Columbia Willamette is working to end the effects of poverty. Let’s not add another barrier for kids and families by limiting access to food assistance.”

 

Robin Stephenson, Bread for the World Oregon

“Work is the surest way out of hunger. However, the work requirements and benefit cuts proposed in the House version of the Farm Bill will not reduce hunger or poverty. As written, the bill would create greater hardship for Oregonians already struggling to put food on the table. Bread for the World strongly opposes changes to SNAP that would put millions of vulnerable Americans at risk of hunger. We encourage Congress to work toward a bipartisan Farm Bill that will help end hunger in Oregon, our nation, and around the world.”

 

Juan Carlos Ordóñez, Communications Director, Oregon Center for Public Policy

“This bill attacks one of the nation’s most important anti-poverty programs, which protects millions of Americans from hunger,” said “This bill will make life even harder for Americans who toil in low-paying jobs with irregular hours and little or no benefits.”

 

Mike Wenrick, Executive Director, Zenger Farm

“At Zenger Farm we care deeply about families and their ability to access nourishing food. The current version of the farm bill will take SNAP benefits from millions of families, jeopardizing food security, increasing social and economic stress and further perpetuate diet-related chronic disease. We must speak up to ensure we continue to support farmers and families through a common sense farm bill.”

 

Jaime Arredondo, Executive Director, CAPACES Leadership Institute, Board Member, PCUN

 “Chairman Conaway’s 2018 farm bill is a disgrace to humanity. Having food assistance is a basic right for all human beings no matter your circumstances. We already have a significant hunger problem in a nation full of abundance, ironically. Instead of taking away food from people, we should work towards eradicating this problem. I've benefited from the SNAP program as a child. I'll never forget what it felt to go to the grocery story with my mother when she would receive SNAP funds. It felt like the grocery story was mine. Like I could try anything. Abundance. I think every child deserves that.”

 

Beverlee Potter, Executive Director, FOOD for Lane County

“In Lane County the economy continues to improve, yet many people are still struggling with low wages and very high housing and childcare costs. Stripping away basic food assistance from working families is like pulling the rug out from under them while they are already focusing on improving their livelihoods”

 

Additional Resources:

Analysis by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities on the House Farm Bill proposal

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Attached Media Files: 2018-04/620/113714/Partners_for_a_Hunger_Free_Oregon.jpg , 2018-04/620/113714/OFB_logo_full_color.jpg

Portland Children's Museum Promotes Animal Care Through Vet for a Day
Portland Children's Museum - 04/16/18 4:40 PM

Portland Children’s Museum Promotes Animal Care Through Vet for a Day

Banfield Pet Hospital® Sponsors Vet for a Day

 

PORTLAND, Ore. – Banfield Pet Hospital® is the presenting sponsor of Portland Children’s Museum’s Pet Month in May, including the Vet for a Day certification program on Sunday, May 20 from 10 a.m.–2 p.m.

 

The Vet for a Day certification program will promote the work and compassion required to take loving care of our pets, which children have been learning about in the Museum’s Pet Hospital exhibit since inception. This exhibit highlights the important role that pets play in the lives of families in an effort to foster compassion and empathy for animals. 

 

On May 20, children are invited to visit each Pet Care Station around the Museum to learn how to care for pets large and small through hands-on activities and engagement with local Banfield veterinarians and staff. Stations include learning about microchips, pet care trivia, and performing a stuffed animal wellness exam in the Pet Hospital. Children who visit all the stations will pass their Pet Care Exam and receive a Kid Vet Certificate! Additional activities include making your own plush toy pet, creating water dishes and pet toys in Clay and Maker Studios, and adding your picture to the Best Animal Friends wall. During the month-long celebration, the Museum will also offer pet-themed programming, including furry story times, animal masks, and birdhouse building.

 

In June 2010, Banfield created the Museum’s Pet Hospital exhibit to promote the health and wellness of pets. The exhibit features a grooming station and kennels, as well as veterinary tools to check the vital signs of “pets” (stuffed animals), review X-rays, and scan for microchips. 

