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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Sat. Oct. 20 - 5:43 am
Police & Fire
Free Child Safety Seat Clinic
Beaverton Police Dept. - 10/17/18 7:00 AM

On October 20, 2018, Beaverton Police Department, along with Safe Kids Coalition of Washington County and Kuni Auto Center, will be offering a free child safety seat clinic.

The clinic will run from 9:00 AM to 11:30 AM at the Kuni Auto Center located at 3725 SW Cedar Hills Blvd. Beaverton, OR 97005.

Motor-vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death nationwide for children ages 1-12. In 2015, 1,353 children under age 9 were injured in Oregon traffic crashes; six children died. It's estimated that car seats may increase crash survival by 71% for infants under 1 year old, and by up to 59% for toddlers ages 1-4. Booster seats may reduce the chance of nonfatal injury among 4- to 8-year-olds by 45% compared to safety belts used alone.

For more information about the proper fit of a child safety seat please visit https://www.nhtsa.gov/equipment/car-seats-and-booster-seats.

No appointment is necessary so please just drop in. Arriving early is recommended as we sometimes have more vehicles than we can accommodate during the event timeframe. Each car seat check will take approximately 30 minutes.

##BPD##

 




Attached Media Files: Press release

Limited Edition BPD Pink Patches For Sale (Photo)
Beaverton Police Dept. - 10/15/18 3:48 PM
photo
photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1412/118789/thumb_Barkley_pink_bike.jpg

Beaverton Police Department is now selling limited edition pink patches with all proceeds going towards Breast Friends.
Each patch will be sold for $10, with $9 supporting Breast Friends.

Community members can buy patches at the Beaverton Police Department from Lieutenant Keith Welch or Public Information Officer Jeremy Shaw during daytime business hours. Outside daytime hours please call 503-526-2261 and ask for Lt. Welch or Officer Shaw.


Breast Friends was founded in 2000 by two breast cancer survivors and is local to Washington County. Breast Friends ensures no woman goes through cancer alone.
Breast Friends is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization and all sales will include a receipt for tax purposes. There is no limit on the number of patches that can be bought.

##BPD##

 

 




Attached Media Files: Press Release , photo , photo , photo

Canby Fire replaces totaled Battalion Pickup with new vehicle (Photo)
Canby Fire Dist. - 10/17/18 1:44 PM
2018-10/864/118869/IMG_0858[1].JPG
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/864/118869/thumb_IMG_0858[1].JPG

 

October 17th 2018

During this summer’s extreme fire season. Canby Fire was called by Clackamas County to lead a task force to Morro County to fight the wind driven Substation Fire. While at this fire in the dust and smoke the Battalion 360 vehicle was involved in a head on collision our vehicle was a total loss.

Through our auto insurance Canby Fire was able to purchase a Ford F150.

 After several months waiting and having radios, sirens, lights, computers and other emergency equipment installed we are proud to say it is in service and able to respond to the needs of our community.    




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/864/118869/IMG_0858[1].JPG , 2018-10/864/118869/IMG_0864[1].JPG , 2018-10/864/118869/IMG_0861[1].JPG

Canby Fire responds to our first Chimney Fire as temperatures drop (Photo)
Canby Fire Dist. - 10/15/18 9:26 AM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/864/118755/thumb_IMG_0842[1].JPG

Last night Oct 14th Canby Fire responded to a chimney fire on Castro rd in rural Canby. When firefighters arrived there was not only a chimney fire but the cedar shake roof had also caught on fire causing substantial damage.  

Please read the following tips to know when you have a chimney fire and how to avoid one 

One question we often get from homeowners concerned about chimney fires is “How can I tell if my chimney is on fire.” We normally respond with these important indicators provided by the Chimney Safety Institute of America: 

Loud cracking and popping noise 
Flames shooting from your chimney 
Low, loud rumbling noise that sounds like a freight train or airplane overhead 
A lot of dense smoke 
An intense, hot smell 

If you’re in doubt about whether your chimney is on fire, dial 911 immediately. There are products on the market that claim to help extinguish a chimney fire by sucking out oxygen. 

We can’t vouch for the effectiveness of these products, nor do we think a fire raging in your chimney is the time to test them out. Dialing 911 is always your safest move. 

Preventing a Chimney Fire 

Now that we’ve explained some of the warning signs of a chimney fire, here are a few simple tips you can use to prevent one from starting in your home. 

Hire a professional and certified chimney sweep to inspect and clean your chimney annually. 

Cleaning your chimney is not a DIY job. There is little margin for error with the consequences putting you and your family at risk. 

Only burn dry or cured wood. Burning wet or uncured wood leads to more creosote buildup in your flue. It’s that creosote buildup that usually leads to the ignition of a chimney fire. 

Don’t burn garbage in your fireplace. Not only does garbage contain chemicals that are dangerous to inhale, it can also lead to more dangerous buildup of combustible materials in your chimney. 

Keep your fireplace clean. Never start a fire on top of a bed of coals or ash for a previous fire. Doing so can cause the fire to burn even hotter than normal, sparking a chimney fire. 

Install a smoke alarm and carbon monoxide detector close to your fireplace.




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/864/118755/IMG_0842[1].JPG

Sheriff's Office coordinates nationwide domestic-violence warrant sweep
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/18/18 4:02 PM

On Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018, the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office Domestic Violence Enhanced Response Team (DVERT) worked with agencies throughout Oregon -- as well as agencies across the country -- to arrest persons with outstanding family-violence warrants. Locally, they made 18 arrests during the sweep, on a variety of charges. 

Nationwide, the 16th Annual Family Violence Apprehension Detail included over 300 county sheriffs' offices, police departments, probation departments, and community agencies from 29 states. All agencies served outstanding arrest warrants -- with charges ranging from harassment to murder. 

In Clackamas County alone, by 10 p.m. Wednesday, this massive enforcement effort resulted in the arrests of 18 men and women brought to the Clackamas County Jail on existing arrest warrants on a variety of charges, some of them DV-related. A PDF of Clackamas County mugshots and arrest charges (ranging from strangulation to assault to other crimes, including theft and DUII) secured during yesterday's sweep is attached. (These figures may be updated as more agencies report in.) 

LOCAL PARTICIPATION STATS: 

PARTICIPATING CLACKAMAS COUNTY AGENCIES: 

  • Canby Police Department
  • Clackamas County Sheriff's Office
  • Clackamas County Community Corrections / Parole & Probation
  • Gladstone Police Department
  • Happy Valley Police Department
  • Lake Oswego Police Department
  • Milwaukie Police Department
  • Molalla Police Department
  • Oregon City Police Department
  • U.S. Marshals Service
  • West Linn Police Department
  • Wilsonville Police Department

CLACKAMAS COUNTY RESULTS: 

  • 269 warrant attempts 
  • 18 arrests at this writing
  • 59 local law-enforcement members participating 

This collaborative effort, commonly known as the SWEEP, helps raise awareness of the problem of family and domestic violence in our communities. It also demonstrates to offenders that they will be held accountable for their violence. 

In a pre-SWEEP briefing at the Public Safety Training Center, Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts spoke to law-enforcement personnel and the media, along with Clackamas County Senior Deputy District Attorney John Wentworth. 

For more information on DVERT, click here: 
http://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/dvert.html 

For more information on Domestic Violence Awareness Month, click here: 
http://www.nrcdv.org/dvam/ 

To see the SWEEP invite sent to law-enforcement agencies across the country earlier this year, click here: 
http://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/domesticviolence.html 

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE STATS 

• According to a 2010 report from the CDC: 
http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/nisvs_executive_summary-a.pdf 

• More than 1 in 3 women (35.6%) and more than 1 in 4 men (28.5%) in the United States have experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime. 

• Among victims of intimate partner violence, more than 1 in 3 women experienced multiple forms of rape, stalking, or physical violence; 92.1% of male victims experienced physical violence alone, and 6.3% experienced physical violence and stalking. 

• Nearly 1 in 10 women in the United States (9.4%) has been raped by an intimate partner in her lifetime, and an estimated 16.9% of women and 8.0% of men have experienced sexual violence other than rape by an intimate partner at some point in their lifetime. 

• About 1 in 4 women (24.3%) and 1 in 7 men (13.8%) have experienced severe physical violence by an intimate partner (e.g., hit with a fist or something hard, beaten, slammed against something) at some point in their lifetime. 

• An estimated 10.7% of women and 2.1% of men have been stalked by an intimate partner during their lifetime. 

• Nearly half of all women and men in the United States have experienced psychological aggression by an intimate partner in their lifetime (48.4% and 48.8%, respectively). 

• Most female and male victims of rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner (69% of female victims; 53% of male victims) experienced some form of intimate partner violence for the first time before 25 years of age. 

• Nearly 3 in 10 women and 1 in 10 men in the United States have experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner and reported at least one impact related to experiencing these or other forms of violent behavior in the relationship (e.g., being fearful, concerned for safety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, need for health care, injury, contacting a crisis hotline, need for housing services, need for victim's advocate services, need for legal services, missed at least one day of work or school). 

Other information: 

• According to Bureau of Justice Statistics, on average, more than 3 women a day are murdered by their husbands or boyfriends in the United States. 

• In 2008, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published data collected in 2005 that finds that women experience 2 million injuries from intimate partner violence each year. Also, nearly 1 in 4 women in the United States reports experiencing violence by a current or former spouse of boyfriend at some point in her life. 

• A 2007 study states that 15.5 million children in the United States live in families in which partner violence occurred at least once in the past year, and 7 million children live in families in which severe partner violence occurred. 

• Children who witness domestic violence are more likely to attempt suicide, abuse drugs and alcohol, run away from home, and engage in teenage prostitution. 

• According to the Oregon Department of Health and Human Services, a survey of more than 85,000 Oregon women showed that 1 in 10 women experienced intimate-partner violence in the five years preceding the survey. Also, the estimated costs of intimate partner violence in Oregon exceed $50 million each year. 

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/624/118907/2018DVWarrantSweep.pdf

UPDATE -- ADDITIONAL DESCRIPTION OF PERSON OF INTEREST: Wilsonville PD responds to Friday-night shooting at Memorial Park; suspect at large; tips sought (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/15/18 5:01 PM
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UPDATE (Monday, Oct. 15) -- ADDITIONAL DESCRIPTION OF PERSON OF INTEREST

Additional description of the person of interest in today's just-released forensic sketch (attached):

  • Hispanic male
  • 17-18 years of age
  • Around 5’8” 
  • Chubby face, light brown skin
  • Black hair, spiked
  • Brown eyes, manicured-looking brows
  • Wearing long-sleeved, light-colored shirt, jeans, and white Vans-style shoes

EARLIER (Monday, Oct. 15) -- SKETCH OF PERSON OF INTEREST IN OCT. 12 SHOOTING

Our Forensic Imaging Unit sketch artist has completed a composite sketch of a person of interest in the Friday, Oct. 12 shooting at Memorial Park. The sketch is attached.

Investigators continue to ask anyone with information on the shooting to contact the Sheriff’s office Tip Line -- by phone at (503) 723-4949 or by using the online email form at https://web3.clackamas.us/contact/tip.jsp . Please reference CCSO Case #18-027997.


EARLIER (Oct. 13, 2018) -- Wilsonville PD responds to Friday-night shooting at Memorial Park

Please reference CCSO Case #18-027997

At approximately 9:55 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 12, 2018, deputies contracted to Wilsonville Police responded to a reported shooting at Memorial Park (8100 SW Memorial Dr. Wilsonville).

Deputies arrived at the scene and were able to quickly locate a 21-year-old male who had been shot two times. Deputies rendered First Aid until paramedics arrived a short time later.

The suspect had fled the scene and remains at large, but authorities do not believe the suspect represents a danger to the public at this time.

The victim was transported to a local hospital and admitted to the Intensive Care Unit. At this writing he is being treated for gunshot wounds to arm and abdomen and is listed in stable condition.

Detectives and our Crime Scene Investigation (CSI) Unit responded to the crime scene to gather evidence. Detectives are also interviewing the victim at the hospital.

SKETCH COMING; TIPS SOUGHT

Detectives have enlisted the services of our Forensic Imaging Unit sketch artist, and will be releasing a composite sketch of the suspect [UPDATE: SKETCH IS OF A PERSON OF INTEREST] in the near future.

Investigators are asking anyone with information about the shooting or who were in the area of Memorial Park around 9:55 p.m. Friday night to contact the Sheriff’s office Tip Line -- by phone at (503) 723-4949 or by using the online email form at https://web3.clackamas.us/contact/tip.jsp . Please reference CCSO Case #18-027997.

Three Clackamas County cities -- Happy Valley, Estacada, and Wilsonville -- contract with the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office to provide municipal police services.

[END]

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/624/118737/18-027997_Sketch.JPG

MEDIA OPPORTUNITY: Clackamas County Sheriff's Office hosts 'Drive with a Cop' Oct. 20 during National Teen Driver Safety Week (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/15/18 10:44 AM
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'Drive with a Cop' promotional video (.m4v format): 
https://www.dropbox.com/s/1qz5fci3pihaw0d/2018%20DWC%20Promo.m4v?dl=0 

The Clackamas County Sheriff's Office will host the 4th Annual "Drive with a Cop" on Saturday, Oct. 20 at Portland International Raceway (1940 N Victory Blvd, Portland, OR 97217) from 10 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The event takes place during National Teen Driver Safety Week. 

Media outlets are invited to attend. To set up interviews at Drive with a Cop, contact Event Coordinator Kim Lippert at 503-413-1762 or t@clackamas.us">klippert@clackamas.us

"Car crashes are a leading killer of young people nationwide," said Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts. "This is our opportunity to make a difference and help save lives." 

At "Drive with a Cop" teen drivers will receive top notch training from law enforcement officers statewide who are also trained driving instructors. Teens will learn how to handle their car in all kinds of conditions and take part in a variety of activities outside the car to learn about the dangers of driving distracted or impaired.

The event also employs virtual reality, "Impaired Goggles" simulating intoxication, and other tech aimed at teaching young people about the dangers of driving impaired and distracted. There will also be a "Crash Reconstruction" presentation with CCSO forensic crash analyst Deputy Bryon O'Neil.

Teens will also hear from speakers impacted by car crashes, including Carrie Higgins, who lost her daughter Maddi in a high-speed car crash on June 8, 2014. Higgins has become a safe teen driving advocate -- and tells her story in hopes of empowering other teens to make good decisions while driving and as a passenger in the car.

To watch a video about "Maddi's Story," produced by the Sheriff's Office with Carrie Higgins, click here:
https://youtu.be/mFu6TWRdu5I

Photos from previous "Drive With a Cop" trainings are attached to this release. 

Drive with a Cop is made possible through a partnership between the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office and Oregon Impact, along with a generous grant from State Farm

The event is sold-out for 2018. Learn more at http://DriveWithACop.com

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/624/118758/DriveWithACop-WEBHEADER2018.jpg , 2018-10/624/118758/DWC3.jpg , 2018-10/624/118758/DWC2.jpg

Backyard Burn Season Delayed
Clackamas Fire Dist. #1 - 10/15/18 12:08 PM

Clackamas Fire District #1, in conjunction with the Oregon Department of Forestry and all Clackamas County fire agencies, will continue to delay the opening of the Backyard Burn Season, which will prohibit the burning of backyard debris. The current fire danger level will remain at High due to dry conditions and a lack of significant rainfall.

Oregon Department of Forestry will evaluate conditions daily, but until a significant amount of rainfall occurs over a period of several days, the backyard burn season will remain closed.

For updated information, citizens can call the Burn Information Hotline at: 503.632.0211, visit our website at www.clackamasfire.com, or visit the Fire District’s social media outlets.

                                                                                           ###


Community alert: Firefighter Imposter
Clark Co. Fire Dist. 6 - 10/19/18 2:54 PM

Clark County Fire District 6 wishes to inform the community of an individual posing as a firefighter conducting “fire inspections”.

Last night near midnight a man reportedly entered a Hazel Dell area senior citizen assisted living center wearing a shirt witnesses say appeared similar to a T-shirt belonging to Clark County Fire District 6.

Witnesses claim the man said he was a firefighter and wanted access to perform a fire inspection, however employees felt the man was an imposter due to the fact that he arrived in the middle of the night.

Deputies from the Clark County Sheriff’s Office were called, but the imposter left by the time the authorities arrived.

Residents need to know that Clark County Fire District 6 would never send an individual to do fire inspections in the first place, as that is the function of the Fire Marshal’s office. And all Fire District employees carry identification confirming their employment with the Fire District.

Anyone with suspicions about an individual posing as a firefighter should call 9-1-1.


Burn ban in Columbia River Fire & Rescue and Scappoose Fire Districts
Columbia River Fire & Rescue - 10/16/18 3:36 PM

Press release regarding backyard burn ban attached




Attached Media Files: Burn ban 10.2018

Early morning rollover accident sends one to hospital (Photo)
Cowlitz 2 Fire and Rescue - 10/14/18 7:58 AM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/3738/118742/thumb_MVA2.jpg

Kelso, Wa- Firefighters from Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue responded to a rollover motor vehicle accident Sunday morning at 01:17 near the intersection of Norwood Dr. and Old Pacific Hwy.  The sixteen year old female driver explained that she had fallen asleep at the wheel, lost control of the car, and wrecked off the road.  She was extricated from the passenger car by firefighters and was taken to Peace Health St. John’s Medical Center, by a Cowlitz 2 medic unit, for lower back pain and other minor injuries.  Cowlitz County Sheriff deputies also responded to the call.  The patient’s grandmother was notified by authorities of the incident.  No other injuries were reported.   




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/3738/118742/MVA2.jpg , 2018-10/3738/118742/MVA1.jpg

Downtown Portland Homicide Remains Unsolved After Eight Years - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #10-44 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 10/18/18 8:00 AM
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The Portland Police Bureau, in cooperation with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for your help in solving a homicide that occurred in October 2010 at Southwest 1st Avenue and Sheridan Street.

On Thursday October 21, 2010, at approximately 8:00 a.m., Portland Police officers responded to a bus shelter at Southwest 1st and Sheridan to assist medical personnel with a deceased male. Officers arrived and found 50-year-old Donald Ray Polk dead of apparent stab wounds. Homicide detectives were called to the scene to begin an investigation into Polk's death.

"Pokey", as he was known to his friends, is believed to have been living on the streets at the time of his death.

There is no suspect information in this case.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip: Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2018-10/5183/118866/Donald_Polk_ODL_Photo.jpg

Reward Offered to Help Solve a Gresham Armed Robbery - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #18-33 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 10/16/18 9:12 AM
2018-10/5183/118811/CS-18-33_Suspect.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/5183/118811/thumb_CS-18-33_Suspect.jpg
The Gresham Police Department, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to solve an armed robbery.

On August 18, 2018, around 7:05 a.m., a man armed with a handgun entered Rounders Bar at 1509 Northeast 181 Avenue and demanded money. The suspect fled the area with an undisclosed amount of cash.

The man is described as 6-feet-2 inches to 6-feet-5-inches tall, 250-280 pounds, wearing a black hoodie and a mask.

Surveillance images and video are being released to aid in this investigation. Video surveillance may be viewed at https://youtu.be/FHzY-K_xq7M

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip: Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2018-10/5183/118811/CS-18-33_Suspect.jpg

Quick Stop on Out of Control Burn Pile Saves 3 Homes (Photo)
Dallas Fire & EMS - 10/14/18 7:54 PM
2018-10/5192/118746/EBAA482B-CAA6-4CC9-8807-935CE36B11F6.jpeg
2018-10/5192/118746/EBAA482B-CAA6-4CC9-8807-935CE36B11F6.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/5192/118746/thumb_EBAA482B-CAA6-4CC9-8807-935CE36B11F6.jpeg

Just before 3 pm on Sunday afternoon SW Polk Fire responded to a high risk grass fire off of Highway 22 near Highway 51, about 5 miles west of the City of Salem. Approximately 30 fire personnel from SW Polk, Dallas Fire & EMS, Polk Fire Dist #1, Salem Fire and Oregon Department of Forestry responded to assist in containing the fire. The fire, which started out as a burn pile, got away from a property owner due to the dry conditions and high winds. One injury was reported by a homeowner who was attempting to protect his property from the fire. The property owner was evaluated and treated on scene by EMS personnel. Approximately 10 acres were burned and three homes were threaten. It took firefighters about an hour to get the fire under control. Amity Fire moved up to cover the SW Fire response area.




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/5192/118746/EBAA482B-CAA6-4CC9-8807-935CE36B11F6.jpeg , 2018-10/5192/118746/96101E31-DCEB-450F-94E1-52D9BD34FBC7.jpeg , 2018-10/5192/118746/19683506-700D-40ED-9F67-DA724F3751DD.jpeg , 2018-10/5192/118746/402B9DB8-DFFC-4680-91A7-00A59BD21BEF.jpeg , 2018-10/5192/118746/40CA9E64-0266-4716-9F05-F85D227888E1.jpeg , 2018-10/5192/118746/36B9A1AB-625B-4C3B-B48B-DC0FA4D23399.jpeg

Nationwide request for publicity concerning missing and endangered 13-year-old girl
FBI - Oregon - 10/18/18 4:38 PM

Note: While there is no indication that 13-year-old Jayme Closs is in Oregon, the FBI is pushing this information out across the country with the thought that she could be anywhere at this time. The FBI is requesting that local media publicize her missing poster and related information and that the public post this information on their own social media platforms.

On Monday, October 15, 2018, at 12:53 AM, a 911 call was received from Barron, Wisconsin. Upon arrival, law enforcement officials found two adults deceased, and their 13-year-old daughter, Jayme Closs, missing. Closs is now considered endangered. If you have any information regarding the whereabouts of Jayme Closs, or if you have had contact with Closs, please contact the Wisconsin Department of Justice Child Abduction Response Team tipline at 1-855-744-3879. You may also contact your local FBI office.




Attached Media Files: Jayme Closs - FBI Missing Poster

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Payroll Phishing Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 10/16/18 10:00 AM
TT - Payroll Phishing Scams - GRAPHIC
TT - Payroll Phishing Scams - GRAPHIC
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Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: Building a digital defense against payroll phishing scams.

The FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center is out with a new warning about fraudsters who are targeting your paycheck via direct deposit. Any worker can be affected by this scam – but the industries getting hit the hardest include education, healthcare and commercial airway transportation.

Here’s what happens: the bad guy uses your work login info to get into your employer’s HR system to replace your direct deposit information with his own.

It starts when an employee receives an email that looks just familiar enough that he doesn’t question it too much. The email includes a link or web address that the user clicks on. Once he clicks, he will be directed to a fraudulent site or portal where the victim will be asked to enter his work credentials to confirm his identity. The bad guys use that login ID and password to change the employee’s direct deposit information in the company’s files. Often, the fraudsters even change other account settings in the system, preventing the victim from receiving an email warning that changes have been made to his account.  

Here’s how employees can avoid being scammed:

  • Make sure you verify with your employer that a suspicious email is valid. Send it to your office’s HR or IT departments for confirmation.
  • Keep an eye out for any misspelled words, odd phrasing and poor grammar. These could be indications that the email is coming from elsewhere in the world.
  • If the email includes any links to web pages, hover your mouse over the link and confirm that the URL is exactly the same as that used by the payroll company. Don’t click if you are not 100% sure.

Here are some steps that businesses can take to protect their employees:

  • Teach your employees what a phishing scam is and how to avoid it.
  • Require that login credentials used for payroll purposes differ from those used for other purposes, such as employee surveys.
  • Use two-factor authentication on sensitive systems and information.
  • Create protocols that require additional scrutiny to banking changes that appear to be requested by employees.

Iin the end, a little extra hassle in the short term may prevent a big headache in the long run. As always, if you have been victimized by a cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

###




Attached Media Files: TT - Payroll Phishing Scams - AUDIO File , TT - Payroll Phishing Scams - GRAPHIC

Two Fires in Westen Washington County Caused by Burn Piles (Photo)
Forest Grove Fire & Rescue - 10/17/18 7:49 PM
Lee Road Fire
Lee Road Fire
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1797/118885/thumb_17357DBE-0416-42E0-9C6A-9D4FE83105F6.jpeg

This afternoon Western Washington County fire departments responded to two separate brush fire that were both caused by out of control burn piles.

The first fire occurred just before 1pm on NW Wilson School Road near the community of Gales Creek, it was contained to about an acre in size and burned between rows at a vineyard. The fire in Gales Creek was handles by Forest Grove Fire & Rescue with assistance from Banks Fire District, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue and Oregon Department of Forestry.

The second fire occurred around 3:15pm on SW Lee Road in the community of Cherry Grove, it was contained to 2 acres in size. The property owner was transported to a local hospital from smoke inhalation trying to extinguish the flames. The fire in Cherry Grove was handled by Gaston Fire District with assistance from Forest Grove Fire & Rescue, Cornelius Fire Department, Yamhill Fire District and Oregon Department of Forestry.

At this time, burning in Washington County is allowed, but we highly suggest residents not burn until it is safe to do so. Use due diligence if you choose to burn, follow safety rules. Those safety rules are have a bare dirt break around the burn pile, never leave a burn pile unattended(EVER), always have a shovel and hose readily available. 




Attached Media Files: Lee Road Fire , Lee Road Fire , Wilson School Road Fire

Gresham Police Identify Rider Injured in Collision
Gresham Police Dept - 10/16/18 2:26 PM

Gresham, Ore.— On Oct. 14 at 5:57 p.m. police responded to a collision involving a vehicle and a motorcycle on Highway 26 at SE 11th St. Police and medical personnel arrived on scene and found that the motorcycle rider was seriously injured. He was transported to the hospital by helicopter with life threatening injuries.

According to witnesses, the vehicle was travelling eastbound on Highway 26 and began turning on to SE 11th St. The motorcycle was travelling westbound and struck the vehicle.

The driver of the vehicle is identified as Katherine Lankins, 33, of Gresham. The motorcycle rider is identified as Phillip Reed, 19, of Gresham. Lankins remained at the scene and cooperated with the investigation.

Anyone who witnessed or has information about the collision is asked to call the Gresham Police at 503.618.2719.


Man hospitalized after being shot in Hood River
Hood River Police Dept. - 10/19/18 11:06 AM

Date:            October 19, 2018

Topic:           Salem man hospitalized after shooting

From:            Neal Holste, Chief of Police

For Release:  Immediately

A man was transported by Life Flight to a Portland area hospital after being shot early Friday morning.  The Hood River Police responded to the area of 930 Sieverkropp Dr. at 12:04am where neighbors reported hearing several gunshots.  When Police arrived they found Demarea Brisco, 32, Salem, OR on the ground with at least one gunshot wound.  The Hood River Police Department is being assisted in this investigation by the Hood River County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon State Police and Wasco County Sheriff’s Office.  No arrests have been made at this time and this incident is still under investigation.  The Hood River Police Department is asking anyone with information regarding this matter to contact Detective Anthony Frasier (541)387-5257. 

 


Keizer Fire District Receives Highest Marks for Financial Management (Photo)
Keizer Fire Dist. - 10/17/18 11:09 AM
2018-10/1800/118861/audit_2017.jpg
2018-10/1800/118861/audit_2017.jpg
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Keizer, OR, The Keizer Fire District Board of Directors received their annual audit review per Oregon Budgeting Law according to standards of the Governmental Accounting Board in the United States by generally accepted accounting standards known as (GAASB). The annual audit is part of the required financial responsibilities of governmental agencies using public funds and Keizer Fire District takes it very seriously. 

The annual audit was completed by Aldrich, an Independent CPA Auditing Firm, and provides for an accounting of all the financial dealings for the fire district transactions for an entire year.   Through all the review and analysis for KFD financials, Aldrich issued an “Unmodified Opinion” the highest level of government accountability of the fire district financial practices. Josh Bailey of Aldrich reported that “Compliance was Spot-On.”

While the Board mused about the dry subject of government accounting, Board President, Chet Patterson, himself a CPA, recognized the highest level of achievement in Government Financial Accounting.  “Keizer Fire District has a long record of this achievement for the fiducial responsibility to the citizens they serve.”  




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1800/118861/audit_2017.jpg

School Threat
Kelso Police Dept. - 10/17/18 11:47 AM

Today, at approximately 0800 hours Hunting Middle School recieved an anonymous threat that there was a weapon in a locker at school.  Huntington Middle School Staff locked the school down and contacted the Kelso Police Department.  Kelso Police, along with assistance from Washigton Community Corrections Officers and Washington State Patrol secured the school and conducted a thorough search.  Students and staff were bused to the Expo Center in Longview where the Kelso School District conducted standard reunification of students/parents.

The investigation is ongoing and further details are not being released at this time.  The Kelso Police Department would like to thank the parents for thier patience, the students for thier great conduct and the Kelso School District Staff for thier assistance.

 

 


Special Reunion for Lebanon Family and Firefighters (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 10/15/18 2:03 PM
Captions notes in press release.
Captions notes in press release.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1191/118779/thumb_Cidni.jpg

The members of Lebanon Fire District’s C-Shift had a very special visit on Friday afternoon. Cidni O’Brien, 12, was playing in a soccer game at Lebanon’s Cheadle Lake Park on Saturday April 21st when she began to feel sick. After scoring a goal she told her step-father Tim Faulconer, who was officiating the game, that she wasn’t feeling well. Tim recommended she go see her coach, who took her out of the game to rest.

What followed was a traumatic experience for Cidni, her family, and the fans gathered at the game. Cidni sat down on the sideline and then rolled over onto the ground, unresponsive. Bystanders didn’t know if at the time, but Cidni was suffering a cardiac arrest which had stopped her heart. Cidni’s mother Nikki is a registered nurse at Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital, and as she sat across the field she watched her daughter slump to the ground. As the coach called out for help, Nikki Faulconer raced across the field to assess her daughter who was unconscious, not breathing, and had no pulse. Nikki immediately began CPR while bystanders called 911.

Firefighters and paramedics from the Lebanon Fire District were in house at Station 34, located less than a quarter mile from the soccer fields. They were dispatched at 2:36 pm and arrived on scene in just 37 seconds. Crews then had to navigate through dozens of soccer players and fans to find the actual scene of the emergency. Once with Cidni, medics quickly initiated Advanced Life Support care which included intravenous access, defibrillation, and cardiac monitoring. Medics also performed a Rapid Sequence Intubation, in which a patient is chemically paralyzed for the placement of an endotracheal tube which allowed responders to breathe for Cidni.

Cidni was transported to Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital where she was further stabilized before being flown to OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital in Portland two hours later. Following the incident, the grim reality of the situation began to set in on the fire and EMS crews. “Almost every responder on that call was a parent.” noted LFD Division Chief Jason Bolen. “Serious pediatric calls normally involve a heightened level of stress, and in this case Cidni was very close in age to a number of our own kids which really hits home once the call is over.” First responders went through a Critical Incident Stress Debriefing with LFD Chaplain Brian Gosser following the call, which is typical for incidents with serious emotional impact on responders.

In the days following her flight to Portland Cidni was diagnosed with a rare heart defect called anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery, or AAOCA. The defect restricts blood flow to the heart and ultimately led to her cardiac arrest. Cidni underwent open heart surgery on April 30 to correct the defect, but the risk for arrhythmia and another possible cardiac arrest will remain. That risk meant that Cidni would need to have an AED (Automated External Defibrillator) near her at all times, and AED’s come with a significant price tag. Cidni’s pediatrician, Dr. Dana Kosmala, reached out to the Lebanon Fire District to ask about a loaner AED while the family figured out how to navigate the purchase of their own unit. “When Dr. Kosmala called me to ask if LFD could loan out an AED for a few weeks I thought, we can do better than that!”, said Chief Bolen. Bolen contacted LFD Lieutenant Russell Duerr who serves on the board of LFCAIRS, the Lebanon Firefighters Community Assistance and Initial Relief Service.

LFCAIRS is a non-profit organization which raises funds through donations and fundraising activities to support victims of house fires, traumatic circumstances, or catastrophic loss. “When I received the request from Chief Bolen I knew this was something that LFCAIRS could provide for this Lebanon family that would really help them out during a really difficult time.” said Lieutenant Duerr. In the matter of a few days the new AED was ordered and delivered to Cidni by Dr. Kosmala’s office. 

In the months since her incident Cidni has been focusing on her recovery and trying to get back into the normal routine of family life. While her condition may now limit her competitive sports participation, she looks forward to exchanging that for a horse someday.

It’s not often that responders get to follow up with their patients after the call. In most cases, responders will never know what happened to their patients once leaving the emergency room. That’s why last Friday was so special for the LFD crews when Cidni and her family walked through the doors at Fire Station 31. There were lots of smiles, stories, and even a few tears of joy. Both Nikki and Tim and the Lebanon Fire District continue to advocate for CPR instruction and how to use an AED in the event of another incident like Cidni’s. The fire district offers CPR/AED classes on a regular basis, and the Faulconers hope to see an AED installed at the soccer fields at Cheadle Lake Park.

“The stars really aligned that day so that Cidni had the best care possible from the moment she collapsed until she had her surgery.” notes LFD Battalion Chief Nick Tyler, who was the shift officer working on that April day. “It was a very special moment for us as responders to see her today, smiling and healthy!”.

A family friend has set up a Go Fund Me account for Cidni’s medical expenses. To view or donate, visit: https://www.gofundme.com/cidni039s-life-flight-fund 

For more information about CPR or AED courses, contact the Lebanon Fire District Fire & Life Safety Division at 541-451-1901.

Photo Attached: Top – Cidni O’Brien Middle(L-R) – Tim Faulconer, Lincoln Faulconer, Nikki Faulconer Lower(L-R) – Battalion Chief Nick Tyler, Firefighter Nick Unruh, Engineer Corey Knipstein, Lieutenant Brett Kibble, Student Intern Brett Doshier.

For HD Video of this and other LFD incidents, please subscribe to the Lebanon Fire District YouTube Channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjTxDBuPbD3DPAybCkCgEvg

For HD photos of this and other LFD incidents, please follow the Lebanon Fire District Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/LebanonFireDistrict/?ref=bookmarks

For updates on large scale incidents within the Lebanon Fire District, follow us on Twitter: @LebanonFD




Attached Media Files: Captions notes in press release.

LFD responds to house fire on South 9th Street (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 10/13/18 11:40 PM
Firefighters from Engine 34 check for extension into the attic space.
Firefighters from Engine 34 check for extension into the attic space.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1191/118740/thumb_Capture.JPG

On 10/13/2018 at 6:53 PM Lebanon Fire District responded to a house fire at 1960 South 9 th St. in Lebanon.  Upon arrival of the Battalion Chief the home was found to have fire in the structure with smoke and flames visible at the back of the house.  Engines and other apparatus from Lebanon responded to the scene but were hampered in their suppression efforts due to multiple propane tanks venting and ammunition that was involved in the fire. After it was safe to enter, crews  got a quick knock down on the exterior of the home, working to the inside of the home where the fire was extinguished completely.

It took seven fire apparatus and twenty firefighters to extinguish the blaze.  The cause of the fire was a generator used to supply electrical equipment located at the rear of the home. The occupants of the home were alerted to the fire by neighbors that saw the blaze and acted quickly to help the occupants get out.  There were no injuries reported.

Albany Fire assisted Lebanon by standing by while Lebanon’s crews were extinguishing the fire.

Attached Video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mlEgJlydXy0




Attached Media Files: Firefighters from Engine 34 check for extension into the attic space.

Tip of the Week for October 22
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/17/18 5:29 PM

You buckle up when you get in your vehicle. Make sure your pet is just as safe. Many dog owners let their dog run loose in an open truck bed, not thinking about the dangers. No matter how well-trained or coordinated you think your dog is, he or she can still fall or jump out of the back of a truck.

Oregon law requires a dog to be protected by a carrier or other restraint if transported on "the external part of a vehicle" on a highway.

A carrier or cage is most ideal, but if you use a leash or lead, make sure it is of a length that doesn’t allow the dog to go over the side. A two-point restraint works best to ensure the animal can’t jump or be thrown in the event of a sudden stop or collision.

If your pet travels inside the vehicle with you, remember that driving with any live animal on your lap presents a distraction and puts the pet, the driver, other passengers and other drivers at significant risk for a collision. A collision that would otherwise be preventable.

There are numerous pet-specific vehicle restraints that work with your existing seatbelts and can be purchased either online or in pet stores.

 

Our pets love to be on the go with us. Show them how much you care by always considering their safety whenever you take them on the road with you.

 

For more information and tips visit our website at: www.lincolncountysheriff.net

and like us on Facebook: Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office - Oregon

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/5490/118881/102218_-_Pet_Safety_on_the_Road.pdf

News release
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/15/18 3:05 PM

Pretrial Justice in Lincoln County is a newly established program which added its first defendants on Monday October 15, 2018.

Research indicates that harm can be done to defendants who are unnecessarily detained prior to trial.  Detained defendants can suffer loss of employment and housing, become separated from loved ones, experience family disruption, have higher odds of recidivism and receive harsher sentences than similarly situated defendants who are released from jail prior to their trial.  The goals of the Lincoln County Pretrial Justice Program are:

  1. Help courts make informed bail decisions, including nonfinancial options for release of appropriate defendants;
  2. Ensure that release options are realistic, enforceable, measurable and,
  3. Promote maximized pretrial release appearances, public safety and compliance outcomes.

The program operates on the presumption that individuals are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

Two pretrial specialist positions were approved through the Lincoln County Board of Commissioners to provide recommendations to the courts.  These recommendations will occur after the pretrial specialist has verified information pertinent to the defendant’s possible release.  If approved for release into this program, these defendants will be monitored by the pretrial specialist to ensure they are following the conditions as outlined by the Judge.  They will receive timely phone reminders prior to their court appearances.

The Lincoln County Jail currently has approximately 50% of the inmate population on pretrial status.  Through the process of building the pretrial justice program, the hope will be to reduce this percentage to then allow beds for those who need to remain in custody. 

“I am very excited Lincoln County is starting the Pretrial Justice Program” stated Sheriff Curtis Landers.  “The Pretrial Justice Program is an effective way to manage the inmate population in the jail to prevent overcrowding while making sure people show up for court and do not commit further crimes” said Sheriff Landers.

###

Prepared by:

Jamie Russell

Jail Commander

541-265-0701

jrussell@co.lincoln.or.us


Increase in phone scam attempts in Lincoln County
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/13/18 8:34 PM

On October 13, 2018 The Lincoln County Sheriff's Office received numerous complaints from citizens after they received phone calls from subjects identifying themselves as law enforcement officers. The subjects or callers reported to the citizens that a member of their family is in custody and needs funds to get out of jail and to transfer money electronically or onto gift cards for a quick release of the famiily member. 

Another citizen reported the subjects advised the citizen they had a warrant for their arrest and to turn themselves into City Hall. The citizen reported their Caller ID displayed a name they affilated with law enforcment. 

Many of the citizens who reported the suspicious calls reported the subjects used the names of  Lt. Whitman, Sgt. Chip Baker or Deputy Baker.

The Lincoln County Sheriff's Office wants to remind citizens to not give out personal, financial or other protected information over the phone. If you doubt the credibilty of any suspicious phone calls we encourage you to call your local law enforcement agency or stop by in person to discuss sensetive information. 

