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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Sun. Jun. 13 - 8:08 am
Sat. 06/12/21
Missing Endangered Adult Male
Vancouver Police Dept. - 06/12/21 10:41 PM
2021-06/385/145816/J._WADE.jpg
2021-06/385/145816/J._WADE.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/385/145816/thumb_J._WADE.jpg

The Vancouver Police Department is seeking the public’s assistance in locating an endangered missing adult male.

Jeremy B Wade, 25-year-old, white male, 5’10”, 150lb, brown hair and eyes was last contacted on 6-10-2021, near Battleground Lake. Jeremy is schizophrenic and autistic and currently doesn’t have his prescribed medication. Jeremy is transient and was staying in a tent on the Burnt Bridge Creek trail but has not been seen there.

Anyone with information is asked to call 311 or 911




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/385/145816/J._WADE.jpg

Missing Juvenile (Located Safe) (Photo)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 06/12/21 5:49 PM

Update

Aiden was located safe

The Vancouver Police Department is looking for assistance with locating a 12-year-old missing juvenile.

Aiden D Brooks, who is Non-Binary, also known as Niko, and uses the pronouns They/Them, was last seen on 6-11-2021, at 1445 hours leaving Jason L. Middle School. They are described as white, 5' tall, 100lbs, brown eyes, fire engine red hair, and was last seen wearing a white hoodie with tie-dye colors, dark blue jeans, dark shoes, and a backpack with rainbow on it.

Anyone with information on the missing juvenile's whereabouts are asked to call 911 or 311.


Vancouver Police arrest Attempted Murder suspect
Vancouver Police Dept. - 06/12/21 3:49 PM

On 6/11/2021 at approximately 1408 hours, VPD officers responded to an assault just occurred at Retriever Towing, located in the 6600 block of E 18th St. The female employee called to report she had been attacked from behind from an unknown male suspect. She reported she could not feel anything in her neck. Upon arrival, officers observed the female had been viciously stabbed in the neck and she was immediately transported to the hospital for treatment where she was in stable condition. The male suspect, who was identified as 20 year old Hunter Levi, was observed by witnesses fleeing on foot. VPD officers quickly set up a perimeter and a K9 search was conducted with the assistance of drones by CCSO and VPD. While fleeing, Hunter had discarded layers of clothing and briefly hid in businesses before being spotted by VPD officers near Burton & E 18th St. After a short foot pursuit, Hunter was captured and taken into custody. During the pursuit, an officer sustained a minor non life threatening injury.

Hunter was observed on video standing behind the female employee. He takes out a knife and adjusts the angle of how he wants to stab her before bringing the knife down onto her neck.

Hunter was transported to CCSO Jail where he was booked for Burglary and Attempted Murder. 

The evidence discarded by Hunter was recovered by VPD K9 Koa and his partner Ofc Epperson. The public also assisted in providing video/information of Hunter's attempted escape route after he discarded his clothing to try and change his appearance. 


Oregon reports 285 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/12/21 10:37 AM

June 12, 2021

PORTLAND, Ore. There are three new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,729 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 285 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 204,865.

Clackamas County approved to move to Lower Risk Level

Governor Kate Brown announced today that, effective immediately, Clackamas County has been approved to move to the Lower Risk level under the state's public health framework to reduce transmission and protect Oregonians from COVID-19. The county today achieved a 65% first dose vaccination rate for adults and has submitted an equity plan to the state. Read the press release here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 17,231 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 9,034 doses were administered on June 11 and 8,197 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 11.

The seven-day running average is now 17,567 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 2,364,446 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,667,165 first and second doses of Moderna and 155,271 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 2,019,299 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 2,315,940 people who have had at least one dose.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,862,225 doses of Pfizer, 2,176,380 doses of Moderna and 299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 160, which is nine fewer than yesterday. There are 41 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one more than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,278, which is a 23.4% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 206.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (5), Clackamas (28), Columbia (3), Coos (2), Crook (9), Curry (1), Deschutes (14), Douglas (30), Gilliam (3), Harney (2), Jackson (15), Jefferson (3), Josephine (5), Klamath (5), Lane (22), Lincoln (2), Linn (9), Malheur (3), Marion (25), Multnomah (37), Polk (3), Sherman (1), Umatilla (10), Union (1), Washington (38), Wheeler (1), Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 2,727th death is a 77-year-old woman from Klamath county who tested positive on April 19 and died on May 5 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,728th death is a 93-year-old woman from Lane county who tested positive on April 7 and died on May 15 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,729th death is a 96-year-old woman from Lane county who tested positive on June 8 and died on June 8 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