 

About Banfield Pet Hospital®
Founded in Portland, Ore., in 1955, Banfield is the largest general-veterinary practice in the world. In 2007, Banfield joined the Mars, Inc. family of businesses, and today has more than 1,000 hospitals across the United States and Puerto Rico. More than 3,600 Banfield veterinarians are committed to providing high-quality veterinary care for over three million pets annually. Banfield's charitable arm, the Banfield Foundation, was established in 2015 as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the well-being of pets and communities. In 2017, Banfield Pet Hospital – including the work of the Banfield Foundation – was named among Points of Light's ‘Civic 50’ as one of the most community-minded companies in the U.S. Press seeking additional information are invited to contact the Media Hotline: (888) 355-0595.

 

About Portland Children’s Museum

Portland Children’s Museum is located at 4015 SW Canyon Road in Portland and is open daily from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Children 0-10 and their grown-ups discover a world of hands-on experiences designed to let their creativity and imagination soar at Portland Children’s Museum. Our mission is to develop innovative problem-solvers through playful learning experiences, and there’s no better place to have fun and learn at the same time! Explore nature in Outdoor Adventure, splash in Water Works, create in Clay and Maker Studios, and pretend play in The Market, Pet Hospital, and Theater--plus so much more. Come make, play, and share with us! 

 

LOCATION  In Washington Park across from Oregon Zoo; 4015 SW Canyon Road, Portland, 97221

HOURS  9 a.m.–5 p.m. daily 

ADMISSION  Museum members: Free | Under age 1: Free | Ages 1­–64: $10.75 | Ages 65+ and military: $9.75

CONTACT  503-223-6500 | portlandcm.org | facebook.com/portlandcm 

 

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Renderings of Academy Site Redevelopment Unveiled and Community Feedback Collected at Open House (Photo)
The Historic Trust - 04/17/18 7:30 PM
Southeast view of proposed Providence Academy site redevelopment
Southeast view of proposed Providence Academy site redevelopment
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/3818/113666/thumb_Proposed_Providence_Academy_Site_Redevelopment_Rendering.jpg

(VANCOUVER, Wash. April 17, 2018) – Tonight The Historic Trust and Marathon Acquisition & Development held a public open house to receive input and feedback on redevelopment of the Providence Academy site.  Over 100 people attended the meeting in the Providence Academy ballroom. “The fact that so many people took time out of their busy schedules to engage with The Trust on the history of the Providence Academy and to share their comments on the proposed plan for redevelopment is what makes our community so strong.” stated Mike True, CEO & President of The Historic Trust.

Since acquisition of the 7-acre Providence Academy site in 2015, The Historic Trust has worked to preserve the Academy Building and position the site for redevelopment. The Trust has made significant progress in renovating the Providence Academy Building and extensively engaging with the development community to prepare a program to redevelop the site into a mixed-use urban campus. The Trust selected Marathon Acquisition & Development based on a shared vision and aligned principles.

The Trust’s Mission, Vision and Guiding Principles continue to guide The Trust through site redevelopment steps that are compatible with The Trust Board’s long-term vision for the property.  The community engagement initiative launched by The Trust includes stakeholder engagement, an Academy Advisory Team, and tonight’s public open house. The Academy Advisory Team will develop recommendations for plan revisions based on stakeholder, public, Clark County Historic Preservation Commission (CCHPC) and City of Vancouver feedback.

The renderings shown at tonight’s open house of the proposed development are available on The Trust’s website: www.TheHistoricTrust.org. True stated, “We hope those who could not join us tonight will take the time and provide feedback on our website. Together our community will realize a true vision for the Providence Academy Building; that it is preserved and enhanced as a place of commerce and year-round center of activity for all.”

______________________

About The Historic Trust: The Historic Trust is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization with a mission to inspire civic pride and economic vitality through education, celebration, and preservation of our community's history. Learn more at thehistorictrust.org.