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and “Like” us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

 

#### 

 

Submitted by, 

Karl Vertner, Patrol Sergeant


Scam alert!
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 10/16/18 1:02 PM

Linn County Sheriff Jim Yon would like to advise our citizens of a scam technique that is currently on a rise in Linn County.

Citizens have been receiving telephone calls from a male who identifies himself as Captain Guilford.  The male tells you of an outstanding warrant and because you did not show up for court, you now have a federal subpoena.  The caller then asks you to get a pre-paid money card and pay your fine over the telephone.  The phone number is often a fake, as these phone numbers are forwarded through fake phone apps. 

Our office has received 2 calls today regarding this scam.  This is extremely alarming to our office, as we do have a Captain Guilford employed at the Linn County Sheriff’s Office.   Often names are pulled from public websites and used in these types of scams.   In 2015, another captain from our office was used in these types of scams.

We would like to remind our citizens that law enforcement will never ask for money over the phone or electronically.  These are well known scams, please do not give out any personal information to someone you do not know.  This includes your account numbers, Social Security number, names, addresses and date of birth. 

If you fall victim to one of these scams and have been defrauded money or personal information, please call your local law enforcement agency and report it immediately.   If you suspect a scam and have not been defrauded, we recommend reporting this activity directly to the United States Department of Justice at www.justice.gov/criminal/fraud/contact/report-fraud.html

 


Marion County Sheriff's Office to host annual Drug Take Back Event (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/17/18 2:00 PM
Drug Take Back Flyer
Drug Take Back Flyer
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1294/118871/thumb_DrugTakeBackOctober2018Roths.jpg

The 15th Annual National Prescription Drug Take Back Day is a safe, convenient and responsible way to dispose of prescription medication, while educating the general public about abuse and prescription medications.

During the last event held on April 28th, 2018, Residents of Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington turned in over 20 tons of expired or unwanted medications for safe and proper disposal at over 180 sites throughout the northwest.

This event is a great opportunity to turn in your expired and unwanted prescription medications. It helps prevent pill abuse and possible theft of these potentially dangerous medications in the wrong hands.

The Marion County Sheriff’s Office is participating as a collection site in partnership with the DEA. The date is set for Saturday, October 27 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. in the parking lot of Roth’s Fresh Market located on the corner of Lancaster Dr and Center St.

For a list of year-round prescription disposal boxes provided by local law enforcement agencies, visit the Marion County Health Department website at http://bit.ly/MCHDResources. The Marion County Health Department, a public safety partner, has ample information on drug and substance abuse prevention and available resources for adults, teens, and families.

The Drug Take Back event is a national program through the Department of Justice – Drug Enforcement Administration.




Attached Media Files: Drug Take Back Flyer

2nd robbery suspect arrested (Photo)
McMinnville Police Dept. - 10/18/18 7:27 AM
2018-10/1837/118890/Rocha_arrest.jpg
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On 10/17/18 at approximately 2210 hours, officers received reliable information that Judas Rocha (wanted on felony Burglary and Robbery charges) was at 201 SW Agee Street #27, McMinnville.  Officers responded to the residence and attempted to convince the occupants to exit the apartment. 

 

The occupants failed to comply and a search warrant was obtained to enter the residence and arrest Rocha on his outstanding felony warrants. 

 

On 10/18/18 at approximately 0145 hours, the search warrant was served on the residence and upon entry, Rocha was inside. Rocha was taken into custody and lodged at the Yamhill County Jail with a SRA of $240.000.00.

 

Two other occupants were located inside the residence. One of the other occupants was identified as Amarissa Morales, the renter of the apartment.  Morales was arrested for Hindering Prosecution and lodged at the Yamhill County Jail with a SRA of $7500.00.

 

The remaining occupant was interviewed and released at the scene without being charged.

 

The investigation was a cooperative effort involving officers from the McMinnville Police Department, Yamhill County Interagency Narcotics Team, Oregon State Police, Newberg/Dundee Police Department and Yamhill Police Department and deputies from the Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office.

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1837/118890/Rocha_arrest.jpg

Collision in 2400 Block NE Highway 99W
McMinnville Police Dept. - 10/16/18 2:56 PM

 

On October 16, 2018 at approximately 12:29 p.m., McMinnville Police and Fire Department personnel responded to a three vehicle collision on NE Hwy 99W in front of Big 5, McMinnville.

 

The collision involved a passenger vehicle, a commercial motor vehicle and a Yamhill County Transit Authority bus.

 

Based upon initial information, an El Dorado Yamhill County Transit Authority bus, operated by 54 year old rural McMinnville resident Reginald Steens, was stopped loading/unloading transit passengers at a designated stop at the location of occurrence.

 

A 2001 Peterbilt tractor operated by 31 year old rural Amity resident Bryce McKee and a 2001 Mercury Grand Marquis operated by 90 year old rural Dayton resident Ruth Sauer appeared to have collided and then both struck the transit bus as a result of the initial collision event.

 

At the time of the collision, there were 5 reported passengers on board the transit authority bus.

 

Based upon initial assessment, it appears that all involved operators/occupants escaped serious injury.

 

The collision remains under investigation by the McMinnville Police Department. If you should have any information in relation to the incident, contact Sergeant Steve Macartney at (503) 435-5622 or Steve.Macartney@mcminnvilleoregon.gov

 

The McMinnville Police Department was assisted by Oregon State Police and the Oregon Department of Transportation during the extended collision investigation.


Pursuit Ends When Suspect Car Crashes Into Detached Garage. (Photo)
Milwaukie Police Dept. - 10/18/18 9:03 AM
2018-10/1406/118892/20181018_064418773_iOS.jpg
2018-10/1406/118892/20181018_064418773_iOS.jpg
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Case #18-7325

On 10-17-18, around 11:00 p.m., Milwaukie Police attempted to stop a blue Honda Civic, near SE King Road and SE Bell Avenue, for having no license plates. When police activated their emergency lights, the vehicle sped off at a high rate of speed.

Milwaukie Police pursued the vehicle, which eventually crashed into a detached garage near SE 111th / SE Harold Street in Portland. No one was injured at the residence.

Both the driver and passenger fled the vehicle on foot, but were quickly apprehended with assistance from Portland Police.  After checking the VIN, Police learned the vehicle was listed as stolen out of Portland.

The driver of the vehicle, 34-year-old Scott Raymond Keast, was taken into custody for an outstanding warrant. He is facing charges of Unauthorized Use of a vehicle (UUMV), Felony attempt to elude, and possession of controlled substance (PCS-Meth).

The passenger, 28-year-old Destiny Keast, was released at the scene and is facing charges of possession of controlled substance (PCS-Meth).




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1406/118892/20181018_064418773_iOS.jpg , 2018-10/1406/118892/20181018_062857303_iOS.jpg , 2018-10/1406/118892/20181018_062917968_iOS.jpg

Newport Police Department New Non-Emergency Dispatch Telephone Number
Newport Police Dept. - 10/19/18 10:02 AM

Newport Police Department Publishes New Non-Emergency Dispatch Telephone Number

The Newport Police Department has a new public use, non-emergency dispatch telephone number (541) 574-5807.  This number will be unique to Newport Police dispatch requests for officer response and crime reporting of incidents that do not meet criteria for utilizing the 911 emergency line. 

The implementation of this unique Newport Police telephone number will allow our dispatch center, the Willamette Valley Communications Center (WVCC), to better serve Newport residents with efficient dispatching of Police resources.  This will provide our citizens with a direct line to WVCC for Newport Police response requests.  The direct line will provide additional detail of call volume and service levels WVCC is providing for the Newport Police Department.

To contact the Newport Police Department, please refer to the following:

  • Dial 9-1-1 for emergencies ONLY
  • 541-574-5807 – to report cold crimes, disputes, animal complaints, non-injury/non-blocking traffic crashes, and other incidents requiring officer response from the Newport Police Department.
  • 541-574-3348 – to contact Newport Police Records and Police Administration. Also refer to our website at www.newportpolice.net

The current non-emergency dispatch number, 541-265-4231, will remain in effect, however, the transition to the 541-574-5807 dispatch number for Newport Police dispatch services will begin immediately.


Klondike West Fire declared a conflagration
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 10/15/18 8:33 AM

Governor Kate Brown has declared the Klondike Fire, burning near Agness, a conflagration. The declaration cleared the way for the State Fire Marshal to mobilize firefighters and equipment to assist local resources battling the fire.

 

The Office of State Marshal’s Red Incident Management Team led by Chief Ian Yocum, and five structural task forces from Lane, Rogue Valley, Linn, Benton, and Marion counties will arrive early this afternoon.  Three task forces will be assigned to day shift and two will be working the night shift.

 

 A level 3 "GO" evacuation is in effect for the Oak Flats and Spud Road areas of the Agness community.

 

More information on evacuations is available at Curry County Emergency Services Facebook.

 


Multi vehicle crash on Hwy 35 - Hood River County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/17/18 4:50 PM
2018-10/1002/118880/Hwy_35-2.jpg
2018-10/1002/118880/Hwy_35-2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1002/118880/thumb_Hwy_35-2.jpg

Oregon State Police, Hood River County Sheriff's Office, ODOT and emergency personnel are on the scene of a multi vehicle motor vehicle crash on Hwy 35 at Central Vale rd.

One person has been transported to the hospital in Hood River.

Hwy 35 is closed in both directions.  Traffic is being diverted off of Central Vale road.

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1002/118880/Hwy_35-2.jpg , 2018-10/1002/118880/Hwy_35-1.jpg , 2018-10/1002/118880/Hwy_35_-3.jpg

UPDATE -----Semi Truck loaded with cattle crashes on I-84 - Union County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/16/18 7:21 PM
2018-10/1002/118829/IMG_3389.jpg
2018-10/1002/118829/IMG_3389.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1002/118829/thumb_IMG_3389.jpg

Investigation revealed that a 2012 Peterbilt semi truck, being operated by Shannon Dwinell (46) of Great Bend, KS, was westbound on I-84 when for unknown reasons left the roadway, struck the guardrail, and overturned.  

Dwinell sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

The stock trailer was loaded with 28 cattle, 5 died as a result of the crash.

 

Oregon State Police and emergency personnel are on scene of a single vehicle semi truck crash on I-84 near milepost 284 westbound.  

A commercial motor vehicle hauling cattle has struck a guardrail and flipped over on Interstate 84 - 2 miles west of North Powder.  

The operator sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Several cattle escaped and are loose on the freeway, unfortunately several cattle also died in the crash.

Investigation is continuing no more information to be released at this time.

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1002/118829/IMG_3389.jpg , 2018-10/1002/118829/IMG_3387.jpg , 2018-10/1002/118829/IMG_3383.jpg

Two vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 99W north of Eugene - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/16/18 8:59 AM
2018-10/1002/118809/IMG_0517_(2).JPG
2018-10/1002/118809/IMG_0517_(2).JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1002/118809/thumb_IMG_0517_(2).JPG

On Monday, October 15, 2018 at approximately 6:35 PM. Oregon State Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 99W near milepost 117 - approximately 2 miles north of Eugene.

Investigation revealed that a 2005 Toyota Prius, operated by Sandra Boynton (78) from Eugene, was attempting to turn left onto Hwy 99W from a private driveway.  Boynton turned in front of a northbound 2005 Ford Explorer, operated by Rebecca Weston (34) from Eugene.  

Boynton and her passenger Gail Purkerson (74) from Eugene both sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased at the scene. 

Weston and her juvenile male passenger received minor injuries.

Oregon State Police were assisted by the Lane County Sheriff's Office, Lane County Fire and ODOT




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1002/118809/IMG_0517_(2).JPG

Oregon State Police requesting public's assistance in waste of Deer #2 - Union County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/15/18 12:58 PM
2018-10/1002/118774/Woodland-buck.jpg
2018-10/1002/118774/Woodland-buck.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1002/118774/thumb_Woodland-buck.jpg

The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division is asking for the public’s help in locating the individual(s) responsible for shooting and wasting a mule deer buck near the Woodland snow park off of Hwy 204.  Woodland snow park is 16 miles west of the City of Elgin in the Umatilla National Forest.

On Sunday, October 7, 2018  an Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Trooper responded to a complaint of a buck deer that was shot and left to waste at the Woodland Snow Park. The dead buck was located approximately 70 yards from the parking lot on an old skid road.  The buck was visible from the parking area.  The Trooper confirmed the buck had been shot behind the front shoulder, with a rifle, and left to waste 

Anyone with information regarding this case is urged to contact OSP Trooper Davis through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677).

In addition, to either a preference point reward or cash reward offered below, the local Union/Wallowa County OHA chapter is offering an additional $500.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:
$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1002/118774/Woodland-buck.jpg

Oregon State Police requesting public's assistance in waste of Deer - Union County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/15/18 12:33 PM
2018-10/1002/118772/Elgin-buck#2.jpg
2018-10/1002/118772/Elgin-buck#2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1002/118772/thumb_Elgin-buck#2.jpg

The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division is asking for the public’s help in locating the individual(s) responsible for shooting and wasting a mule deer buck in the Mt. Emily Wildlife Management Unit near the City of Elgin in Union County. 

On Sunday, October 7, 2018 the Union County Sheriff’s Office received a report of a dead buck deer on South 11th Street near Birch Street in the City of Elgin.  The Deputy along with a Fish and Wildlife Trooper responded and located the buck dead and the meat spoiled. The buck was found to have been shot in the hindquarters with an arrow. The buck had been observed alive the day prior and a photo of him was taken by a resident.  

Anyone with information regarding this case is urged to contact OSP Trooper Davis through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677).

In addition, to either a preference point reward or cash reward offered below, the local Union/Wallowa County OHA chapter is offering an additional $500.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:
$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1002/118772/Elgin-buck#2.jpg , 2018-10/1002/118772/Elgin-Buck#1.jpg

Single Vehicle Fatal Crash
Polk Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/19/18 11:35 PM

On Thursday, October 18, 2018 at approximately 8:29 PM the Polk County Sheriff’s Office and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Maxfield Creek Rd near Storey Rd – approximately 13 miles south of Dallas near the county line.  \

 

The investigation revealed that a 2004 Nissan Titan, operated by Candelario Navarro Jr (37) from Salem, was traveling northbound on Maxfield Creek Rd.  As Mr. Navarro Jr was negotiating a curve in the roadway he lost control and left the roadway causing the vehicle to roll ejecting Mr. Navarro Jr.  Mr. Navarro Jr sustained fatal injuries as a result of the crash and was pronounced deceased at the scene.  Speed and alcohol are being investigated as factors in the crash.

 

The Polk County Sheriff’s Office was assisted by the Dallas Police Department, the Benton County Sheriff’s Office and the Polk County Fire District No. 1. 


Subjected Arrested for Murder following last Thursday's shooting south of Independence
Polk Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/16/18 5:00 PM

Today, October 16th, 2018, at about 3 pm, detectives from the Polk County Sheriff’s Office arrested 49 year old Darin E. Shaw on the charges of Murder and Manslaughter stemming from the shooting last Thursday that occurred in the 9000 block of Corvallis Rd, just south Independence. He was taken to the Polk County Jail without incident (no booking photo available at this time). The investigation is continuing. If anyone has information about this incident, please contact Detective Carballo of the Polk County Sheriff’s Office at 503-623-9251.

No further details are available for release at this time and any further requests for such information should be directed towards the Polk County District Attorney’s Office.

Original Release -

On October 11th, 2018 at about 8:38 pm, Polk County Deputies, with the assistance from the Independence Police Department responded to a residence in the 9000 block of Corvallis Rd on a reported shooting. After life saving measures were exhausted, 31 year old Joseph Sieg was pronounced dead at the scene from an apparent gunshot wound.

The Polk County Major Crimes Team was activated to help with the investigation. The team consists of detectives from every Polk County law enforcement agency and the Oregon State Police. An autopsy is scheduled for Monday, October 15th. The investigation is ongoing.


Portland Fire & Rescue Responds to a House Fire (NE Alberta & 12th Ave.)
Portland Fire & Rescue - 10/19/18 8:51 PM

This evening at 5:15pm Portland Firefighters responded to a house fire located in the area of NE Alberta & 12th Ave.  When crews arrived, they discovered large amounts of smoke coming from the first floor of the two-story home.   Crews were informed that two people live in the home, and upon the primary search, one of the residents, and elderly male, was located in the front room.  The victim was immediately transported to a local hospital with life threatening injuries. 

Firefighters reported that it was difficult to locate the seat of the fire due to the excessive amounts of items that were stored throughout the home.  It was reported soon after that the second resident was not at home. 

Crews are still on scene, and an Investigator is working to determine the cause of the fire.  There are no photos available of this incident.  Any updates on the loss and the cause will be posted as soon as they are received. 

 


Crews Extinguish Stubborn House Fire in SW Portland (Photo)
Portland Fire & Rescue - 10/14/18 8:23 AM
SW Moss Front of House
SW Moss Front of House
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/549/118743/thumb_PA142463.JPG

Correction-The previous release stated that "No one was found inside and injuries were reported". It has been corrected to say "No one was found inside and no injuries were reported" This was a typo.

10/14/2018-This Morning at 5:40 AM Portland Fire & Rescue crews were called to a house on the 2000 block of SW Moss St. On arrival firefighters noted heavy fire throughout the 1.5 story structure. Reports from neighbors indicated that the structure is currently vacant, however it's still important for crews to check for people trapped inside. Crews worked to extinguish the fire, while other's vented the dangerous fire gases by cutting a hole in the roof.

A large amount furniture and other belongings slowed the entry of fire crews. They stated that it appeared that the house was being used for storage. Firefighters made their way inside only to be pulled back by fire commanders as fire burning in the attic increased. This was made more dangerous by the fact that furniture and other heavy items were kept in the attic space. After crews knocked down the attic fire they were able to continue attacking the fire from inside.

No one was found inside the house and no injuries were reported. The fire was extinguished and an investigator was called to the scene to determine the cause of the fire. Cause and damage estimates will be added to this release when they are available.

PF&R asks that you take care when collecting and storing items. If it is difficult to move through your home normally, it will be much worse during an emergency. The dust and smoke from a fire or earthquake will make it much harder to breath, see and escape! Help us to keep you safe!




Attached Media Files: SW Moss Front of House , SW Moss Fire Damaged Window , SW Moss Fire Crews on Roof

UPDATE - Officer-Involved Shooting Investigation Underway in Southeast Portland
Portland Police Bureau - 10/19/18 11:31 PM
The Portland Police Bureau and the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office are conducting a joint investigation into this evening's incident that resulted in an officer-involved shooting.

Preliminary information indicates that this incident started at approximately 8:00 p.m. near the Johnson Creek Fred Meyer store when a Clackamas County Sheriff's Office deputy attempted to stop the driver in a stolen car. The suspect attempted to elude officers in the vehicle and eventually crashed near Southeast 89th Avenue and Gray Street, which is in Clackamas County.

The male suspect ran from the crash on foot, leaving a female passenger in the vehicle. Additional Clackamas County Sheriff's Office deputies, and a Portland Police Canine Unit officer responded to the area to assist in the search for the suspect.

At some point during the search, officers encountered the suspect and shots were fired. The suspect was injured by gunfire and was transported by ambulance to a Portland hospital for treatment. The suspect is expected to survive his injuries.

During the incident, a Portland Police Canine Unit officer was bitten by a Clackamas County K-9 (dog) and suffered non-life-threatening injuries. The officer was transported by ambulance to a Portland hospital for treatment.

The Portland Police officer and a Clackamas County deputy were involved in the shooting with the suspect, which occurred in the City of Portland.

The Portland Police Bureau will be the lead investigating agency on the officer-involved shooting portion of this incident.

No additional updates are expected to be released this evening.

The injured Portland Police officer will remain on paid administrative leave, per Bureau policy, until the completion of the investigation and Grand Jury.

The Portland Police Bureau's directive outlining the procedures followed after an officer-involved shooting may be found at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/article/656780

Following the Grand Jury, the Bureau may release additional information as appropriate.
As part of the use of force review process, the Bureau will conduct an internal review of the entire incident and the case will go before the Police Review Board (PRB), which is comprised of community members, Bureau members and representatives from the Independent Police Review Division.

Once the entire investigation and legal process is complete, the investigative files and any grand jury transcripts will be posted on the Bureau's Open Data page and can be found here: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/52175

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

The Portland Police Bureau is in the preliminary stages of an officer-involved shooting investigation in the area of Southeast 89th Avenue and Harney Street.

No additional details are available at this time.

The Acting Public Information Officer will be responding to the scene and interested media should stage on Southeast Harney Street, East of 82nd Avenue.

###PPB###

Shooting Investigation Underway in Southeast Portland - One Person Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 10/19/18 8:41 PM
On Friday October 19, 2018, at 7:32 p.m., East Precinct officers responded to the report of gunfire in the area of the 10100 block of Southeast Steele Street.

Officers arrived in the area and spoke to witnesses who reported hearing several gunshots in the area. No victims were located at the scene. At 7:45 p.m., a gunshot victim arrived at Portland Adventist Medical Center by private car. The victim was then transported by ambulance to a different hospital with serious injuries.

At this point in the investigation, there is no confirmed suspect information to share.

Anyone with information about this shooting is asked to call the Police Non-Emergency Line at 503-823-3333.

###PPB###

CORRECTION TO UPDATE - Shooting Investigation Underway in North Portland - One Person Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 10/19/18 3:54 PM
The victim in this morning's shooting is alive and is on life support. Due to a miscommunication, the Bureau reported earlier that the victim was deceased.

The Bureau regrets the error and will provide updates as soon as they are available.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW##

Detectives are continuing to investigate the circumstances of this morning's shooting in North Portland. The victim, a male in his 40s, is on life support at a Portland area hospital.

Anyone with information about this case is asked to contact Detective Anthony Merrill at 503-823-4033, anthony.merrill@portlandoregon.gov.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

On Friday October 19, 2018, at 9:58 a.m., North Precinct officers responded to the report of a shooting at North Rosa Parks Way and North Albina Avenue.

Officers and medical personnel arrived and located an adult male victim suffering from a gunshot wound. Passersby were providing medical aid to the victim prior to police and EMS arrival. The victim was transported by ambulance to a Portland hospital for treatment to life-threatening injuries.

Preliminary information indicates that the suspect is a Black male in his 20s, medium build, wearing gray or black clothing, and that he ran out of the area, last seen running northbound on North Mississippi Avenue. There are no indications that the suspect has remained in the neighborhood.

Detectives are responding to the scene to begin an investigation.

Traffic within a one block radius of the scene is blocked due to the ongoing investigation. Interested media may stage on North Albina Avenue, to the North of Rosa Parks Way.

The Acting Public Information Officer (PIO) is responding to the scene, ETA 45 minutes.

###PPB###

Acting Public Information Officer (PIO) Through Monday, October 22, at 7:00 a.m.
Portland Police Bureau - 10/19/18 8:00 AM
Sergeant Pete Simpson will be the Acting Public Information Officer (PIO) until Monday, October 22, 2018 at 7:00 a.m.

Sergeant Simpson will respond to media requests for information via email or media-only pager for emergent events.

###PPB###

Tavern Robbed at Gunpoint Early Friday Morning on SE Powell Blvd - No Injuries
Portland Police Bureau - 10/19/18 7:01 AM
On Friday, October 19, 2018, at 2:35 a.m., East Precinct officers responded to the report of a robbery at the Lay Low Tavern, located at 6015 Southeast Powell Boulevard.

Officers arrived at the tavern and learned three suspects entered the location wearing masks. The suspects directed patrons in the tavern to lie on the floor and demanded money, while two of the suspects reportedly brandished firearms and one possessed a taser. After obtaining an undisclosed amount of cash the suspects left the location without incident.

Responding officers searched the neighborhood but did not locate anyone matching the suspects' description.

At this time there are no suspect descriptions to provide the public.

There were no injuries reported as a result of this robbery.

Investigators with the Portland Police Bureau Detective Division's Robbery Detail will continue this investigation. Anyone with information about this incident is asked to contact the Robbery Detail at 503-823-0412.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information about this case or any unsolved felony crime may be eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,500.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###PPB###

63 Citations Issued During Tuesday #VisionZero Traffic Safety Mission on Identified High Crash-Areas (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 10/18/18 4:06 PM
Vision Zero
Vision Zero
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/3056/118908/thumb_Vision_Zero.jpg
On Thursday, October 18, 2018, members of the Portland Police Bureau's Traffic Division conducted Vision Zero traffic safety missions along Southeast Hawthorne Boulevard, Southeast Grand Avenue, Northeast 122nd Avenue, North Marine Drive, and Burnside Street

Officers focused on dangerous behaviors and the officers were free to make traffic stops on drivers, pedestrians and bicycle riders as they saw appropriate. The officers were encouraged to share information about the Vision Zero program during these contacts. As always, officers were allowed the discretion to issue citations, warnings or classes.

During this traffic safety mission, 63 citations and one warning was issued. Officers also offered traffic safety classes to eight motorists after they were stopped for traffic violations. A photo-radar van was utilized during this Vision Zero traffic safety mission and issued 49 of the citations. One motorist was cited for traveling 61 miles per hour in a 35 mile per hour zone on Northeast 122nd Avenue. Another motorist was cited after an officer observed the driver traveling 84 miles per hours in the 5300 block of North Marine Drive. This area of North Marine Drive has a designated speed limit of 40 miles per hour.

The Traffic Division will be conducting future enforcement missions as staffing allows.

The Portland Police Bureau is committed to working with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work towards reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Vision Zero

UPDATE: Deceased Person in Tuesday Morning Suspicious Death Investigation Identified (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 10/18/18 1:51 PM
Denorris L McClendon
Denorris L McClendon
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/3056/118810/thumb_Denorris_L_McClendon.jpg
The deceased man located Tuesday, October 18, 2018, on a bike path near Northeast 122nd Avenue and Northeast Siskiyou Street has been identified as 31-year-old Denorris L. McClendon of Portland.

Based on information gathered at this time in the investigation, there is not believed to be an immediate danger to the community in relation to this suspicious death investigation.

This remains an open investigation and there is no additional information to provide at this time.

Anyone with information about Denorris McClendon or this incident should contact the Portland Police Bureau Homicide Detail Detective Brad Clifton at 503-823-0696, Brad.Clifton@portlandoregon.gov or Detective Todd Gradwahl at 503-823-0991 or Todd.Gradwahl@portlandoregon.gov

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

###PPB###

On Tuesday, October 16, 2018, at 7:23 a.m., North Precinct and East Precinct officers responded to the bike path near Northeast 122nd Ave and Northeast Siskiyou Street on the report of an injured person on the path.

Officers and emergency medical personnel arrived and located a man lying on the bike path. Emergency medical personnel determined the man was deceased. The deceased is believed to be an adult male. Officers noted that circumstances at the crime scene were suspicious-in-nature, so members of the Portland Police Bureau Detective Division's Homicide Detail have responded to the scene along with criminalists from the Forensic Evidence Division and the Medical Examiner.

The Medical Examiner will conduct an autopsy to determine the cause and manner of death as well as confirm the identity of the deceased.

Any interested media should stage at Northeast 122nd Avenue and Northeast Siskiyou Street. A representative for the Police Bureau is responding to the scene.

Anyone with information about this death should contact the Portland Police Bureau Detective Division's Homicide Detective at 503-823-0479

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information about this case or any unsolved felony crime may be eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,500.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Denorris L McClendon

UPDATE #2: Deceased Cyclist Involved in Monday Morning Crash on SE 82nd Ave Identified
Portland Police Bureau - 10/18/18 1:41 PM
The cyclist who died at an area hospital after being struck by a vehicle in the 7300 block of Southeast 82nd Avenue on Monday, October 15th, 2018, has been identified as 52-year-old Pamela Seidel of Portland.

Anyone with information about this traffic crash investigation should contact Portland Police Bureau Traffic Division's Major Crash Team Investigator Garrett Dow at 503-823-5070 or Garrett.Dow@portlandoregon.gov

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

###PPB###

The cyclist that was injured during a crash in the 7300 block of Southeast 82nd Avenue died at an area hospital Monday evening.

The Police Bureau will provide the identity of the deceased cyclist after the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office determines the cause of death and notifies next of kin.

This is the 29th traffic related fatality investigated by the Portland Police Bureau Traffic Division's Major Crash Team in 2018.

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

###PPB###

On Monday, October 15, 2018, at 11:09 a.m., East Precinct and Traffic Division officers responded to the report of a crash in the 7300 block of Southeast 82nd Avenue.

When officers and emergency medical personnel arrived on scene they located an adult female lying on the ground. The injured woman was provided emergency medical aid and transported by ambulance to an area hospital for treatment of what were believed to be serious life-threatening injuries.

Based on the severity of the woman's injuries, the Portland Police Bureau Traffic Division's Major Crash Team has responded to assume the investigation. Criminalists with the Forensic Evidence Division are also responding to assist with the investigation.

The investigation is in its early stages and at this time officers believe the driver of a Honda Pilot drove south on Southeast 82nd Avenue as the bicyclist traveled east on Southeast Henderson Street. The bicyclist and Honda collided at the intersection of Southeast 82nd Avenue and Southeast Henderson Street. The driver of the Honda remained at the scene and is cooperating with investigators. There have been no citations issued or arrests made at this time.

During this investigation Southeast 82nd Avenue will be closed between Southeast Henderson Street and Southeast Flavel Street.

The Portland Police Bureau is committed to working with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work towards reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB###

Shooting Investigation Underway in Portland's Eliot Neighborhood -- One Person Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 10/16/18 8:05 PM
On Tuesday, October 16, 2018, at 7:13 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to Dawson Park, located at 2949 North Williams Avenue, on the report of a person hearing gunfire.

Officers arrived at the park and searched the area for suspects, injured people and evidence of gunfire. As officers canvassed the area, they located evidence of gunfire in Dawson Park.

During the on-scene investigation, personnel at an area hospital emergency department informed officers that an adult male victim arrived at the emergency department by private vehicle. The victim was suffering from what were believed to be serious life-threatening gunshot injuries. Based on information gathered at this time, investigators believe the victim was injured at Dawson Park.

Officers have not located any suspects involved in this shooting and there is no suspect information to provide to the public at this time.

The Gun Violence Response Team responded to assume the investigation. Criminalists with the Forensic Evidence Division have also responded to assist with this investigation.

Anyone who witnessed this shooting or who possesses video surveillance footage of the shooting is asked to contact Portland Police Bureau Tactical Operations Division Gun Violence Response Team at 503-823-4106.

The Portland Police Bureau works closely with Enough is Enough PDX, a community-led campaign aimed at encouraging people to take a stand against gang violence in the area.

For more information about Enough is Enough PDX and how you can get involved, please visit https://www.facebook.com/EnoughIsEnoughPDX

Additional information about Enough is Enough PDX and other City efforts addressing youth violence can be found at the Office of Youth Violence Prevention, http://www.portlandonline.com/safeyouth/

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information about this case or any unsolved felony crime may be eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,500.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###PPB###

Stabbing Investigation Underway in Portland's Kerns Neighborhood -- One Person Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 10/16/18 5:19 PM
On Tuesday, October 16, 2018, at 4:00 p.m., Central Precinct officers responded to Northeast Couch Street and Northeast 12th Avenue on the report that a man had been stabbed.

When officers arrived, they located an adult male victim suffering from what were believed to be multiple stab wounds. Officers provided emergency first aid, including the application of a tourniquet, until emergency medical responders arrived on scene. Emergency medical responders provided the victim medical aid and transported him to an area hospital by ambulance for treatment of what were believed to be serious but non-life-threatening injuries.

Based on preliminary information, officers believe the victim was stabbed near Northeast 12th Avenue and Northeast Davis Street. After the victim was stabbed he proceeded to Northeast 12th Avenue and Northeast Couch Street where he contacted a TriMet bus driver. The TriMet bus driver requested police and medical personnel respond to the scene.

At this time in the investigation, there is no suspect information to provide to the public.

During this investigation, Northeast 12th Avenue will be closed between Northeast Couch Street and Northeast Davis Street.

Anyone with information about this stabbing investigation should contact the Portland Police Bureau Detective Division's Assault Detail at 503-823-0479.

###PPB###

Suspect Arrested After Assault, Menacing with a Firearm, and Vehicle Pursuit
Portland Police Bureau - 10/16/18 5:00 PM
On Tuesday, October 16, 2018, at 11:38 a.m., North Precinct officers responded to the 7-Eleven located at 3311 Northeast 82nd Avenue, on the report a man had brandished a gun and assaulted a customer.

When officers arrived at the 7-Eleven, they contacted witnesses and the victim. The officers learned the suspect entered the store, obtained several items, brandished a firearm and assaulted a juvenile male customer who was inside the store. The suspect reportedly then left the location in a black Toyota Tacoma.

As officers continued the investigation at the 7-Eleven, a community member reported the driver of a Toyota Tacoma had thrown an item at the community member's car. Based on the description provided by the complainant, officers believed this was likely the suspect involved in the investigation at the 7-Eleven on Northeast 82nd Avenue. Officers assigned to East Precinct searched the area for the vehicle and located a Toyota Tacoma that matched the description of the involved vehicle near Southeast 82nd Avenue and Southeast Claybourne Street. Officers attempted to stop the vehicle, but the driver did not stop. Officers pursued the Tacoma and its occupants. As the pursuit continued, members assigned to the Portland Police Bureau Tactical Operation Division's Air Support Unit continued following the Tacoma and provided updates to officers on the ground. The driver of the Tacoma continued driving and traveled into Clark County, Washington.

Deputies with the Clark County Sheriff's Office located the vehicle. After locating the vehicle, the driver stopped the Tacoma and both occupants of the vehicle fled from the vehicle. Deputies located the occupants and took both into custody nearby.

During the investigation, officers learned the Toyota Tacoma had been stolen at 8:50 a.m., on Tuesday, October 16, 2018, from the 3000 block of Northeast Sandy Boulevard.

The juvenile male that was assaulted by the suspect at the 7-Eleven was treated by emergency medical personnel at the scene and did not require transport by ambulance to an area hospital.

Members of the Portland Police Bureau Detective Division's Robbery Detail are continuing this investigation. Based on information learned at this time in the investigation, officers believe the driver of the Tacoma was involved in the brandishing of a firearm and assault at the 7-Eleven as well as the incident in which a person threw an object at another vehicle.

The two people taken into custody will be identified after which time they are lodged at the Clark County Jail.

Anyone with information about should contact the Portland Police Bureau Detective Division Robbery Detail at 503-823-0405.

###PPB###

UPDATE: Pedestrian Injured during Thursday, October 11 Crash Dies at Area Hospital
Portland Police Bureau - 10/16/18 3:12 PM
The pedestrian that was injured during a crash at Southeast 55th Avenue and East Burnside Street died at an area hospital Thursday evening. The deceased has been identified as 82-year-old Charles A. McCarthy of Portland.

This is the 28th traffic related fatality investigated by the Portland Police Bureau Traffic Division's Major Crash Team in 2018.

There have been no citations or arrests in connection with this investigation at this time. The Police Bureau will forward investigative reports to the Multnomah County District Attorney's Office for consideration.

Anyone with information about this traffic crash investigation should contact Portland Police Bureau Traffic Division's Major Crash Team Investigator Garrett Dow at 503-823-5070 or Garrett.Dow@portlandoregon.gov

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

###PPB###

On Thursday, October 11, 2018, at 3:41 p.m., East Precinct officers responded to the intersection of East Burnside Street and Southeast 55th Avenue on the report that a pedestrian had been struck by a vehicle.

Officers and emergency medical responders arrived on scene and found an injured adult male lying on the roadway. The man was provided emergency medical aid and transported to an area hospital for treatment of what are believed to be serious-life-threatening injuries.

The Portland Police Bureau Traffic Division's Major Crash Team is responding to lead this investigation because of the severity of the injuries suffered by the man during the crash. Criminalists with the Forensic Evidence Division are also responding to assist with thi Major Crash Team investigation.

Based on preliminary information, investigators believe the pedestrian was walking north across East Burnside Street in a marked crosswalk when he was struck by a vehicle that was turning from southbound Southeast 55th Avenue to eastbound East Burnside Street.

The driver of the vehicle has remained at the scene and is cooperating with investigators. At this time in the investigation there have been no arrests or citations.

During this traffic crash investigation, East Burnside Street will be closed between Southeast 53rd Avenue and Southeast 56th Avenue. Traffic will likely be impacted for the next four to six hours in this area of East Burnside Street.

Anyone with information about this investigation should contact Portland Police Bureau Traffic Division at 503-823-2103.

The Portland Police Bureau is committed to working with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work towards reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB###

PPB Clarifies Information Regarding Demonstration Time, Place and Manner Ordinance
Portland Police Bureau - 10/16/18 12:53 PM
The Police Bureau has been receiving many questions regarding information shared in yesterday's press conference regarding police contact with protestors who had weapons and were parked in a downtown parking garage.

On August 4, 2018, as the Police Bureau prepared for a planned demonstration and counter-demonstration in Waterfront Park, officers witnessed several people parking their cars and gathering on the top floor of a parking garage, located approximately three blocks away from the where the event was to be held at the Salmon Springs Fountain.

Officers contacted a group of approximately 20-30 people on the west side of the parking structure. Some of the individuals were putting on padded clothing, helmets and were gathering weapons. Police personnel reminded the group what they could not bring any weapons to the park. Police watched them place items that could be used as weapons, such as make-shift sticks and signs with sticks, into their vehicles and some of them kept these items and said they would not enter the park. The group eventually departed the garage on foot.

Meanwhile, four individuals were located on the northeast side of the top floor of the garage. The sergeant involved contacted them and they confirmed they had three rifles and had concealed weapon permits. The men told the sergeant they were going to stay at the garage and act as a quick extraction team in case any of their group was injured during the demonstration. The men were compliant and allowed the sergeant to inspect the weapons. All three firearms were in cases (one was disassembled) and none were loaded. In consultation with the City Attorney's Office, the sergeant told the men to store the weapons in a locked storage container in the back of the pickup and place the ammo away from the weapons in a different part of the truck.

After further review it has been determined that no firearms were seized or taken as safe keeping from the individuals in the parking garage, as police did not have lawful authority to do so. No arrests were made as no laws were broken.

Portland Police Officers continued to monitor the individuals for some time during this event.

Based on information learned during the contact with the individuals, there was no imminent danger to the public and no police reports were written regarding this activity.

However, the Police Bureau is becoming increasingly concerned that people from these demonstrations and counter-demonstrations are talking about arming themselves on social media and officers have observed firearms in the crowds. Participants are suiting up in body armor and weapons of all kinds, including firearms, bats, chemicals, explosives and make-shift weapons are being brought to these protests. When the law allows and it is safe to do so, officers have seized or taken into safekeeping, weapons they have observed in the possession of demonstrators. We have been working with the Mayor's Office, City Attorney's office and District Attorney to seek additional laws or tools that would provide police with authority to help facilitate a safer environment for participants and non-participants at frequent demonstrations.

At this particular protest, officers located and seized or witnessed multiple weapons throughout the day, including knives, bats, flagpoles, rocks, smoke bombs, firework mortars, unknown chemical agents, bottles, items from a slingshot, and other projectiles.