990

15

Benton

3,236

22

Clackamas

18,723

234

Clatsop

1,026

8

Columbia

1,885

29

Coos

2,157

37

Crook

1,271

23

Curry

684

10

Deschutes

9,918

80

Douglas

3,778

80

Gilliam

75

1

Grant

547

7

Harney

412

9

Hood River

1,215

33

Jackson

11,415

146

Jefferson

2,354

38

Josephine

3,525

72

Klamath

4,751

77

Lake

466

7

Lane

13,768

158

Lincoln

1,412

21

Linn

5,496

79

Malheur

3,597

63

Marion

23,245

322

Morrow

1,146

16

Multnomah

40,063

611

Polk

3,933

55

Sherman

66

1

Tillamook

660

4

Umatilla

8,517

86

Union

1,486

24

Wallowa

193

5

Wasco

1,434

29

Washington

26,642

247

Wheeler

35

1

Yamhill

4,744

79

Statewide

204,865

2,729

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases

 

ELRs received 6/11

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

24

1

25

4.0%

Benton

1,149

5

1,154

0.4%

Clackamas

928

41

969

4.2%

Clatsop

98

0

98

0.0%

Columbia

99

3

102

2.9%

Coos

95

2

97

2.1%

Crook

106

8

114

7.0%

Curry

27

1

28

3.6%

Deschutes

554

17

571

3.0%

Douglas

252

35

287

12.2%

Gilliam

3

0

3

0.0%

Grant

13

0

13

0.0%

Harney

10

2

12

16.7%

Hood River

54

0

54

0.0%

Jackson

399

25

424

5.9%

Jefferson

74

5

79

6.3%

Josephine

117

3

120

2.5%

Klamath

112

4

116

3.4%

Lake

17

0

17

0.0%

Lane

737

17

754

2.3%

Lincoln

120

2

122

1.6%

Linn

421

16

437

3.7%

Malheur

105

13

118

11.0%

Marion

948

26

974

2.7%

Morrow

30

1

31

3.2%

Multnomah

2,084

56

2,140

2.6%

Polk

207

9

216

4.2%

Sherman

4

0

4

0.0%

Tillamook

51

0

51

0.0%

Umatilla

151

6

157

3.8%

Union

81

1

82

1.2%

Wallowa

7

0

7

0.0%

Wasco

52

1

53

1.9%

Washington

1,430

37

1,467

2.5%

Wheeler

1

0

1

0.0%

Yamhill

244

10

254

3.9%

Statewide

10,804

347

11,151

3.1%

 

Cumulative ELRs

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

12,628

1,892

14,520

13.0%

Benton

153,229

4,919

158,148

3.1%

Clackamas

489,585

29,466

519,051

5.7%

Clatsop

37,191

1,765

38,956

4.5%

Columbia

46,885

2,568

49,453

5.2%

Coos

51,045

2,623

53,668

4.9%

Crook

21,662

1,619

23,281

7.0%

Curry

12,252

582

12,834

4.5%

Deschutes

210,897

12,466

223,363

5.6%

Douglas

90,384

4,254

94,638

4.5%

Gilliam

1,340

56

1,396

4.0%

Grant

7,141

477

7,618

6.3%

Harney

4,653

459

5,112

9.0%

Hood River

34,238

1,754

35,992

4.9%

Jackson

235,907

17,261

253,168

6.8%

Jefferson

21,625

2,213

23,838

9.3%

Josephine

82,872

4,137

87,009

4.8%

Klamath

54,952

5,440

60,392

9.0%

Lake

6,264

465

6,729

6.9%

Lane

535,607

16,615

552,222

3.0%

Lincoln

46,518

2,752

49,270

5.6%

Linn

156,796

9,876

166,672

5.9%

Malheur

28,044

5,275

33,319

15.8%

Marion

379,600

34,781

414,381

8.4%

Morrow

8,136

1,373

9,509

14.4%

Multnomah

1,139,320

60,851

1,200,171

5.1%

Polk

78,398

5,210

83,608

6.2%

Sherman

1,538

75

1,613

4.6%

Tillamook

16,647

669

17,316

3.9%

Umatilla

72,292

9,525

81,817

11.6%

Union

23,355

1,886

25,241

7.5%

Wallowa

3,502

197

3,699

5.3%

Wasco

37,030

1,792

38,822

4.6%

Washington

704,811

44,097

748,908

5.9%

Wheeler

776

34

810

4.2%

Yamhill

149,092

7,782

156,874

5.0%

Statewide

4,956,212

297,206

5,253,418

5.7%

 

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Homicide of Brian Spaulding Remains Unsolved After Four Years - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #17-22 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 06/12/21 8:00 AM
2021-06/5183/145740/Brian_Spaulding.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/5183/145740/thumb_Brian_Spaulding.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau, in cooperation with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to solve the 2017 homicide of Brian Spaulding.