About Marathon: The Marathon family of companies is comprised of three vertically integrated entities specializing in development, construction, and management of multi-family real estate. Marathon’s control of every facet of a development provides a unique ability to manage quality and cost.  As a long-term holder Marathon is motivated to build high quality apartments that enrich communities.  Marathon was formed in 1979 as an affiliate of Simpson Housing, a large multi-state apartment development company.  Since inception Marathon has developed, constructed, and managed thousands of apartments and ancillary commercial space. 

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Attached Media Files: Southeast view of proposed Providence Academy site redevelopment

Public Open House on April 17th, 2018 Redevelopment of the Providence Academy Site
The Historic Trust - 04/16/18 10:42 AM

The Historic Trust invites the community to join in a public open house on April 17, 2018 from 4:00pm to 7:00pm to provide input and feedback on redevelopment of the Providence Academy site.  The open house will be held in the Providence Academy ballroom with an opportunity to engage with the Trust on the history of the Providence Academy and the guiding principles established for the site.  The public will also have an opportunity to review and comment on the proposed plan for redevelopment of the western portion of the site.

Since acquisition of the 7-acre Providence Academy site in 2015, the Historic Trust has worked to preserve the Academy Building and position the site for redevelopment. The Trust has made significant progress in renovating the Providence Academy Building and extensively engaging with the development community to prepare a program to redevelop the site into a mixed-use urban campus. The Trust selected Marathon Acquisition & Development based on a shared vision and aligned principles.

For those who cannot make it to the Open House, renderings of the proposed buildings will be online at www.TheHistoricTrust.org starting Wednesday, April 18th. Comments will be accepted online through that website as well.

The community engagement initiative launched by the Trust includes stakeholder engagement, an Academy Advisory Team, and a public open house. The Academy Advisory Team will develop recommendations for plan revisions based on stakeholder, public, Clark County Historic Preservation Commission (CCHPC) and City of Vancouver feedback.

______________________

About The Historic Trust: The Historic Trust is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization with a mission to inspire civic pride and economic vitality through education, celebration, and preservation of our community's history. Learn more at thehistorictrust.org.

About Marathon: The Marathon family of companies is comprised of three vertically integrated entities specializing in development, construction, and management of multi-family real estate. Marathon’s control of every facet of a development provides a unique ability to manage quality and cost.  As a long-term holder Marathon is motivated to build high quality apartments that enrich communities.  Marathon was formed in 1979 as an affiliate of Simpson Housing, a large multi-state apartment development company.  Since inception Marathon has developed, constructed, and managed thousands of apartments and ancillary commercial space. 


Science on Tap Portland -- Music and the Aging Brain: A Discussion and Concert
Via Productions - 04/16/18 1:53 PM

Date: Thursday, May 3, 2018

Time: Event at 7 p.m. (doors at 6 p.m.)

Location: Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie Ave, Portland, OR

Cost: $15 general admission, $8 student with ID, All Ages

Food & Drink: Beer, wine, & sodas, as well as pizza and snacks

Event Website: https://www.viaproductions.org/events/aladdin_may_3_music/

Our brains undergo numerous changes that affect memory, motor, and sensory functions as we age. Many of these changes are amplified in diseases like Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. Could music limit the effects of aging and neurodegenerative diseases? Join Dr. Larry Sherman, a musician and Professor of Neuroscience at the Oregon Health & Science University, and singer/songwriter Naomi LaViolette as they explore how listening, practicing, and performing music influence the brain, and how these activities could impact brain aging and disease. They will also discuss Naomi’s work as a pianist, vocalist, arranger, and composer with Steven Goodwin, who suffers from Alzheimer’s, and the Saving His Music project, which has received prominent coverage in national and local news. 

Join us and enjoy a multi-media presentation that combines live music and visuals with discussions about cutting edge science. Both Dr. Sherman and Ms. LaViolette will be performing live music ranging from Debussy, Leonard Cohen, and the Beatles to original pieces by Ms. LaViolette and Steven Goodwin

 


Science on Tap is a science lecture series where you can sit back, drink a pint, and enjoy learning. Listen to experts talk about the science in your neighborhood and around the world. You don't have to be a science geek to have fun--all you need is a thirst for knowledge! For more information on this event or about Science on Tap, visit Via Productions.