The intent of law enforcement at all protests/demonstrations is to provide a safe environment for all participants, non-participants, and community members while ensuring the peaceful exercise of the First Amendment. The Police Bureau actively reaches out to organizers prior to any planned protest/march in the hope to help them plan for a peaceful and successful event.

Prior to the August 4 protest, and during the event, the Police Bureau informed the public repeatedly via news releases, social media and sound truck of some officers' observations and the following city codes and Oregon Revised Statues:

Per Portland City Code, it is unlawful to carry a loaded firearm in public unless you have a valid Oregon concealed handgun license or as specified in the code. See https://www.portlandoregon.gov/citycode/article/332592

The City of Portland has specific conduct rules and laws that apply to parks: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/citycode/?c=28627 including a specific prohibition on the possession of weapons in parks: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/citycode/article/641629

Oregon has NO concealed handgun license reciprocity with any other state, and it is a crime to carry a concealed handgun in Oregon unless you have and present for inspection a valid OREGON concealed handgun license (Oregon Revised Statute (ORS) 166.250 and ORS 166.291: https://www.oregonlegislature.gov/bills_laws/ors/ors166.html

###PPB###

Shooting Investigation Underway in Portland's Argay Terrace Neighborhood - One Person Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 10/15/18 10:18 PM
On Monday, October 15, 2018, at 9:12 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to the 13000 block of Northeast Prescott Drive on the report of a shooting.

Officers arrived in the area, located one person with a gunshot injury, and provided the injured person with emergency first aid until emergency medical responders arrived. When emergency medical personnel arrived they provided the victim medical aid and transported the victim to an area hospital for treatment of what was believed to be a serious but non-life-threatening injury.

Officers continue to investigate this shooting and no suspects have been taken into custody at this time.

This remains an active investigation and there is no additional information to provide at this time.

The Gun Violence Response Team responded to assume the investigation. Criminalists with the Forensic Evidence Division have also responded to assist with this investigation.

During this investigation Northeast Prescott Drive will be closed between Northeast 128th Place and Northeast 131st Avenue.

Anyone who witnessed this shooting or who possesses video surveillance footage of the shooting is asked to contact Portland Police Bureau Tactical Operations Division Gun Violence Response Team at 503-823-4106.

The Portland Police Bureau works closely with Enough is Enough PDX, a community-led campaign aimed at encouraging people to take a stand against gang violence in the area.

For more information about Enough is Enough PDX and how you can get involved, please visit https://www.facebook.com/EnoughIsEnoughPDX

Additional information about Enough is Enough PDX and other City efforts addressing youth violence can be found at the Office of Youth Violence Prevention, http://www.portlandonline.com/safeyouth/

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information about this case or any unsolved felony crime may be eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,500.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###PPB###

Demonstration and Counter Demonstration Concluded - No Arrests
Portland Police Bureau - 10/13/18 9:59 PM
On Saturday, October 13, 2018, a demonstration, counter-demonstration and an unpermitted march occurred in Downtown Portland. The protest events and march were held on sidewalks and roadways in the Downtown Portland area over the course of approximately three hours.

Prior to the start of the event, liaison officers attempted to communicate with both groups to help facilitate a safe environment for everyone involved.

During today's event, officers observed people in possession of hard-knuckled gloves, firearms, batons and knives. Officers also observed people use pepper spray. At this time, there are no reports of any weapons that were seized during today's demonstration, counter-demonstration and march.

The Police Bureau is aware that people were assaulted during today's demonstration at an incident in the 400 block of Southwest Washington Street. On scene Portland Fire and Rescue emergency medical technicians provided emergency medical aid to four people during the march. However, the Police Bureau is unaware of anyone being transported by ambulance to area hospitals with injuries as a result of the assaults.

At this time, the Police Bureau is aware that the following riot control agents and less lethal impact munitions were used by officers in response to an assault in progress:

40 mm Marking Foam Round http://www.defense-technology.com/products/impact-munitions/40-mm-munitions/direct-impact/direct-impact-40-mm-marking-crushable-foam-round-1012836.html#start=11

FN303 Less Lethal Round https://fnamerica.com/products/less-lethal/projectiles/?referrer=law-enforcement

"The Portland Police Bureau's objectives for today's events were to provide a safe environment for everyone, including participants, non-participants and bystanders," said Chief Danielle Outlaw. "We are aware that there was a large, violent encounter between opposing groups on Southwest Washington Street. Officers responded to the scene and used less lethal munitions to break up the fight and prevent further violence. We will continue to investigate this incident and ask that anyone who was the victim of a crime to come forward and file a report."

Throughout the evening, the Portland Police Bureau provided information to protesters through announcements on a sound truck equipped with long-range acoustic speakers. The purpose of the sound truck announcements is to increase community safety by communicating police expectations and reminding people to peaceably protest. Sound trucks are also used to warn community members of potential force deployment by law enforcement as a means to give individuals an opportunity to avoid force by complying with officer orders.

The Portland Police Bureau also provided information and updates on Twitter, including announcements provided by the sound trucks: https://twitter.com/PortlandPolice

Officers are required to write reports after any use of force. The Bureau reviews force applications to determine if members actions were within Police Bureau policy. The policies that direct Bureau members' actions regarding complaint intake, crowd management, force application and review, and weapons qualifications may be found in the following Portland Police Bureau directives:

0330.00 Internal Affairs, Complaint Intake and Processing: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/article/674602

0336.00 Police Review Board: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/article/674632

635.10 Crowd Management/ Crowd Control: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/article/649358

1010.00 Use of Force: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/article/647779

1021.00 Weapons Qualifications: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/article/647799

Commendations or complaints about officer conduct today should be directed to the Office of Independent Police Review (IPR) at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/ipr/26646?

The Police Bureau reminds community members that demonstrations generally do not require any permit from the City of Portland; however, any event held in the street and/or sidewalk, such as runs, walks, marches, parades or bicycle races must have a permit granted by the City of Portland. Additionally, event organizers are encouraged to work with the City of Portland to ensure a safe event for participants and non-participants.

To learn more about the permitting process or to file a request for a permit, please visit the Portland Bureau of Transportation's Special Events page at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/?c=29979

At this time no arrests have been made in relation to incidents that occurred during today's demonstration, counter-demonstration, and march. Members with the Portland Police Bureau Detective Division's Assault Detail will investigate the incident that occurred in the 400 block of Southwest Washington Street. Victims, witnesses or people with knowledge of assaults should contact the Detective Division at 503-823-0479. Anyone with information about other criminal activity during today's events should contact the Portland Police Bureau non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

The Portland Police Bureau will review video and images of today's events in an attempt to identify people who were involved in criminal activity.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information about this case or any unsolved felony crime may be eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,500.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###PPB###

Redmond Police Seek Whereabouts of Michael Tallman (Bremont) (Photo)
Redmond Police Dept. - 10/18/18 4:33 PM
Tallman 2017
Tallman 2017
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/6157/118911/thumb_Tallman_(Bremont)_3.jpg

Redmond, OR – The Redmond Police Department is turning to the public for help in locating Michael Tallman, formerly known as Michael Bremont.  Tallman has also used the name “Jacob Straib.”  A trial was set to begin on Tuesday, October 23, on ten counts of Sex Abuse in the Second Degree.  Tallman was indicted on these crimes earlier this year and released from custody with the condition he wears a GPS ankle bracelet, pending the trial date.  The GPS ankle bracelet has been recovered and Tallman's whereabouts are unknown.  A warrant has been issed for his arrest.  It is believed Tallman has or is about to flee the state. 

 

Tallman is the former director of the Redmond Proficiency Academy in Redmond, Oregon, and used the name Michael Bremont at the time.  In 2012, Tallman was arrested and ultimately convicted of several sex crimes involving two underage students.  Tallman was sentenced to prison and was released at the end of the prison term.  These new charges stem from a new victim bravely coming forward to report what happened to her, several years ago.  The Redmond Police Department is passionate about seeking justice for juvenile sex crimes victims, and will not stop looking for Tallman until he is in custody. 

 

Redmond Police Detectives are actively seeking Tallman’s whereabouts using resources available to local law enforcement.  We are hopeful anyone with information about Tallman’s whereabouts will contact us by calling the Deschutes County 911 Dispatch non-emergency line at 541-693-6911, or their local law enforcement agency.

 

# # #

 

Your Redmond Police Department keeps you safe with 45 sworn officers and 11 support staff who field more than 23,000 calls for service annually. 

 




Attached Media Files: Tallman 2017 , Tallman 2017

Salem Police SWAT arrests burglar at BLM office (Photo)
Salem Police Dept. - 10/19/18 2:56 PM
Outside the Salem District BLM Office
Outside the Salem District BLM Office
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1095/118941/thumb_101918_salem-police_0052.JPG

Salem, OR, October 19, 2018 -- Today at approximately 3:26 a.m., the Salem Police Department responded to a commercial burglary alarm at the Salem District Office of the Bureau of Land Management located in the 1700 block of Fabry Rd SE.  Arriving officers saw a person on the roof and quickly surrounded the location. Eventually, BLM employees arrived and let officers into the building.

Once inside the building, more resources were needed to safely clear the building and locate the suspect due to the building’s size and complexity. Salem Police SWAT was called away from a scheduled training day to provide search support.  Additionally, two Salem Police K-9 officers were also called to assist.

While searching the building, a police K-9 alerted to a HVAC access room. SWAT officers entered the room and spotted the suspect, Charles McWilliams age 54 of Salem, hiding approximately 15 feet down a ventilation access shaft. With assistance, McWilliams was able to climb out of the access shaft and was taken into custody. He was transported to the Salem Police Department to be interviewed by detectives.

With the help of the Salem Fire Department Heavy Rescue Team, officers were lowered into the access shaft to look for evidence and ensure McWilliams did not have an accomplice hiding in the area.

The investigation was coordinated with BLM officials.

McWilliams was booked into the Marion County Correctional Facility for Burglary II.     

###

For media outlets: B-roll of the incident is available on the Salem Police Department YouTube Channel, https://youtu.be/ByhzDJ9nJ4I 




Attached Media Files: Outside the Salem District BLM Office , Outside the Salem District BLM Office , Salem District BLM Office , Salem Fire Department Heavy Rescue Team , SWAT officer being lowered into the ventilation shaft

Salem Police to host drug take back site (Photo)
Salem Police Dept. - 10/16/18 1:13 PM
2018-10/1095/118824/101618-dea-drug-take-back-day-october-2018-promo.jpg
2018-10/1095/118824/101618-dea-drug-take-back-day-october-2018-promo.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1095/118824/thumb_101618-dea-drug-take-back-day-october-2018-promo.jpg

Salem, OR, October 16, 2018 -- The Salem Police Department is partnering with the Drug Enforcement Administration for the biannual Drug Take-Back Day on Saturday, October 27 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Peace Plaza on the city hall campus (500 block of Commercial ST SE).

Public information officer Lieutenant Treven Upkes shared, “We’re pleased to host a drop location for residents to get rid of expired, unused or unwanted prescription meds.”

“These events give residents a chance to clean out their cabinets and drawers of meds which may be expired or are no longer used,” explained Upkes. By securely storing and disposing of no longer needed prescriptions, accidental poisonings can be prevented and drug abuse deterred.

Officers will accept unused or unwanted prescription drugs (including veterinary meds), over-the-counter medicine, and any unknown tablets and capsules. All medications should remain in their original containers, if possible.

Items which will not be accepted at collection sites include:

  • Needles and syringes
  • Thermometers
  • Medical waste of any type
  • Non-medical over-the-counter products
  • Nutritional supplements
  • Bath or hygiene products
  • Leaking liquid containers
  • Insect repellent

Additionally, medications from pharmacies, assisted living facilities, and medical clinics or facilities cannot be accepted.

For a list of year-round prescription disposal boxes provided by local law enforcement agencies, visit the Marion County Health Department website at http://bit.ly/MCHDResources. The Marion County Health Department, a public safety partner, has ample information on drug and substance abuse prevention and available resources for adults, teens, and families.

#S#P#D




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1095/118824/101618-dea-drug-take-back-day-october-2018-promo.jpg

Sandy Police Investigates Bomb Scare
Sandy Police Dept. - 10/18/18 2:33 PM

A little after 11:30AM today, officers from the Sandy Police Department responded to a report of a suspicious device at a thrift store at 37201 Highway 26, in Sandy. An alert employee of that business called 911, and isolated the device. Officers responded, and observed what appeared to be a realistic looking explosive device. A perimeter was set up, and the Portland Metro Explosive Device Unit was called. After they arrived, they analyzed the device, and concluded that while realistic appearing, it was inert and harmless. 

The hoax device was taken as evidence, and the Sandy Police are asking for any information from anyone who may have dropped off the device, even innocently, as a donation to the business. Please call the Sandy Police Tip Line at 503-489-2195 with any information. 

In this case, the employee did what we hope all people will do in these types of situations. If you see a suspicious package or device, leave it alone. Clear people out of the immediate area, and call 911. 


Sandy Police Requests Assistance with Attempted Robbery at Local Credit Union (Photo)
Sandy Police Dept. - 10/16/18 7:03 PM
2018-10/1751/118844/Suspect_exiting.jpg
2018-10/1751/118844/Suspect_exiting.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1751/118844/thumb_Suspect_exiting.jpg

Today at about 4:59PM, officers with the Sandy Police Department responded to a report of an attempted robbery that occurred at the Sandy branch of Clackamas Federal Credit Union, located at 37077 Highway 26, in Sandy. The attempt was unsuccessful, and no one was injured. The Sandy Police are asking for assistance in identifying the suspect. Attached are 6 still photos taken from surveillance footage.

We are also asking for assistance from anyone who may have been in the area of the credit union today, and may have seen something suspicious, including the suspect. We are asking the public to call the following voicemail number to leave tips in this case: 503-783-2582, or the Clackamas County non-emergency dispatch number: 503-655-8211. 




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1751/118844/Suspect_exiting.jpg , 2018-10/1751/118844/suspect_entering.jpg , 2018-10/1751/118844/suspect_entering_2.jpg , 2018-10/1751/118844/Suspect_3.jpg , 2018-10/1751/118844/Suspect_2.jpg , Suspect 1

Sandy Police Log 10-7-18 to 10-13-18
Sandy Police Dept. - 10/15/18 2:22 PM

See Attached Bulletin




Attached Media Files: Bulletin

Vancouver Police seek assistance locating missing person (Update: Located safe)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 10/17/18 10:29 AM

Ms. Pearson has been located and is safe. 

The Vancouver Police Department is seeking the public’s help in locating a missing person. 65 year old Karen Pearson was last seen walking away from residence near downtown Vancouver, on October 16, 2018 at 5:00 PM. Karen is described as a white female, 5’05” tall, 200lbs, with gray shoulder length hair and blue eyes.  Karen has a mental health disorder which requires medication that she does not have with her. Anyone with information regarding Karen’s whereabouts is asked to call 911.


Joint Release: Local Law Enforcement Participates in National Family Violence Apprehension Detail (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/19/18 10:44 AM
Photo
Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1128/118930/thumb_NFVAD_2018.jpg

On Wednesday, October 17th, 2018, the Beaverton Police Department, Hillsboro Police Department, Washington County Sheriff’s Office, and Washington County Parole & Probation participated in the 16th annual National Family Violence Apprehension Detail.

During the mission, participating law enforcement agencies coordinated closely to attempt to locate and apprehend suspects of family violence warrants and criminal investigations within Washington County.

By the end of the day, law enforcement conducted 47 checks to locate family violence suspects, resulting in four arrests.

This October, in observance of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, the Beaverton Police Department, Hillsboro Police Department, Washington County Sheriff's Office, Washington County District Attorney's Office and victim advocates across our community are standing together to break the silence of domestic violence. More information, including resources for domestic violence survivors and a joint video message, can be viewed here.

The National Family Violence Apprehension Detail is a joint effort of agencies from across the United States. Last year, 148 law enforcement agencies from 37 different states participated along with probation departments, District Attorney's offices, shelter organizations, and community members. Additional information can be viewed here.




Attached Media Files: PDF of Media Release , Photo

UPDATE: PERSON HAS BEEN FOUND SAFELY *** Endangered Missing Person -- Attempt to locate *** (Photo)
Woodburn Police - 10/14/18 8:33 AM
Teodor Iacob 1
Teodor Iacob 1
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/4128/118741/thumb_Teodor_Iacob_1.jpg

UPDATE: Mr. Iacob has been located safe and returned home.

___________________________________________________

TEODOR IACOB

31 Years Old, 5’6”, 155 pounds, Brown Hair and Brown Eyes.

Last seen on 10/13/18 at about 10:00 a.m. in Woodburn, Oregon.

Driving a maroon 2004 Toyota Tacoma pickup with a black canopy and off-road tires (in photo above), Oregon License Plate 966GKG.

The Woodburn Police Department is asking the public’s help in locating Teodor Iacob. Mr. Iacob left home wearing blue pajama pants with flowers on them, a dark blue T-shirt and no shoes.  Mr. Iacob has a medical condition requiring medication, which he left home without.  

If you have any information about Mr. Iacob’s current whereabouts contact your local police or the Woodburn Police Department at 503-982-2345.




Attached Media Files: Teodor Iacob 1

Medical
Legacy Emanuel Gala raises over $110,000 for ECMO Program (Photo)
Legacy Health - 10/17/18 2:26 PM
Roya Quirk shared a testimony about how ECMO saved her life. She spoke at Legacy Emanuel’s Gala on October 5, 2018. The event raised $110,000 for the ECMO Program.
Roya Quirk shared a testimony about how ECMO saved her life. She spoke at Legacy Emanuel’s Gala on October 5, 2018. The event raised $110,000 for the ECMO Program.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/419/118872/thumb_Roya_Quirk(Legacy_Emanuel_Gala1).jpg

NEWS RELEASE

For Immediate Release

 

 

Contact: Jeanette Weston

Oct. 17, 2018

 

 

Phone: 503-413-6393
Vicki Guinn
Phone: 503-413-2939

 

 

 

 

 

Legacy Emanuel Gala raises over $110,000 for ECMO Program

 

PORTLAND, ORE. – October 5 was a night for heroes as Legacy Emanuel Medical Center celebrated the caregivers who treat seriously ill or injured patients using Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) technology. About 150 guests gathered in The Atrium of Legacy Emanuel to honor the heroes who perform this life-saving work each day and to raise funds for the hospital’s ECMO program. The event netted more than $110,000 thanks to the generosity of so many, as well as presenting sponsor – the Piacentini family, represented at the event by Frank Piacentini and Sara Weinstein.

An ECMO machine substitutes for a patient’s failed lungs or heart. This revolutionary technology allows the lungs to rest, giving the body time to fight the infection by oxygenating the blood outside of the body when the lungs cannot function normally.

Emanuel Medical Center Foundation is raising funds to help purchase four ECMO machines and ancillary equipment. Each machine costs approximately $105,000. “Legacy Emanuel is making significant investments to provide the highest-quality patient care for generations to come,” said Trent Green, president of Legacy Emanuel. “We are thankful for the strong community support of our ECMO Program.”

The evening featured personal stories from patients and their families. Roya Quirk reflected on how Legacy Emanuel’s mobile ECMO team saved her life. She had collapsed and blacked out while watching TV at home. When paramedics arrived, her breathing was shallow. “I am thankful the paramedics chose to drive me to Legacy Emanuel where the outstanding trauma team knew exactly how to treat me when a pulmonary embolism caused my heart to stop four times,” she said.

Legacy Emanuel’s ECMO program is the busiest and most experienced center in the region. The program has been recognized as a distinguished leader in critical care. And, it is the only ECMO program in the Pacific Northwest to have an ECMO transport team. The six-person mobile critical care team is available at a moment’s notice for patient’s in immediate need of this life-saving therapy.

Nationally known for expertise in treating critical health conditions, Legacy Emanuel is a medical pacesetter. With advanced specialized services, which include a Level I Trauma Center, a Level I Burn Center, ECMO and the LifeFlight Network, it is a vital regional hub for trauma care.

                To learn more about supporting any of Legacy Health’s hospitals or programs, call the Legacy Health Office of Philanthropy at 503-415-4700 or visit www.legacyhealth.org/giving.

 

# # #




Attached Media Files: Roya Quirk shared a testimony about how ECMO saved her life. She spoke at Legacy Emanuel’s Gala on October 5, 2018. The event raised $110,000 for the ECMO Program.

PeaceHealth St. John Foundation's Candace Hickey earns CFRE designation
PeaceHealth - 10/15/18 11:00 AM

Candace Hickey, Annual Giving Coordinator for PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center Foundation, has been named by CFRE International as a Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE).

Individuals granted the CFRE credential have met a series of standards set by CFRE International which include tenure in the profession, education, demonstrated fundraising achievement and a commitment to service to not-for-profit organizations. They have also passed a rigorous written examination testing the knowledge, skills, and abilities required of a fundraising executive, and have agreed to uphold Accountability Standards and the Donor Bill of Rights.

“The CFRE credential was created to identify for the public and employers those individuals who possess the knowledge, skills and commitment to perform fundraising duties in an effective and ethical manner,” states Jim Caldarola, CFRE, Past Chair of CFRE International. “As the certification is a voluntary achievement, the CFRE credential demonstrates a high level of commitment on the part of Candace Hickey to herself, the fundraising profession, and, the donors who are served."

CFRE recipients are awarded certification for a three-year period. In order to maintain certification status certificants must demonstrate on-going fundraising employment and fundraising results, and continue with their professional education.

PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center is a not-for-profit, 193-bed acute care hospital and Level III trauma center located in Longview, Washington. Recognized nationally as a Top 100 Hospital, PeaceHealth St. John provides a full range of outpatient and inpatient diagnostic, medical, and surgical services. The region’s health care leader for more than 75 years, PeaceHealth St. John is one of ten medical centers in the PeaceHealth System.

About CFRE
CFRE International is an independent organization dedicated to the certification of fundraising executives by setting standards in philanthropic practice. Governed by a volunteer Board of Directors and led by a small professional staff, CFRE International consistently meets the highest standards for certification excellence and is itself accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) under the ANSI/ISO/IEC 17024 standard for personnel certification programs. As the premier global credential for career fundraisers, the Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE) designation is endorsed and supported by the world’s leading professional and philanthropic associations.


Salem Health welcomes two new board members (Photo)
Salem Health - 10/15/18 11:08 AM
Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/977/118760/thumb_PhilJackson.jpg

Salem Health Hospitals & Clinics recently welcomed two health care leaders to its board of trustees. David Harrison, MD and Phil Jackson began serving their three-year terms in early October.

“These two leaders have demonstrated competencies that will complement those of other board members and will support the mission of Salem Health,” said Bonnie Driggers, BSN, MS, MA, RN, Salem Health board of trustees chair. “They’ve both demonstrated their commitment to caring for people throughout their careers. We are looking forward to their contributions toward our mission to improve the health and well-being of the people and communities we serve.”

Dr. Harrison grew up in Chicago. He earned his undergraduate degree from Yale University, and then attended medical school at the University of Virginia. He completed his radiology residency and magnetic resonance imaging fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. After finishing his training, Dr. Harrison worked for nine years as a radiologist at a small Harvard teaching hospital, where he became associate chief and directed the MRI program. He took a sabbatical in 2004, working as a radiologist in New Zealand. He joined Salem Radiology Consultants in August 2005.

“As a physician who has served in Salem Health’s medical staff leadership, I've seen the commitment to excellence firsthand,” said Harrison. “I’m thrilled to bring my experiences in a wide variety of health care settings across the U.S. and New Zealand to the board. This is an excellent opportunity to be involved in leading-edge efforts to create quality, value-driven health care.”

Dr. Harrison's wife, Joyce Millen, is an anthropology professor at Willamette University. They live in Salem with their daughter Maya. Dr. Harrison's outside interests include traveling, hiking, running and birding. He also serves on the boards of the Oregon Chapter of the Nature Conservancy and the American Bird Conservancy.

Jackson has been a leader in health care systems for four decades. He is currently CEO of Sutter Health’s Health Plan Products. He previously spent nearly 30 years with Washington-based Providence St. Joseph Health.

“I am honored to serve on the Salem Health board of trustees,” said Jackson. “As a native Oregonian with deep roots and family in the region, I am vested in the health of its citizens. I look forward to supporting Salem Health’s mission through work on the board of trustees.”

After leadership roles at Providence Health Plan, Jackson moved into medical group management. He served as chief operating officer, vice president of physician services and, finally, chief integration and transformation officer for the California region while at Providence Medical Group. Jackson served as president and CEO of Oregon’s Health CO-OP before moving to his current role at Sutter. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Portland State University and a master’s degree from the University of Texas at Austin.

Dr. Harrison and Mr. Jackson are expected to bring a multitude of skills and expertise to the Salem Health board of trustees. They are both expected to begin their tenure in October.

About Salem Health: Salem Health offers exceptional care to people in and around Oregon’s Mid-Willamette Valley. It comprises hospitals in Salem and Dallas, a medical group of primary and specialty care providers, plus other affiliated services. Visit them at www.salemhealth.org; “Like” them on www.facebook.com/salemhealth; follow them on Twitter: @salemhealth; and view them at www.youtube.com/salemhealth.




Attached Media Files: Phil Jackson , Dr David Harrison

Utilities
Grants available for EV charging innovation
Pacific Power - 10/15/18 1:06 PM

Media contact:                                                          
Tom Gauntt, Pacific Power, 503-813-7291

Grants available for EV charging innovation

Pacific Power opens grant applications Oct 15 to help provide wide range of charging options for customers

 

PORTLAND, Ore. —Oct. 15, 2018-- Have a great idea of how to provide charging options for the growing number of electric vehicles in Oregon? Pacific Power wants to hear from you.

Applications for electric vehicle charging station grants are now open. Up to $300,000 is available in this funding cycle for projects that help communities and businesses develop creative electric transportation infrastructure projects. A total of $1.5 million will be awarded to customer projects through the end of 2019.

“We see collaboration and partnership with community groups, employers and local governments as an important jumpstart in bringing charging technology forward,” said Cory Scott, director of customer solutions.

To apply, entities need to complete and submit an application along with supporting materials by 5 p.m. Nov. 15, 2018.

All non-residential Pacific Power customers in Oregon are eligible to apply with preference given to community-focused organizations, such as 501(c)(3) and city, county and regional governments.

 

Funding awards will cover up to 100 percent of eligible costs to purchase and install electric vehicle charging stations.

 

Some examples of projects eligible for grants include, but are not limited to:   

  • Businesses of all sizes installing chargers as an amenity for customers and employees.
  • Multi-unit housing owners installing chargers for tenants, either in support of tenant-owned electric cars or in conjunction with offering electric cars for tenant use.
  • Chargers for community car sharing programs to improve access and charging to electric cars in underserved communities.

For detailed eligibility requirements, project qualifications and application forms, please go to pacificpower.net/ev-grants.

 

Materials may be submitted to plugin@pacificpower.net.

 

Grants will be awarded in quarterly cycles through 2019. The next grant cycle will open on Jan. 15, 2019.
 

To learn more about the benefits of electric vehicles, visit pacificpower.net/ev

 

About Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 740,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states Information about Pacific Power is available on the company's website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages.

 


PGE and City of Hillsboro partner to build new electric vehicle charging stations
PGE - 10/16/18 8:00 AM

Newest Electric Avenue increases charging infrastructure’s accessibility, affordability and reliability

Portland General Electric and the City of Hillsboro announced plans to build a new Electric Avenue charging hub in the Sunset Esplanade shopping center. This new charging hub supports Hillsboro’s 2035 Community and Environmental Sustainability Plans as well as PGE’s Transportation Electrification Plan, which are designed to help accelerate the electrification of Oregon’s transportation system.

“The decision to add public electric vehicle charging infrastructure in Hillsboro is another example of PGE’s commitment to a clean energy future for all of us,” said Hillsboro Mayor Steve Callaway. “We’re grateful to PGE for partnering with our city to achieve our sustainability goals and City Council priorities.”

The newest Electric Avenue will be located at Sunset Esplanade off Southeast Tualatin Valley Highway and Southeast Cypress Street, giving residents public access to additional quick-charging stations. This shopping center is a high-traffic area that will allow EV drivers convenient access to chargers while they are shopping at popular retailers. The location’s visibility will also increase awareness of the availability and benefits of EVs.

“This new Electric Avenue charging hub is part of our larger effort to increase access to electricity as a transportation fuel for our entire region,” said Maria Pope, president and CEO of PGE. “With the full support of the Hillsboro City Council, this partnership with the City of Hillsboro is an example of how working together as a whole community is critical in achieving a clean energy future.”

Each charging hub will feature six stations equipped with two types of connectors, allowing up to six EVs to charge simultaneously. A standard charge fee will be $3, and a quick charge will cost $5. Customers can opt for a subscription to use all Electric Avenue stations for $25 per month.

PGE will own and maintain the new charging site at no cost to the city. Hillsboro joins the City of Milwaukie as the second location identified in PGE’s Transportation Electrification Plan that calls for up to six Electric Avenues to be installed.

PGE’s original Electric Avenue — located at its World Trade Center headquarters — has charged more than 1.25 million miles of driving, avoiding more than 515 metric tons of carbon dioxide since its installation in October 2015.

About Portland General Electric Company: Portland General Electric (NYSE: POR) is a fully integrated energy company based in Portland, Oregon, serving approximately 883,000 customers in 51 cities. For more than 125 years, PGE has been delivering safe, affordable and reliable energy to Oregonians. Together with its customers, PGE has the No. 1 voluntary renewable energy program in the U.S. With approximately 2,900 employees across the state, PGE is committed to helping its customers and the communities it serves build a clean energy future. For more information, visit PortlandGeneral.com/CleanVision.

About the City of Hillsboro: Hillsboro is one of Oregon’s most diverse and dynamic cities, with a steadily growing population of 101,540 residents, as of 2017. Hillsboro is the largest city in Washington County and serves as the county seat. During the workday, more than 50,000 employees commute to Hillsboro to work at companies such as Intel, Nike and Genentech. Known as the “high-tech hub of Oregon” and the “tallest tree in the Silicon Forest,” Hillsboro has some of the best land, power and water resources in the country. With its thriving economy, Hillsboro is the home of Oregon’s fourth-largest school district, two higher-education campuses and 28 parks with more than 1,500 acres of designated green spaces. Annual community events include the Oregon International Air Show, the Hillsboro Latino Cultural Festival and one of the largest Fourth of July parades in the Northwest. The Hillsboro Hops, the only professional baseball team in the Portland metro area, entertain fans during home games at the city’s baseball stadium, Ron Tonkin Field. Learn more at www.Hillsboro-Oregon.gov.


Transportation
OR 47 open south of Vernonia following bridge construction
ODOT: Valley, No. Coast - 10/15/18 8:46 AM

OR 47 is open just south of Vernonia following over two months of construction to replace the Beaver Creek Bridge. 

However, work around the bridge will continue for the next few months.  Travelers can expect daytime, periodic single lane closures with flaggers controlling traffic as needed. Minor delays should be expected when single lane closures are occurring and the public is reminded to drive through the area with caution. 

Most work on the project is scheduled to be completed by this November.  The project included removing the old bridge and reconstructing a new one it is place.  The work also includes installing drainage, storm water facilities and a retaining wall.

Final top lift paving and permanent striping will continue next spring and will be completed by May 30, 2019.

 

 

 


Port of Vancouver 2019 preliminary budget workshop scheduled for Oct. 23
Port of Vancouver - 10/17/18 3:32 PM

Public workshop immediately follows Board of Commissioners meeting

VANCOUVER, Wash. – The Port of Vancouver USA Board of Commissioners will meet to discuss the port’s 2019 preliminary budget at a public workshop Tuesday, Oct. 23.

The workshop immediately follows the regularly scheduled Board of Commissioners meeting, held at the port administrative office, 3103 Northwest Lower River Road. The meeting begins at 9:30 a.m. and is open to the public.

During the workshop, port staff will walk commissioners Eric LaBrant, Jerry Oliver and Don Orange through the 2019 preliminary budget and answer their questions. This year’s presentation also includes information on how the budget reflects priorities outlined by the port’s recently approved 2018 Strategic Plan.

The commission is expected to consider the preliminary budget at their regularly scheduled meeting Tuesday, Nov. 13.

Public input on the port's preliminary budget is welcome at the Nov. 13 commission meeting during Open forum. Open forum begins at 9:30 a.m. in the Commission Room at the port’s administrative office

Adoption of the preliminary budget is the first formal step in the public process of establishing the final 2019 Port of Vancouver budget. The commission is expected to vote on the final 2019 budget at the November 27 meeting, during which a formal public hearing on the subject will be held.

For more information on the port’s budgeting process and finances, please visit www.portvanusa.com/about/budget.

Regularly scheduled Board of Commissioner meetings are televised and live-streamed on Clark/Vancouver Television (cable channel 21) beginning at 9:30 a.m. CVTV archives meetings within 24 hours for future viewing.

– POV – 

The Port of Vancouver USA is one of the major ports on the Pacific Coast, and its competitive strengths include available land, versatile cargo handling capabilities, vast transportation networks, a skilled labor force and an exceptional level of service to its customers and community. For more information, please visit us at www.portvanusa.com.


Military
Photos: Oregon National Guard honors military police unit in demobilization ceremony (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 10/14/18 4:05 PM
2018-10/962/118745/181014-Z-FS713-010.jpg
2018-10/962/118745/181014-Z-FS713-010.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/962/118745/thumb_181014-Z-FS713-010.jpg

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

181014-Z-FS713-007: Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel (right), Adjutant General, Oregon, and 1186th Military Police commander, Capt. Richard Smith, pause for a photo during a demobilization ceremony, Oct. 14, 2018, at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Oregon. Approximately 30 Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers in the unit returned from Afghanistan where they provided Personal Security Detail (PSD), to protect individuals or groups of individuals. (Photo by Sgt. Cory Grogan, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

181014-Z-FS713-003: Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers with the 1186th Military Police Company stand in formation during a demobilization ceremony honoring their overseas deployment, Oct. 14, 2018, at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Oregon. Approximately 30 Soldiers in the unit recently returned from a deployment to Afghanistan where they provided Personal Security Detail (PSD), protecting individuals or groups of individuals. (Photo by Sgt. Cory Grogan, Oregon Military Deparment Public Affairs)

181014-Z-FS713-002: Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers with the 1186th Military Police Company stand in formation during a demobilization ceremony honoring their overseas deployment, Oct. 14, 2018, at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Oregon. Approximately 30 Soldiers in the unit recently returned from a deployment to Afghanistan where they provided Personal Security Detail (PSD), protecting individuals or groups of individuals. (Photo by Sgt. Cory Grogan, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

181014-Z-FS713-010: Brig. Gen. William J. Prendergast IV, Land Component Commander, shakes hands with Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers of the 1186th Military Police Company to welcome them home from their overseas deployment during a demobilization ceremony, Oct. 14, 2018, at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Oregon. Approximately 30 Soldiers in the unit deployed to Afghanistan providing Personal Security Detail (PSD), to protect individuals or groups of individuals. (Photo by Sgt. Cory Grogan, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/962/118745/181014-Z-FS713-010.jpg , 2018-10/962/118745/181014-Z-FS713-002.jpg , 2018-10/962/118745/181014-Z-FS713-003.jpg , 2018-10/962/118745/181014-Z-FS713-007.jpg

Federal
BPA selects new executive vice president of Environment, Fish and Wildlife (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 10/17/18 12:09 PM
Scott Armentrout
Scott Armentrout
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1236/118865/thumb_Armentrout_10_15_18_-_blue_background.jpg

Portland, Ore. – The Bonneville Power Administration has chosen Scott Armentrout to be its executive vice president of Environment, Fish and Wildlife. Armentrout begins his new position at BPA’s Portland headquarters Oct. 29.

“Scott has extensive experience in program management, fish and wildlife biology, restoration programs and teamwork with 30 years of experience working for the U.S. Forest Service,” said BPA Administrator Elliot Mainzer. “His skills and background make him ideal to lead BPA’s Environment, Fish and Wildlife organization. Scott grew up in the Pacific Northwest, so he’s also looking forward to returning home.”

In his new position, Armentrout will serve as top policy-maker and strategist, ensuring environmental compliance while addressing fish and wildlife issues integral to BPA’s business responsibilities and its commitment to stewardship of the region’s environmental resources.

Armentrout will also oversee BPA’s Fish and Wildlife program, one of the largest fish and wildlife mitigation efforts in the world. The program is implemented to mitigate for the inundation, construction and operation of dams in the Columbia and Snake river basins.

“I am excited to be part of BPA’s efforts to protect and enhance the environment and the region’s fish and wildlife,” says Armentrout. “I’m looking forward to tackling the many complex issues and working with BPA’s partners to find creative solutions for a better Pacific Northwest.”

Armentrout comes to BPA from the U.S. Forest Service in Montrose, Colorado, where he’s served as forest supervisor over the Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre and Gunnison National Forests that comprise 2.9 million acres and together make up the largest national forest in the Rocky Mountain Region.

He replaces Lorri Bodi, who retired in July 2018.

About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Ore., is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale electricity from 31 federal dams and one nuclear plant to 142 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA delivers power via more than 15,000 circuit miles of lines and 261 substations to 475 transmission customers. In all, BPA markets about a third of the electricity consumed in the Northwest and operates three-quarters of the region’s high-voltage transmission grid. BPA also funds one of the largest fish and wildlife programs in the world, and, with its partners, pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain affordable, reliable and carbon-free electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov

###




Attached Media Files: Scott Armentrout

Author Steve Adelson Will Discuss "Little Bighorn, Voices from a Distant Wind" on October 27
Fort Vancouver National Historic Site - 10/17/18 10:59 AM

Fort Vancouver National Historic Site and the Friends of Fort Vancouver invite you to attend a free book signing and presentation by Steve Adelson, author of Little Bighorn, Voices from a Distant Wind, on Saturday, October 27, 2018, from 2:30 pm to 4 pm at the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site Visitor Center. 

Steve Adelson is an historian of American western expansion and the Indian Wars in the American West. He is also a seasonal Park Ranger Interpreter at Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. 

Adelson is also a writer and speaker focusing on the Indian Wars and westward expansion. At the Custer Battlefield, he has presented his riveting “Battle Talk” Apocalypse at Little Bighorn; Custer’s Final Battle to thousands of visitors from around the world. He has been a consultant on the history of the epic battle, appearing on the History Channel, Discovery Channel, CBS Sunday Morning, Travel Channel, radio shows and other media outlets. 

Adelson’s fascination with “Custer’s Last Stand” has captivated him since boyhood. He has been an avid student of this epic battle for the past 25 years. His book Little Bighorn, Voices from a Distant Wind comes packaged with a DVD of his powerful presentation,‘Contested Ground,’ filmed at the battlefield where the events chronicled in the book took place. The book is $25 in the Friends’ Bookstore in the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center.

This widely acclaimed publication package—book (now in its third printing) and DVD—is the number one seller at Custer Battlefield Museum and other outlets. Copies are available at the Friends’ Bookstore & Gallery.