On Monday June 12, 2017, at 12:27 p.m., Portland Police Bureau officers responded to a residence in the 3500 block of Northeast 10th Avenue to conduct a death investigation.

Officers and medical personnel arrived and determined that the resident, 36-year-old Brian Elton Spaulding, was deceased. Based on observations at the scene, Homicide detectives responded to the scene to begin an investigation.

The Medical Examiner conducted an autopsy and determined that Spaulding was the victim of a shooting and ruled the death a homicide.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Anyone wishing to submit a secure and anonymous tip regarding any unsolved felony crime should visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/ or visit the App Store and download P3 Tips for your smart phone or tablet.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, or to view other unsolved cases, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2021-06/5183/145740/Brian_Spaulding.jpg

Fri. 06/11/21
Search for missing person (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/11/21 10:02 PM
2021-06/6111/145792/21-3223(2).jpg
2021-06/6111/145792/21-3223(2).jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/6111/145792/thumb_21-3223(2).jpg


Adam Specht was located this afternoon and transported to an area hospital for evaluation.  We would like to thank the community for support and efforts to locate him.

The Lane County Sheriff’s Office with the assistance of search and rescue volunteers are searching for 56 year old Adam Specht.  Specht did not return home to Eugene on 06/10/21 after telling family members that he was going to the beach.  Specht’s vehicle along with his cell phone were located in the North Jetty parking lot near Florence.  Area agencies including the Eugene Police Department, Florence Police Department, Siuslaw Valley Fire and United States Coast Guard have been assisting with the search.  Specht is described as a white male, approximately 6’2”, weight 145 lbs., with graying hair and a light gray beard.  Anyone with information regarding Specht’s whereabouts within the last 24 hours are asked to contact the Lane County Sheriff’s Office at 541-682-4150 Opt. 1. or the Eugene Police Department at 541-682-5111.

 




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/6111/145792/21-3223(2).jpg

Sheriff Announces Death of Benton County Deputy
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/11/21 7:35 PM

CORVALLIS, Ore. – It is with a heavy heart Benton County Sheriff Jef Van Arsdall announces the untimely passing of Benton County Sheriff’s Office Patrol Deputy Paul Lancaster. 

Deputy Lancaster was found deceased in his home in the early morning hours of Thursday, June 10th in Albany, OR.

Deputy Lancaster joined the Benton County Sheriff’s Office (BCSO) in January of 2016 as a Reserve Deputy Sheriff.  In October of 2017, Deputy Lancaster was hired full-time as a Jail Deputy.  In March of 2019, Deputy Lancaster transferred to the patrol division.

BCSO expresses its deepest sympathies to Deputy Lancaster’s family and friends on their loss, and mourns the loss of a friend and colleague.

The tremendous support we have received from surrounding agencies and the Benton County community has been overwhelmingly warm and generous. We’re very grateful for everyone’s kindness during this difficult time.

We have no further statements or information to release at this time. We ask that the privacy of Deputy Lancaster’s family be respected at this time.

XXX




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/1505/145808/Lancaster_PR_6.11.21.pdf

Hockinson School District Board of Directors Regular Meeting
Hockinson Sch. Dist. - 06/11/21 5:30 PM

District Board of Directors Work Session June 14, 2021 at 6:00 PM HS

Library Note: Masks are required to attend in-person meetings through June 30, 2021

Digital Zoom Please check the HSD website www.hocksd.org for a link to join the Zoom meeting.

AGENDA

I. End of the Year Update

II. 2021-24 Strategic Plan

III. School Improvement Plan Presentations 6:30 HHES 7:00 HMS 7:30 HHS IV. School Board Protocols & Calendar Steven Marshall, Superintendent


CCSO Warns of Prolific Identity Thief
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/11/21 4:49 PM
2021-06/1172/145806/kutsar2.JPG
2021-06/1172/145806/kutsar2.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1172/145806/thumb_kutsar2.JPG

The Clark County Sheriff’s Office wants local businesses to be aware of a prolific, wanted identity thief.  Anatoly V. Kutsar, age 38.  Kutsar has been the subject of several investigations by the Sheriff’s Office Tactical Detective Unit since February.  In a March search warrant at Kutsar’s residence, detectives located nearly twenty identification cards from Washington, Oregon, Texas and Florida, all bearing Kutsar’s image and various names of victims of identity theft. 

On June 11, 2021, Kutsar purchased a $36,000 dollar Dodge Charger from a local car dealership using a stolen identity.  The vehicle has been recovered.  When detectives attempted to apprehend him, Kutsar fled the scene in a gold 2002 Nissan Maxima (WA) BWC5287.

Kutsar is wanted on several felony crimes and has an active felony warrant for his arrest.  Anyone with knowledge of his location is asked to call 911. 