A veteran educator of 30 years service, he has taught graduate courses through Montana State University and the Heritage Institute. His flagship courses ‘Apocalypse at Little Bighorn’ and ‘the Bozeman Trail; Days of Thunder’ have provided a fascinating living history experience to a multitude of students.
Steve holds a B.A. in Social Studies from Pacific Lutheran University and a master’s degree in Education from Montana State University. He has a colorful flair as a storyteller and his writing is emotionally descriptive. Little Bighorn, Voices from a Distant Wind is his first book. [Retail in the Friends’ Bookstore for $25.00.]

The famous Custer Battlefield holds numerous links to the Fort Vancouver site and the US Army’s Vancouver Barracks. The controversial Colonel Marcus Reno served in Oregon before the Civil War and after, he served in the Inspector General’s Office at Vancouver Barracks for Department of the Columbia. As a Colonel, John Gibbon led the first troops onto the scene of the Custer Battlefield and helped rescue Reno’s survivors. In 1885, Gibbon became Commanding General of the Department of the Columbia. He and his family were the first to live in today’s “Marshall House.” Donald McIntosh, son of an HBC employee and a Native American descendent of Red Jacket lived at the Hudson Bay Company Fort Vancouver as a youth and when his father was killed in the late 1840s. “Young Mac” moved east and joined the Union Army during the Civil War and eventually became a 1st Lieutenant in the 7th U.S. Cavalry. McIntosh held command of Company G under Reno’s troops, who were among the last to leave the timber when Reno desperately ordered his overwhelmed troops to withdraw across the river onto the bluffs. Indians knocked McIntosh from his horse and quickly killed him. Gibbon’s troops buried all the soldiers’ bodies where they fell in battle. Eventually, McIntosh’s remains were reinterred in Arlington National Cemetery. 

Additional information and is available at www.friendsfortvancouver.org and www.nps.gov/fova

What: Book Signing and Presentation by author Steve Adelson

When: Saturday, October 27, 2018, 2:30 pm to 4 pm

Where: Fort Vancouver National Historic Site Visitor Center, 1501 E Evergreen Blvd, Vancouver, WA 98661

Cost: Free


Two Prineville Men Charged With Conspiracy To Transfer And Unlawful Possession Of A Machine Gun
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/19/18 12:44 PM

EUGENE, Ore. – A three-count indictment was unsealed in federal court today charging John Widener Jordan, 38, and Michael James Friesen, 32, both of Prineville, Oregon, with conspiracy to transfer and unlawful possession of a machine gun.

According to the indictment, between May and June 2018, Friesen agreed to broker the sale of a Guide Lamp, Model M3A1, .45 ACP caliber machine gun for Jordan. Between May 30 and June 5, Friesen discussed the sale price of the firearm with an undercover agent from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) posing as a potential purchaser. Friesen confirmed for the agent that he had seen the firearm function as a machine gun.

On June 6, Friesen met the undercover agent in a motel room in Prineville. Shortly thereafter, Jordan brought the firearm to the motel room and completed the transaction in exchange for $3,000 in cash. Jordan in turn paid Friesen for arranging the sale.

This case was investigated by the ATF and is being prosecuted by Nathan J. Lichvarcik, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

The case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer for everyone. Attorney General Jeff Sessions reinvigorated PSN in 2017 as part of the Department’s renewed focus on targeting violent criminals, directing all U.S. Attorney’s Offices to work in partnership with federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement and the local community to develop effective, locally-based strategies to reduce violent crime.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/6325/118927/INDICTMENT-Jordan-Friesen-Final.pdf

Pendleton Man Found Guilty of Abusive Sexual Contact on the Umatilla Indian Reservation
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/18/18 10:33 AM

PORTLAND, Ore. – On Wednesday, October 17, 2018, a federal jury in Portland found Shane Britton, 43, of Pendleton, Oregon, guilty of abusive sexual contact.

According to court documents and evidence presented at trial, in June 2016, Britton was staying at a residence shared by the victim and her mother on the Umatilla Indian Reservation. The victim and her mother are both enrolled members of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Britton is not a tribal member.

During his stay, Britton subjected the victim to a series of unwanted and progressively more invasive physical encounters. In a recorded interview, Britton initially denied the allegation of abusive sexual contact, but later admitted he inappropriately touched the victim. Britton eventually told law enforcement officers that “in no way shape or form did [the victim] do anything wrong or provoke” his abusive conduct.

Britton faces a maximum sentence of two years in prison, a $250,000 fine and five years’ supervised release. He will be sentenced on Wednesday, January 23, 2019, before U.S. District Judge Michael H. Simon.

The FBI investigated this case in partnership with the Umatilla Tribal Police Department. It was prosecuted by Jennifer Martin and Natalie Wight, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/6325/118900/VERDICT-Britton-Final.pdf

Harrisburg Man Sentenced to Five Years in Federal Prison for Dealing Heroin and Illegally Possessing a Firearm
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/15/18 11:14 AM

EUGENE, Ore. – Shawn Sherman Wilson, Jr., 27, of Harrisburg, Oregon, was sentenced today to 60 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release for dealing heroin and illegally possessing a firearm.

According to court documents, law enforcement began investigating Wilson in July 2017 after receiving a tip from a confidential source that he was trafficking heroin in and around Eugene. An undercover agent from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) contacted Wilson and arranged to purchase an ounce of heroin. They agreed to meet on July 24, 2017 in front of Taylor’s Bar & Grill, a popular night spot in Eugene near the University of Oregon.

At the meeting location, the ATF agent entered Wilson’s car, sitting in the front passenger seat. Wilson had a Smith & Wesson 9mm semi-automatic pistol sitting between his legs with the pistol’s handle positioned for easy access. The agent said “I see you got the heat.” Wilson replied, “yeah, while I’m running around town.” Wilson grabbed the firearm and showed it to the agent, telling the agent the firearm belonged to his girlfriend and he was interested in purchasing another.

The ATF agent subsequently completed the heroin purchase, giving Wilson $1,200 in cash. Wilson was later arrested in Douglas County on August 6, 2017. When arrested, Wilson possessed a Smith & Wesson 9mm pistol matching the description of the firearm observed by the undercover agent during the controlled buy.

Wilson previously pleaded guilty to one count each of possession with intent to distribute heroin and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime on May 30, 2018.

This case was investigated by ATF and prosecuted by Pamela Paaso, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

The case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer for everyone. Attorney General Jeff Sessions reinvigorated PSN in 2017 as part of the Department’s renewed focus on targeting violent criminals, directing all U.S. Attorney’s Offices to work in partnership with federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement and the local community to develop effective, locally-based strategies to reduce violent crime.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/6325/118759/SENTENCING-Wilson-Final.pdf

State
Board on Public Safety Standards and Training Meeting Agenda
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 10/16/18 3:45 PM

The Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Thursday, October 25, 2018 in the Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem.  For further information, please contact Theresa Janda at (503) 373-1553 or esa.janda@state.or.us">theresa.janda@state.or.us.

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Board members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

 

1.  Introductions

Welcome new Board member, Thomas Thomas.

2.  Minutes

Approve minutes from the July 26, 2018 Meeting.

3.  Fire Policy Committee

a.  Fire Policy Committee Update – James Oeder, Chair

b. Consent Agenda  (The following items to be ratified by one vote)

      A. OAR 259-009-0010 and OAR 259-009-0059 – Proposed rule change – Approve

      Application for Personnel Affiliation and Certification Eligibility (E-1 Form)

      Recommended to the Board by the FPC on September 24, 2018. 

B. OAR 259-009-0062 – Proposed rule change – Approve

Fire Ground Leader

Recommended to the Board by the FPC on September 24, 2018.

C. Cheyenne McEwen DPSST#36822 (Jefferson County RFPD#1) – Deny

Recommended to the Board by the FPC on September 24, 2018.

D. Samantha Morey DPSST#18786  - (West Valley Fire District ) – Deny Application to Instruct and Revoke Certifications

Recommended to the Board by the FPC on September 24, 2018.

E.  David R. Morey DPSST#13538 (West Valley Fire District) –  Revoke

Recommended to the Board by the FPC on September 24, 2018.

F. Committee Appointments

Fire Policy Committee Appointment

  • Richard Cearns; Appointment to the FPC to replace Jim Whelan; 1st term effective 10/25/18
  • John Rinier; Re-appointment to the FPC; 2nd term effective 7/26/18.

5.  Criminal Justice Policy Committees

a. Police Policy Committee Update – Jeff Hering, Chair

b. Telecommunications Policy Committee Update – Kelly Dutra, Chair

c. Corrections Policy Committee Update – Jason Myers, Chair

d. Consent Agenda  (The following items to be ratified by one vote)

A. OAR 259-008-0075 – Proposed Rule Change – Approve

Sheriff Eligibility Determinations

Recommended to the Board by the PPC on August 16, 2018. 

B. Eric Petersen DPSST#33872 (Molalla Police Department) - Revoke

Recommended to the Board by the PPC on August 16, 2018.

C. Bradley Johnston DPSST#27723 (Astoria Police Department - retired) – No Action

Recommended to the Board by the PPC on August 16, 2018.

D. Daniel Thurman DPSST #43666 (Silverton Police Department) – Suspend

Recommended to the Board by the PPC on August 16, 2018.

E. Thomas Fleming DPSST#55747 (Marion County Sheriff’s Office) – No Action

Recommended to the Board by the PPC on August 16, 2018.

F. Brock Mittelbach DPSST#41816 (Dept. of Corrections CCCF) – Revoke

Recommended to the Board by the CPC on August 14, 2018.

G. Mario Lagao DPSST#53203 (Dept.of Corrections EOCI)  – Revoke

Recommended to the Board by the CPC on August 14, 2018.

H. Colin Duncan DPSST#44454 (Klamath County Sheriff’s Office)  - Revoke and Deny Application for Training

Recommended to the Board by the CPC on August 14, 2018.

I.  Talissa Baldovino DPSST#58666 (Union County Sheriff’s Office) – No Action against application for Training and Subsequent Certification

Recommended to the Board by the CPC on August 14, 2018.

J. Shawn King DPSST#49251 (Department of Corrections - SRCI) - Revoke

Recommended to the Board by the CPC on August 14, 2018.

K. Cory Thornton DPSST#53006 (DOC – currently not employed)  - Revoke

8/3 Vote Recommended to the Board by the TPC on August 1, 2018.

L. Jennifer Stolt DPSST#42217 (Junction City Police Department) – No Action

Unanimous vote minus one recusal to recommend to the Board by the TPC on August 1, 2018.

M. Committee Appointments

Telecommunications Policy Committee

  • Matt Dale; Appointment to the TPC position previously held by Sherry Bensema; 1st term effective 10/25/18

e. Sergeant John Lawrence DPSST#31555 - City of Bend Police Department – Memorial Wall Nomination - Approve

Add Sergeant John Lawrence’s name to the Law Enforcement Memorial Wall during the 2019 Law Enforcement Memorial Ceremony.

Recommended to the Board by the PPC on August 16, 2018.

f. Changes to the Basic Parole & Probation Curriculum – Approve

Presented by Chris Enquist:  Revised curriculum and testing method (two pilots) for the DPSST Basic Parole & Probation curriculum.

Recommended to the Board by the CPC on August 14, 2018.

6.  Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee

a.  Private Security Investigator Policy Committee Update – Bill Geiger, Chair

b. Consent Agenda (The following items to be ratified by one vote)

A. OAR 259-060-0450 and 259-061-0200 – Proposed Rule Change – Approve

Removal of cease and desist language.

Recommended to the Board by the PSIPC on September 11, 2018.

B. OAR 259-060-0010 et al – Proposed Rule Change  – Approve

Temporary work permits.

Recommended to the Board by the PSIPC on September 11, 2018.

C. OAR 259-060-0010 et al – Proposed Rule Change  – Approve

Emergency suspension for failure of annual firearms training or renewal training standards      and changes to the annual due date requirement – with staff-recommended amendments.

Recommended to the Board by the PSIPC on September 11, 2018.

D. Committee Appointment

Private Security Investigator Policy Committee

Richard Valencia, Appointment to the PSIPC position previously held by Edward Sharpe; 1st term effective 10/25/18.

7.  Administrative

a. OAR 259-012-0005, 259-013-0300 and 259-025-0000 – Proposed Rule Change – Approve

Presented by Jennifer Howald: Related to Public Records Requests and Fees.

Recommended to the Board by DPSST Staff on October 25, 2018.

b. Information Only:  2018 Customer Service Questionnaire 

9.  Director's Report - Director Gabliks

  • Training Reminder – Required Training due by 12/31/18.  Preventing Sexual Harassment and Maintaining a Professional Workplace. 
  • 2019 Board and Policy Committee schedule
  • DPSST Update

10.  Next Meeting Date:  January 24, 2019

 

# Background Information about the Board and Department #

The Board consists of 24 members representing city, county and state public safety professionals representing each of the disciplines (police, fire, 9-1-1, corrections, private security), and a private citizen appointed by the Governor. The current Board Chair is Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office. The Board includes administrators as well as non-management representatives from statewide organizations. The Board represents more than 40,000 public safety professionals and establishes minimum standards for the training and certification of city, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security/private investigator providers, and makes determinations on waiver requests. The Board is supported by six policy committees and a number of sub-committees representing the public safety disciplines, which provide technical expertise and serve as vital links to public safety organizations. The Board operates in close partnership with the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST).

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) implements minimum standards established by the Board for training and certification of city, county, tribal and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers. DPSST provides training to more than 20,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem; certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director of DPSST.

 


DPSST Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 10/16/18 2:41 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

October 15, 2018

Contact: Mona Riesterer
                 (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Telecommunications Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on November 7, 2018.  The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon.  The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities.  A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658 and Participant code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1.   Introductions

2.  Minutes of August 1, 2018
Approve Minutes of August 1, 2018 Meeting

3.  Approval of Changes for the Basic Telecommunications Curriculum

4.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0085; Updating the Course Description and Testing Standards for the Three-week Basic Telecommunicator Course and Course Challenge

Presented by Jennifer Howald

5.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0025; Relating to the Three week Basic Telecommunicator Course and Course Challenge Eligibility Standards.

Presented by Jennifer Howald

6.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0060; FA & CPR Requirements for Obtaining DPSST Certifications as a Telecommunicator/Emergency Medical Dispatcher

Presented by Jennifer Howald 

7.  Administrative Closures – Telecommunicator/Emergency Medical Dispatcher

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

8.  Coy, Gibson DPSST #58809 – Application for Training and Subsequent Certification; Columbia 911 Communication District

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

9.  Pickard, Amy DPSST #54512 – Basic Emergency Medical Dispatch Certification; American Medical Response

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

10. Staff Update

11.  Next Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting February 6, 2019 @ 9:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Telecommunications  Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


Oregon Public Safety Professionals Recognized at NW Crisis Intervention Conference
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 10/16/18 12:41 PM

The Northwest Regional Crisis Intervention Training (CIT) Conference Committee is pleased to announce the 2018 award recipients given at the 8th annual Northwest Regional CIT Conference on Wednesday, October 10, 2018, at The Three Rivers Convention Center in Kennewick, WA.

The conference and awards banquet are hosted by the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission and the CIT Statewide and CIT-King County Programs; King County Behavioral Health and Recovery Division; CIT-King County Coordinators Committee; Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training – Center for Policing Excellence; FBI – Seattle CAAA; Portland Police Bureau Behavioral Health Unit; Marion County Crisis Outreach Response Team; Greater Oregon Behavioral Health, Inc. (GOBHI); and the Oregon CIT Center of Excellence (CITCOE).

CIT International 2nd Vice President Ron Bruno was on hand to recognize the nominees and award recipients. Banquet attendees also participated in a silent auction fundraiser for National Association for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) Tri-Cities raising more than $2,000 to support behavioral health programs in the community.

The following are the award nominees and award recipients by category:

CIT Coordinator of the Year:

· Sergeant Dan Nelson, Seattle Police Department, Washington (Award Recipient)

CIT Trainer/Instructor of the Year:

· Allison Wedin, Supervisor, King County Crisis & Commitment Services, Washington (Award Recipient)

· Sergeant James Anthony Lockhart, King County Sheriff’s Office, CIT King CO Program, Washington (Award Recipient)

CIT Mental Health Professional of the Year:

· Monique “Nikki” Roger, Designated Crisis Responder, Comprehensive Behavioral Health, Washington (Award Recipient)

CIT Non-Commissioned Staff Member of the Year:

· Glenda Coms, Administrative Assistant, CIT Programs, WA State Criminal Justice Training Commission, Washington (Award Recipient)

· Lynn Morse, Security Officer, King County, Washington (Nominee)

CIT Community Resource of the Year:

· Megan Ridle, Crisis Manager, Coos Health & Wellness, Oregon (Award Recipient)

CIT Fire/EMS Agency of the Year:

· Eastside Fire & Rescue - Issaquah, Washington (Award Recipient)

CIT Outstanding Crisis Intervention Team:

· Malheur County Crisis Intervention Team, Oregon (Award Recipient)

· Seattle Police Department Crisis Response Unit, Washington (Nominee)

CIT Agency Executive of the Year:

· Chief Shawn Ledford, Shoreline Police Department, Washington (Award Recipient)

· Chief Joel Fish, Enterprise Police Department, Oregon (Nominee)

CIT Law Enforcement Officer of the year:

· Officer Daniel Erickson, Seattle Police Department, Washington (Award Recipient)

CIT Law Enforcement Supervisor of the Year:

· Captain Carolyn Mason, Eugene Police Department, Oregon (Award Recipient)

· Major Bryan Howard, King County Sheriff’s Office, Washington (Nominee)

CIT Corrections Officer of the Year:

· Corrections Deputy Mark Wolff, Deschutes County Adult Jail, Oregon (Award Recipient)

· Corrections Deputy Paul Bond, Clark County Sheriff’s Office, Washington (Nominee)

· Lieutenant Jeff Gepner, SCORE Jail, Washington (Nominee)

 

Note: Photos from the event are available upon request.  If you have any further questions or need further information email rwright@cjtc.state.wa.us

 


Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee meets Oct. 19
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/15/18 4:40 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – The Advisory Committee for the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services will meet from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 19, in Room 166 of the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, 500 Summer St. N.E., Salem, Oregon, 97301.

The meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include will include public comment, advisory committee planning, old business, discussion and new business, subcommittee reports, roundtable and future agenda items.

Sign language interpreters and live captioning will be provided. Those who are unable to attend in person, may join by calling toll-free phone number, (503) 934-1400, and using Conference ID # 360372. 

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Request.ODHHSP@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For questions about this meeting, please contact: Max Brown at 503-945-6993 or ODHHS.Info@state.or.us

About the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee

The committee assists the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Service Program (ODHHSP) by providing information and expertise on issues affecting individuals who are deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing and those with additional disability.

                                                                                            # # #  


Public comment sought on contracting, Medicaid waiver amendments
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/15/18 12:31 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – The Department of Human Services Aging and People with Disabilities (APD) is seeking public comment on amendments to the 1915(b)(4) selective contracting waiver and the 1915(c) Medicaid Long-Term Services and Supports (LTSS) waiver.

APD is amending the 1915(b)(4) selective contracting waiver and the 1915(c) Medicaid Long-Term Services and Supports waiver to allow Waivered Case Management services to be provided by Oregon Tribes. These amendments are part of an ongoing effort to work more closely with Oregon’s Nine Federally Recognized Tribes and the Urban Indian Health Program to better serve their members.

APD intends to submit the waiver amendments on Dec. 1, 2018, with a proposed effective date of April 1, 2019. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) approval of these amendments will authorize Oregon tribes to provide case management services to tribal members receiving Medicaid LTSS and receive Medicaid reimbursement for providing these services to tribal members.

APD and Oregon Tribes continue to work collaboratively to develop and operationalize the provision of case management services, including identifying tribes that choose to participate, identifying tribal members that would be served, and developing qualifications, capacity and case management rates. APD is committed to ensuring that participating tribes have access to all technology, tools and training available to LTSS case managers currently being provided by the Area Agencies on Aging and Department of Human Services local offices. These amendments affect tribes that choose to participate and provide these services. APD staff and management and tribal members have been participating in workgroups since June 2018 to develop a plan to operationalize the provision of case management services and ensure a smooth transition of these services to participating tribes.

APD invites you to review the attached documents for further information:

  • Draft of 1915(b)(4) selective contracting waiver
  • Draft of 1915(c) LTSS waiver

Comments, suggestions and questions may be submitted directly to Chris Pascual, APD policy analyst, via email at chris.pascual@state.or.us;  by phone at 503-779-6408. Interested parties may also send written comments addressed to Chris Pascual, Aging and People with Disabilities Policy Analyst, Department of Human Services, 500 Summer Street NE E-10, Salem, OR 97301. Print versions of the 1915(b)(4) selective contracting waiver and the 1915(c) Medicaid Long-Term Services and Supports waivers will be posted in APD district offices.  Print versions may also be obtained from Chris Pascual.

The deadline for comments is Nov. 15, 2018. Mail responses must be received by this date to be considered.




Attached Media Files: APD 1915 b4 Waiver Amendment 2018 Tribal Case Management , APD 1915c Waiver Amendment

Medicare annual enrollment is Oct. 15 through Dec. 7
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/15/18 11:48 AM

(Salem) – Annual open enrollment for Medicare starts today, and Oregon’s Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance (SHIBA) Program is available to help.

Medicare is health insurance for people 65 years or older or younger than 65 with Social Security Disability Income. People living in Oregon who are 65 years or older may be eligible to sign up and find health insurance that best meets their needs. Medicare covers many medical costs, including visits to the doctor, prescription medications, and preventive care, such as mammograms, colonoscopies, diabetes treatment, and blood pressure screenings.

Medicare annual enrollment runs Oct. 15 through Dec. 7, 2018. Any Medicare Advantage (MA) or prescription drug plan (Part D) changes must be made between these dates so that coverage begins without interruption on Jan. 1, 2019. Those who are late to enroll may face a lifetime of premium penalties.

“It is important to compare Medicare Advantage and prescription drug plans every year,” SHIBA Program Manager Lisa Emerson said. “Plans change year to year, as do people’s individual health care needs. People could potentially save money by shopping for a new plan.”

SHIBA provides free health insurance counseling to explain how the Medicare program works, additional insurance options that work with Medicare, and help with reducing out-of-pocket costs. SHIBA staff members, along with more than 200 certified counselors, serve many of Oregon’s more than 860,000 Medicare beneficiaries to help them understand their Medicare benefits and enrollment options. Free information and help is available by calling 1-800-722-4134 (toll-free) or visiting shiba.oregon.gov.

SHIBA counselors help beneficiaries compare plans and enroll by using the plan finder tool found online at www.medicare.gov/find-a-plan. Beneficiaries and their families can also choose to use this tool to compare plans and enroll on their own.

SHIBA also publishes an annual Medicare guide, which will be available online in early October and in print in mid-November.

Tips from SHIBA to prepare for Medicare open enrollment:

Review your plan notice. Be sure to read any notices from your Medicare plan about changes for next year, especially your Annual Notice of Change letter.

Think about what matters most to you. Medicare health and drug plans change each year and so can your health needs. Do you need a new primary care doctor? Does your network include the specialist you want for an upcoming surgery? Is your new medication covered by your current plan? Does another plan offer the same value at a lower cost? Take stock of your health status and determine if you need to make a change.

Find out if you qualify for help paying for your Medicare. SHIBA can help you learn about a state program that helps with the costs of Medicare premiums, your Medicare Part A (hospital insurance) and Medicare Part B (medical insurance) deductibles, co-insurance and co-payments, and Medicare prescription drug coverage costs.

Apply for help with drug costs. If you have limited income and assets, you may qualify for extra help with prescription drug costs. SHIBA counselors can help you apply for this benefit through Social Security.

Contact your doctor, hospital, and pharmacy before making changes. Not all health and drug plans contract or work with the same providers. If you switch plans, make sure you understand which providers you can see for the best price.

SHIBA is also advising people to protect their identity by guarding their Medicare card like they would their credit card or Social Security number. Identity theft from stolen Medicare numbers is becoming more common. To protect against identity theft, don’t share your Medicare number or other personal information with anyone who contacts you by telephone or email, or approaches you in person, unless you have given that person permission in advance. Medicare will never contact you (unless you ask them to) for your Medicare number or other personal information. Also, don’t let anyone borrow or pay to use your Medicare number. 

More information

SHIBA: To meet with a counselor, contact the toll-free SHIBA Helpline at 1-800-722-4134. You will be asked to enter your ZIP code to be connected to a program in your area. Visit https://healthcare.oregon.gov/shiba to find local help in your county, obtain a copy of the 2018 Oregon Guide to Medicare Health plans, and find Medicare education and enrollment events in your area.

Follow SHIBA on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/OregonSHIBA.

SHIBA is part of the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS), Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: http://twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on topics such as insurance, mortgages, investments, and workplace safety.


Oregon Community Bank Week recognizes a vital member of communities statewide
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/15/18 8:34 AM

Salem - Gov. Kate Brown has proclaimed Oct. 15-19, as Oregon Community Bank Week. The week honors local banks and their employees for their economic and civic contributions in communities across the state.

 

Oregon’s community banks, most of which are chartered by the Department of Consumer and Business Services, play an essential role in promoting the economic health and prosperity of the state. In some communities they are the sole provider of banking products and services and sometimes the largest employer.

 

Community banks provide $400 million in agriculture-related loans, $5.9 billion in small business loans, and 5,400 family wage jobs annually. 

 

“Our state banks take a relationship-based approach to doing business by providing banking services, creating jobs, and educating customers and students about a variety of financial matters,” said Cameron Smith, DCBS director. “They actively participate in every corner of the state and are a major financing source for our small businesses and farms.”

 

State chartered banks throughout Oregon are celebrating Community Bank Week in their local neighborhoods. Many of them will host consumers, students, small businesses, and local elected officials to showcase the positive effect banks have on the people they serve.

 

To learn more about the Oregon banks recognized during Community Bank Week, go to oregonbankers.com/community-bank-week.html.

 

###

 

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. 

 

About Oregon DFR:

The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.

 


Coffee Creek Correctional Facility reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 10/17/18 8:50 AM
Sally Ann Bicandi
Sally Ann Bicandi
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1070/118852/thumb_Bicandi.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Sally Ann Bicandi, died on the evening of October 16, 2018. She was incarcerated at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF) and passed away in the hospital. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death.

Bicandi entered DOC custody on May 31, 2018, from Washington County.  Her earliest release date was November 7, 2019. She was 54 years old.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,800 men and women who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state.

CCCF is a multi-custody facility in Wilsonville that houses more than 1,200 women. It provides intake and evaluation of all female and male inmates committed to state custody. CCCF delivers a range of correctional services and programs including alcohol and drug treatment, education, work opportunities, cognitive programming, and pre-release services. The minimum facility opened in 2001 and the medium facility opened in 2002. CCCF is Oregon’s only women’s prison.




Attached Media Files: Sally Ann Bicandi

The Oregon Department of Corrections two reports in-custody deaths (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 10/15/18 12:35 PM
Douglas Miller
Douglas Miller
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1070/118773/thumb_DouglasMiller.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Douglas Miller, died the morning of October 12, 2018. He was incarcerated at the Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) and passed away at the institution’s infirmary. He was 72 years old and was incarcerated out of Multnomah County. His earliest release date was January 11, 2021.

Raymond Madrigal, died the morning of October 14, 2018. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI) and passed away in the hospital. Madrigal entered DOC custody on March 16, 2006 from Multnomah County.  His earliest release date was August 8, 2022. He was 81 years old. Next of kin have been notified for both men.

As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 men and women who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state.

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 male inmates. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.
 

TRCI is a multi-custody facility in Umatilla that houses more than 1,800 men.  It delivers a range of correctional services and programs including education, work opportunities, and cognitive programming.  The minimum facility opened in 1998 and the medium facility opened in 2000.




Attached Media Files: Douglas Miller , Raymond Madrigal

Info meeting on Northwest State Forest Management Plan Revision, potential Habitat Conservation Plan set for October 26
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/19/18 9:49 AM

SALEM, Ore - The Oregon Department of Forestry will host an informational meeting concerning the ongoing Northwest State Forest Management Plan revision and the Habitat Conservation Plan business case analysis at 1 p.m. Friday, October 26, in Salem.

The meeting will be held in the Tillamook Room at ODF's Salem headquarters, Building C, 2600 State St. It is intended to inform the public about the status of the Forest Management Plan revision and Habitat Conservation Plan projects, and to get feedback on these topics prior to the November 7-8 Board of Forestry meetings.

  • State Forest Management Plans establish the goals and direction to manage state forests, which are sustainably managed to provide environmental, social and economic benefits to all Oregonians. By law, the majority of revenue generated from state forests must be distributed to counties and schools and used to provide public services. The State Forests Division will present proposed goals, strategies and measurable outcomes as well as a recommendation on the geographic scope of the Forest Management Plan revision.
  • Habitat Conservation Plans can serve as a more holistic and cost-effective way to manage threatened and endangered species under the federal Endangered Species Act. The State Forests Division has completed Phase I: HCP initiation and Scoping. This includes a business case analysis to determine the cost and revenue impacts of adopting an HCP as an alternative to the Division’s current approach to complying with the Endangered Species Act.

Meeting information is posted at https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/AboutODF/Pages/Initiatives.aspx

This meeting is open to the public. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at 503-945-7200.


County forestry advisory group meets October 26
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/18/18 12:14 PM

SALEM, Ore – The Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee will meet Friday, October 26 at 9:30 a.m. at the Oregon Department of Forestry Salem headquarters, Tillamook Room, Building C, 2600 State St. Items on the committee’s agenda include comments from State Forester Peter Daugherty and Board Chair Tom Imeson, as well as the following topics.

  • Forest Management Plan Update
  • Habitat Conservation Plan Update
  • Field updates

Committee members will also formulate the committee’s testimony for the upcoming Board of Forestry meeting on November 7-8, 2018. The meeting agenda and materials will be posted on the department’s web site at http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/FTLAC.aspx.

This meeting is open to the public. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at 503-945-7200.

The Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee is comprised of seven county commissioners representing 15 Oregon counties where state forestlands are located. The FTLAC is a statutorily established committee that advises the Board of Forestry on matters related to forestland managed by ODF.


Feedback sought on Elliott State Forest report
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 10/16/18 4:54 PM

SALEM, Ore. – Public feedback is being sought on a report that captures tribal and stakeholder perspectives regarding the future of the Elliott State Forest. 

The State Land Board today heard a summary of the Oregon Consensus report, which explored issues and interests regarding decoupling the forest from the Common School Fund. Decoupling would compensate the school fund for the value of the forest and release the forest from its obligation to generate revenue for schools. The forest would remain publicly owned, potentially by a different public owner. 

Between March and August 2018, Oregon Consensus conducted interviews with individuals representing federal, tribal, state and local governments, as well as individuals representing timber, conservation, school funding beneficiaries, recreation, land trusts, labor and others. The resulting report summarizes what was heard in interviews and discusses key themes, issues, and considerations for successful decoupling. 

The report is available on the Oregon Department of State Lands (DSL) website. Paper copies are also available from DSL on request. DSL is inviting the public to read the final report and provide feedback. Feedback may be submitted until 5 p.m. on Thursday, November 15 via the DSL website or by U.S. mail to 775 Summer St. NE, Ste. 100, Salem OR 97301.  

Discussion regarding the future of the Elliott State Forest will continue in December. The Board asked that potential public owners, including Oregon State University, indicate their interest to DSL and come before the Board at the December 18 meeting. DSL will also present a summary of public feedback at the December meeting. 

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Dennis Richardson and State Treasurer Tobias Read. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon’s Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit. 


Veterans Stand Down - Tillamook and Clatsop County
Oregon Employment Department - 10/16/18 4:21 PM

Clatsop County

Veterans returning home face many challenges. So on Friday, October 26, 2018, WorkSource Oregon will be hosting a Veterans Stand Down. Veterans will be able to connect with benefits and claims counselors, as well as receive basic medical services and learn about programs available to them and their families. The stand down will take place at Camp Rilea in Warrenton, from 10:00 A.M to 2:00 P.M., Friday, October 26. Bus transport will be provided from 9:00 A.M. to 2:30 P.M. and day passes will be given at the time you board the bus.

Tillamook County

Veterans returning home face many challenges. So on Friday, November 2, 2018, WorkSource Oregon will be hosting a Veterans Stand Down. Veterans will be able to connect with benefits and claims counselors, as well as receive basic medical services and learn about programs available to them and their families. The stand down will take place at the Tillamook County Fairgrounds in Tillamook, from 10:00 A.M to 2:00 P.M., Friday, November 2. 




Attached Media Files: Tillamook County Veterans Stand Down Audio Clip , Clatsop County Veterans Stand Down Audio Clip

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon September 2018 News Release
Oregon Employment Department - 10/16/18 10:00 AM

Oregon’s Unemployment Rate Remained at a Record Low of 3.8 Percent in September

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 3.8 percent in September, the same as in August. These were Oregon’s lowest unemployment rates since comparable records began in 1976. The U.S. unemployment rate dropped from 3.9 percent in August to 3.7 percent in September.

Oregon’s labor market was unusually tight in September, as indicated not only by the low unemployment rate, but also by the low number of Oregonians who are considered “short-term unemployed.” In September, 80,000 Oregonians were unemployed. Of those, 16,000 had been unemployed for 27 weeks or more (“long-term unemployed”), and 64,000 had been unemployed for less than 27 weeks (“short-term unemployed”). The number of short-term unemployed was quite low historically and was well below levels seen at the end of the prior expansion in 2006 and 2007, when an average of 86,000 people were categorized as short-term unemployed.

In September, Oregon’s nonfarm payroll employment grew by a modest 300 jobs, following a revised gain of 2,400 jobs in August. Monthly gains in September were concentrated in leisure and hospitality (+900 jobs) and professional and business services (+800 jobs). These gains were offset by losses in retail trade (-1,300 jobs) and wholesale trade (-800 jobs).

Oregon’s nonfarm payroll employment increased by 40,200 jobs, or 2.1 percent, since September 2017. This growth rate is very close to the 2.2 percent annual growth rate the state has experienced over the prior 21 months, cooling off from the 3.0 percent average annual growth rate seen during the prior three years dating back to 2013.

More than one-quarter of Oregon’s payroll employment growth over the past 12 months was in the construction industry, which added 11,100 jobs, expanding by 11.2 percent. Over the year, no other industry has grown nearly as fast as construction. Next in line are three major industries that each grew by close to 3 percent: leisure and hospitality (+6,600 jobs, or 3.2%); other services (+2,000 jobs, or 3.1%); and professional and business services (+7,400 jobs, or 3.0%). Several industries remained close to their year-ago job totals, including information (+100 jobs, or 0.3%); government (-200 jobs, or -0.1%); retail trade (-700 jobs, or -0.3%); and wholesale trade (-300 jobs, or -0.4%).

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the September county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, October 23rd, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for October on Wednesday, November 14th. 


Notes: 
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month’s release incorporates the January, February, and March 2018 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

Effective with the January 2018 data, employment of Oregon’s approximately 17,000 home care workers are counted in private health care and social assistance instead of state government. The change was due to legislative action clarifying that for purposes of workforce and labor market information, home care workers are not employees of state government. The reclassification affects private sector and government monthly change figures for January 2018 and will affect over-the-year change figures through December 2018. It does not affect total payroll employment levels.


The PDF version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: Employment in Oregon September 2018 News Release

Low levels of cyanotoxin detected in Siltcoos Lake near Florence
Oregon Health Authority - 10/19/18 4:33 PM

October 19, 2018

Low levels of cyanotoxin detected in Siltcoos Lake near Florence

People who draw water directly from the lake, use in-home treatment, should find alternative drinking source after harmful algae bloom found

The presence of cyanotoxins caused by harmful algae blooms is prompting the Oregon Health Authority to recommend that people who draw water directly from Siltcoos Lake use an alternative drinking source for vulnerable family members and pets.

OHA environmental health officials say low levels of cyanotoxins, produced by cyanobacteria found in harmful algae blooms, were discovered in the water body located about seven miles south of Florence off U.S. Route 101 (Oregon Coast Highway) in Lane and Douglas counties.

Public drinking water advisory levels are very different from levels used for recreational advisories. This is because the amount of water people incidentally swallow while recreating (swimming, water skiing, etc.) is much lower than when people use it as a primary source of drinking water. Therefore, separate advisories are issued for drinking water or recreational use as data warrant. Private intakes and in-home treatment systems are not tracked or regulated by OHA Drinking Water Services, so advisories for these systems are not issued.

Cyanotoxin levels at Siltcoos Lake are well below OHA recreational use values for human exposure. As a result, a recreational use health advisory was not issued. Because toxins have not been found in finished or treated drinking water, a drinking water advisory from the city also is not necessary. However, analyses of raw water from samples taken weekly by the South Coast Water District at the agency’s drinking water intake within the lake show a level of toxin above drinking water values for vulnerable populations, including children younger than 5, pregnant and nursing women, the elderly and those with compromised immune systems. The levels can be a health issue for people who are not on a public drinking water system.

South Coast Water District is monitoring Siltcoos Lake because prior sampling confirmed the presence of cyanotoxins above drinking water advisory values in the lake water. Individuals on private intakes and using in-home treatment systems will be notified when toxin levels in the raw (lake) water are confirmed to be below drinking water advisory values.

For information about cyanobacteria, cyanotoxins, exposures or illnesses (people or pets), health advisories and other related topics, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0440, the toll-free information line at 877-290-6767, or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select "Algae Bloom Advisories."

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http://bit.ly/2yPK0rW


Public health modernization funds fuel new approaches to prevent, fight infectious disease outbreaks
Oregon Health Authority - 10/19/18 11:15 AM

October 19, 2018

Public health modernization funds fuel new approaches to prevent, fight infectious disease outbreaks

Evaluation report shows effects of $5 million legislative investment

The Oregon Legislature’s $5 million public health modernization investment is allowing counties to partner with each other and share staff resources so they can better prepare for and respond to communicable disease threats, a new state report found.

The 2017 investment, $3.9 million of which went toward funding communicable disease control efforts at eight regions of local public health departments, also is improving health equity work such as identifying populations disproportionately affected by infectious diseases, according to the Oregon Health Authority’s Public Health Modernization Interim Evaluation Report.

The OHA Public Health Division used the remaining $1.1 million in legislative funds to improve collection and reporting of population health data, including enhancing a database that tracks immunizations. It also went to local public health departments to provide technical assistance such as training on best practices for improving childhood immunization rates and communicable disease reporting.

"In the first six months of the Oregon Legislature’s modernization investment, we have seen important changes in how we deal with communicable diseases on a regional level," said Oregon Public Health Division director Lillian Shirley. "We know that these diseases don’t stop at the county line during an outbreak, and neither should we when we’re working to prevent and fight them."

For example, local public health departments have developed formal policies such as memoranda of understanding and cross-jurisdictional agreements, to create or expand inter-governmental partnerships so they can coordinate and share staff, data, and public information documents during an outbreak. Additionally, they have been able to hire additional regional epidemiologists, infection prevention specialists and communicable disease investigators, who can be quickly deployed to respond to public health emergencies.

"This allows counties to support neighboring jurisdictions with fewer resources to conduct routine investigations," Shirley said.

Specific examples:

Health equity work has improved on a regional level, too, the report notes. Local public health departments are working with tribes, regional health equity coalitions and other partners on assessments that ensure health equity and community engagement are incorporated into communicable disease prevention strategies. One health department used funds for translation services to ensure better access to communicable disease risk communications.

"This evaluation report shows that we are making progress in our work to build a modern public health system, but there’s a lot more to be done," Shirley said.

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http://bit.ly/2ypjmH4


CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet October 19
Oregon Health Authority - 10/17/18 4:12 PM

October 17, 2018

Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet October 19

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics and Scoring Committee

When: Friday, October 19, 9 a.m. to noon

Where: Five Oak Building (formerly known as Lincoln Building), 7th Floor Suite 775 Transformation Center Training Room, 421 SW Oak St. Portland. Attendees also can join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/7438627555801803523 and conference line at 888-204-5984, access code 1277166.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda, and updates; public testimony from 9:15-9:25; state of public health in Oregon and opportunities for incentive measures to aid in improvement; break; HPQMC recommendations and strategic planning for measure set; adjourn

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2pWzquX


All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group meets October 18 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 10/17/18 3:50 PM

October 17, 2018

Contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@state.or.us (media inquiries)

Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group meets October 18 in Portland

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group

When: Thursday, October 18, 2-4 p.m.

Where: 421 SW Oak St., Suite 850 Abraham Room, Portland. Attendees also can join remotely through a webinar at   and conference line at 877-810-9415, access code 1773452#.

Agenda: Introduction and meeting goals; general updates; 2020 Administrative Rule; public comments

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/All-Payer-All-Claims-TAG.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2QWctnd


OHA to hold technical forum on CCO 2.0 service areas
Oregon Health Authority - 10/16/18 3:15 PM

October 16, 2018

Contact: Janet Zeyen-Hall, 503-945-6938, janet.l.zeyen-hall@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

OHA to hold technical forum on CCO 2.0 service areas

As the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) develops contracts for the next five years of coordinated care for Oregon Health Plan members, the agency is seeking public comment on how to best define service areas for current and potential new applicants.

Fifteen CCOs operate in service areas defined in 2012 through the state’s RFA process. A service area is the geographic footprint where a plan accepts members based on where they live.

Through the CCO 2.0 public engagement process, OHA proposed regional service areas for new applicants for the 2020-2025 CCO contracts. OHA is considering an alternative proposal that would require all participants to define service areas by county. CCOs could serve counties or portions of counties. If they propose serving less than a full county, they would need to demonstrate: how the proposed service area would better achieve the transformation priorities of CCO 2.0; its benefit to members and the community; and that the proposal is not designed to minimize financial risk and does not create adverse selection.

OHA’s main priorities and values guiding the service area approach include:

  • Behavioral health: Align with local mental health services and systems.
  • Social determinants of health: Avoid the possibility of redlining and carve-out of underserved and culturally diverse populations.
  • Value-based payments and cost containment: Ensure that CCOs can maintain financial viability, implement value-based agreements with providers, and create administrative efficiencies to reduce costly duplication.
  • Community engagement and governance: Decision-making should reflect local priorities and be accountable to members of the community.

What: Public meeting of OHA to seek public comment on service area approaches for the 2020-2025 CCO contracts

When: Monday, October 22, 3-5 p.m.

Where: University of Oregon Portland at the White Stag Block, 70 NW Couch St., Portland.

Attendees can also join remotely through a telephone conference line at 888-363-4735, participant code 1593726.

The meeting will also be live-streamed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuYRYLHBTm8.

Public comment: The public can submit comments about the service area approaches before the meeting by email at CCO2.0@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Public comment will also be accepted over the phone during the meeting. Please submit your name and organization (if applicable) to the CCO 2.0 email address if you’d like to submit public comment at the meeting.

Agenda: Welcome; priorities and values for service area approach decision-making; presentation of service area approaches; public comment; adjourn

For more information about the approaches, go to the CCO 2.0 page on the OHA website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Janet Zeyen-Hall at 503-945-6938, 711 TTY, janet.l.zeyen-hall@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2ykyyVE


Health policy board adopts policy recommendations that shape Oregon Health Plan's future
Oregon Health Authority - 10/15/18 11:11 AM

October 15, 2018

Health policy board adopts policy recommendations that shape Oregon Health Plan's future

On October 15 the Oregon Health Policy Board (OHPB) voted to approve a comprehensive set of policies that will improve the health of Oregon Health Plan (OHP) members, address health disparities, control program costs, and continue to transform health care delivery in our state. This next phase of health care transformation is known as "CCO 2.0."

"We’ve taken this opportunity to really look at what’s working with CCOs and where we need to push the system to advance health transformation in Oregon," said Zeke Smith, OHPB chair. Together, these policies have the potential to significantly change how our members experience care and how the state pays for that care."

The end of the first five-year contracts with coordinated care organizations (CCOs) marks an opportunity for OHA and OHPB to improve the services that 1 million Oregonians receive through OHP. CCOs are community-governed organizations that bring together physical health, mental health, addiction medicine, and dental health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan. Since 2012 Oregon’s coordinated care model has saved taxpayers an estimated $2.2 billion, while also reducing unnecessary emergency department visits and improving preventive care for children and adults.

OHA heard directly from more than 850 Oregonians who participated in public meetings and forums held across the state in more than a dozen locations, which were led by OHA Director Patrick Allen. Additionally, multiple surveys and online outreach tools were used to gather perspectives from a diverse cross-section of Oregonians. OHP members and other stakeholders issued support for the policy direction and expressed satisfaction with Oregon’s coordinated care system.

"Our members feel good about the coverage they’re receiving from OHP, but they also let us know that we have areas where we can improve," Allen said. "It was clear that our top focus needed to be improving access to mental health and addiction services. We also heard that CCOs can play a stronger role in working with community partners to help patients with the factors that influence health outside the doctor’s office, particularly access to safe and affordable housing."

The resulting CCO 2.0 policies build on Oregon’s strong foundation of health care innovation and tackle our biggest health problems. They cover four priority areas identified by Governor Kate Brown:

1. Improve the behavioral health system and address barriers to access to and integration of care

CCOs will be accountable for developing a person-centered mental health and substance use disorder (behavioral health) system that OHP members can count on, no matter who they are or where they live. CCOs will remove barriers between behavioral, physical and dental health. The policies include:

  • Require CCOs to be fully accountable for the behavioral health benefit.
  • Address prior authorization and network adequacy issues that limit member choice and timely access to providers.
  • Use metrics to incentivize behavioral health and oral health integration.
  • Expand programs that integrate primary care into behavioral health settings.
  • Require CCOs to support electronic health record adoption and access to electronic health information exchange.
  • Develop a diverse and culturally responsive workforce.
  • Ensure children have behavioral health needs met with access to appropriate services.

2. Increase value and pay for performance

Over the next five years, CCOs will make a significant move away from fee-for-service payments toward paying providers based on value. OHA will incentivize providers and health systems for delivering patient-centered and high-quality care. CCOs will develop value-based payments (VBPs) to improve health outcomes specifically in the areas of hospital care, maternity care, behavioral health, oral health, and children’s health care. The policies include:

  • Require annual, CCO-specific value-based payment growth targets.
  • Each CCO will be achieve an annual VBP growth target and have 70 percent of their payments to providers be VBPs by the end of the five-year period.
  • CCOs will be required to make "infrastructure and operations" payments to patient-centered primary care homes.
  • OHA will work to align VBP efforts in OHP with Public Employees’ Benefit Board (PEBB), the Oregon Educators Benefit Board (OEBB), and commercial payers participating in the Primary Care Payment Reform Collaborative.
     

3. Focus on social determinants of health and health equity

Over the next five years CCOs will increase their investments in strategies to address social determinants of health and health equity. CCOs will align goals at the state and local level to improve health outcomes and advance health equity. OHA will develop measurement and evaluation strategies to increase understanding of spending in this area and track outcomes. The policies include:

  • Increase strategic spending by CCOs on social determinants of health, health equity and disparities in communities.
  • Increase CCO financial support of non-clinical and public health providers.
  • Align community health assessment and community health improvement plans to increase impact.
  • Strengthen meaningful engagement of tribes, diverse OHP members and community advisory councils (CACs).
  • Build CCOs’ organizational capacity to advance health equity.
  • Increase the integration and use of traditional health workers (THWs).

4. Maintain sustainable cost growth

To support sustainability of OHP, CCO 2.0 policies address the major cost drivers currently in the system. OHA will also identify areas where CCOs can increase efficiency, improve value and decrease administrative costs. The policies include:

  • Strengthen financial incentives and set up new tools to reward CCOs for improving health outcomes and containing costs.
  • Ensure program-wide financial stability and program integrity through improved reporting and strategies to manage a CCO in financial distress.
  • Use program purchasing power to align benefits and reduce costs, with a focus on pharmacy costs.

"In order to make these improvements a reality for our members, our team at OHA needs to hold ourselves accountable to monitor and enforce new and existing contracts with CCOs," said Jeremy Vandehey, director of OHA's Health Policy and Analytics Division. "We also need to set clear expectations and support providers and CCOs in making these changes so together we can improve health while containing costs."

The request for applications for the coordinated care contracts for 2020-2025 will be released in January, and the contracts are expected to be awarded in summer 2019.

For more information and to download the complete report, visit the CCO 2.0 webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/CCO-2-0.aspx.

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http://bit.ly/2NI1YSk


Mega Millions $900 Million Jackpot Largest Ever
Oregon Lottery - 10/17/18 10:07 AM

October 17, 2018 - Salem, Ore. – Friday’s estimated Mega Millions jackpot is at an all-time Mega Millions high of $900 million! This jackpot is also the second largest lottery jackpot in U.S. history, trailing only the $1.586 billion Powerball jackpot from 2016. That jackpot was shared by three lucky players from California, Florida and Tennessee.

Across all Mega Millions lotteries, there were over 4.5 million winning tickets in the Oct. 16 drawing.

Oregon Mega Millions Winners

For the Oct. 16 drawing, in Oregon, there were over 37,000 winning Mega Millions tickets ranging from $10,000 to $2!

Oregon has also had several larger Mega Millions winners in the last few years. The largest winner recently was Joemel Panisa, who purchased a ticket in January 2016 then found it during a snow day, mere days before the $1 million ticket was to expire in Jan. 2017.

More recently, in Wayne Harder of Lebanon won $30,00 playing Mega Millions in August. Harder said he plays all three draw games, Powerball, Oregon’s Game Megabucks and Mega Millions. He used his prize to fund a family reunion trip to the Oregon Coast.

The Oregon Lottery began offering Mega Millions in March 2010. While Oregon is still waiting for its first Mega Millions jackpot winner, since 2010 there have been over $83 million in Mega Millions prizes in Oregon! And since 2010, Mega Millions has had over $164 million in sales.

Just like the Lottery's other big jackpot games, Powerball and Oregon’s Game Megabucks, the winner of the Mega Millions jackpot can choose to take the prize either in a 30-year annuity or a one-time lump sum.

After taxes, the 30-year graduated annuity will average $20.4 million each year. The one-time cash option, after taxes, is over $349 million.

The next Mega Millions drawing is Friday, Oct. 19.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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Holiday Wishes come true for Lebanon Lottery winner (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 10/16/18 8:13 AM
Yolanda Reyes, Lebanon, 100,000 Scratch-it winner
Yolanda Reyes, Lebanon, 100,000 Scratch-it winner
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/4939/118804/thumb_Yolanda_R._Lebanon_100k_Scratch.JPG

October 16, 2018 – Salem, Ore. – Holiday wishes came true for Yolanda Reyes of Lebanon, when she won $100,000 playing one of the new Holiday Wishes Scratch-it from the Oregon Lottery.
“I was at Bingo and scratching the ticket and thought I won $10,” she said. “When I asked a friend, we realized I won $100,000!”
Reyes won playing the $10 Holiday Wishes Scratch-it, which is part of the new featured holiday tickets offered by the Oregon Lottery this winter that also includes the $1 Stocking Stuffer, $2 Snow Globe Cash and the $5 Holiday Cheer. The tickets went on sale earlier this month and will run through the end of the year to celebrate the season. The Holiday Wishes Scratch-it still has one $100,000 jackpot prize left.
Reyes, who recently retired from the Oregon Department of Human Services after a 20-year career, said the money was going toward her retirement.
“It comes at a great time for me,” she said. “I just retired and this will be a nice cushion.”
In addition to her retirement nest egg, she said she will probably purchase a small pickup with the money.
Reyes purchased the ticket at B&G Bingo in Salem. 
During the 2015-17 biennium in Linn County, where Reyes lives, more than $42.1 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education, and watershed enhancement.
Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks, and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org
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Attached Media Files: Yolanda Reyes, Lebanon, 100,000 Scratch-it winner

PHOTO RELEASE: 2018 Great Oregon ShakeOut, Oregon's largest ever quake drill! (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 10/19/18 12:24 PM
2018-10/3986/118933/2018-10-18_Great_OregonShakeOut_016.jpg
2018-10/3986/118933/2018-10-18_Great_OregonShakeOut_016.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/3986/118933/thumb_2018-10-18_Great_OregonShakeOut_016.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management would like to thank local, tribal, state, federal, media, private and non-profit partners for helping to make this year’s Great Oregon ShakeOut earthquake drill a success. The most ever, 672,623, Oregonians participated in this year’s drill!

Rigler Elementary School in Portland was one of many schools in Oregon that learned about earthquakes and what to do during a quake. With help from their teachers, students throughout the state “Dropped, Covered, and Held On!” during the nation’s largest earthquake drill, “The Great ShakeOut” yesterday, Oct. 18, at 10:18 a.m.

“As we build a culture of preparedness within our youth it’s going to benefit Oregonians for decades to come,” said Oregon Office of Emergency Management Director Andrew Phelps.

 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

2018-10-18 Great OregonShakeOut 016

A student at Rigler Elementary School in Portland, Ore., conducts a media interview after participating in the Great Oregon ShakeOut earthquake drill, Oct. 18 at 10:18 a.m. This year’s drill was the largest ever with 672,623 Oregonians registered. (Portland Bureau of Emergency Management Photo by Dan Douthit)

2018-10-18 Great OregonShakeOut 014

Students from Rigler Elementary School in Portland, Ore., "Drop, Cover, and Hold On!" during the Great Oregon ShakeOut earthquake drill, Oct. 18 at 10:18 a.m. This year's drill was the largest ever with 672,623 Oregonians registered. (Portland Bureau of Emergency Management Photo by Dan Douthit)

20181018_101618

Students from Rigler Elementary School in Portland, Ore., learn about the earthquakes before the Great Oregon ShakeOut earthquake drill, Oct. 18 at 10:18 a.m. This year's drill was the largest ever with 672,623 Oregonians registered. (Oregon Office of Emergency Management Photo by Cory Grogan)

20181018_101407

Students from Rigler Elementary School in Portland, Ore., "Drop, Cover, and Hold On!" during the Great Oregon ShakeOut earthquake drill, Oct. 18 at 10:18 a.m. This years drill was the largest ever with 672,623 Oregonians registered. (Oregon Office of Emergency Management Photo by Cory Grogan)




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/3986/118933/2018-10-18_Great_OregonShakeOut_016.jpg , 2018-10/3986/118933/20181018_101618.jpg , 2018-10/3986/118933/2018-10-18_Great_OregonShakeOut_014.jpg , 2018-10/3986/118933/20181018_101407.jpg

Time to ShakeOut Oregon! (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 10/17/18 8:48 AM
2018-10/3986/118851/Facebook_ShakeOut_JoinUs_1200x900.png
2018-10/3986/118851/Facebook_ShakeOut_JoinUs_1200x900.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/3986/118851/thumb_Facebook_ShakeOut_JoinUs_1200x900.png

In partnership with the Portland Bureau of Emergency Management and Rigler Elementary School in Portland, the Office of Emergency Management (OEM) is inviting media to observe Rigler students drop, cover, and hold on during the nation’s largest earthquake drill, “The Great ShakeOut” scheduled Thursday, Oct. 18 at 10:18 a.m.

As of today, nearly 560,000 are registered in Oregon for the Great Oregon ShakeOut!

OEM would also like to encourage the public and media outside Portland to participate on ShakeOut day! If you have questions about how to observe or participate in your area please contact lic.info@state.or.us">public.info@state.or.us.

“Earthquakes are one of the natural hazards we face in Oregon and “The Great ShakeOut is a safe and fun way to practice what to do when seismic activity occurs,” says Althea Rizzo, geologic hazards awareness program coordinator at Oregon’s Office of Emergency Management.

If you would like to observe please arrive at 9:30 a.m. at Rigler elementary school, 5401 NE Prescott St, Portland, OR 97218.

This year’s Great ShakeOut is happening as the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) along with a coalition of state and university partners are developing and testing the ShakeAlert, an earthquake early warning (EEW) system that detects significant earthquakes so quickly that alerts can reach many people before shaking occurs.

"ShakeAlert is a critical investment in reducing risk for our nation’s future," said USGS Director, Jim Reilly. "Our country’s first public earthquake early warning system will allow citizens, institutions, and managers of essential infrastructure to take timely actions that will save lives and property."   

Learn more about ShakeAlert by visiting the USGS website that offers ShakeAlert science, multimedia, news and more. 




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/3986/118851/Facebook_ShakeOut_JoinUs_1200x900.png , 2018-10/3986/118851/130424-FS713-25.jpg

Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council presents Doug Newman Award at Oregon Trails Summit (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 10/15/18 9:05 AM
Bruce Ronning (left) and Lauralee Svendsgaard, ORTAC chair
Bruce Ronning (left) and Lauralee Svendsgaard, ORTAC chair
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1303/118753/thumb_Photo_credit_-__Gabriel_Amadeus_Tiller.jpg

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) presented the annual Doug Newman Memorial Award to Bruce Ronning at the 2018 Oregon Trails Summit Oct. 5.

Bruce Ronning is from Deschutes County and began his recreational career at the City of Eugene Parks Department. Bruce worked in their Outdoor Programs section, helping many Oregonians learn to ski, paddle, hike and bike.

During his career, Bruce served on several committees overseen by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department: ORTAC, the Recreational Trails Program advisory committee, the Local Government Grant Program advisory committee, and review committees for development of Oregon’s Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) and the Oregon Statewide Recreation Trails Plan.

Bruce retired from public service after 24 years with the Bend Park and Recreation District. During his tenure Bruce served as the Outdoor Programs Manager, Long Range Planner, and finally as the Director of Planning and Development. During that time 65 miles of the 95-mile Bend Urban Trails Plan were developed.

The Doug Newman Memorial Award recognizes an Oregonian whose efforts have inspired, benefitted and contributed to the trails and trail users of Oregon. The award pays tribute to Doug Newman, an avid outdoorsman, author and writer for the Eugene Register-Guard. He also worked extensively with the University of Oregon Outdoors Program. Diagnosed with polio as a child, Newman died in 1992.

ORTAC was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise OPRD and its partners in the development and promotion of high quality non-motorized trail systems throughout Oregon. The Council is made up of seven volunteer members appointed by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Commission to represent the five Oregon congressional districts. The Council meets four times annually in different locations across the state.

For more information about the Doug Newman award or ORTAC, contact Jodi Bellefeuille at ellefeuille@oregon.gov">jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov or 503-986-0716.




Attached Media Files: Bruce Ronning (left) and Lauralee Svendsgaard, ORTAC chair

Counties/Regional
Public Health adds Lacamas Lake to blue-green algae advisory
Clark Co. WA Communications - 10/18/18 2:52 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health has added Lacamas Lake to the blue-green algae advisory issued Tuesday afternoon for nearby Round Lake.

The public should avoid direct contact with water at Round Lake and Lacamas Lake in Camas due to cyanobacteria blooms, also known as blue-green algae. Blue-green algae produce toxins that can be harmful to people and deadly for small pets that drink the water.

A citizen reported a bloom at Round Lake earlier this week. Public Health collected water samples from Round Lake on Tuesday afternoon and posted caution signs at the lake. Results from those water samples are pending.

On Thursday, Public Health staff found a cyanobacteria bloom at nearby Lacamas Lake and collected water samples to test for toxins. Caution signs have been posted at the lake.

For Lacamas and Round lakes, health officials are recommending:

  • No water contact for people in areas of scum.
  • Keep pets away from lake water.
  • Clean fish well and discard organs.

The appearance of the blooms may grow and dissipate as temperatures fluctuate throughout the day and overnight. Public Health will continue to monitor the lakes, and signs will be updated as conditions change. Additional information and current advisories are posted on the Public Health public beach website.

Lacamas Regional Park and Heritage Park remain open. Water within the restrooms and shelters is not affected by lake water and remains safe to drink.


Volunteers sought for cigarette butt cleanup, ivy pull on Make a Difference Day
Clark Co. WA Communications - 10/17/18 9:17 AM

Vancouver, Wash. –  Volunteers will celebrate national Make a Difference Day on Saturday, Oct. 27, by picking up discarded cigarette butts from Clark County and Vancouver parks and by removing English ivy from a county park.

Clark County and the city of Vancouver will coordinate the eighth annual “The Butt Stops Here” cleanup. Volunteers will meet at 9 am in the Bud Van Cleve Community Room at Luke Jensen Sports Park, 4000 NE 78th St. After a brief orientation, volunteers will break into small groups and fan out to parks throughout Vancouver and unincorporated Clark County.

Gloves and trash bags will be provided, but volunteers must have their own transportation. At 11:30 am, volunteers will return to Luke Jensen Sports Park to weigh bags of cigarette butts and enjoy lunch, provided by Blind Onion Pizza. Volunteers can sign up online at https://bit.ly/DifferenceDay.

Since the first The Butt Stops Here cleanup in October 2011, volunteers have removed more than 105 pounds of cigarette butts – each butt weighs about one-tenth of an ounce – from our parks and public spaces. More than 4.5 trillion cigarette butts worldwide are discarded as litter each year, making them the most common litter in the world.

Clark County Public Works also will partner with the Vancouver Ivy Near Elimination squad and Portland Parks and Recreation for the 15th annual No Ivy Day. Volunteers throughout the region will remove non-native English ivy from various parks, trails and green spaces.

Volunteers are needed to remove ivy at Tenny Creek Neighborhood Park, 3105 NE 91st St., from 9 am to noon Saturday, Oct. 27. Volunteers can sign up online at http://bit.ly/NoTennyIvy.

Remember to dress for the weather and wear long pants and sturdy, closed-toe shoes for both events. Youth 13 and younger can volunteer with a parent or guardian. Teenagers 14 to 17 years old need to have signed minor consent forms to volunteer without a parent or guardian.

More information on Clark County Public Works’ volunteer program is available on the county’s website, www.clark.wa.gov/public-works/volunteer.


Board of Health seeks applicants for Mosquito Control District board
Clark Co. WA Communications - 10/17/18 8:45 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Board of Health is requesting applications for a volunteer position on the Mosquito Control District Board of Trustees.

The position represents residents living in east Clark County. Applicants must live within the Position 2 boundaries, which include portions of east Vancouver, the cities of Camas and Washougal, and unincorporated areas of east Clark County. For a map of position boundaries, visit the Board of Trustees website.

The position term begins Jan. 1, 2019, and runs through Dec. 31, 2020.

The Board of Trustees oversees the work of the Clark County Mosquito Control District. The board establishes policy, manages expenditures and approves contracts for services. Clark County Public Health provides administrative services for the district.

The Board of Trustees is comprised of one member from each city or town in Clark County and three at-large members appointed by the Clark County Board of Health.

The board meets quarterly on the second Tuesday of February, May, August and November. The meetings begin at 7 pm at the Mosquito Control Shop, 8115 NE St. Johns Road.

Applicants should send a résumé and letter of interest to Alyssa Weyhrauch, County Manager’s Office, PO Box 5000, Vancouver 98666-5000. Applications also can be sent by email to auch@clark.wa.gov">Alyssa.Weyhrauch@clark.wa.gov or fax to 360.397.6058.

The application deadline is 5 pm Monday, Nov. 12.


Public Health issues blue-green algae advisory at Round Lake in Camas
Clark Co. WA Communications - 10/17/18 7:50 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health is advising the public to avoid direct contact with water at Round Lake in Camas due to a cyanobacteria bloom, also known as blue-green algae.

Blue-green algae produce toxins that can be harmful to people and deadly for small pets that drink the water. Public Health collected water samples from Round Lake on Tuesday afternoon and is awaiting results to determine if toxins are in the water.

Health officials are recommending:

  • No water contact for people in areas of scum.
  • Keep pets away from lake water.
  • Clean fish well and discard organs.

The bloom was reported by a citizen this week, after the recent stretch of warm weather. The appearance of the bloom may grow and dissipate as temperatures fluctuate throughout the day and overnight.

Caution signs were posted at the lake Tuesday afternoon and will remain in place as long as the bloom is active and present. Public Health will continue to monitor the bloom, and signs will be updated as conditions change. Additional information and current advisories are posted on the Public Health public beach website.

Lacamas Regional Park remains open. Water within the restrooms and shelters is not affected by lake water and remains safe to drink.


Oct. 16 Commission on Aging meeting canceled, rescheduled for Oct. 22
Clark Co. WA Communications - 10/15/18 12:25 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Commission on Aging meeting scheduled for 4:30 pm Tuesday, Oct. 16, is canceled. The meeting will be rescheduled for 4:30 pm next Monday, Oct. 22, in the sixth-floor Hearing Room of the Public Service Center, 1300 Franklin St.

The Clark County Commission on Aging is focusing this year on transportation, especially for people 60 and older. Transportation allows residents of all ages and abilities to connect with others and maintain independence. It is a hallmark of a livable community.

At the Oct. 22 meeting, Matt Hermen, a transportation planner with Clark County, will describe how multiple modes of transportation; biking, walking, vehicles and buses; are planned for locally to meet the needs for present and future populations.  He also will discuss the county’s transportation successes and challenges.

The Commission on Aging, supported by the Clark County Council, is a nine-member volunteer group that implements the Aging Readiness Plan and provides leadership addressing needs of aging community members.

For more about the commission, visit www.clark.wa.gov/community-planning/commission-aging.


County seeks applicants for Portland International Airport Citizen Noise Advisory Committee
Clark Co. WA Communications - 10/15/18 12:10 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County is seeking applicants for the Portland International Airport Citizen Noise Advisory Committee, PDX CNAC. The county has one appointment to the 15-member committee.

The term begins Dec. 1, 2018, and expires on Nov. 31, 2021.

 This committee is charged with:

• Acting on behalf of local jurisdictions as the official forum to address community PDX aircraft noise concerns;

• Monitoring and providing input on the implementation of the current PDX Noise Compatibility Plan;

• Reviewing aircraft noise issues and providing advice on issue resolution and follow-up action;

• Developing ideas and recommending proposals for consideration in future airport noise plans;

• Participating on advisory committees involved in long-range airport facilities and capital improvement planning;

• Enhancing citizen understanding of aircraft noise management through the work of the CNAC as a whole; and

• Periodically briefing the Port of Portland Board of Commissioners and other appointing jurisdictions on the work of the committee.

The committee generally meets 5:30-8 pm on the second Thursday of every odd-numbered month at the Portland International Airport. Dinner is provided beginning about 5 pm, and parking will be validated.

Given the technical nature of noise, it is not expected that any volunteer appointee be an expert on the topic. Port of Portland staff will take all necessary steps to on-board new committee members and help them be prepared to participate. CNAC appointments are asked to regularly report back to their appointing jurisdiction on the work of the committee.

To apply, please send a letter of interest and résumé to Alyssa Weyhrauch, Clark County Council, P.O. Box 5000, Vancouver, WA 98666-5000 or email to auch@clark.wa.gov">alyssa.weyhrauch@clark.wa.gov.

Application deadline is 5pm Friday, Nov. 9, 2018.


Green Neighbors celebrates six years of sustainability programs with a birthday party
Clark Co. WA Communications - 10/15/18 9:33 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health’s Green Neighbors program is turning 6 this year, and the public is invited to help celebrate!

Green Neighbors is throwing a birthday party 2-4 pm Sunday, Oct. 28 at the Water Resources Education Center, 4600 SE Columbia Way. Register to attend the free party at www.clarkgreenneighbors.org/birthday.

In addition to fun giveaways and prizes, the party will feature a special guest: Portland blogger Jenica Barrett of Zero Waste Wisdom. Jenica will talk about her “zerowaster” lifestyle and share how she fits all of her trash for an entire month into one pint-size jar. Then, party attendees will be encouraged to take the #onejarchallenge themselves.

Green Neighbors will distribute free jars to party attendees, who will try to fit all of their trash for the week into one jar and share their experiences on social media. Participants can minimize their waste by refusing, reducing, reusing, recycling and composting as much as possible.

Participants who complete the weeklong challenge will be entered into a drawing for an iPad.

The Green Neighbors program helps citizens create sustainable lifestyles. The program promotes green living through a variety of community events, such as WasteBusters, the Natural Garden Tour and the Recycled Arts Festival.

To stay up to date on green tips and local events, sign up for the Green Neighbors newsletter at: http://clarkgreenneighbors.org/newsletter-signup/modify.


Cities
Drug Take Back Event hosted by Battle Ground Police Department
City of Battle Ground - 10/16/18 3:50 PM

The Battle Ground Police Station will serve as a drop-off site on Saturday, October 27 for the semi-annual Drug Take Back Event.  Anyone with expired or unneeded medications may dispose of them safely and free of charge at the Battle Ground Police Station located at 507 SW 1st Street in Battle Ground between the hours of 10:00 am and 2:00 pm. 

All unwanted medications, prescription or over-the-counter, in pill, liquid or inhaler form will be accepted.  Medications may remain in original containers, with labels attached, but medications not in the original container are accepted as well.  Organizers ask that lids are tight on liquid medications and that those participating refrain from including unrelated recycling or garbage with disposed medications.

While sharps and syringes are not accepted at the Battle Ground location, two Drug Take Back Event locations in Vancouver are accepting sharps:  PeaceHealth Southwest Washington Urgent Care and the Cascade Park Kaiser Permanente.  The event flyer, available at www.cityofbg.org/Drug-Take-Back-Day, provides details and information on all site locations within Clark and Skamania counties.

Appropriate disposal of expired or unneeded prescription and over-the-counter drugs helps keep homes and the community safe by reducing accidents, thefts, and the misuse and abuse of medications.  The most common drugs misused by teens and adults come from family and friends’ home medicine cabinets.  About 70% of people who abuse prescription drugs obtain them from family and friends and 80% of heroin users start by using pain medications prescribed to them or someone they know.

Drug disposal is also an environmental concern.  Unused medications should never be flushed down the toilet or put in the trash; improperly disposed of medications can easily contaminate water systems. 

Battle Ground’s Drug Take Back Event is a collaborative effort of the Battle Ground and La Center Police Departments, Prevent Together: Battle Ground Prevention Alliance, and La Center United.   


Hillsboro Selects Simone Brooks as Assistant City Manager Focusing on Community and Organizational Connectivity and Engagement (Photo)
City of Hillsboro - 10/19/18 9:45 AM
Simone Brooks, Assistant City Manager for the City of Hillsboro
Simone Brooks, Assistant City Manager for the City of Hillsboro
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/2850/118921/thumb_Simone_Brooks_City_of_Hillsboro.jpg

Following a national recruitment and a highly competitive application and interview process that featured 217 applicants from across the country — and as far away as Abu Dhabi and London — the City of Hillsboro has selected Simone Brooks to become Hillsboro’s Assistant City Manager focusing on Community and Organizational Connectivity and Engagement.

“After one of the most comprehensive recruitment and interview processes in the City’s history, and within an exceptional pool of applicants, Simone stood out for her blend of emotional intelligence, experience, passion for people, and humor necessary for success in this important role,” said City Manager Michael Brown.

As Assistant City Manager, Brooks will be responsible for leading the Parks & Recreation, Library, and Human Resources departments, as well as the City’s Community Services and Communications & Marketing teams. The position will assist in carrying out the City Council’s desire to have City services and infrastructure delivered in a creative, collaborative, and effective manner to Hillsboro's diverse community of residents and businesses.

Brooks’ leadership priorities will be both internally and externally focused, ensuring the health, well-being, and quality of life for all City employees and the community.

“I’m ecstatic about the opportunity to build upon the great work already done by the City of Hillsboro to create a welcoming and livable city, and the opportunity to assist the Council, City employees, and community members, in all their diversity, in making this city a great place for all, ” said Brooks. “I look forward to helping build community both within the City walls and externally – demonstrating every day to communities that are disenfranchised and/or disengaged that we are ready and willing to be a part of their lives, and that we know they are part of the fabric of this community.”

For the past seven years, Brooks has led Portland-based Brooks Staffing, a minority-owned professional services and staffing firm provided staffing and other services to employers in the Pacific Northwest, with a focus on creating employment opportunities for individuals of color. Prior to serving as President of Brooks Staffing, she worked at the company since 2006 in various capacities, including as Staff & Services Director and Customer & Contracts Manager.

Brooks’ extensive community involvement includes serving on the boards of the Portland Business Alliance, A Home For Everyone, All Hands Raised, and the Oregon State Board of Licensed Social Workers. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Marine and Environmental Science from Hampton University.

“Simone has demonstrated the qualities and values at the core of our efforts to serve our community,” Brown said. “She has great compassion for people, care and concern for the community, and she recognizes the City’s essential role in delivering quality-of-life services. Her natural abilities to be a catalyst, convener, and collaborator, while balancing and respecting a variety of views, position her well to help City employees continue to exceed expectations in providing outstanding service to our community.” 
 

About Hillsboro, Oregon

Hillsboro is one of Oregon’s most diverse and dynamic cities, with a steadily growing population of 101,540 residents. Hillsboro is the largest city in Washington County and serves as the county seat. During the workday, more than 50,000 employees commute to Hillsboro to work at companies such as Intel, Nike, and Genentech.

Known as the “high-tech hub of Oregon” and the “tallest tree in the Silicon Forest,” Hillsboro has some of the best land, power, and water resources in the country. With its thriving economy, Hillsboro is the home of Oregon’s fourth-largest school district, two higher-education campuses, and 28 parks with more than 1,500 acres of designated green spaces.

Annual community events include the Oregon International Air Show, the Hillsboro Latino Cultural Festival, and one of the largest 4th of July parades in the Northwest. The Hillsboro Hops, the only professional baseball team in the Portland metro area, entertain fans during home games at the City’s baseball stadium, Ron Tonkin Field.




Attached Media Files: Simone Brooks, Assistant City Manager for the City of Hillsboro

Traffic Signal Out at Cordon Rd SE / Keubler Blvd. SE (Lancaster Dr. / Aumsville Hwy)
City of Salem - 10/15/18 4:21 PM

The traffic signal at intersection of Cordon Rd SE / Keubler Blvd. SE (Lancaster Dr. / Aumsville Hwy) has been damaged. This intersection is being temporarily controlled by a stop sign and traffic is proceeding slowly. Please use extra caution and treat this intersection as 4-way stop.  If possible, please choose an alternate route until the repairs can be completed. Repairs are expected to be completed later this evening.


City seeks volunteer to serve on regional library district board
City of Vancouver - 10/17/18 9:36 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The City of Vancouver is seeking applicants to fill a vacancy on the Fort Vancouver Regional Library District Board of Trustees. Completed applications must be received by the City Manager’s Office by 5 p.m. Monday, Nov. 19.

The seven-member board of trustees oversees the Fort Vancouver Regional Library District system whose service area includes Clark, Klickitat and Skamania counties, plus the city of Woodland. Board members are responsible for setting library policies for the district’s 15 libraries, bookmobiles, online services and centralized headquarters. The board also adopts the budget, encourages effective service programs, and ensures the public has equal access to information.

Applicants for this vacancy must be city residents. The position is currently held by an individual whose term is expiring. This individual may or may not reapply for their position. Per Vancouver City Council policy, all incumbents who wish to reapply for their positions will be re-interviewed along with any other qualifying applicants. This recruitment is for a seven-year term that would begin Jan. 1, 2019 and expire Dec. 31, 2025.

The Vancouver mayor and city council recommend two of the seven positions on the board. Any recommendations must be approved by joint action of the Clark, Skamania and Klickitat county legislative boards. Library board meetings are generally held the second Monday of each month.  Meeting locations rotate to the various library branches throughout the three-county area. 

Applicants may apply online at www.cityofvancouver.us/boards. For an application or additional information, contact Michelle Bartley by mail at Vancouver City Hall, P.O. Box 1995, Vancouver, WA 98668-1995, by phone at 360-487-8607, or by email at artley@cityofvancouver.us">michelle.bartley@cityofvancouver.us.

For more information about the Fort Vancouver Regional Library District Board of Trustees, including links to meeting schedules, minutes and bylaws, visit www.fvrl.org/about-us/trustees.  

###


Portland Water Bureau Returns to 100 Percent Bull Run Water
Portland Water Bureau - 10/17/18 9:20 AM

The Portland Water Bureau returned to 100 percent Bull Run water today, Oct. 17. On June 19, the Portland Water Bureau began blending a portion of water from wells at the Columbia South Shore Well Field to augment supply from the Bull Run. Between an anticipated return of fall weather and lower seasonal demand, Bull Run reservoirs have adequate supply to meet Portland’s drinking water needs. Both the Bull Run and Columbia South Shore Well Field are high quality water sources that meet or surpass all federal and state drinking water regulations.

Through careful planning and investment, Portland has developed two excellent water sources that ensured the City could meet all of its customers’ needs through this warm and dry summer. Together, the Bull Run watershed and the Columbia South Shore Well Field constitute a resilient drinking water supply.

It will take one to eight days, depending on location, for 100 percent Bull Run water to move through the distribution system and reach customers.

While public notification is not required, the Water Bureau informs the media and sensitive users when it activates and discontinues use of groundwater.

To learn more about the Columbia South Shore Well Field, visit www.portlandoregon.gov/water/groundwater. Customers with water quality questions are encouraged to contact the Water Line at 503?823?7525.




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1240/118855/Media_Release_Groundwater_Off_101718.docx

Cryptosporidium Monitoring Update: Detections from routine monitoring in the Bull Run. Coordination with health officials continues.
Portland Water Bureau - 10/16/18 12:30 PM

The Portland Water Bureau received results from ongoing monitoring from the Bull Run Watershed intake for Cryptosporidium, a potentially disease-causing microorganism. One Cryptosporidium oocyst was detected in a 10-liter sample collected on Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018. Prior to this detection, Cryptosporidium was last detected from the Bull Run Watershed intake on April 10, 2018, when one oocyst was detected in a 50-liter sample.

The bureau is currently serving a blend of Bull Run and groundwater from the Columbia South Shore Well Field as its source of drinking water. The Portland Water Bureau does not currently treat the Bull Run for Cryptosporidium, but is required to do so under the drinking water regulations. Portland is working to install filtration by 2027 under a compliance schedule with the Oregon Health Authority. In the meantime, the Portland Water Bureau is implementing interim measures such as watershed protection and additional monitoring to protect public health. Consultation with public health officials has concluded that at this time, customers do not need to take any additional precautions.