 




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/1172/145806/kutsar2.JPG , Image used on ID

$20,000 Reward for Information Remains in Place on 4th Anniversary of Homicide (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 06/11/21 4:41 PM
On the fourth anniversary of the homicide of a 36-year-old man in Northeast Portland, the Portland Police Bureau is asking for the public's help to solve the case. Brian Elton Spaulding's family and friends have privately raised $20,000 to offer as a reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for his death.

On Monday, June 12, 2017, at 12:27 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to a residence in the 3500 block of Northeast 10th Avenue to conduct a death investigation. Officers and medical personnel arrived and determined that Brian was deceased. Based on observations of officers, Homicide Detectives responded to the scene. The Oregon State Medical Examiner conducted an autopsy and determined that Spaulding was the victim of a shooting and ruled the death a homicide.

Brian's family is willing to speak to media about the case. Interested reporters can contact ppbpio@portlandoregon.gov to arrange an interview.

To be eligible for the family and friends reward, a person with information would need to contact Detective Rico Beniga at Rico.Beniga@portlandoregon.gov or 503-823-0457.

People who wish to remain anonymous may be eligible for a reward from Crime Stoppers, should their information lead to an arrest. Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous. Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823 Call 503-823-HELP (4357). Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit https://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/support.php

Photo description: family picture of Brian Spaulding smiling

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Brian Spaulding Family Photo

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Research and Leadership Subcommittee meets via Zoom June 24
Oregon Health Authority - 06/11/21 4:30 PM

June 11, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Research and Leadership Subcommittee meets via Zoom June 24

What: A public Zoom meeting for the Research and Leadership Subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD

When: Thursday, June 24, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Zoom Meeting.  Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 160 453 2659 Passcode: 710824.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or .lockwood@state.or.us">megan.r.lockwood@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon reports 308 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/11/21 4:08 PM

June 11, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 308 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are no new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, and the state’s death toll remains at 2,726, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 308 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 204,587.

Information from today’s media briefing

This morning, Gov. Kate Brown and Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state health officer and state epidemiologist with OHA, provided an update on Oregon’s ongoing COVID-19 response. Gov. Brown highlighted Oregon’s continued progress in reaching her goal of having at least 70% of all eligible Oregonians vaccinated and in closing the equity gap in vaccinating Oregon’s communities of color. Dr. Sidelinger discussed the highly protective benefits provided by COVID-19 vaccines, noting that virtually every patient now requiring hospital care from a COVID-19 illness has been unvaccinated.

Watch more about that here and read the press conference talking points here.

CDC data tracker issue update

OHA has relied on a daily U.S. Centers for Disease and Control Prevention (CDC) data update to report the number of people who need to receive a COVID-19 vaccination to reach Oregon’s goal of vaccinating 70% of people 18 and older.

Unfortunately, CDC is experiencing an issue with the data feed that contributes to its COVID data tracker dashboard, which Oregon uses to track the state’s progress towards 70%.

CDC believes that approximately two days of data is not appearing on the CDC COVID data tracker dashboard. CDC is working to resolve the issue and anticipates having it fixed by June 15. The COVID data tracker is the only place where doses from all sources administered to Oregonians are reported, including doses administered by federal entities, as well as doses administered to people living in Oregon by providers in other states.

Newest COVID-19 modeling report shows decline in transmission

Today, OHA released its latest COVID-19 forecast, which showed lower transmission of the virus through late May and projects fewer hospitalizations and daily cases through June 29.

According to the model, the effective reproduction rate — the expected number of secondary cases that a single case generates — was estimated at 0.66 through May 26.

At that same level of transmission, daily cases would decline to 100 daily cases and new hospitalizations would decrease to five per day over the next three weeks.

If transmission increases by 20%, new cases would decline more gradually, to 135 new daily cases, with seven new hospitalizations daily.

The modeling shows that estimated immunity from vaccination is present in four times more people than have naturally acquired immunity. Natural immunity is immunity stemming from prior infection.

A person who has had COVID-19 and recovered may not have the same level of immunity as someone who has not been infected and has been fully vaccinated, and it is unknown how long the natural immunity will last.

People who have recovered from the disease have a robust response to the vaccine. OHA recommends that people get the vaccine to increase their protection against COVID-19.

More than 2.3 million Oregonians have received at least one dose of the safe and highly effective vaccine, and 2 million have completed a vaccine series.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 24,213 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 15,926 doses were administered on June 10 and 8,987 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 10.

The seven-day running average is now 17,697 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 2,352,742 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,662,657 first and second doses of Moderna and 154,388 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 2,007,367 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 2,310,053 people who have had at least one dose. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 87,702.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,862,225 doses of Pfizer, 2,176,380 doses of Moderna and 299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 169, which is four fewer than yesterday. There are 40 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one fewer than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,278, which is a 23.4% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 206.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (34), Clatsop (4), Columbia (6), Coos (1), Crook (8), Curry (2), Deschutes (14), Douglas (15), Grant (2), Hood River (2), Jackson (21), Jefferson (3), Josephine (3), Klamath (2), Lake (1), Lane (12), Lincoln (1), Linn (12), Malheur (2), Marion (31), Multnomah (67), Polk (5), Umatilla (11), Union (1), Wasco (1), Washington (37) and Yamhill (7).

Note: Due to routine data quality assurance reviews, OHA identified 19,992 duplicate negative electronic lab reports (ELRs) from April 30 to June 10, 2021, related to a single laboratory in Yamhill County. These duplicate negative ELRs were removed from the system last night. As a result, statewide and Yamhill County ELR counts have decreased and percent positivity has increased for this time period.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


Oregon Virtual Academy
Oregon Virtual Academy - 06/11/21 3:35 PM

OREGON VIRTUAL ACADEMY NOTICE OF SPECIAL SESSION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

JUNE 14th, 2021 @ 12:00 p.m.

Oregon Virtual Academy Board Members are hereby notified that a Special Session of the Board will be held via teleconference 1-720-707-2699 Ext. 526309737# and via Zoom at https://us02web.zoom.us/j/5033141592 _________________________________________________________


Great Accomplishments at Sheridan and West Valley Fire Districts
Sheridan/SW Polk/West Valley Fire Dists. - 06/11/21 3:24 PM

Leading the Sheridan and West Valley Fire Districts, the current administrative team has overcome many notable challenges. Half-truths by several key board members have led our community members into a state of confusion and mistrust, stalling the consolidation efforts, and we would like to try and address those concerns. We have been asked many times about what has been accomplished. Our team’s number one goal is to provide outstanding service to our communities through compassion and positive interactions. The following is an attempt to shed some light on what the administrative team has been able to accomplish in the past two and a half years. These examples are illustrative, and the administrative team has accomplished much more than is included here.

When the administrative team first arrived, both the districts were struggling with ethical and illegal practices. These included deferred maintenance on all facilities and equipment, nonpermitted construction within facilities, illegally paying their employees, failure to comply with Oregon Safety and Health Agency (OSHA) laws and were generally non-compliant with many regulatory requirements. Turning these previously detrimental practices around has been a huge undertaking.

Catching up on deferred maintenance has been ongoing. The administrative team has facilitated nearly $200,000 in repairs to facilities and vehicles. With board direction, the administrative team has been able to sell multiple vehicles that had too many maintenance issues to be repaired. West Valley Fire District has sold five vehicles, while Sheridan Fire District has sold four. In addition, the administrative team has facilitated the purchase of one new ambulance for West Valley, after the previous one caught fire in 2020. Both Sheridan and West Valley have borrowed vehicles form McMinnville and Southwest Polk Fire Districts to be able to continue providing services.

The administrative team also wrote, received, and is managing a 2.1-million-dollar grant for a seismic retrofit of Sheridan Fire District’s main station. During the engineering phase of this project, the contractors noted that nonpermitted construction of the sleeping quarters had been performed in the past. In these quarters, line staff have no means of egress, no fire alarm system, incorrect heating and ventilation systems, and a noncompliant fire sprinkler system. The Sheridan Fire Board has paired an additional $500,000 to bring these quarters into compliance, and the administrative team is developing a path to make repairs during the seismic retrofit.

West Valley Fire District owned self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) that were non-OSHA compliant. The administrative team immediately borrowed a few SCBAs from Sheridan and Southwest Polk Fire Districts to get West Valley into compliance. They then wrote, received, and administered a $264,000 FEMA grant for new SCBA equipment in West Valley vehicles. The administrative team has received than 3 million dollars in grants to help stretch tax dollars. The districts have received SCBA’s, medical ventilators, video intubation devices, wildland tools, personal protective equipment, and extrication equipment.

Sheridan Fire District did not know how to pay their line staff legally. The administrative team went to work developing immediate steps to correct this and established long term systems that now have employees being paid correctly and legally. West Valley Fire District had an established overtime pay system, but it was noncompliant. The team adjusted this system to make sure their employees were paid fairly and correctly. On arrival, West Valley was also a year behind on their financial audit and their accounting system had been non-functioning for more than six months. The administrative team hired an accounting firm to bring this system up to date. For the first time in four years, the administrative team is on track to getting the financial audit completed on time. The administrative team also implemented an online policy system for both Sheridan and West Valley Districts that was specifically designed for fire services. This solved the problem of both districts having either outdated policies or policies that were not being followed.