Exposure to Cryptosporidium can cause cryptosporidiosis, a serious illness. Symptoms can include diarrhea, vomiting, fever and stomach pain. People with healthy immune systems recover without medical treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people with severely weakened immune systems are at risk for more serious disease. Symptoms may be more severe and could lead to serious or life-threatening illness. Examples of people with weakened immune systems include those with AIDS; those with inherited diseases that affect the immune system; and cancer and transplant patients who are taking certain immunosuppressive drugs.

The Environmental Protection Agency has estimated that a small percentage of the population could experience gastro-intestinal illness from Cryptosporidium and advises that customers who are immunocompromised and receive their drinking water from the Bull Run Watershed consult with their healthcare professional about the safety of drinking the tap water. The Portland Water Bureau and Burlington, City of Gresham, City of Sandy, City of Tualatin, Green Valley, GNR, Hideaway Hills, Lake Grove, Lorna Portland Water, Lusted, Palatine Hill, Pleasant Home, Raleigh, Rockwood, Skyview Acres, Tualatin Valley, Two Rivers, Valley View and West Slope Water Districts receive all or part of their drinking water supply from the Bull Run. To learn if your drinking water comes from Bull Run, please contact your local drinking water provider.

The public and the media are encouraged to view all sampling results posted to the City’s website at portlandoregon.gov/water/cryptoresults. The bureau will notify the media and public immediately should further test results indicate a risk to public health and precautions are necessary.

Customers with questions regarding water quality can call the Water Line at 503-823-7525.




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1240/118819/Crypto_Press_Release_101618.docx

Courts/District Attorneys
Keizer Shooting Found Justified By Grand Jury
Marion Co. Dist. Attorney's Office - 10/16/18 5:37 PM

Today a Marion County Grand Jury unanimously found that Alex Hackney, 26, was justified in his use of deadly force on Bryan O’Connor, 27, on September 4, 2018. 

The grand jury convened today to hear testimony from 10 witnesses, including detectives from the Keizer Police department and civilians.  They also reviewed photographs, dispatch recordings, scene diagrams, medical records and autopsy reports.  The grand jury was given an opportunity to review all evidence gathered by and provided to the Keizer Police Department.

The following is a factual summary of evidence found by the Grand Jury:

Alex Hackney and Bryan O’Connor were close friends for many years.  They lived next to each other on Cummings Lane N in Keizer, Oregon.  Hackney lived at 401 Cummings Lane N and O’Connor lived at 411 Cummings Lane N.  On the evening of September 3, 2018, Hackney and O’Connor went to several local bars with friends.  The group returned to O’Connor’s home on September 4, 2018, around 12:50am where a verbal argument began between Hackney and O’Connor. 

The argument turned physical and O’Connor hit Hackney multiple times in the face and head, causing a large laceration above Hackney’s eye.  O’Connor put Hackney in a choke hold causing Hackney to become dizzy and fear that he may lose consciousness rendering him unable to defend himself.  Hackney was able to break free from O’Connor’s choke hold and run to Hackney’s home at 401 Cummings Lane N around 1:03am.  O’Connor continued to yell threats at Hackney as he retreated home.  Friends, including O’Connor’s live in girlfriend, were present during the physical altercation.

Upon returning to his home, Hackney locked all of his doors, armed himself with a .380 handgun, and began to clean his bleeding face.  Hackney has a valid concealed weapons permit.  Hackney’s live-in girlfriend was with him and received a text message from O’Connor’s girlfriend at 1:06am warning that O’Connor was on his way over and stated “hope your doors are locked”.  Simultaneously, O’Connor began to kick Hackney’s back door open, broke in, and came after Hackney.  Hackney fired one shot at the approaching O’Connor.  O’Connor turned and ran back to his house.  Hackney immediately called 911 at 1:07am to report that he just shot at his neighbor who had broke in to his home.

O’Connor was taken to the Salem Hospital Emergency Room by his friends, where he was later pronounced deceased after life saving measures were attempted.

Officers and detectives from the Keizer Police Department, Salem Police Department, and Marion County Sheriff’s Office responded to the properties on Cummings Lane and the Salem Hospital Emergency Room.  Hackney was compliant and cooperative throughout the investigation.  Hackney at no time exhibited signs of being under the influence of intoxicants or controlled substances.  Hackney voluntarily provided a blood alcohol breath sample which revealed a blood alcohol content of .00%. 

A search of Hackney’s home revealed that his back door was kicked in, damaging the frame and deadbolt lock.  Hackney’s .380 handgun was located on the dining room table, where Hackney placed it at the direction of the 911 operator before officers arrived.  A single bullet casing was found in the laundry room. 

An autopsy performed by Dr. Rebecca Millius at the Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office on September 4, 2018, found that O’Connor died from a single gunshot wound to the chest. O’Connor had injuries to and debris in the bottom of his foot, consistent with kicking a wood door.  O’Connor’s toxicology reports were positive for cocaine and THC.  O’Connor’s medical blood draw revealed his blood alcohol plasma was .23%.


Pursuant to Oregon law, in order to be justified in his use of deadly force, Alex Hackney had to reasonably believe that:

(1) Bryan O’Connor was committing or attempting to commit a burglary in a dwelling; or

(2) Bryan O’Connor was committing or attempting to commit a felony involving the use or threatened imminent use of physical force against a person; or

(3) Bryan O’Connor was using or about to use unlawful deadly physical force against Alex Hackney or another person.


The Grand Jury's decision required a review of all the facts and evidence available and applying it to the legal principles above. The Marion County Grand Jury concluded that the actions of Alex Hackney were lawful and justified.


 


Samuel D. Mason, 40, charged with attempted murder in connection with SE Portland shooting
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 10/19/18 1:05 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

OCTOBER 19, 2018

Samuel D. Mason, 40, charged with attempted murder in connection with SE Portland shooting

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that a six-count indictment accusing a 40-year-old man of attempted murder was unsealed.

The secret indictment was filed on August 8, 2018 and charges Samuel D. Mason with one count each of attempted murder with a firearm, attempted assault in the first degree with a firearm, assault in the second degree with a firearm and being a felon in possession of a firearm with a firearm enhancement. Mason is also charged with two counts of unlawful use of a weapon with a firearm enhancement.

According to an affidavit filed in this case, on May 18, 2018, Portland Police officers responded to Rachel’s Bar and Grill, located at 12510 Southeast Division Street on reports of a shooting. Officers contacted the manager who reported that the shooting resulted after an argument ensued inside the establishment. Law enforcement collected video from the bar and identified Mason as the shooter. Furthermore, law enforcement later learned that a male victim arrived at Portland Adventist Medical Center with a single gunshot wound. The individual told police that he had been shot at Rachel’s Bar and Grill. Detectives assigned to the Portland Police Bureau’s Tactical Operations Division learned the people involved in the argument were rival gang members. The weapon used in this offense was a .38 revolver, according to court documents. After the shooting, the defendant fled to Arkansas, according to the affidavit.  

Mason appeared before Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Melvin Oden-Orr on October 19, 2018 where he was arraigned on the indictment. A not guilty plea was entered on his behalf. His next court date is scheduled for November 30, 2018.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office works closely with the City of Portland’s Office of Youth Violence Prevention and attends the bi-weekly Community Peace Collaborative meeting, which is a coalition of law enforcement, service providers and community members who are focused on encouraging people to take a stand against gun violence.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and the defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/5769/118936/PR-18-117-Samuel_D._Mason.pdf

Grand jury hands down murder indictment following October 5th homicide in North Portland
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 10/16/18 12:20 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                 

OCTOBER 16, 2018

Grand jury hands down murder indictment following October 5th homicide in North Portland

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced 35-year-old Robert James, Jr. was arraigned on an eight count indictment.

According to previously filed court documents, on October 5, 2018, the defendant was at the corner of Northeast Wheeler Street and Northeast Multnomah Avenue when he killed 44-year-old Markell Jones and injured two other people using a firearm during the same criminal episode. An officer assigned to the Portland Police Bureau was at the Moda Center working an event when he heard gunshots. The officer saw an individual, later identified as James, shooting a firearm. The officer chased the defendant for about a block before taking James into custody. Law enforcement recovered a firearm from the scene, which has been seized for evidence. Video from the Moda Center shows James shooting into a vehicle around 11 p.m. on October 5, 2018. Mr. Jones, the passenger inside the vehicle, died as a result of multiple gunshot wounds. The driver of the vehicle sustained a gunshot injury. The third victim, who was standing on a nearby TriMet platform was also struck by gunfire from the defendant’s firearm.

The indictment charges James with one count each of murder with a firearm, attempted aggravated murder with a firearm, and being a felon in possession of a firearm. James is also charged with two counts of assault in the second degree with a firearm and three counts of unlawful use of a weapon with a firearm.

James appeared in court on October 16, 2018 where a not guilty plea was entered on his behalf.

A copy of the PC statement and indictment filed in this case can be obtained using case number 18CR66906 in the Oregon eCourt Case Information (OECI) system.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and the defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

 

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/5769/118818/PR-18-115-Grand_jury_hands_down_murder_indictment_following_October_5th_homicide_in_North_Portland.pdf

Banks & Credit Unions
Northwest Credit Unions Raise Over $628K for Children's Hospitals During Tacoma Convention (Photo)
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 10/18/18 4:33 PM
Auction photo
Auction photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/4992/118912/thumb_D71A1603.JPG

                    Eight Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals in the Northwest will benefit.

 TACOMA, Wash.  — Hundreds of credit union leaders raised $628,226.49, for Children’s Miracle Network (CMN) hospitals during a gala auction Oct. 17. The credit union community is gathered in Tacoma for the Northwest Credit Union Association’s (NWCUA) MAXX Convention in Tacoma this week. The grand total was announced during the closing session of MAXX today.

While exploring technology and other innovative services to offer to their 6.5 million consumer members in Idaho, Washington, and Oregon, the credit union community at MAXX Convention also focused on its community impact “DNA.” As not-for-profit cooperatives, credit unions are founded on a “people helping people” philosophy, and giving back is an important principle for them as financial institutions. The gala auction in Tacoma is such an example.

The curtains parted and Cass Huff – the 2018 Miracle Child for the “New York, New York” auction -- came to the microphone and belted out an inspired version of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah. That set the stage for the event to build on the legacy Northwest credit unions started in 1986, when they founded the now-national “Credit Unions for Kids” charity.

Cass is one of just 150 people in the world with Conradi-Hunermann Syndrome, a severe form of scoliosis. Despite 42 surgeries, being blind in one eye, and being deaf in one ear, Cass aspires to star on Broadway. Her rendition of another song, Somewhere Over the Rainbow, was set to touching photos of babies and children whose lives have been saved at CMN hospitals.

Attendees bid aggressively on silent auction items such as jewelry and wine flights. They engaged in friendly bidding wars over luxury golf outings and hot air balloon rides during the live auction, to set an NWCUA auction record.

“We are moved and humbled by the generosity of our colleagues in the Credit Union Movement,” said Troy Stang, Northwest Credit Union Association (NWCUA) President and CEO. “The journey credit unions started here in the Northwest 32 years ago has made so many miracles possible for the kids and their families.”

All funds raised last night will stay in the Northwest, directly benefitting the CMN hospitals in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, and Intermountain Primary Children’s Hospital in Utah.

“Thanks to the generosity of all of our sponsors, donors, and bidders, Credit Unions for Kids will again make miracles happen,” said Holly Miller, NWCUA Project Manager and Auction Coordinator. “The funds raised at auction will support research, treatments at the CMN hospitals, and will provide comfort to the families of hospitalized children. Does it really get any better than that?”

                                                                                            <END>

The Northwest Credit Union Association is the not-for-profit trade association representing over 180 credit unions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, and their 6.5 million consumer members. Northwest Credit unions are not-for-profit cooperatives, owned by their members. Credit unions help members achieve their financial goals.  All earnings in excess of operating expenses and required reserves are returned to members in the form of lower loan rates, fewer fees and higher interest paid on savings. For information on how to join a credit union, please visit http://www.asmarterchoice.org.  




Attached Media Files: News Release , Auction photo , Auction photo , Auction photo

Northwest Credit Unions Raise Over $628K for Children's Hospitals During Tacoma Convention (Photo)
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 10/18/18 4:25 PM
Auction photo
Auction photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/4992/118910/thumb_D71A1603.JPG

Seattle Children’s and seven other Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals will benefit

TACOMA, Wash.  — Hundreds of credit union leaders raised $628,226.49, for Children’s Miracle Network (CMN) hospitals during a gala auction Oct. 17. The credit union community is gathered in Tacoma for the Northwest Credit Union Association’s (NWCUA) MAXX Convention in Tacoma this week. The grand total was announced during the closing session of MAXX today.

While exploring technology and other innovative services to offer to their 6.5 million consumer members in Idaho, Washington, and Oregon, the credit union community at MAXX Convention also focused on its community impact “DNA.” As not-for-profit cooperatives, credit unions are founded on a “people helping people” philosophy, and giving back is an important principle for them as financial institutions. The gala auction in Tacoma is such an example.

The curtains parted and Cass Huff – the 2018 Miracle Child for the “New York, New York” auction -- came to the microphone and belted out an inspired version of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah. That set the stage for the event to build on the legacy Northwest credit unions started in 1986, when they founded the now-national “Credit Unions for Kids” charity.

Cass is one of just 150 people in the world with Conradi-Hunermann Syndrome, a severe form of scoliosis. Despite 42 surgeries, being blind in one eye, and being deaf in one ear, Cass aspires to star on Broadway. Her rendition of another song, Somewhere Over the Rainbow, was set to touching photos of babies and children whose lives have been saved at CMN hospitals.

Attendees bid aggressively on silent auction items such as jewelry and wine flights. They engaged in friendly bidding wars over luxury golf outings and hot air balloon rides during the live auction, to set an NWCUA auction record.

“We are moved and humbled by the generosity of our colleagues in the Credit Union Movement,” said Troy Stang, Northwest Credit Union Association (NWCUA) President and CEO. “The journey credit unions started here in the Northwest 32 years ago has made so many miracles possible for the kids and their families.”

All funds raised last night will stay in the Northwest, directly benefitting the CMN hospitals in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho.

“Thanks to the generosity of all of our sponsors, donors, and bidders, Credit Unions for Kids will again make miracles happen,” said Holly Miller, NWCUA Project Manager and Auction Coordinator. “The funds raised at auction will support research, treatments at the CMN hospitals, and will provide comfort to the families of hospitalized children. Does it really get any better than that?”

 

                                                                                 <END>

The Northwest Credit Union Association is the not-for-profit trade association representing over 180 credit unions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, and their 6.5 million consumer members. Northwest Credit unions are not-for-profit cooperatives, owned by their members. Credit unions help members achieve their financial goals.  All earnings in excess of operating expenses and required reserves are returned to members in the form of lower loan rates, fewer fees and higher interest paid on savings. For information on how to join a credit union, please visit http://www.asmarterchoice.org.

 




Attached Media Files: News Release , Auction photo , Auction photo , Auction photo

Night Coverage Alert: Credit Union Auction Expected to Raise Hundreds of Thousands Tonight for Children's Hospitals (Photo)
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 10/17/18 1:30 PM
Cass Huff 2018 CU4Kids Miracle Child
Cass Huff 2018 CU4Kids Miracle Child
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/4992/118848/thumb_Cass_Huff_2018_CU4Kids_Miracle_Child.jpg

News coverage is welcome as credit unions open their hearts and wallets for their legacy charity—Credit Unions for Kids

TACOMA, Wash.—Nearly four million Washingtonians are members of credit unions – not only because of the financial services and value they receive – but also because of the positive impact credit unions have on communities as not-for-profit cooperatives.

The community “DNA” will be demonstrated in Tacoma tonight at the Northwest Credit Union Association’s (NWCUA) MAXX Convention. Hundreds of credit union leaders from Washington, Oregon, and Idaho will engage in friendly “bidding wars” to benefit the region’s eight Children’s Miracle Network (CMN) hospitals, including Seattle Children’s. Northwest credit unions have a strong passion for CMN hospitals, having founded “Credit Unions for Kids” more than 30 years ago. Their model was adopted nationally ten years later and has now raised $200 million for sick children.

Expect an emotional evening as 16-year-old Cass Huff takes center stage as the 2018 “Miracle Child.” Cass is one of only 150 people in the world with a rare genetic condition called Conradi-Hunermann Syndrome. She’s had 42 surgeries to treat this severe scoliosis, which left her blind in one eye, and deaf in one ear. But that hasn’t stopped her from becoming an aspiring Broadway star who plays multiple instruments and sings professionally. Cass is expected to perform two classics on stage tonight – Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah” and “Somewhere Over the Rainbow.”

The Credit Unions for Kids auction is a MAXX Convention tradition. Last year’s auction held in Spokane raised more than $300,000 for CMN hospitals.

WHAT: Credit Unions for Kids Action

WHEN:  Silent auction: 6:30-7:30 pm  Live auction: 8:00 – 9:30 pm

WHERE: Greater Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St. Tacoma, WA 98402

 

                                                                                         

The Northwest Credit Union Association is the not-for-profit trade association representing over 180 credit unions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, and their 6.5 million consumer members. Northwest Credit unions are not-for-profit cooperatives, owned by their members. Credit unions help members achieve their financial goals.  All earnings in excess of operating expenses and required reserves are returned to members in the form of lower loan rates, fewer fees and higher interest paid on savings. For information on how to join a credit union, please visit http://www.asmarterchoice.org.

 




Attached Media Files: News Release , Cass Huff 2018 CU4Kids Miracle Child

National Cable TV Politics Editor Chris Stirewalt Headlines Credit Union Convention in Tacoma Today
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 10/17/18 6:48 AM

How credit unions are addressing the housing crisis, artificial intelligence, and an auction expected to raise hundreds of thousands for children’s hospitals also highlight today’s agenda.

TACOMA, Wash.—One of the nation’s leading experts on American politics takes centerstage at the Northwest Credit Union Association’s (NWCUA) MAXX Convention this afternoon. Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt will provide insight into next month’s critically important midterm elections, and dive into what is at heart of today’s political divide. Stirewalt’s signature style breaks down complex political issues in a way that people can understand and enjoy as he offers astute commentary on the current political climate.  3:15 pm.

The NWCUA is the association representing over 180 credit unions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Those not-for-profit, cooperative credit unions serve 6.5 million consumers in Northwest.

Additional opportunities for news coverage include:

  • Artificial Intelligence is finding its way into every corner of our lives. Find out what this means to credit union members. Peek at fintech products on the horizon that are making financial institutions more efficient, and helping consumers have 24/7 access to their money. Join us for the Strategic Link Trade Show from 10:00 am – 12:30 pm.
  • How credit unions are addressing the housing crisis. Every community is impacted by a housing crisis due to either low inventory or high prices. This panel discussion explores innovative approaches credit unions are taking to help consumers. 2:00 pm.
  • Credit Unions for Kids is a national charity that has contributed nearly $200 million to Children’s Miracle Network hospitals. It was founded right here in the Northwest in 1986. To honor that legacy, MAXX Convention will host “New York, New York,” a live auction and dinner expected to raise more than $300,000 for the region’s eight CMN hospitals. Expect lively “bidding wars” and a touching on-stage appearance by our 2018 Miracle Child. 8:00-9:30 pm

WHAT: MAXX Convention for Northwest Credit Unions

WHEN: Times vary; please visit https://nwcua.org/event/maxx-2018/

WHERE: Greater Tacoma Convention Center, 1500 Commerce St. Tacoma, WA 98402

Please reach out to Lynn Heider for all your coverage needs. lheider@nwcua.org. Call or text (503) 329-7208. Post event information and photos will be provided upon request.

Coverage of Chris Stirewalt’s address is open to media. No live streaming is permitted, and video clips for later distribution are limited to two minutes in length. Chris is open to one-on-one interviews.

 

                                                                                                    <END>

The Northwest Credit Union Association is the not-for-profit trade association representing over 180 credit unions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, and their 6.5 million consumer members. Northwest Credit unions are not-for-profit cooperatives, owned by their members. Credit unions help members achieve their financial goals.  All earnings in excess of operating expenses and required reserves are returned to members in the form of lower loan rates, fewer fees and higher interest paid on savings. For information on how to join a credit union, please visit http://www.asmarterchoice.org.

 




Attached Media Files: News Release

MAXX Convention shines the spotlight on the Credit Union Movement Oct. 16- 18.
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 10/16/18 5:26 AM

Find out Why 3.7 Million Washingtonians are Members of Credit Unions

TACOMA, Wash.— More than 6.5 million Northwest consumers have chosen credit unions as their financial services partner – nearly four million in Washington alone. As not-for-profit cooperatives, credit unions don’t pay Wall Street stockholders – they reinvest their earnings right back into members on Main Street. Local media coverage is welcomed at the Northwest Credit Union Association’s (NWCUA) MAXX Convention, which opens at the Greater Tacoma Convention Center today.

The NWCUA is the trade association representing more than 180 credit unions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington.

With an expected 700 attendees, MAXX Convention could generate over $1 million for the local economy, according to Travel Tacoma.

When the curtain goes up at this afternoon’s general session, NWCUA President and CEO Troy Stang shares his passion for the “Credit Union Movement.” Cover MAXX to connect with Troy and other credit union thought leaders who are driving innovative technology for consumers, affordable housing solutions for communities, and more. Also on stage this afternoon, Christine Cashen, an internationally recognized speaker presents on handling conflict, reducing stress, and sparking innovating ideas.

WHAT: NWCUA MAXX Convention Opens

WHEN: 3:00 pm

WHERE Greater Tacoma Convention Center

Please reach out to Lynn Heider for all your coverage needs. lheider@nwcua.org. Call or text (503) 329-7208.




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/4992/118803/Find_out_why_3.7million_Washingtonians_belong_to_credit_unions.docx

Colleges & Universities - Public
"Social. Art. Work." opens in the Alexander Gallery (Photo)
Clackamas Comm. College - 10/18/18 9:58 AM
“Girl with Hat” by Pippa Arend.
“Girl with Hat” by Pippa Arend.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/29/118899/thumb_Social_Art_Work_opens_in_the_Alexander_Gallery.jpg

OREGON CITY – Clackamas Community College will host the work of Portland-based artist Pippa Arend, Nov. 5-Dec. 7 in the Alexander Gallery.

Arend is the co-founder of p:ear, an organization that mentors Portland’s homeless youth. “Social. Art. Work.” is an exhibition of Arend’s pen and ink portraits inspired by the youth she has worked with over the last 17 years. The exhibition is supported by the MacArthur Fellowship prize.

The public is invited to an artist’s reception Tuesday, Nov. 6, noon-1 p.m., at the Alexander Gallery. Arend will speak about her work at 1 p.m. Light refreshments will be served.

The Alexander Gallery is free and open to the public, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., with the exception of campus holidays. The gallery is located in the Niemeyer Center on the Oregon City campus, 19600 Molalla Ave.

For questions, contact Kate Simmons at 503-594-3032 or kates@clackamas.edu. For more information on Clackamas Community College’s art exhibits and performances, visit www.clackamas.edu/art.

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Attached Media Files: “Girl with Hat” by Pippa Arend.

Vendors sought for CCC craft sale (Photo)
Clackamas Comm. College - 10/18/18 9:18 AM
CCC seeks vendors for its annual craft sale
CCC seeks vendors for its annual craft sale
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/29/118894/thumb_DSC_7677.JPG

OREGON CITY – Clackamas Community College (CCC) is holding a craft sale and food drive, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Nov. 27 and 28, in the Community Center on the Oregon City campus, 19600 Molalla Ave.

Take part in this event as a vendor by registering with CCC’s Associated Student Government office. The priority deadline for applications is Friday, Nov. 2. After this date, as space allows, more vendors will be permitted on a first-come, first-served basis. Selections are based on the following criteria:

  • All items must be, at least in part, handmade
  • Quality and selection of items
  • CCC students, clubs and Clackamas County residents have priority

The cost per table for CCC Clubs and CCC students is $10 or a donation of 20 cans of food. For all other vendors, $15 or 30 cans of food. CCC’s Associated Student Government suggested food donations include canned proteins, grains and ready-to-eat items. Toiletries are also needed.

For setup times, a list of suggested food donations, applications or more information, call Cynthia Boettcher at 503-594-1823 or email oettcher@clackamas.edu">cynthia.boettcher@clackamas.edu.

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Attached Media Files: CCC seeks vendors for its annual craft sale

CCC seeks applicants for budget committee
Clackamas Comm. College - 10/18/18 9:12 AM

OREGON CITY – Help make a difference in higher education. The Clackamas Community College Budget Committee is seeking two new citizen representatives, one from Happy Valley and one from the Canby and Molalla area.

The budget committee meets each spring to deliberate on the proposed budget and approve it, before sending it to the CCC Board of Education for approval. Additional meetings may be scheduled as needed.

The budget committee includes the CCC Board of Education and seven volunteers appointed by the board for three-year terms. Budget committee members represent each of the college’s six zones. The current openings are for Zone 2 (Happy Valley) and Zone 7 (Canby and Molalla). Applicants must be registered voters and reside in the zone for which they are applying. For a district map, visit www.clackamas.edu/district-map.

Applications must be received by Nov. 9 and committee members will be announced Dec.14.

For an application or more information, visit http://www.clackamas.edu/about-us/leadership/budget. For questions, contact Denice Bailey at 503-594-3002 or email ailey@clackamas.edu">denice.bailey@clackamas.edu.

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Space Oddities: Stars That Are Stranger Than Fiction (Photo)
Mt. Hood Comm. College - 10/15/18 1:36 PM
New stars often form in dust clouds that take on many shapes. A new star can be seen forming in the “eye” of this strange-looking object (top). The infrared image (bottom) allows us to see through the dust to see a whirlpool forming a new star, with jets
New stars often form in dust clouds that take on many shapes. A new star can be seen forming in the “eye” of this strange-looking object (top). The infrared image (bottom) allows us to see through the dust to see a whirlpool forming a new star, with jets
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/37/118777/thumb_CarinaPillar_hubble_2400.jpg

From afar, shimmering stars set in the night sky seem peaceful and tranquil. However, telescopic images can paint a different picture, showing us star “oddities.” For instance, older stars can become unstable and even explode. Many stars have doubles; there’s at least one instance of a person describing a “star within a star.”

Some stars are outright dangerous, too. In 2004, a star exploding over 50,000 light-years away affected Earth’s atmosphere. The star was appropriately named ASASSN-15LH. Another potentially hazardous star, WR 104, is pointed at us, but closer than ASASSN-15LH. And WR 104 could send a burst of gamma rays directly towards us.

Planetarium Director Pat Hanrahan will present “Space Oddities: Stars That Are Stranger Than Fiction” on Tuesday, Nov. 6, and Friday, Nov. 9, with shows at 6 and 7:15 p.m. on both days. Hanrahan will also identify stars in the current night sky and show observers where to find some of these curious stars and other attractions.

Visitors are encouraged to ask questions during each 45-minute live program. Children are welcome to attend. The MHCC Planetarium is wheelchair accessible. Admission for the general public is $5, and $2 for children (17 and younger) and for MHCC students (identification required). Seating is limited and available on a first come, first served basis.

Don't miss these upcoming shows in the Planetarium Sky Theater.

Dec. 4 and 7, 2018
Treasures of Orion and his Neighbors

Jan. 8 and 11, 2019
A Snapshot of Upcoming Astronomical Events for 2019

Feb. 5 and 8, 2019
Seeing the Invisible Universe

March 5 and 8, 2019
What did NASA’s New Horizons Spacecraft Find Beyond Pluto?

April 2 and 5, 2019
Auroras, Cosmic Rays, Shooting Stars, and Other Space Invaders

May 7 and 10, 2019
Current Spacecraft Exploration by NASA/JPL and By Other Countries

June 4 and 7, 2019
To Be Announced

All planetarium shows are at 6 and 7:15 p.m. For more information about the MHCC planetarium, visit mhcc.edu/planetarium.

Private showings for groups are also available on Fridays.




Attached Media Files: New stars often form in dust clouds that take on many shapes. A new star can be seen forming in the “eye” of this strange-looking object (top). The infrared image (bottom) allows us to see through the dust to see a whirlpool forming a new star, with jets

Mexican feminist artist and activist to speak at Women in Art Lecture Series in Portland (Photo)
PCC - 10/18/18 2:35 PM
Mónica Mayer, ‘El Tendedero’ (‘The Clothesline’), Los Angeles, 1979. Photo by Víctor Lerma
Mónica Mayer, ‘El Tendedero’ (‘The Clothesline’), Los Angeles, 1979. Photo by Víctor Lerma
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/40/118904/thumb_Monica_Mayer.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore. – Portland Community College and Portland State University are hosting Mónica Mayer, a Mexican feminist artist and activist, for the annual Portland Women in Art Lecture Series.

Mayer will give a public lecture and host an art exhibition as part of the seventh annual Portland Women in Art Lecture Series (PWALS). The goal of PWALS is to present important women in the visual arts to the students and faculty of PCC and PSU, as well as to Portland audiences. It focuses on pioneering feminist artists and younger women significant in the fields of art and art history.

Mayer will speak at Portland State University at 7 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 7, in the Lincoln Recital Hall (LH75), 1620 S. Park Ave. Admission is free and the public is welcome. The lecture “Translocal Translations, Feminist Art in Contemporary Mexico (Traducciones translocales, Arte feminista en el México contemporáneo)” will be in English.

“I'm very excited to be in Portland for the first time, working with some of my favorite art audiences: college students and young kids,” Mayer said.

Her exhibition “Mónica Mayer: Translocal Translations, 1978 - 2018” features work from the past four decades, including video, photography, and archives of her performance art and social practices. Visitors will be able to engage in cultural critique through interactive activities in the gallery. Mayer will lead a walk-through of the exhibition at 5:30 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 8, in the Paragon Gallery, Cascade Campus (705 N. Killingsworth St.).

The gallery will be open noon to 7 p.m., Wednesdays through Fridays and noon to 5 p.m., on Saturdays for viewing of her exhibit, which runs from Nov. 7 to Dec. 15. Gallery materials will be in English and in Spanish, and a bilingual catalogue will be produced documenting the exhibition and artist events.

For decades, Mónica Mayer’s work in performance, drawing, photography, and social practice has been engaged with feminist issues. The internationally acclaimed feminist artist has exhibited in over 100 group and solo exhibitions in Mexico, the U.S. and Europe. Mayer is known for pioneering feminist projects such as El Tendedero (The Clothesline), recreated repeatedly since its first iteration in Mexico City in 1978 and proving the continued relevance of the social issues she engages. Her work has been shown internationally for decades, notably in historic survey exhibitions such as “WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution” and “Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960-1985.”

PWALS receives funding from Regional Arts and Culture Council, Portland Community College and Portland State University.

Lincoln Recital Hall (LH75) at Portland State University is ADA accessible. For other accommodations, contact the Disability Resource Center (drcterp@pdx.edu or 503-725-6504) by Wednesday, Oct. 31.

 

About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to more than 73,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. PCC has four comprehensive campuses, eight education centers or areas served, and approximately 200 community locations in the Portland metropolitan area. The PCC district encompasses a 1,500-square-mile area in northwest Oregon and offers two-year degrees, one-year certificate programs, short-term training, alternative education, pre-college courses and life-long learning.

Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/




Attached Media Files: Mónica Mayer, ‘El Tendedero’ (‘The Clothesline’), Los Angeles, 1979. Photo by Víctor Lerma

An Education with a Kick (and a Punch) (Photo)
PCC - 10/16/18 12:57 PM
2018-10/40/118822/MareCoxJiuJitsu.jpg
2018-10/40/118822/MareCoxJiuJitsu.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/40/118822/thumb_MareCoxJiuJitsu.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore. – Nurses are known for their strong sense of compassion and caring. But you wouldn’t want to mess with aspiring nurse Mare Cox.

The Portland Community College transfer student started this academic year as a first-year nursing student at Oregon Health & Science University and is known for dishing out kicks and punches in addition to excellent health care. Cox worked her way through lower division credits at PCC while honing her martial arts skills to prepare for her application to the OHSU’s School of Nursing. From anatomy and physiology to chemistry to, yes, martial arts, the college got her ready for her next stage of her academic journey.

“Ever since I was little girl I enjoyed science and connecting with people on a human level,” said Cox, a Hillsboro resident. “Nursing is the perfect career for me.”

But you might think, “Why martial arts?” It doesn’t exactly go with biology, chemistry or any of your normal science classes. Cox actually credits the Brazilian Jiu Jitsu course she took as part of her physical education option as the class that best prepared her for the high-pressure nursing career. Jiu Jitsu is a martial arts and combat sport system that focuses on grappling and especially ground fighting. The sport is based on the concept that a smaller, weaker person can successfully defend themselves against a bigger, stronger, heavier assailant by using proper technique and leverage.

“That class was the most life changing thing for me,” Cox beamed. “It taught me to fight through challenges so I could reach my goals. It was amazing.”

Cox joined the team at Impact Jiu Jitsu in Hillsboro and took up Muay Thai and boxing, and is working her way up through the ranks. It all connects, she said, to her studies and career plans as nurses need to be strong and able to defend themselves in highly emotional emergency situations.

Cox excelled at PCC. Her last two years at the college included regular appearances on the President and Vice President’s academic lists. Cox, who is Cherokee Indian, even earned three PCC Foundation scholarships — one focused on minority students — to boost her success. In addition to her lower division requirements, she also earned an phlebotomy certification through the CLIMB Center, which allowed her to work part-time at Providence Health & Services.

After completing her lower division coursework this past spring at PCC with a sparkling 3.8 grade-point average, Cox applied for OHSU’s vaunted School of Nursing. The bachelor’s of science program is hard to get into with high entrance standards and expectations of its students. But soon after graduating from PCC, Cox got the acceptance letter in the mail that she was accepted into the 2021 nursing cohort and was able to start classes there this fall.

“Getting accepted to OHSU is one of the coolest things I’ve ever experienced,” said Cox, who wants to become a nurse practitioner. “I had to re-read it to make sure I was reading it correctly. I just felt overwhelmed with excitement, joy and gratitude in that moment.”

For her complete story, visit: https://www.pcc.edu/news/2018/10/mare-cox/

 

About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to more than 73,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. PCC has four comprehensive campuses, eight education centers or areas served, and approximately 200 community locations in the Portland metropolitan area. The PCC district encompasses a 1,500-square-mile area in northwest Oregon and offers two-year degrees, one-year certificate programs, short-term training, alternative education, pre-college courses and life-long learning.

Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/40/118822/MareCoxJiuJitsu.jpg , 2018-10/40/118822/MareCox.jpg

Re-Imagined performance celebrates 80th anniversary of historic radio broadcast (Photo)
WSU Vancouver - 10/16/18 5:22 PM
War of the Worlds
War of the Worlds
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/48/118842/thumb_War_of_the_Worlds.jpg

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Eighty years ago, on the evening before Halloween, radio audiences across the country were shocked, thrilled or panicked by a radio drama depicting an invasion by beings from the planet Mars.

That radio drama was "The War of the Worlds," directed by and starring Orson Welles and members of the Mercury Theatre on the Air. First heard on Oct. 30, 1938, "The War of the Worlds" remains the most famous radio broadcast in history.

To celebrate its 80th anniversary, the Re-Imagined Radio project will offer a live reenactment of "The War of the Worlds" on Oct. 30 at the historic Kiggins Theatre, 1011 Main St., Vancouver. It is produced and directed by John Barber, professor of Creative Media and Digital Culture at WSU Vancouver and head of the Re-Imagined Radio project.

"We plan a great celebration of alien invasion," Barber said. “Our audience will recognize familiar landmarks, buildings and place names."

The re-enactment is based on the original radio drama, except that it is set in Southwest Washington rather than the original New Jersey. The original drama was adapted from H.G. Wells's 1898 novel of the same name.

While the original broadcast was heard across the country, the only way to experience this re-imagined performance is to join the live audience. The doors will open at 6 p.m., and the performance begins at 7 p.m. Admission is $12 at the door, $8 online through the Kiggins website. Costumes are encouraged in honor of Halloween. Concessions, beer and wine will be available for purchase.

A special pre-show alien-themed food and wine service will be available at Niche Wine Bar, 1013 Main St., Vancouver.

Re-Imagined Radio is a partnership between Barber, Kiggins Theatre and Metropolitan Performing Arts, a local school and resource for aspiring actors, dancers and singers. Each production features a live re-creation of a radio drama with voice actors and sound artists.

About the Kiggins Theatre

The theater has been a landmark in downtown Vancouver since 1936. It is owned and operated by WSU alumnus Dan Wyatt Jr. Learn more at kigginstheatre.com.

About Metropolitan Performing Arts

Metropolitan Performing Arts is a nonprofit organization providing performing theater arts education and community theater for Southwest Washington. Learn more metropolitanperformingarts.org.

About WSU Vancouver

As one of six campuses of the Washington State University system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

# # #




Attached Media Files: War of the Worlds

Colleges & Universities - Private
Unveiling of Boxer III Highlights Pacific University Homecoming 2018
Pacific University - 10/17/18 3:39 PM

FOREST GROVE -- Hundreds of Pacific University alumni are expected to return to campus this weekend for Homecoming 2018.

Among the most anticipated events is the unveiling of Boxer III, the third version of an iconic statue symbolizing one of higher education’s most unique mascots.

Additionally, university alumni will take a look back at their participation in the Tom McCall Forum, one of Oregon’s most high-profile public policy events from 1982 to 2007.

The university will also hold its biennial Alumni Awards Dinner, where it will recognize three distinguished alumni for outstanding contributions to their communities and alma mater. 

Homecoming festivities will also include traditional staples, including:

Golden Guard Induction and Sidewalk Signing - Class of 1968

Noise Parade

Boxer Nation Celebration

Additionally, Pacific University Theatre will present Silent Sky, the remarkable story of female astronomer Henrietta Leavitt, as its fall production. Following Friday evening’s performance, attendees will have an opportunity to learn about the various stars and the night sky through a special telescope viewing session presented by the Physics Department.

Visit pacificu.edu/homecoming for a complete schedule of events.

Journalists and news crews planning to cover the festivities should contact Joe Lang at 503-352-2902 or jlang@pacificu.edu for assistance.


Welcome Back, Boxer! (Photo)
Pacific University - 10/16/18 9:47 AM
Pacific University alumni and students will celebrate the return of Boxer on Friday, Oct. 19.
Pacific University alumni and students will celebrate the return of Boxer on Friday, Oct. 19.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/888/118813/thumb_BoxerIII.jpg

Third Version of Statue Depicting Iconic Mascot to be Unveiled at Pacific University's 2018 Homecoming

FOREST GROVE -- The resurrection of an icon representing one of the most storied mascots in all of higher education highlights the 2018 Homecoming festivities at Pacific University.

Alumni, students, employees and friends will receive a new jolt of Boxer Spirit on Friday, Oct. 19, with the unveiling Boxer III, the second replacement to an original bronze statue depicting the university's famed mascot that has been missing for nearly 50 years.