Three to four years ago the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde started an investigation into West Valley Fire District’s management of their contractual services agreement. The administrative team attempted to repair relations between the two entities. Ultimately the Confederated Tribes of Grande determined to start their own fire and emergency medical services agency. To review the contract termination notice letter, go to the June 3rd special meeting minutes on westvalleyfd.org, or click here.

Finally, both fire district boards were violating Oregon Public Meeting Laws by performing serial meetings. A serial meeting (also known as a “rolling” or “chain” meeting) and occurs when a majority of the members of the governing body have a series of smaller gatherings or communications that result in a majority of the body taking action, even if a quorum is never involved in one communication. The administrative team has and continues to discourage this type of activity.

Your Fire District is constantly striving for improvement, and we have accomplished much in a short period of time. As the Fire Chief, I am proud of the administrative team and what we have overcome together. I further want to state that we have amazing volunteers and employees that have helped the administrative team be successful in turning things around.


Public Health issues danger advisory at Vancouver Lake due to elevated toxin levels
Clark Co. WA Communications - 06/11/21 2:55 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health has issued a danger advisory at Vancouver Lake after test results revealed elevated levels of cyanotoxins in the water at the swim beach and flushing channel.

Results from water samples taken from Vancouver Lake on Monday revealed cyanotoxins above the threshold levels recommended by the Washington Department of Health. Danger signs are being posted at the swim beach and other public access points to the lake. Public Health is advising against all recreating in the lake, including swimming, kayaking, paddle boarding, canoeing and water skiing.

Blooms of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, are currently present at the swim beach, flushing channel and the south entrance by the Shillapoo Wildlife area.

Blue-green algae can pose a significant health risk if the cyanobacteria or toxins are ingested, inhaled or come into contact with skin. Inhaled bacteria or toxins can cause wheezing, coughing, chest tightness and shortness of breath. Skin contact can lead to rash, itching, blisters and eye irritation.

If water with cyanotoxins is accidentally swallowed, symptoms can include abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, numbness of the lips, tingling in fingers and toes, and dizziness. The toxins can be fatal to pets that drink the water.

Public Health has been monitoring cyanobacteria blooms at Vancouver Lake since June 1 and will continue to monitor the lake throughout the summer. As long as blooms are present, Public Health will take weekly water samples to test toxin levels. Signs will be updated as conditions change.

Vancouver Lake Regional Park remains open. Water in park restrooms and shelters is not affected by lake water and remains safe to drink.

Additional information about blue-green algae and current advisories are posted on the Public Health public beach website. To report algae blooms in other bodies of water, visit the Public Health website.


Update:  SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON INDEPENDENT INVESTIGATIVE TEAM RESPONDS TO OFFICER INVOLVED SHOOTING
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/11/21 2:46 PM

On June 3, 2021, two Washington State Troopers and on Cowlitz Tribal Police officer were involved in an officer involved shooting.  The two involved Troopers are identified as Trooper Josh Bacheller a 6 year veteran of Washington State Patrol and is currently assigned to WSP District 5, Kelso detachment and Trooper Evan Tippets a 5.5 year veteran of the Washington State Patrol and is currently assigned to the WSP District 5, Kelso detachment.  The Cowlitz Tribal Police Officer is identified as Officer Austin Moore a 2.5-year veteran of the Cowlitz Tribal Police.  The two Troopers and the Cowlitz Tribal Officer were placed on critical incident leave at the time of the incident per protocol. 

 

The suspect, 47-year-old Vencine Hadley was struck by gunfire and transported to an area hospital to receive treatment.  He was subsequently released from the hospital and booked into the Clark County Jail for outstanding warrants and new charges of Attempt to Elude and Unlawful Possession of a Firearm.   This continued investigation is ongoing and will be conducted by the Southwest Washington Independent Investigative Response Team (SWIIR Team) and additional charges are anticipated. 

The SWIIR Team is comprised of agencies in Clark County, including the Battle Ground Police Department, Camas Police Department, Clark County Sheriff’s Office, and Vancouver Police Department.  In compliance with WAC 139-12, the involved agency personnel will not be involved in this investigation.

 

This press release is in compliance with weekly updates to the ongoing investigation to the media in accordance with Washington State Law I-940. 

 

No further information at this time.


UPDATE: Death Investigation after Fight is Ongoing, Victim Identified
Portland Police Bureau - 06/11/21 2:42 PM
Anthony Hartley
Anthony Hartley
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/3056/145753/thumb_Anthony_Hartley.jpg
The Oregon State Medical Examiner has completed the autopsy of the person who died after a fight on Wednesday. Cause and manner of death are still pending further investigation and test results.

The deceased subject has been identified as Frank D. Keller, 61. Keller’s family has been notified of his death and provided the attached photo for release.

Based on the findings from the Oregon State Medical Examiner, Anthony Hartley is being released from custody.

This is still an active investigation and detectives are seeking any information on both Anthony Hartley (photo) and Frank Keller.

Anyone with information is asked to contact Detective Rico Beniga Rico.Beniga@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-0457, or Detective Jennifer Hertzler Jennifer.Hertzler@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-1040.


Photo descriptions:
Family photo of Frank Keller's face

Anthony Hartley mugshot photo

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

A man is facing a manslaughter charge after a fight that ended with a death.

On Wednesday, June 9, 2021 at 10:47p.m., North Precinct Officers responded to a call of two people fighting in the 4700 block of North Lombard Street. When officers arrived, they found a person on the ground, unresponsive. Paramedics arrived and confirmed the person was deceased.

Officers from North Precinct immediately began searching for another person who was involved in the fight. Several blocks away, near North Lombard Street and North Westanna Avenue, an officer located a man matching the description. He was detained for an investigation. Portland Police Bureau Homicide Unit detectives, Multnomah County Medical Examiner’s Office, and the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office responded and conducted an investigation.

They booked Anthony M. Hartley, 38, was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on charges of Manslaughter in the Second Degree.

The Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office will conduct an autopsy to identify the victim and determine the manner and cause of death. The victim's name will be released once it has been verified and family is notified.

This is an ongoing investigation. Anyone with information about this incident is asked to contact Detective Rico Beniga Rico.Beniga@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-0457, or Detective Jennifer Hertzler Jennifer.Hertzler@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-1040.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Anthony Hartley , Frank Keller family photo

Southwest Polk Fire District Receives Spirit Mountain Community Fund Grant
Sheridan/SW Polk/West Valley Fire Dists. - 06/11/21 2:37 PM

On June 9th, 2021, Southwestern Polk Fire District attended a virtual Check Presentation to receive a grant from the Spirit Mountain Community Fund in the amount of $21,950. With this grant, the Southwestern Polk Fire District will be able to upgrade extrication equipment to continue to assist with emergency services in extricating people from vehicles. The district currently covers more than 50 miles of Hwy, including Hwy 22. Extrication equipment allows the district to assist victims of vehicle incidents.

The Spirit Mountain Community Fund was founded in 1997 and since then has awarded 2,885 grants, totaling over $84.5 million, to various organizations in the community. Southwestern Polk Fire district thanks the Spirit Mountain Community Fund and the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde for their generous and continued support of fire protection and emergency services.


Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working Subcommittee meets via Zoom June 15.
Oregon Health Authority - 06/11/21 2:10 PM

June 11, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working Subcommittee meets via Zoom June 15.

What: A combined public Zoom meeting for the Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD

When: Tuesday, June 15, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Zoom Meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 160 072 1195 Passcode: 439535.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission is tasked with determining a possible framework for future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, steps to address research on cannabis in areas of public health policy and public safety policy, agronomic and horticultural best practices, and medical and pharmacopoeia best practices. The commission also advises the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission regarding statutes governing medical and retail cannabis. Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or .lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us">megan.r.lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Two Shootings in East Precinct Leave Injured Victims, Firearms Seized (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 06/11/21 2:09 PM
Gun Seized
Gun Seized
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/3056/145795/thumb_Gun_3900_Block_SE_174_21157537.JPG
Two injury shootings took place in East Precinct Thursday afternoon that strained resources, but officers were able to follow investigative leads and seize evidence.

On Thursday, June 10, 2021 at 4:02p.m., East Precinct Officers responded to a report of shots fired near Southeast 82nd Avenue and Southeast Insley Street. Officers located a crime scene closer to Southeast 83rd Avenue (photo), where there was evidence of gunfire. A short time later, officers learned of a shooting victim being dropped off at a local hospital by private vehicle. Officers confirmed that the patient was injured in the shooting on Southeast Insley Street. The adult male victim was severely wounded, but after lifesaving treatment at the hospital he is expected to survive his injuries.

East Precinct Officers followed investigative leads and tips from the public to locate a vehicle involved in the shooting and three firearms (photo). They were seized as evidence. Investigators will determine if they were in fact used in a crime. The Enhanced Community Safety Team (ECST) responded to the scene and assumed the investigation. They believe occupants of another vehicle were involved in the shooting. They have not yet been located yet and no arrests have been made. The case number is 21-157409.

As that call response was underway, another shooting call came out in East Precinct. At 7:17p.m., officers responded to the 3900 block of Southeast 174th Avenue on a shooting. When they arrived they found one adult male had been shot in a leg. He was transported to the hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

Investigating officers determined that at least two people were shooting at each other. A stray bullet struck the victim, who was uninvolved and watering his front lawn at the time. Several bullets also pierced a nearby occupied apartment, narrowly missing a child taking a bath.