Boxer III will be introduced and dedicated at 3 p.m. on the University Center patio on the Forest Grove Campus to the delight of generations of Pacific alumni, particularly those of the class of 1968, which spearheaded the effort to replace the missing icon.

“Because it was our 50th reunion year, and (the original) Boxer has been gone from campus for nearly that long, we resolved to bring it back,” said Bruce Bishop '68, who led the campaign for Boxer III's creation.

Boxer has represented Pacific's spirit, pride and honor for over a century, ever since the Chinese incense burner statue was gifted to the university in 1896 by the family of Rev. J.E. Walker, a missionary who purchased the statue while in China as a gift for his mother.

Although sometimes mistaken for a dog or a lion, Boxer is a qilin (pronounced chi-lin), a mythical Chinese creature combining several animals that features a lion-like stance, a unicorn-like horn, and deer or ox hooves from the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911).

During the period, qilins were thought to be good omens, and bring wisdom and prosperity to whomever they watch over. The timing of the Walkers' gift to Pacific coincided with the Boxer Rebellion in China, a resistance to foreign influence from Westerners and Christians near the end of the Qing Dynasty. In support of uprising, Pacific's student newspaper The Index, began referring to the qilin as "Boxer" in 1909.

In the early 1900s, Boxer was stolen by a student from its home in Pacific’s chapel, launching a decades-long tradition of “Boxer Flashes” and “Boxer Tosses,” where different student groups and fraternities would take possession of Boxer for a period of time.

In 1969, shortly after the university's adoption of Boxer as the official school mascot, the original statue went missing. In the decades since, rumors have circulated as to where the statue is, and small pieces have been recovered, but no one has seen the full statue in almost five decades. In the 1980s, several Pacific students raised funds for a new Boxer statue, but Boxer II also disappeared after a few flashes.

The new Boxer statue was created by the same sculptor who created Boxer II, but Boxer III will be much more accurate to the original design, thanks to detailed photos and pieces of the original statue that were not available for the creation of Boxer II back in the 1980s.

More information about Boxer's history and legacy at Pacific can be found at pacificu.edu/boxer

                                                                                                                             -pacificu.edu-

Pacific University is a small, but diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Tracing its roots to 1849, when it was chartered as a school for orphans of the Oregon Trail, Pacific has long been devoted to making a difference in the world. Today, students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn. At Pacific University, students and faculty develop close, nurturing relationships that provide an extraordinary educational experience.




Attached Media Files: Pacific University alumni and students will celebrate the return of Boxer on Friday, Oct. 19.

CORRECTED: Pacific University Homecoming Weekend Includes Look Back at Tom McCall Forum (Photo)
Pacific University - 10/15/18 11:58 AM
The 2005 Tom McCall Forum featured former Democratic National Committee Chair Howard Dean and assistant defense secretary Richard Perle debating American Foreign Policy Post--9/11.
The 2005 Tom McCall Forum featured former Democratic National Committee Chair Howard Dean and assistant defense secretary Richard Perle debating American Foreign Policy Post--9/11.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/888/118767/thumb_tom_mccall0029.JPG

FOREST GROVE -- For more than quarter of a century, the Pacific University Tom McCall Forum was a fixture of the Portland political scene, annually bringing high-profile liberal and conservative politicians and pundits to the Pacific Northwest for a debate on public policy issues.

This fall, Pacific University takes a look back at the forum, its impact on thousands of alumni, and the current state of political discourse during a special event during Homecoming. A panel of four alumni and students, moderated by Jim Moore, director of political outreach for the Tom McCall Center for Civic Engagement, will share their recollections and thoughts during the Tom McCall Forum Retrospective. The free public event takes place at 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 19 in the gallery of the Tran Library.

Panelists include Dan James ‘87, deputy administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration and a current member of the Pacific University Board of Trustees; Jennifer Hudson ‘98, governmental and public affairs manager for Schnitzer Steel Industries; Gina Mattioda ‘88, founding director of Multnomah County Office of Public Affairs; and Giovana Oaxaca ’19, a senior double-majoring in politics & government and economics at Pacific.

The Tom McCall Forum brought some of the country’s most well-known political figures to Oregon to engage one-on-one in a lively and spirited discussion that allowed attendees to better understand the reasoning between distinct philosophical differences about how to approach civic challenges.

Spearheaded by Pacific Politics & Government Professor Emeritus Russ Dondero, faculty and students founded the forum in 1982 as the Annual Politics and Law Forum. The event’s primary purpose was to engage Pacific students and provide them opportunities to connect with political movers and shakers. It was renamed in honor of former Oregon Gov. Tom Lawson McCall following his death in 1983. In 1991, the popularity of the event resulted in its move from Forest Grove to the Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall in Portland, where it drew capacity crowds of 2,000.

High-profile participants over the years include former Vice President Dan Quayle and several presidential candidates, including Democratic Party nominee George McGovern, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, former Democratic National Committee Chair Howard Dean, Rev. Jesse Jackson, Ralph Nader, Pat Buchanan, Bill Bradley and a host of other household names, including former Defense secretaries Robert McNamara and Leon Panetta, former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop and former Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle.

The forum’s lively and impassioned debates led to several installments being broadcast on C-SPAN, including the 2005 matchup between Dean, then-chair of the Democratic National Committee, and Richard Perle, considered one of the architects of the war in Iraq, in which a spectator threw a shoe at Perle.

The final installment of the McCall Forum took place in 2007, the year of Dondero’s retirement from the university, and featured former Congressman Lee Hamilton and current National Security Advisor John Bolton discussing U.S. foreign policy.

Dondero told Pacific magazine the McCall Forum was always about attracting students to Pacific, giving an opportunity to connect them with political leaders and inspiring them to civic engagement endeavors. “I always viewed the forum as a large classroom, not only for students, but for the larger community,” he said. “It was a chance for people to sit down and think about important topics.”

The legacy of former Oregon Gov. Tom McCall lives on at Pacific today through the Tom McCall Center for Civic Engagement, a host of the retrospective. The center promotes active citizenship by connecting students, faculty and staff with policymakers and partner organizations in the larger community for collaborations that contribute to the common good for the betterment of society.

Student panelist Oaxaca says participation in McCall Center activities has led her to hands-on opportunities, such as a recent internship with the office of local Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici.

 “The internship was the single-most eye-opening political experience I’ve ever had,” she said. “I've taken some of the knowledge I learned from it and applied it to my studies.”

She has stayed on as a member of Bonamici’s reelection campaign staff and intends to pursue a career in public service. She said the McCall Center gave her the chance she needed. “When you have the support and encouragement you need to succeed, anything is possible.”

Tom McCall Forum Through the Years                

2007 | Lee Hamilton and John Bolton 
U.S. Foreign Policy Post-’08
                    
2006 | Tom Daschle and Pat Buchanan
Democracy at the Crossroads: Does Our System Work
                    
2005 | Howard Dean and Richard Perle 
American Foreign Policy Post–9/11
                    
2004 | Molly Ivins and William Kristol 
Election 2004: Winners and Losers
                    
2003 | Bill Bradley and David Gergen 
Assessing the Bush Presidency: 9/11 to Enron
                    
2002 | Newt Gingrich and Ralph Nader
Who Rules America? Power in the New Millennium
                    
2001 | Alan Dershowitz and Ralph Reed 
Religion, Politics and the Constitution
                    
2000 | Mary Matalin and James Carville 
Leadership for the 21st Century: Campaign 2000
                    
1999 | C. Everett Koop and Joseph Califano 
Health Care: Right or Responsibility
                    
1998 | Haley Barbour and Leon Panetta 
Money and Politics
                    
1997 | Dan Quayle and Robert Kennedy Jr
Striking the Balance: The Economy and the Environmentalist
                    
1996 | Mario Cuomo and Lynn Martin
From New Hampshire to November: Values vs. Votes
                    
1995 | James Carville and William Safire 
Conservation and the Future of the GOP
                    
1994 | Pierre Salinger and John Sununu
The President and the Press: Who Sets the Agenda
                    
1992 | Jesse Jackson and Peter Ueberroth 
American Cities: An Agenda for the Next President
                    
1991 | Geraldine Ferraro and William Bennett
Leadership in the 1990s: Democracy and the National Conscience
                    
1990 | Carl Bernstein and Michael Deaver 
Media in U.S. Politics: Powerbroker or Pawn?
                    
1989 | Arthur Schlesinger Jr. and Robert Bork 
Law of the Land: Politics in Courts?
                    
1988 | Pat Schroeder and Jeane Kirkpatrick
American Foreign Policy in the 1990s: Who is the Enemy?
                    
1987 | Robert McNamara and Zbingniew Brzezinski 
Preventing Nuclear War: The ‘Star Wars’ Option
                    
1986 | Andrew Young and Arthur Laffer 
Reagan’s Stewardship of the Economy
                    
1985 | George McGovern and James Watt
Economic & Environmental Progress: Is There a Free Lunch After All?
                    
1984 | William F. Buckley Jr. and Dick Clark 
America’s Future: Is Liberal Politics Dead?
                    
1983 | Mulford Q. Sibley, Howard Phillips and Admiral Noel Gayler 
Total Disarmament: Hope, Hoax or Utopia?
                    
1982 | Cal Thomas and Sam Brown 
The Moral Majority: A Debate

                                                                                                             -pacificu.edu-

Pacific University is a small, but diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Tracing its roots to 1849, when it was chartered as a school for orphans of the Oregon Trail, Pacific has long been devoted to making a difference in the world. Today, students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn. At Pacific University, students and faculty develop close, nurturing relationships that provide an extraordinary educational experience.




Attached Media Files: The 2005 Tom McCall Forum featured former Democratic National Committee Chair Howard Dean and assistant defense secretary Richard Perle debating American Foreign Policy Post--9/11.

Dr. Eileen Hulme Picked to Lead Warner Pacific Accelerator (Photo)
Warner Pacific University - 10/16/18 11:50 AM
Dr. Eileen Hulme
Dr. Eileen Hulme
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/391/118816/thumb_Hulme_Eileen.jpg

Warner Pacific University President Dr. Andrea P. Cook announced the appointment of Dr. Eileen Hulme as chief acceleration officer. With more than twenty five years of higher education administration experience, Dr. Hulme is known for her work on studying effectiveness in universities in a disruptive environment. In her role at Warner Pacific, Dr. Hulme provides leadership and oversight to the University’s new Accelerator initiative.

“I am tremendously excited to see how the Accelerator will infuse new energy and increased market viability to Warner Pacific academic offerings,” President Cook said. “As Warner Pacific seeks to prepare students for a constantly changing world, I am confident that Dr. Hulme’s leadership and expertise will guide our work to expand partnerships and introduce cutting edge, career-focused academic programming for Warner Pacific students. ”

Accelerating Private Higher Education Programming
The Warner Pacific Accelerator is designed to incubate new programs at a record pace, test their success in the market, and embed growing programs within the institution in sustainable ways.

In her work to build and lead the Warner Pacific University Accelerator, Dr. Hulme will have both external and internal duties. She is responsible for developing key external relationships and partnerships to benefit the institution’s academic programming. At the same time, Dr. Hulme will oversee the development of new programs in a lean start-up fashion to quickly advance high-demand opportunities.

Proven Leadership and Institutional Alignment
A Fulbright Scholar in higher education administration, Dr. Hulme has been a member of faculty at Azusa Pacific University since 2005, teaching at both the master and doctoral level. She has also served as a Vice President at both Baylor University in Waco, Texas and George Fox University in Newberg, Ore. Dr. Hulme’s research focuses on the development of meaning and purpose in college students, the effect of emotional intelligence on success in a university environment, and a strengths-based approach to leadership.

Hulme served on the Warner Pacific Board of Trustees for the last three years. She resigned from her board role in order to engage the institution in a more hands-on capacity as chief acceleration officer.

“I am deeply committed to the mission and vision of Warner Pacific University,” said Dr. Hulme. “I consider it an honor and a blessing to serve alongside President Cook, her executive team, and the gifted faculty and staff at this institution. I look forward to exploring what the future of higher education holds, together.”

# # #

About Warner Pacific University
Founded in 1937, Warner Pacific University is Oregon’s most diverse four-year institution. Offering associate, bachelor, and master degrees, Warner Pacific University empowers students through personalized attention, relational support, and career-focused liberal arts education. Degrees are available in the traditional undergraduate format, as well as one night a week, and online. Earlier this year, Warner Pacific announced tuition reductions for all undergraduate degrees as part of its mission to provide equitable access to higher education for every student. Warner Pacific was recently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as the #1 Most Ethnically Diverse Campus in the West, as a Best College in the West (10), and a Best Value School (8). Warner Pacific is the only four-year college or university in Oregon to be named a Hispanic-Serving Institution by the Department of Education. Learn more about Warner Pacific University at www.warnerpacific.edu.




Attached Media Files: Dr. Eileen Hulme , Warner Pacific University Logo

Multnomah Co. Schools
ZSpace virtual reality van visits Clear Creek Middle School October 18 to engage students in STEAM Learning
Gresham-Barlow Sch. Dist. - 10/18/18 9:51 AM

Who: ZSpace Virtural Reality van

What: zspace.com: a Virtual Reality experience for  students to engage in STEAM learning

When: 8 - 4; today 10/18/18

Where: Clear Creek Middle School located at 219 NE 219th Avenue, Gresham, OR 97030

Why: Learning opportunity that is linked to science, technology, engineering, art, & math.

STEAM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, Art + Design, Math


Monday, October 22, 2018 Executive & Regular Board Business Meeting Agenda
Parkrose Sch. Dist. - 10/17/18 6:23 PM

The Parkrose Board of Education of School District No. 3, Multnomah County, Oregon, will convene in an Executive & Regular Board Business Meeting on Monday, October 22, 2018 in the Boardroom at the Parkrose District Office located at 10636 NE Prescott St., Portland, Oregon at the hour of 6:30 pm. The Board will receive reports from the Associated Student Body, Teaching & Learning, Technology and Student Services. Hear presentations on seismic readiness, middle school attendance, Rossi Farms community collaboration and Rossi development. They will take action on consent agenda items. The Board will report/discuss items of Board Business including: committee liaison reports, legislative update and color caucus. Twice during each Regular Board Business meeting time is set aside to hear Citizen Comments, see policy attached to agenda for further details. The agenda is posted on the Parkrose School District Website at https://v3.boardbook.org/Public/PublicHome.aspx?ak=1000205.  


Washington Co. Schools
Jackson Elementary Student Brigette Harrington Wins U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree Contest
Hillsboro Sch. Dist. - 10/15/18 2:50 PM

Student will travel with her family to Washington, D.C. to be the official lighter of “The People’s Tree” from Oregon’s Willamette National Forest

October 15, 2018, Hillsboro, OR - Jackson Elementary School fourth-grader Brigette Harrington was
announced as the winner of Oregon’s U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree essay contest
in a surprise announcement delivered by Governor Kate Brown this morning.

The contest drew more than 1,200 submissions from fourth-graders around the state, all of whom answered the prompt: “What I love about Oregon’s outdoors.”

For winning the contest, Brigette has earned an all-expenses-paid trip to Washington, D.C., this December where she will serve as the official lighter of “The People’s Tree,” which is coming from Oregon’s Willamette National Forest. The 80-foot-tall noble fir has already been selected, and will be the first noble ever displayed on the Capitol lawn.

In addition to the trip, Brigette received a 2018 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree ornament and a special “ugly sweater” baseball jersey created by the Eugene Emeralds minor league baseball team in partnership with the Willamette National Forest Service.

“Amazing” was the word Brigette used to describe her feelings about winning the contest and meeting the Governor. When asked why she loves the outdoors so much, Brigette mentioned animals and fresh air.

Read the official press release here.
Read Brigette’s winning entry here.
See pictures of the reveal event here.

###




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/107/118785/Media_Release_Jackson_Student_Wins_Capitol_Christmas_Tree_Contest_101518.pdf

Clark Co. Schools
Special education teacher pens book about his struggles with anxiety, and the students who help him overcome it   (Photo)
Battle Ground Sch. Dist. - 10/18/18 9:53 AM
Illustrations of the characters from "A Special Education in Anxiety"
Illustrations of the characters from "A Special Education in Anxiety"
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/20/118898/thumb_Character_Illustrations.jpg

When he was a high school student in Beaverton, Ore., Chief Umtuch Middle School special education teacher Brad Smith signed up to be a peer tutor for students with special needs. He figured that it would be a good experience to connect with and help his peers. What he wasn’t expecting was that this seemingly inconsequential decision would entirely change his life’s trajectory.

“I still remember my first day walking into the classroom, and there was just this feeling of acceptance from the kids,” Smith said. “The classroom was the definition of a ‘judgement-free zone’, and within just a couple of weeks, I knew that becoming a special education teacher was exactly what I wanted to do.”

Smith soon graduated from high school and moved on to college at Seattle Pacific University. All along the way, he chose classes, internships and eventually a graduate program to prepare him to be a special education teacher so that he could help teach students and adults with autism, Down syndrome, ADHD, and intellectual and other disabilities.

It’s been 11 years since Smith finished his master’s program and was hired first as an instructional assistant, and then as a special education teacher. However, about eight years ago, Smith’s trajectory was unexpectedly altered yet again. This time, he was simply sitting on a flight when he made what he describes as “awkward eye contact” with a flight attendant. While such a thing wouldn’t normally have stood out for the typically outgoing Smith, for whatever reason, the incident triggered the onset of something entirely new to him: debilitating bouts of social anxiety.

“For most people, making awkward eye contact wouldn’t be a big deal,” Smith said. “They might think about it for a minute, but then a person could just move on with their day. For whatever reason, that incident and that moment stuck in my mind and the more I thought about it, the more I would ruminate and become anxious about the next social encounter I would have. Suddenly, worrying about things like meeting people, having conversations, and making eye contact snowballed until it became hard for me to talk to people without having panic attacks that would leave me dripping with sweat.”

Statistically speaking, it’s very likely that someone you know is affected by an anxiety disorder. The National Institute of Health estimates that 19 percent of adults in the U.S. had any anxiety disorder in the past year, and 31 percent will experience an anxiety disorder at some point in their lives.

After a few years of trying to cope with his social anxiety through therapy and medications, Smith also turned to writing as a way to process the thoughts and feelings he was experiencing. Before long, he decided that he would turn his writings into a book. Now, four years after he started writing it, Smith has published his book “A Special Education in Anxiety.”

In the book, anxiety consumes the life of a young special education teacher named Michael Smith, causing him to feel hopeless and defeated. He constantly worries about when the next cycle of anxiety will strike and is desperately trying to keep it from derailing what he is truly passionate about: teaching his class of middle school special education students.

Readers of “A Special Education in Anxiety” will go through a year in teacher Michael Smith's unique and engaging class. Together, the students and teacher experience a series of positive breakthroughs and heartbreaking loss. His special needs students, as well as some unexpected adults, are key in Michael's pursuit of overcoming his anxiety.

“When people ask me if this book is fiction or nonfiction, I have to say it’s a little of both,” Smith said. “While events, plot points and the students in the book are all made up, they are all heavily inspired by the amazing kids I’ve had the blessing of working with each year. And the anxiety described in this book was–and in some cases is–still very real to me.”

While Smith’s book started out as a therapeutic way to help him work through his anxiety, he soon realized that was only a portion of the story. After all, the first words of the title aren’t about anxiety, but are about special education. That is because the six students you get to know over the course of the story become part of the solution in helping the main character come to grips and find peace with his mental health issues, mirroring Smith’s real-life experiences.

“Anxiety manifests in different ways for those experiencing it,” Smith said. “Unfortunately, the topic is a very relatable story to many people. Ever since I wrote this book, I’ve had so many amazing conversations with friends and co-workers about how it has impacted them or someone that they love.”

Smith’s story, both the book and his own life story, are powerful illustrations that everyone can benefit from interacting with their peers who have special needs. Such interactions are beneficial to everyone involved, and you never know: they just might change the course of someone’s life.

“A Special Education in Anxiety” is available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon, or directly from radley@battlegroundps.org">Brad Smith by sending him an email.




Attached Media Files: Illustrations of the characters from "A Special Education in Anxiety" , Brad Smith signs copies of his book following a reading at the Vancouver Barnes & Noble

Prairie Drama Club presents Chicago (Photo)
Battle Ground Sch. Dist. - 10/16/18 2:05 PM
Poster for Prairie High School's production of 'Chicago'
Poster for Prairie High School's production of 'Chicago'
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/20/118826/thumb_CHICAGO_POSTER.jpg

Prairie High School Drama presents “Chicago” beginning Oct. 26. Set in the “Windy City” during the Roaring Twenties, chorus girl Roxie Hart murders a faithless lover and convinces her hapless husband, Amos, to take the rap. That is, until Amos finds out he's been duped and turns on Roxie. Convicted and sent to death row, Roxie and another "Merry Murderess," Velma Kelly, vie for the spotlight and the headlines, ultimately joining forces in search of the American Dream: fame, fortune, and acquittal.

Based on the award-winning musical written by Fred Ebb, Bob Fosse, John Kander and Maurine Dallas Watkins, PHS Drama’s show runs Oct. 26-27 and Nov. 2-3. The play has been adapted to be content-appropriate and flexible for high school students.

Performances will be at Prairie High School, 11311 NE 119th St., Vancouver. Tickets can be purchased online at www.prairiedramaclub.com and cost $6 for students, $10 for senior citizens, and $12 for adults.

The performance dates and times are:

Friday, October 26 at 7:00 p.m.
Saturday, October 27 at 1:00 p.m.
Saturday, October 27 at 7:00 p.m.
Friday, November 2 at 7:00 p.m.
Saturday, November 3 at 1:00 p.m.
Saturday, November 3 at 7:00 p.m.




Attached Media Files: Poster for Prairie High School's production of 'Chicago'

MEDIA ALERT: Teachers from 11 school districts visit Goose Point Oyster Farm to learn about impacts of climate change
ESD 112 - 10/18/18 5:23 PM

PHOTO OPP:  K-12 teachers touring an oyster farm – please wear waterproof boots

 

WHAT:

Teachers from 11 public school districts and one Tribal school are going to Goose Point Oyster Farm to learn how climate science is affecting oyster cultivation from both an economic and sustainability perspective. Teachers will visit the business for half a day, and spend the second half developing career-connected classroom activities to engage their students in STEM and career awareness.

The externship, led by Educational Service District (ESD) 112’s STEM experts, is part of a $3 million Climate Science grant from Governor Inslee to connect the work of scientists and the effects of a shifting climate on local businesses with classroom curriculum.

 

WHEN:

Friday, October 19, 2018
9:00 – 11:30 am

 

WHERE:

Goose Point Oyster Farm
7081 Niawiakum St Hwy #101
Bay Center, WA 98527

 

The media is invited to attend to hear first-hand how our changing climate is impacting the oyster business and to see how teacher training can bring climate science to life for SW Washington students.

 

About the Climate Science Grant

All nine Educational Service Districts (ESDs) in Washington are launching programs for science teacher training around Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and climate science, thanks to grant money made available to the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) by Governor Inslee. Distributed by OSPI, the ESDs are sharing $3 million from the state’s general fund for teacher professional development, development of instructional materials and student events. With an additional $1 million provided to community-based nonprofits to partner with public schools around NGSS, the $4 million appropriation makes Washington the first state in the country to dedicate significant funding for climate science education and NGSS.

With an allocation of $304,140, ESD 112’s work includes a series of free teacher trainings and seminars aimed at helping K-12 educators develop authentic learning opportunities for students; bringing current events together with science for the benefit of public education. Throughout the school year, there will be six 1-day externships for teachers developed in collaboration with local climate-related STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) businesses or organizations.


ESD 112 Uses WA State Climate Science Grant to Connect Local Businesses, Scientists, and SW Washington Schools to Teach Kids the Effects of Our Changing Climate
ESD 112 - 10/16/18 12:11 PM

As part of a $3 million Climate Science grant from Governor Inslee, ESD 112’s STEM experts will be taking classroom teachers this Friday to a local oyster farm to learn how climate change is impacting their business. This is just one activity to connect the work of scientists and the real effects of a shifting climate on local businesses with classroom curriculum for public schools in SW Washington. This grant, along with an additional $1 million for partnering non-profits, makes Washington the first state in the country to dedicate significant funding for climate science education and NGSS.

With an allocation of $304,140, ESD 112’s work includes a series of teacher trainings and seminars aimed at helping K-12 educators develop authentic learning opportunities for students; bringing current events together with science for the benefit of public education. Throughout the school year, there will be six 1-day externships for teachers developed in collaboration with local climate-related STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) businesses or organizations. Participating teachers will spend the first part of the day visiting the business and learning about the impacts of climate change on their work. During the second half of the day, teachers will collaborate in small grade-level teams to develop a classroom task based on their new learning.

There will also be six STEM seminars in which scientists and researchers present the impacts of climate change on their work to a group of teachers.

Upcoming Events

  • Friday, October 19, 2018, 9:00 – 11:30 am: nPower Teachers externship #1, Goose Point Oysters, Naselle, WA – How our changing climate is effecting this local oyster farm (for background, watch this Smithsonian video with the owners of Goose Point Oysters: https://ocean.si.edu/ocean-life/invertebrates/facing-climate-change-oyster-farmers)
  • Monday, October 29, 2018, 8:30 – 11:30 am: STEM seminar #1, Fire and our Future, Columbia River Gorge Interpretive Center and Museum, Stevenson, WA
  • Thursday, November 15, 2018, 8:30 – 11:30 am: STEM seminar #2, Coastal Hazards and a Changing Climate, Adrift Hotel, Long Beach, WA
  • More externships and seminars to be announced…

The media is invited to attend these events and follow along with how the State of Washington and ESD 112 are bringing climate science to life for SW Washington students.

Partners and collaborators for these events include Washington Green Schools, Climate Impacts Group at University of Washington, Cascade Volcano Observatory, Water Resource Center, Friends of Ridgefield Wildlife Refuge, Pacific Education Institute, Clark County Public Health, Goose Island Oysters, Mount St. Helen’s Institute, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Clark County PUD, and SW Clean Air Agency.

 

About the Climate Science Grant

All nine Educational Service Districts (ESDs) in Washington are launching programs for science teacher training around Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and climate science, thanks to grant money made available to the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) by Governor Inslee. Distributed by OSPI, the ESDs are sharing $3 million from the state’s general fund for teacher professional development, development of instructional materials and student events. With an additional $1 million provided to community-based nonprofits to partner with public schools around NGSS, the $4 million appropriation makes Washington the first state in the country to dedicate significant funding for climate science education and NGSS.


Hockinson School District Board of Directors Regular Meeting
Hockinson Sch. Dist. - 10/19/18 1:46 PM

Date:               Monday, October 22, 2018

Time:               6:00 p.m. Regular Meeting

Location:         Hockinson School District Board Room

Address:          17912 NE 159th St.; Brush Prairie, WA 98606


Union Ridge Elementary Students Collect Socks for Homeless Shelters (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 10/15/18 3:59 PM
Union Ridge Elementary students Savanhy Virakitti and Bruce Kizim collect donated socks for their Socktober drive.
Union Ridge Elementary students Savanhy Virakitti and Bruce Kizim collect donated socks for their Socktober drive.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/889/118791/thumb_Socktober1.jpg

Monday, October 15, 2018 – Ridgefield, Washington – Socktober is a nationwide movement to collect socks for homeless shelters.  Socks are one of the most needed but least often donated items at shelters.  Students from Stephanie Brown’s class at Union Ridge Elementary in the Ridgefield School District are helping fill that gap with their own Socktober drive.  Their goal is to collect 1,000 pairs of socks for the Council for the Homeless in Vancouver. 

Many of the students in the RISE (Reaching Independence through Structured Education) program are on the autism spectrum, and the students are running every element of the program.  The students visited each classroom in the school to place donation bags.  RISE teacher Stephanie Brown said, “They went into classrooms to say a few words, which can be difficult for them.  They handed out the bags and were able to say, ‘This is for socks.  Thank you.’” 

Every day, the RISE students walk around school with a big wagon to collect donations.  Then they sort the socks and graph donations to keep track.  It has been part of their curriculum in other ways as well.  They have read books about homelessness, and they colored the posters promoting Socktober around the school.  Using the Socktober drive across multiple subjects has helped reinforce their learning.  “It’s awesome to see the concepts starting to sink in,” Brown said. 

“But my biggest drive is to show them that anybody and everybody can make a difference,” Brown explained.  “We have some of the most impacted students in our district, and here they are doing something fantastic and wonderful. “ 

Socktober runs through the month of October.  If you’d like to drop off new socks for the Socktober drive, please leave them at the Union Ridge Elementary School office. 

###




Attached Media Files: Union Ridge Elementary students Savanhy Virakitti and Bruce Kizim collect donated socks for their Socktober drive.

Cowlitz Co. & Lower Columbia (WA) Schs.
Community Invited to Preview Designs for Two New Kelso Schools
Kelso Sch. Dist. - 10/18/18 5:29 PM

The Kelso School District community is invited to preview the initial designs for two of the three new schools being built thanks to the voter-approved bond in February. Schematics of the new schools at Lexington and Wallace will be up in the Kelso High School Commons on Thursday, October 25th from 6:00 to 8:00 PM for viewing and discussion.

The designs are the result of many hours of research and community input from multiple committees. An Educational Specifications Committee worked together to determine needs for each school and tour other elementary schools in the Washington and Oregon for ideas and best practices. Then a Design Advisory Committee refined ideas and worked with architects to conceptualize plans.

In addition to a station for each of the two schools, a safety and security station will also be available at the open house for community input.

Team members from Integrus Architecture, FORMA Construction Company, and Kelso School District will be leading discussions at each station and on-hand to answer questions and record community comments.




Attached Media Files: Lexington site plan , Wallace site plan

Public Invited to Attend Reception for Long-Time Public Educator, Bob Lucas (Photo)
Kelso Sch. Dist. - 10/16/18 4:30 PM
reception invite
reception invite
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/57/118837/thumb_Bobs_party.jpg

The community is invited to join a celebration for Bob Lucas as he retires from Kelso School District School Board. Bob originally became a Kelso School District Board Member in the 1980’s when Carrolls School District consolidated with the Kelso. He later became a teacher and spent 14 of his 17 years as a teacher in the Kelso School District.  Bob then rejoined the Board of Directors in 2011 and has served as a member, vice president and, most recently, president.

The community is welcome to attend the reception at Kelso High School in the library on Wednesday, October 31st from 1:30 to 3:30 pm. Comments will begin at 2:00 pm.




Attached Media Files: reception invite

MEDIA ALERT: Beacon Hill Elementary Students Campaign for Student Council Seats (Photo)
Kelso Sch. Dist. - 10/15/18 5:14 PM
Peyton's campaign poster
Peyton's campaign poster
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/57/118797/thumb_Peyton_0970.jpg

Photo Op: 5th grade students giving campaign speeches to entire student body

 

WHAT:

More than a dozen 5th graders at Beacon Hill Elementary are campaigning for one of six seats on the new Student Council at the school this week. The nominees will be giving a two-minute speech to the entire student body stating the position on the council they’re running for, a need they see at the school and what they propose to do about it, and why they should be elected.

Platforms students are running on include recycling, anti-bullying, food drives, fundraising for children's hospitals, and starting a "green day" on Fridays for students to pick up any trash they see.

 

WHEN:

Wednesday, October 17
1:10 pm

 

WHERE:

Beacon Hill Elementary
257 Alpha Dr. 
Longview, WA 98632

 

WHY:

Learning about leadership is important, and teacher Laura Cain was “looking for a way to make a difference in the lives of these students, and to help them make a difference in the lives of others, as well.”

 

MORE:

Voting will happen after all speeches are given at the 1:10 assembly and officers will be announced Thursday morning. The first council meeting will be October 29. 




Attached Media Files: Peyton's campaign poster , Isaac's campaign poster

Woodland Primary School's new Dual Language Program empowers kindergarten students to become biliterate and bilingual in English and Spanish (Photo)
Woodland Sch. Dist. - 10/15/18 4:30 PM
Woodland Primary School Principal Ingrid Colvard shows the planning timeline for how each element of the dual language program's lessons intersect, ensuring enrolled students learn the same lessons as their single-language counterparts throughout the year
Woodland Primary School Principal Ingrid Colvard shows the planning timeline for how each element of the dual language program's lessons intersect, ensuring enrolled students learn the same lessons as their single-language counterparts throughout the year
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/59/118761/thumb_WPS-Dual-Language-Program-Ingrid-Colvard-1.jpg

Monday, October 15, 2018-Woodland, WA-Kindergarten students in Woodland Primary School’s new Dual Language Program use English and Spanish to learn school lessons, make new friends, and positively change the entire school’s culture. Woodland Primary School’s dual language program, introduced at the beginning of this school year, uses a 50/50 model with bilingual teachers giving lessons for half of the day in Spanish and half of the day in English.

An Overview of Dual Language

Currently, the school’s dual language program serves 44 students in two kindergarten classes. The dual language program is opt-in with families electing to enroll their student in either a dual language classroom or a traditional class. “Many people might think learning two languages at such a young age would be confusing but it’s actually the opposite,” explained Woodland Primary School’s Principal, Ingrid Colvard. “By having the different physical and audio cues provided by both languages, students have even more references to associate with both their English and Spanish lessons; the cues from one language help the students understand the other.”

For half of each school day, teachers speak entirely in that time’s designated language without switching to the other language, wearing colored scarves to show students which language they will be speaking. Only students have the option of using either language if they need to express something they don’t yet know how to say in the designated language. “Fully immersing a student in a language without switching helps students learn by repetition as well as avoiding the desire to fall back to their native language,” explained Jill Thoeny, one of the school’s two bilingual kindergarten teachers.

Students can be native speakers of either language when they enroll in the program with optimal enrollment having equal numbers of English and Spanish speakers to better use a learning technique called peer modeling. “Each student is assigned a peer who’s a native speaker of the other language,” said Ingrid. “Each student helps their peer better learn their own native language while effectively learning more about both their native language and the new language at the same time.”

Teachers also use a technique called Total Physical Response (TPR) to enhance learning and improve students’ language development. “Studies show that students – especially young students – learn faster when a physical action is associated with the lesson they’re learning,” said Ingrid. “For each element of a lesson, the teachers demonstrate a physical action for the students to copy so students can connect the lesson with that action.”

While learning animal vocabulary in a recent lesson, students made a fist rotating in their other hand to simulate the movement of a tortoise – “tortuga” in Spanish – and spoke the word aloud to music. “The more students connect a letter or word to a physical action, the more they recognize and retain that word,” said Jill. “Even the music played in the background during class activities is chosen intentionally to use sounds and words the students have been learning during the lesson.”

The Benefits of Dual Language Learning

The long-term benefits of dual language learning reach beyond becoming bilingual, and Woodland Public Schools has committed to providing the program to enrolled students at least to fourth grade. “Studies show that students enrolled in dual language programs see academic gains beyond their single-language peers in all subject areas, not just language arts, beginning in third grade,” explained Ingrid. “When a district implements a dual language program, it’s imperative that everyone involved – both staff and families – remain committed to the program for the long-term in order for students to benefit.”

Woodland Public Schools introduced the program to help address the increasing diversity of the community’s population. “More than 25% of the primary school’s entering kindergartners cannot speak English,” said Ingrid. “In an effort to more effectively work with our Hispanic population, I’ve been learning Spanish, too.” The dual language program received enthusiastic response from the community nearly immediately. “We didn’t need to actively recruit any students; we received the exact number of applicants we needed,” said Ingrid. “Our native Spanish-speaking population was so supportive – they really wanted the district to introduce a dual language program like this.”

Shortly after the school year started, Woodland Public Schools received a $34,000 grant from the state to help the school buy teaching and learning materials to enhance the dual language program’s curriculum. “What we can do with this kind of funding in our first year is absolutely huge,” said Ingrid. “The grant’s going to make a big difference as we will be able to buy more bilingual learning materials to provide additional resources to our students.”

In addition to funding support, the school has been working closely with other districts throughout the state who provide immersion programs including Evergreen Public Schools. “We have received significant support from other districts through site visits and guidance,” said Ingrid. “Collaborating with other schools helps all the districts involved improve their immersion programs through teamwork and strategy development.”

Woodland Primary has already started seeing big changes from the new program. “Before we started, our native Spanish-speaking kindergarten students took a great deal of time feeling comfortable enough to speak during class,” said Ingrid. “The program has changed the entire culture of our school – students aren’t afraid to play with others who don’t speak their language, and students see the staff trying to speak multiple languages which shows how we’re all learning new things, students and adults alike.”

Jill agreed with Ingrid, “For our native Spanish speakers, hearing their home language used around the school brings a great deal of comfort,” she said. “We want to make honoring languages something that lives every day throughout our school; we see our Spanish-speaking students smiling and feeling okay using a language their friend might not completely understand because their language is visibly accepted here.”

Anahisse Hodge, the school’s other bilingual kindergarten teacher, has started seeing the effects the dual language program has on students not enrolled in it. “We hear students not in the program asking their friends how to say different words in Spanish and then trying to learn the words themselves,” she said. “It’s only been a month and a half and students are already using Spanish everywhere!”

In addition to the students, staff members see a difference in the families of native Spanish speakers. “Families of Spanish-speaking students are feeling empowered by the program and are attending school activities in greater numbers than they did previously,” said Ingrid. “We’re incredibly excited to see this kind of response.”

Teacher Background

The background of the kindergarten teachers teaching dual language is nearly as diverse as the program itself. Jill, a Woodland native, got her first taste of the needs of bilingual students when she used an elective while attending high school to help student-teach at the primary school. “I realized at that point that I had to learn Spanish to be a more effective elementary school teacher,” she said. “After teaching in immersion schools in Oregon and Spanish-speaking schools abroad, I knew I needed to bring that experience with me when I came back to Woodland.”

Anahisse started school in Oregon as a native Spanish-speaker who didn’t know English. “When I attended kindergarten, I was told I couldn’t speak Spanish at school even though that’s all I knew,” she said. “Eventually, I became so immersed in English that my mom couldn’t speak with me anymore.” Anahisse’s parents emphasized the importance of keeping up her ability to speak and write in Spanish. “Since I didn’t learn the proper way to read and write Spanish at school, my mom helped me learn at home; my experience made me realize what so many of our Woodland parents experience in their own homes.”

For More Information

Families interested in enrolling their students in the program don’t need to be bilingual themselves and students do not need to have any prior knowledge of their non-native language. Additionally, there are no screening criteria for students to enroll – all students are eligible. Applicants are accepted in the order of their application date and the district has a designated lottery-system should the number of applicants exceed the number of available classroom spots.

Although there is no additional cost to enroll, parents and guardians must remember that the true benefits from a dual language program involve a long-term commitment and should plan for their student to continue enrollment in the program for the grades following kindergarten, too.

###




Attached Media Files: Woodland Primary School Principal Ingrid Colvard shows the planning timeline for how each element of the dual language program's lessons intersect, ensuring enrolled students learn the same lessons as their single-language counterparts throughout the year , Jill Thoeny, one of two bilingual kindergarten teachers, teaches half of each school day in Spanish and the other half in English , Teachers use a technique called Total Physical Response (TPR) which associates lessons with physical actions, such as making the movement of a tortoise in your hand to learn the word "tortuga" , Jill Thoeny, one of two bilingual kindergarten teachers, teaches half of each school day in Spanish and the other half in English

PR Agencies
Salem City Club Informed Voter Series A Debate of Ballot Measure 105 -- Sanctuary Law (Photo)
VanNatta Public Relations - 10/17/18 2:56 PM
2018-10/1853/118874/WHC_logo_medium.jpg
2018-10/1853/118874/WHC_logo_medium.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1853/118874/thumb_WHC_logo_medium.jpg

Salem, OR (Oct. 17, 2018) - Salem City Club, a biweekly gathering of more than 100 members, will meet Oct. 26 at the Willamette Heritage Center to discuss Ballot Measure 105. The measure proposes to remove Oregon’s listing as a “sanctuary state” by allowing local law enforcement resources and personnel to be used in the prevention of illegal immigration.  

Cynthia Kendoll, President of Oregonians for Immigration Reform, will speak in support of Ballot Measure 105. She also serves on the advisory board of the Colorado Alliance for Immigration Reform. 

Andrea Williams, Executive Director of CAUSA (Oregon‘s statewide immigrant rights organization), will speak in opposition to Measure 105. Williams also serves as a board member of the Northwest Health Foundation and the National Partnership for New Americans.  

The controversial ballot measure essentially dictates whether local resources will be used to battle immigration or not. The ramifications of this issue will be discussed. 

The meeting will take place Friday, Oct. 26, at 11:30 a.m. at the Willamette Heritage Center at 1313 Mill Street St. SE. Members pay $20 and non-members pay $10 without lunch or $30 with lunch. Register online at SalemCityClub.com.




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1853/118874/WHC_logo_medium.jpg , 2018-10/1853/118874/SCC_Short_Burgundy_JPG.jpg

Rowers take on the Willamette River for Regatta at Portland Fall Classic
Woloshin Communications Inc. - 10/17/18 1:32 PM

October 17, 2018

Rowers take on the Willamette River for Regatta at Portland Fall Classic

 

Portland, Oregon – Rain or shine, 1,300 rowers from high school-aged, to college and adult, will race on the Willamette River in the Portland Fall Classic, hosted by Station L Rowing Club in Portland. The races begin at 8:30 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 28, from the Eastbank Esplanade.

Teams from throughout the Pacific Northwest will compete in the regatta, including colleges, such as Portland State, Oregon State, Washington State, Gonzaga, Lewis and Clark and University of Portland. The teams will race 5,000 meters in various categories with staggered starts of about 15 seconds apart. The long, skinny boats are completely human-powered and move very fast down the river.

Rowing and paddling are becoming a very popular sports in Portland with a fast rate of growth. Rowers utilize every major muscle group in the body and is a cardiovascular workout second only to cross-country skiing. Most people recognize the sport from Summer Olympics. Teams compete in a variety of configurations, including eights, fours and doubles in sweep rowing and sculling.

Station L Rowing Club competes out of the Portland Boathouse at 1515 SE Water Avenue, which also hosts a variety of other competitive paddling and rowing teams. The Boathouse, rebuilt 20 years ago through Portland Development Commission grant, is losing its lease and will soon need to find a new home on Portland’s waterfront.

 

About Station L Rowing Club
Station L Rowing Club is a member governed not-for-profit club located in Portland, Oregon.  As a community rowing club, we offer a complete adult rowing program, from Learn to Row classes for the general public to high level competitive opportunities for our members.  Member coached programs include sculling and sweep rowing.

Club members compete in local, regional and national regattas, generally in the “Masters” category.  In 2017 we won the Women’s Team Points Trophy at the USRowing NW Regional Masters Championships, In 2016, we won the Efficiency Points Trophy at the USRowing Masters National Championships.

 

For more information on the Station L Rowing Club, please visit https://stationlrowingclub.com/

For more information on the Portland Fall Classic, please visit https://www.regattacentral.com/regatta/?job_id=5989

# # #


Organizations & Associations
Dr. Fernando Torres Gil to Keynote Diversity: Aging with a Purpose at PSU Friday
AARP Oregon - 10/18/18 3:09 PM

OGA 2018 Annual Conference
"Diversity: Aging with a Purpose"

Friday, October 19, 2018
8 am - 3:45 pm
Portland State University - Smith Memorial Student Union

8:00 - 8:30 AM: Registration & Breakfast

8:30 - 8:45 AM: Welcome

8:45 - 9:45 AM: Keynote

Our keynote speaker is Fernando Torres-Gil, M.S.W., Ph.D., who will speak on the topic of his new book, “The Politics of a Majority-Minority Nation: Aging, Disability and Immigration.” Dr.l Gil is the former Asst. Secretary on Aging. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fernando_Torres-Gil

10:00 - 11:00 AM: Panel of Elders

The keynote talk will be followed in the plenary session by a panel of diverse elders, including José Manuel Romero, a retired educator, community activist and lifelong advocate for the Chicano/Latino community, Elaine Friesen-Strang, the Volunteer State President for AARP Oregon and formerly a state director for a guardianship program service for adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and Tekle Sebhatu, a native of Eritrea, East Africa, who immigrated to the U.S. as a student in 1973 and became an entrepreneur and academician.

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM: Concurrent Session 1

  • Marcus Mundy (Coalition of Communities of Color), Maria Caballero-Rubio (Centro Cultural of Washington County), and Jay Bloom (Bloom Anew) – Working with Communities of Color: Research, Policies, and Practice
  • Kathleen Sullivan, Ph.D. (Governor's Commission on Senior Services) and Scott Moore, J.D. (Quest Center for Integrative Health) – Creating Safe and Welcoming Space for LGBT Mid-life and Older Adults

12:15 - 1:00 PM: Lunch (not included in Morning-only registration)

1:00 - 2:00 PM: Concurrent Session 2

  • Mai-Yee Yuan (Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon) and Marilou Carrera (Oregon Health Equity Alliance) – The Intersection of Older Adults, Health, Safety, and Housing in the Asian and Pacific American Community
  • John Horvick (DHM Research) – Understanding Financial Security in Communities of Color in Oregon

2:15 - 3:15 PM: Concurrent Session 3

  • Ben Duncan (Multnomah County) – Developing a Workforce Equity Strategic Plan: Lessons Learned from Multnomah County
  • Alan DeLaTorre, Ph.D. (Portland State University) and Cory Bolkan, Ph.D. (Washington State University, Vancouver) – Age-Friendly Housing through an Equity Lens

3:15 - 3:45 PM: Wrap-up and door prizes


Red Cross Disaster Team Responds to Multi-Family Fire Affecting 2-Adults and Pets in Ne Portland
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 10/19/18 10:25 PM

Disaster responders with the local chapter of the American Red Cross responded to a multi-family fire on Friday, October 19, 2018 at approximately 20:00 hours in the 4000 block of Ne 12th Avenue in Portland, Oregon.

This fire affected a family of 2-adults and pets. The Red Cross provided resources to address the immediate basic needs for this familily such housing, food, clothing, comfort kits including toiletry items. The Red Cross also provided recovery information including health and mental health services as needed.

Additional information about this incident may be provided by the first responding agency/fire department.

The Red  Ross in Oregon and Sw Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters such as home fires each day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers free installation of smoke detectors in our community. Residents may call (503)528-5783 or by completing an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.

 

 

 


Red Cross Responds to a Fire Disaster Affecting 2-Adults and One Pet in Sandy
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 10/19/18 5:55 PM

Disaster responders with the Anericn Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on Friday October 19, 2018 at approximately 16:30 hours in the 40,000 block of Se Latino Lane in Sandy, Oregon.

The Single-Family Fire affected 2-adults and 1-pet. The Red Cross provided resources to help address immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits including toiletry items.  Additionally, The Red Cross provided information about recovery services, medical and mental help resources as needed. 

Additional information about this incident, if available may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and SW Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters like a home fire each day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503)528-5783 or complete an online form at : www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.


Red Cross Responds to a Multi-Family Fire Disaster Affecting 7-Adults and Pets In Lane County
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 10/19/18 1:52 AM

Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a multilti-family home fire disaster on Thursday October 18, 2018,  at approximately 23:45 hours in the 47,000 block of Riverview Street in Oakridge, Oregon.

The Fire affected 7-adults and several pets. The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits including toiletry items. Also provided was information about health along with mental health services as needed. 

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The American Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters every day. The Red Cross  advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503)528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.

 


Red Cross responds to a multi-family fire disaster affecting 6-Adults and 2-Children in Oak Grove
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 10/18/18 9:23 AM

Disaster responders with the local chapter of the American Red Cross responded to a multi-family home fire disaster on Thursday October, 18, 2018 at approximately 0230 hours in the 14300 block of Se Christopher Ct. in Oak Grove, Oregon.

The fire affected 6-adults and 2-children. The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected, such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits along with toiletry items. The Red Cross also provided  information about recovery services such as health and mental healt services as needed.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503)528-5783 or complete an online form at: www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment. 


Red Cross Responds to Disaster in Coos Bay affecting 1-adult
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 10/17/18 8:17 PM

Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a single-family home fire disaster on Wednesday, October 17, 2018 at approximately 18:45 in the 63,000 block of Railroad Street, Coos Bay, Oregon.

This fire disaster affected 1-adult. The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected, such as temporary housing, food, clohing,comfort kits including toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services as needed.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department. The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503)528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.

 


Red Cross Responds to Disaster affecting 1 Adult and 1 Child in Lebanon
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 10/15/18 11:14 PM

Disaster responders with the local American Red Cross responded to a home fire disaster on Monday, October 15, 2018 at approximately 21:00 hours in the location of the 1900 block of 9th Street in Lebanon, Or.

This multi-family fire affected 1 adult and 1 child.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits including toiletry items, information about recovery services along with health and mental health services. 

Additional information about this incident, if available may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503)528-5783 or complete an online form at: www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.


Red Cross to Move to New Salem Facility
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 10/15/18 11:17 AM

All Red Cross services, including disaster relief and blood donation services, will be available at one facility in Salem.

                                                                       

SALEM, Ore., October 15, 2018 – The American Red Cross offices in the Willamette Valley are moving to a new location, providing all Red Cross services under one roof in Salem. Red Cross disaster relief services, service to the armed forces and biomedical services will relocate from their current offices, on Orchard Heights Road and Cottage Street respectively, to a new combined facility, located at 1860 Hawthorne Avenue Northeast in Salem. The move is set to occur in early 2019.

“Locating all vital Red Cross services under one roof is priority for the organization,” said Cara Sloman, Regional Disaster Officer for the Red Cross Cascades Region. “There will be no disruption to Red Cross services during the transition, and we believe the relocation will only enhance our ability to best serve the community.”

Red Cross services were needed in 2017, perhaps more than ever, to respond to a record number of disasters in this region and beyond. In 2017, the Red Cross responded to more than 770 disasters like home fires, floods and wildfires; and helped more than 1,200 families and deployed responders nearly 370 times to disaster relief operations. 

Since its inception in 1881, and its start in Oregon in 1917, the American Red Cross has been dedicated to providing compassionate care to those in need. Its network of dedicated volunteers, employees and generous donors share a mission of preventing and alleviating suffering here at home and around the world through five key service areas: Disaster Cycle Services, Service to the Armed Forces, Blood Services, Preparedness Health and Safety Services and International Services. For more information on local Red Cross programs and services, visit www.redcross.org/Cascades or read our blog at www.redcrossblog.org.

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or find us on Facebook at Red Cross Cascades, Twitter at @RedCrossCasc and find us on Instagram at @RedCrossCascades.




Attached Media Files: News Release - Red Cross to Move to New Salem Facility

Red Cross Responds with Emergency Agencies in Salem Affecting 3 Adults and 2 Children
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 10/14/18 9:15 PM

The Red Cross responded to a single family home fire on Sunday October, 14, 2018 at approximately 19:37 hours on Interstate 5 near Salem, Oregon. This single family fire affected a family of 2 adults and 3 children.

Red Cross provided assistance for temporary lodging, along with assistance to address immediate basic needs such as food, clothing, comfort kits including toiletry items and information about long term recovery services including health and mental health services if needed. 

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained through the local first responding agencies/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families  affected by disasters like home fires every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.

 


BBB Employment Scams Increase In 2018
Better Business Bureau Northwest + Pacific - 10/15/18 9:20 AM

                                                                  More Than $3 Million Lost to Schemes

Portland, Oregon Oct. 15,?2018 - Better Business Bureau’s Scam Tracker reveals employment scams are on the rise. With the busy holiday hiring season underway, job seekers should be aware of the scope of these scams. Since January, North America residents have reported more than 3,465 employment scams to BBB Scam Tracker with over $3 million reported lost. Compare this to the estimated 1,751 employments scams with over $800,000 lost from January to October of last year. Locally, Oregonians have already reported 27 employment scams with over $57,480 lost this year.  

Better Business Bureau Northwest + Pacific wants job seekers to be aware of employment scams that often trick “new employees” into giving out their personal information or their hard-earned money. With fall upon us, many job-seekers may be looking for an easy way to make some extra cash to get through the upcoming holidays. Scammers may take advantage of this opportunity to prey on job seekers with scam job postings, fake recruiter emails and work-at-home schemes.   

To avoid employment scams, job hunters should look out for these red flags:  

  • Positions that require little training.?Always be wary of?work-from-home or secret shopper positions, or any job with a generic title such as a caregiver, administrative assistant, or customer service rep.?These positions don't?usually?require special training or licensing, which makes it appealing?to a wide range of applicants. Scammers?know this and use these otherwise legitimate titles in their fake ads.  
  • Vague company descriptions.?It’s a huge red flag if you can’t identify the company’s?contact information,?owner,?headquarters?or?even product from its online ad. Pro tip: check?online at bbb.org/northwest-pacific?to see if the employer has a good rating. Also, watch for legitimate companies being impersonated. Find the real employer website to verify if a job posting is real.  
  • No interview. If you are offered a job without a formal interview or job application, it’s most likely a scam. Be wary of jobs that hire on the spot or conduct interviews via online chat or instant messaging services.  
  • Job applications that require a fee.?The federal government and the U.S. Postal Service never charge for information about jobs or applications for jobs. Be wary of any offer to give you special access or guarantee you a job for a fee —if you are paying for the promise of a job, it’s probably a scam.  
  • Recruiters who don’t disclose information. A legitimate recruiter will provide you with a complete contract for their services with cost, what you get, who pays (you or the employer), and what happens if you do not find a job.  

If you've been a victim of an employment scam, help others avoid being scammed by filing a report at BBB.org/ScamTracker.?

 

ABOUT BBB:?For more than 100 years, the Better Business Bureau has been helping people find businesses, brands,?and?charities they can trust. In 2017, people turned to BBB more than 160 million times for BBB Business Profiles on more than 5.2 million businesses and Charity Reports on 11,000 charities, all available for free at?bbb.org. There are local, independent BBBs across the United States, Canada,?and?Mexico, including BBB Northwest & Pacific, which serves more than 15 million consumers in Alaska, Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Hawaii and Western Wyoming.??

 

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Foundation for VPS receives Vancouver Rotary Foundation grant (Photo)
Foundation for Vancouver Public Schools - 10/15/18 4:43 PM
2018-10/6070/118794/FVPS_Logo_CMYK.png
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The Foundation for Vancouver Public Schools (VPS) received a $5,000 grant from the Vancouver Rotary Foundation to support housing stability, which is directly linked to student attendance and success. The Foundation for VPS addresses housing stability to help students remain on track in school while their family stabilizes.

Foundation for VPS investment areas include direct housing aid, wellness and emergency/crisis support. Direct housing aid includes the Foundation for VPS Housing Stability Fund which helps qualifying VPS students and families remain in their homes when they find themselves unable to pay rent due to a short-term job loss, illness or family crisis.

During the 2017-18 school year, the Housing Stability Fund helped 247 VPS students from 90 families avoid eviction though one time housing assistance. The fund is administered through a partnership with Council for the Homeless.

“We are extremely grateful for the community support and ongoing partnerships that help remove barriers for students and families,” said Nada Wheelock, Foundation for VPS executive director. “When there is stability at home, children can continue to attend their neighborhood school and arrive focused and ready to learn. Together, we can make a lifelong difference for hundreds of students.”

The Foundation for Vancouver Public Schools (VPS) is an independent, 501(c)3 educational non-profit corporation established in 1988 to support Vancouver Public Schools. Governed by a volunteer Board of Directors made up of business, community, and education leaders, the Foundation creates opportunities to cultivate and inspire student success. As an educational non-profit entity, the Foundation serves students at all 37 VPS schools, providing direct aid to students facing learning barriers due to economic need, as well as financial assistance for learning enrichment and mentoring programs. The Foundation is supported by donations from school employees, parents, students, community members, and businesses. Visit www.FoundationforVPS.org for more information.




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/6070/118794/FVPS_Logo_CMYK.png

Girl Scouts, Tillamook County Creamery Association and Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council Debut New Dairy Education Program (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington - 10/18/18 7:00 AM
Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington's Oregon Dairy Patch
Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington's Oregon Dairy Patch
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Girl Scouts, Tillamook County Creamery Association andOregon Dairy and Nutrition Council Debut New Dairy Education Program

Oregon Dairy Patch Program Educates about STEM Concepts, Farms and Food Production;
200 Girl Scouts Will Gather at Tillamook Creamery for Program Launch on October 20

PORTLAND, OR. – October 18, 2018 – Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington (GSOSW), in partnership with the Tillamook County Creamery Association (TCCA) and Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council (ODNC), today announced a new program designed to educate girls about STEM concepts, farms and food production through a look at the Oregon dairy industry. Dairy is Oregon’s fifth most valuable commodity and milk is the official beverage of Oregon.

Through five hands-on steps, the Oregon Dairy Patch program encourages girls to learn by doing as they visit a dairy farm, discover how milk is transformed into dairy products, explore dairy nutrition, and learn about careers in the industry, ranging from dairy farmer to food scientist to food marketer. The program finishes off with a taste test.

“The Oregon Dairy Patch program is a great opportunity for girls to discover the local food chain. It encourages them to be curious about where their food comes from, and what it takes to get it from the farm to the factory to their table,” said Lisa Gilham-Luginbill, Program Manager for Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington. “We hope they’ll learn something new along the way, and perhaps discover an interest or future career in the process.”

About 30 percent of farmers in the U.S. are women. Of the estimated 969,672 female farmers, about a third of them are the “principal operators,” which means they are the person primarily responsible for running the farm day-to-day. Many women are leading the way for dairy and agriculture in Oregon including producers, processors, board members and even the director of the Oregon Department of Agriculture, Alexis Taylor. The Oregon Dairy Women celebrate their 60th anniversary in 2019, with many members dedicating decades of advocacy and service to the organization.

“The development of the Oregon Dairy Patch program is truly a story of successful partnership,” said Sarah Beaubien, Senior Director of Stewardship at TCCA. “Sparked by the leadership of local Seaside Girl Scout troop leader Ashley Houston and her desire to expand the education of her girls, this partnership has since become a collaborative effort between multiple stakeholder groups. At TCCA, it aligns with our Enriched Communities commitment to support agricultural advocacy, food security, and healthful children.”

“Like milk and cookies, working with Girl Scouts to build understanding about dairy is a perfect pairing,” said Josh Thomas, Senior Director of Communications for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council. “Less than two percent of Americans have a connection to agriculture, so we’re bridging a gap with the youth of today who will be the leaders of tomorrow.”

200 Girl Scouts to Celebrate Inaugural Oregon Dairy Day at Tillamook Creamery October 20

The new program will be debuted at an event on October 20, 2018, held at TCCA’s new visitor experience, the Tillamook Creamery, in Tillamook, Oregon. 200 Girl Scout members will complete patch program steps as they visit an in-depth farm exhibit, meet dairy professionals and learn about dairy nutrition and the dairy industry from start to finish. The event is open only to Girl Scout members who have previously registered and members of the media.

“We are honored to host the Girl Scouts Oregon Dairy Day at our new Tillamook Creamery,” said Beaubien. “By providing the Girl Scouts a hands-on, interactive experience with dairy professionals??-who may not have the opportunity otherwise—we hope that they leave more knowledgeable about, and interested in, an industry so important to Oregon. And of course, enjoy squeaky cheese curds in the process.”   

Saturday, October 20, 2018
Tillamook Creamery
4165 Highway 101 North
Tillamook, Oregon 97141
10 a.m. - Noon

About Girl Scout Programming

Every opportunity in Girl Scouting is designed to encourage girls to Discover (find out who she is, what she cares about and what her talents are), Connect (collaborate with other people, both locally and globally, to learn from others and expand her horizons), and Take Action (do something to make the world a better place). With supportive adult mentors by their aide, activities are led by girls themselves, feature cooperative learning, and highlight learning by doing. Girls come up with their own ideas, build teams, and experience the joy of making a positive impact.

About Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington

In partnership with more than 8,000 adult members, Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington prepares 14,500 girls in grades K-12 for a lifetime of leadership, adventure and success. GSOSW’s programs in STEM, the outdoors, entrepreneurship and civic engagement serve girls in 37 counties in Oregon, and in Clark and Skamania counties in Washington. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence and character, who make the world a better place. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.

About the Tillamook County Creamery Association
Founded in 1909 as a farmer-owned cooperative, the Tillamook County Creamery Association (TCCA) prides itself on its commitment to bringing to market the most consistent, best tasting, highest quality dairy products made in the most natural way possible. Guided by the belief that everyone deserves real food that makes them feel good every day, Tillamook has earned top awards for their cheese, ice cream, sour cream, butter and yogurt products made with unwavering values that never sacrifice or compromise values for profit. The TCCA is currently made up of nearly 90 farming families, primarily based in Tillamook County, Oregon. Tillamook operates production facilities in Tillamook and Boardman, Oregon, and employs nearly 900 people throughout the state. The Tillamook Creamery is the largest tourist attraction on the coast of Oregon and one of the most popular in the state, attracting more than one million visitors each year. For more information on Tillamook, visit Tillamook.com.

About the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council
The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council’s (ODNC) origins trace back to 1918, when the Oregon Dairy Council was created to advance the benefits of dairy nutrition. As the state checkoff organization for dairy, ODNC builds trust and demand for Oregon dairy products and support for those who make them. ODNC is funded and directed by 217 dairy farm families and 30 dairy processors in Oregon, with governance by a ten-member Board of Commissioners and oversight by the Oregon Department of Agriculture. Dairy in Oregon provides more than $1 billion in economic impacts annually, along with delicious, award-winning cheeses, ice creams, yogurts, fluid milk and other high quality dairy products.




Attached Media Files: GSOSW Dairy Patch Press Release 10 18 18 , Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington's Oregon Dairy Patch , Tillamook Creamery

NORTH CLARK HISTORICAL MUSEUM, Fall Craft Bazaar October 20th & 21st (Photo)
North Clark Historical Museum - 10/15/18 1:34 PM
Colorful Rocks by Marie!
Colorful Rocks by Marie!
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AMBOY, WASHINGTON – Saturday, October 20th and Sunday, October 21st North Clark Historical Museum will be hosting a Fall Craft Artistry Bazaar.  The Museum is located at 21416 NE 399th St., Amboy, WA.

Saturday hours are 10:00 am to 4:00 pm and Sunday hours are Noon to 4:00 pm.  Vendors will provide a variety of crafts for sale.  Proceeds for the event benefit the Museum’s Development and Maintenance.

Vendors are Ruth Hawes, Nancy Johnson, Susan Andersen, Heidi Reichstein, Jean Proctor, Lynda Fjellman, Marie Downing, Amboy Art Club, and Mary McCarthy.

Items for sale will include quilts, table runners, ornaments, pot holders, place mats, stained glass garden stakes and suncatchers, felted wool purses, decoupage tile coasters, paper ornaments, knit scarves, knit hats, knit bags, baby bibs, aprons, dish clothes,  handmade pottery, painted rocks, gourd crafts, and many more hand-crafted items.

For more information, please contact 360-347-5800 and leave a message.

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The North Clark Historical Museum was founded in 1988 and is a 501(C)3 non-profit organization governed by a Board of Directors. The doors were opened in June of 2000.  Mission Statement:   To preserve North Clark County’s natural and cultural history through collections and exhibits, and to sponsor educational programs and research opportunities for the enrichment of the public.
 




Attached Media Files: Colorful Rocks by Marie!

Oregon Young Farmers & Ranchers Leadership Conference, Nov. 9-11 in Redmond
Oregon Farm Bureau - 10/17/18 2:56 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Oregon Young Farmers & Ranchers Leadership Conference, Nov. 9-11 in Redmond 

Young farmers, ranchers, and others interested in agriculture are encouraged to register for the 2018 Oregon Young Farmers & Ranchers (YF&R) Leadership Conference, set for Nov. 9-11 at the Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond.

Open to Farm Bureau members ages 16 through 35 (as of Jan. 1, 2018), the conference is geared toward young people interested in improving their leadership and communication skills, learning about the most important issues impacting Oregon agriculture, gaining business tips from experts, networking with peers, and having fun!

The $50 registration is due by Nov. 2. Find the registration form and more information at https://oregonfb.org/yfrconference/.

Featured speakers at the YF&R Leadership Conference include: 

  • Steve Gannaway, Director of Training & Development for Illinois Farm Bureau, speaking on "Why Do People Do the Things They Do?"
     
  • PR Expert Shannon Berg and Oregon Rancher Elias Eiguren speaking on "Lessons from the Owyhee Canyonlands"
     
  • Past National FFA Officer Jason Wetzler
     
  • Closing Speaker Damian Mason on "The F Words of Ag"

Breakout sessions with ag industry experts will be offered in the topic tracks of ag business, natural resources, industry support, and leadership.

Social events include a Friday game night and Saturday night karaoke party with DJ Brennan Cooper!

Find the registration form, conference agenda, and hotel information at https://oregonfb.org/yfrconference/.

For more information, email yfr@oregonfb.org or call Jacon Taylor at 541.589.9694 or Jenny Freeborn at 970.214.8143.

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Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

The state’s largest general agriculture organization, Oregon Farm Bureau is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing farm and ranch families in the public and policymaking arenas.

First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties and has nearly 7,000 member families professionally engaged in agriculture.

 

 


Barley, Barrels, Bottles, & Brews: 200 Years of Oregon Beer debuts at the Oregon Historical Society October 26
Oregon Historical Society - 10/19/18 2:20 PM

MEDIA PREVIEW:

Please join us for a private exhibit tour with exhibit curator Lori Erickson and OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk on Thursday, October 25 at 11am. Email achel.randles@ohs.org">rachel.randles@ohs.org if you plan to attend or to schedule a private tour.

PRESS PHOTOS:

High resolution photos and captions available via http://bit.ly/ohsbeerpress.  


Portland, OR – The history of beer in Oregon and the passion Oregonians hold for brewing extends back over two hundred years. From the Lewis and Clark Expedition to the nineteenth century European immigrants who established Oregon’s first breweries to the craft brewery revolution centered here today, this delicious hoppy beverage has been a cornerstone of Oregon’s agriculture and economy.

Opening at the Oregon Historical Society on October 26, Barley, Barrels, Bottles, & Brews: 200 Years of Oregon Beer profiles the people, companies, and legislation that have made Oregon the innovative center of craft brewing that it is today.

“It’s no secret that Oregonians love beer – and, that love has been brewing in our state for centuries,” said Oregon Historical Society Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk. “Whether you are a home brew master or new to the world of beer and brewing, this exhibit provides incredible insights into the crucial role Oregon’s beer industry has played on our state’s history.”

The exhibition traces the history of hop growing Oregon and its impact across the globe, including the momentum that has propelled the state to a place as the second highest hop producer in the country. Some of the most innovative research into hop growing and beer brewing is happening right here at Oregon State University, and visitors will actually be able to smell some of the hops that were developed right here in Oregon.

Barley, Barrels, Bottles, and Brews includes over 100 artifacts, many on public view for the first time, from the Oregon Historical Society collections and from the Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives at Oregon State University. Exhibit highlights include:

  • Historic photos of some Oregon’s earlies breweries, dating back to the 1850s, and a Civil War-era photo of people drinking beer at one of the first saloons in Oregon;
  • A green glass carboy (used for fermenting) that came across the Oregon Trail;
  • A variety of artifacts from historic Oregon breweries including Henry Weinhard, U.S. Brewery, Gambrinus, Albany Brewing Company, and more;
  • A digital interactive where visitors can adjust different beer characteristics to find the variety that best suits their taste; and
  • Videos recreating Oregon beer history and telling the stories of brewing pioneers.

Barley, Barrels, Bottles, and Brews: 200 Years of Oregon Beer is on view October 26, 2018 through June 9, 2019 at the Oregon Historical Society (1200 SW Park Avenue, Portland). The museum is open seven days a week, Monday – Saturday from 10am – 5pm and Sunday from 12pm – 5pm. Admission is currently discounted to $5 (through February 14, 2019) during the renovation of the museum’s permanent exhibition. Admission is always free for OHS members and Multnomah County residents.

 

About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

 


WATCH: Oregon Organizations Call Out Republican Knute Buehler's Empty Campaign Promises
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 10/17/18 11:55 AM

Leaders representing educators, environmental protections and reproductive rights say GOP gubernatorial candidate is saying one thing, doing the opposite

In a new television ad, three of Oregon’s leading organizations representing educators, environmental protections and reproductive rights called out Republican Knute Buehler for misleading voters on each of these key issues.

“We see it over and over, Republican Knute Buehler says one thing but does the opposite,” the ad states. “The real Knute Buehler voted against investing in schools and wants to cut teacher pay.”

In fact, Buehler has earned just a 30% rating on the Oregon Education Association’s 2015 and 2017 legislative report cards. He has voted against increased school funding and against efforts to reduce class sizes, and now he’s proposing to cut teacher pay and benefits by up to 40%.

“Knute Buehler’s record on education is clear,” says John Larson, high school English teacher from Hermiston and President of the Oregon Education Association. “He is no ally to our students or our public schools.”

The ad goes on to state that Buehler has “a lifetime F rating from the Oregon League of Conservation Voters for voting against our environment.”

Buehler voted against protecting our public lands, against reducing carbon emissions from vehicles and for allowing fracking in Oregon.

Oregon League of Conservation Voters Executive Director Doug Moore made the stakes clear by saying, "If you care about Oregon’s great outdoors and our clean air and water, then Knute Buehler’s record combined with $1 million in campaign contributions from corporate polluters add up to one thing — Buehler is unacceptable for Oregon."

The ad continues: “Planned Parenthood PAC of Oregon says Buehler has ‘promised to restrict access to abortion.’ Instead of listening to Knute talk, look at how he votes.”

Buehler voted against the Reproductive Health Equity Act, and the Register-Guard reported that he wants to restrict access to safe, legal abortion. The editorial read, “He describes himself as pro-choice on abortion, though he favors marginal restrictions that pro-lifers would never get from [Governor] Brown.”

Planned Parenthood PAC of Oregon Executive Director Emily McLain says: “Knute Buehler is flagrantly misleading voters when he claims to be ‘100% pro-choice’ while promising to restrict access to abortion and after voting against Governor Brown’s landmark protections for Roe vs. Wade in Oregon. With the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court, there is no room for uncertainty. Knute Buehler is a risk we can’t take. Oregon women deserve the truth about his anti-abortion voting record, not empty campaign promises.”

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Portland community leaders call for respect in the Rose City; Upon Mayor Wheeler's announcement: "We stand in support"
Portland Business Alliance - 10/15/18 4:38 PM

Today, Portland business leaders stand in support of Mayor Ted Wheeler’s action for an emergency ordinance to put an end to the violence happening in our fair city.

"Portland has, and should always be, a place known for its outspoken civil discourse. Our rich tradition of exercising our First Amendment rights is what sets this great city apart from others," said Andrew Hoan, president and CEO of the Portland Business Alliance, Greater Portland’s Chamber of Commerce. "Our protests, debates and disagreements have been a hallmark of what makes us special as a community. We do not always agree on every issue, but we all work to make this city a better place. When we do disagree, we must do it with respect."

As community members, we speak with one, unequivocal voice to say with absolute clarity that violence is never the way to resolve our differences. To those among us who think that violence is a way to change the world, we say to you, it is not.

We call on everyday Portlanders to join together in calling for peaceful discourse and expression through civil means.

 

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The Portland Business Alliance

The Portland Business Alliance is Greater Portland’s Chamber of Commerce. With more than 1,900 members, the Alliance strives to promote and foster an environment in the Portland region that attracts, supports and retains private-sector jobs, spurs economic vitality and enables quality educational opportunities for the region's residents. Learn more at www.portlandalliance.com.


SAIF's free ag safety seminars return later this month
SAIF - 10/16/18 9:10 AM

Summary: Annual trainings will be held in 16 cities between October and March and—for the first time—online as a webinar.

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Whether operating large farm equipment or spraying chemicals, agricultural workers face a lot of risks on the job.

That’s why SAIF is bringing our free ag safety seminars back to 16 cities across Oregon this fall and winter. The first of 28 seminars will be held October 30 in Ontario and they will continue through March. Nine seminars will be presented entirely in Spanish.

The full schedule, registration details, and the list of speakers can be found at saif.com/agseminars. You can also register by calling 800.285.8525.

“We see about 1,500 injuries in the ag industry a year,” said Reva Hartenstein, senior safety management consultant at SAIF. “We created these seminars to help reduce those numbers—our goal is for every ag worker to go home safe and healthy each night.”

This year’s sessions will focus on four safety topics: training new employees, best practices for chemical use, conscious decision making, and safe driving on and off the farm.

“Motor vehicle accidents account for some of the most severe injuries in the ag industry—and across Oregon industries,” said Hartenstein.  

The seminars are designed primarily for people working in agriculture, but are open to anyone interested in ag safety and health—they don’t have to be insured by SAIF.

Each of the one-hour seminar topics will be presented via webinar on March 12, 14, 19, and 21. Participants are encouraged—and required if seeking an exemption for random OSHA inspections—to watch all four presentations. The webinars will be available at saif.com/training.

Each seminar is held from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and includes lunch. 

In-person seminars will be in Bandon, Central Point, Clackamas, Corvallis, Eugene, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Klamath Falls, La Grande, Madras, Ontario, Salem, The Dalles, Wilsonville, and Woodburn.

Spanish seminars will be held in Central Point, Eugene, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Salem, The Dalles, Wilsonville, and Woodburn.

Employers with small ag businesses who attend the seminar will meet OSHA’s instructional requirement, one of four requirements that exempt small agricultural operations from random OSHA inspections.

The Landscape Contractors Board has approved the seminar for three hours of technical and one hour of business continuing education credits. The Department of Consumer and Business Services has also approved producer continuing education credit hours for licensed insurance agents.

About SAIF

SAIF is Oregon's not-for-profit workers' compensation insurance company. Since 1914, we've been taking care of injured workers, helping people get back to work, and striving to make Oregon the safest and healthiest place to work. For more information, visit the About SAIF page on saif.com.     


Mobile pizzeria serving a free lunch to Portland's homeless (Photo)
Union Gospel Mission - 10/16/18 12:04 PM
From 2017
From 2017
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For Immediate Release                                              Contact: Courtney Dodds

October 15, 2018                                                        503-274-4483

                                                                                    971-275-2334 (cell)

 

Mobile pizzeria serving a free lunch to Portland’s homeless

 

Portland, Ore., - On Friday, October 19th 2 – 3:45pm Little Caesars Love kitchen truck will be parking in front of the Union Gospel Mission at 15 NW Third to serve pizza to Portland’s homeless. This is the fifth time that Little Caesars has partnered with Union Gospel Mission to serve the homeless.

 

Little Caesars anticipates providing pizza for more than 300 people (that’s approximately 720 slices) on Friday afternoon during Union Gospel Mission’s afternoon meal. The Mission serves more than 700 meals a day on average to those in need in the community.

“Yay!!!! This is always a fun day for the homeless and us,” says Lori Quinney Union Gospel Mission’s Food Service Coordinator.

 The Little Caesars Love Kitchen travels all over the United States to help those in need. They operate two trucks allowing them to serve 365 days a year. Little Caesars franchise owners donate the resources needed to make the Love Kitchen possible as well as provide volunteers to support the program.

 

About Union Gospel Mission: Union Gospel Mission’s purpose is “Feeding the hungry, restoring the addict and loving our neighbor.” Union Gospel Mission has been serving Portland since 1927. Union Gospel Mission provides meals and care for the homeless, and operates LifeChange -- a transformative recovery program for men, women and children. Contact Union Gospel Mission at 503-274-4483 or ugmportland.org and @ugmpdx.

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Attached Media Files: From 2017 , From 2017 , From 2017

Financial Advice Designed for Women
YWCA Clark County - 10/19/18 12:54 PM

Women’s Leadership Center is pleased to announce the upcoming workshop Financial Empowerment: A Pathway to Informed Decisions and Financial Independence. The Women’s Leadership Center recognizes the vital role finances play in empowering women, and so offer a workshop of financial advice designed for women, by women.

This three part workshop addresses the unique financial gender disparities that women face, such as the wage gap. A gap, which has women earning $.80 for every dollar made by our male counterparts. This disparity is even greater amongst women of color. Black women earning just 62.5% compared to their white male counterparts in 2016 and Hispanic or Latina women 54.4% reducing the income of women over $10,000 each year.

Over a 40 year career women will lose over $400,000 based on today’s wage gap and they will spend more money on the products they use. So while women are saving a higher percentage of their income they still enter retirement with fewer saving than men. Women retire with only two-thirds the money of men. With an average lifespan 5 years longer than men these funds are stretched even further.

This makes investing and saving of increased importance for women. Currently women do not invest as early as men do, and keep more of their assets in cash that doesn’t allow for growth. When women do invest they consistently outperform men, exceeding male investors by 0.3% in2016.

While financial advice for women isn’t all that different than that of men’s, it is essential that it addresses the current gender disparities within finances. This all contributes to women’s financial stability and opportunities. In order to empower women, we have to ensure that women have access to financial planning information. Too often women are left out of important financial decisions, socialized to not discuss money, and fail to have the support of a trusted advisor. With proper resources women can take the next steps toward financial empowerment.

Please join Women’s Leadership Center for Financial Empowerment: A Pathway to Informed decisions and Financial Independence

An interactive and empowering dialogue on finances and personal futures, Jennifer Rhoads will lead attendees as they increase awareness on how individual choices directly influence occupational goals and future earnings potential. Real world topics covered will include income, money management, spending and credit, as well as saving and investing.

Attendees will gain increased knowledge in finance, debt and credit management, design personal and household budgets utilizing checking and saving accounts, and better understand insurance and taxes. Attendees will ultimately work towards an increased foundational understanding for making informed decisions leading to financial independence.

Facilitated by Jennifer Rhoads, CFP

Mondays 10/22-11/5

5:30 PM – 7:30 PM

$80, partial pay scholarships available

Registration available at: ywcaclarkcounty.org/wlc

For questions contact Cheyanne Llanos Bare by email are@ywcaclarkcounty.org">cllanosbare@ywcaclarkcounty.org or phone (360)906-9157