One involved person was identified and detained. A firearm has been seized as evidence (photo). At this time no charges have been filed in that case. At least one other suspect is outstanding. The case number is 21-157537.

ECST supervisors noted the outstanding call response by patrol officers to the two chaotic scenes that led to significant progress in the case investigations.

If anyone has information about either of these cases, please reference their case numbers and e-mail crimetips@portlandoregon.gov .

Anonymous tips can be sent through Crime Stoppers. Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

In the past week in Portland there were at least thirty shootings, ten resulting in injuries. There were also six deaths that are being investigated as homicides.

Photo descriptions:

Three firearms displayed on a surface, one large semiautomatic handgun, black with silver colored slide, with its loaded magazine next to it, a small black revolver, and a small semiautomatic handgun, black with silver colored slide with loaded magazine.

Shooting scene on SE Insley Street. Yellow evidence markers are scattered on a streetscape, indicating where shell casings were found. A red car and a motor home are parked on the curbline, and police vehicles are parked in the distance.

A black semiautomatic handgun sitting on a vehicle seat, slide locked in the rear position, loaded magazine nearby.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Gun Seized , Shooting scene on Insley , Three Guns Seized

House fire suspect arrested
Portland Fire & Rescue - 06/11/21 2:04 PM

A suspect has been arrested in connection with a house fire in an east Portland neighborhood.  During the early morning hours of Friday June 11, Portland Fire and Rescue crews arrived to a one-story house with heavy fire showing.  The fire was intense enough to break windows on a neighbor’s residence and necessitate firefighters to initially attack from the outside of the house.  Crews eventually transitioned to the interior of the home and fully extinguished the fire.  The house was a total loss.  No occupants were in the home and no injuries were reported.  The suspect arrived back on scene during the investigation process, confessed and was arrested.

http://www.mcso.us/PAID/Home/Booking/1518178


Traffic Safety Team Planning Pedestrian Safety Campaign on Friday **Update**
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/11/21 2:02 PM

Update, 6/11/21 – Pedestrian Safety Enforcement Operation Results

On Friday, June 4th, 2021, our Traffic Safety Team conducted a pedestrian safety enforcement operation on Ward Drive NE at Harlan Drive NE at a marked crosswalk.  This location was chosen due to the high volume of traffic and pedestrians that travel through the area on a daily basis.  The day before the operation, the Sheriff’s Office posted signs in the area warning drivers about the operation planned for the following day and information was shared across our social media platforms.

During the 2 ½ hour event, 25 drivers were stopped for a variety of traffic violations with 11 warnings and 19 citations issued:

  • Failure to yield to a pedestrian in a crosswalk – 4 warnings, 8 citations
  • Unlawful use of a mobile electronic device – 1 warning, 3 citations
  • Failure to use seatbelts – 1 warning, 3 citations
  • Speeding – 2 warnings, 3 citations
  • Other violations encountered included no valid operator’s license, failure to yield to an emergency vehicle, failure to obey a traffic control device, and illegal display of license plates.

As drivers were contacted during the event they were given educational materials in English and Spanish to help increase awareness about pedestrian safety.  To learn more about how you can help reduce pedestrian fatalities in Oregon, please visit OregonImpact.org.

Original media release from 6/2/21

On Friday, June 4th, 2021, our Traffic Safety Team will be conducting a pedestrian safety enforcement operation in the Hayesville – Jan Ree neighborhood from 9:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m.  The four hour pedestrian safety enforcement operation will focus on motorists who fail to yield the right-of-way to pedestrians.

In 2018, the State of Oregon had 79 pedestrian fatalities, six of those occurred in Marion County.  The Marion County Sheriff’s Office is committed to preventing these tragic deaths by embracing the three E’s of traffic safety: Education, Enforcement, and Engineering.  The Sheriff’s Office is conducting this public awareness and enforcement program to help educate drivers and encourage members of the community to develop and maintain safe practices while driving, walking, and cycling in Marion County.

During the four hour operation, deputies from the Marion County Sheriff’s Office will be conducting enforcement at marked crosswalks which are heavily traveled.  Deputies dressed in plain clothes will cross the street while uniformed deputies monitor the crosswalk for motorists who fail to yield the right-of-way, or who are engaged in unsafe driving behaviors.  Drivers stopped during this pedestrian safety enforcement operation will be issued written warnings or citations.

At the center of this pedestrian safety enforcement operation is community education.  On Thursday, the day before the operation, deputies will be putting signs out near the intersections of Ward Drive NE and Harlen Drive NE as well as on Hayesville Drive NE at 49th Avenue NE where the focus of the operation is planned to occur to help raise driver awareness about the pedestrian safety campaign scheduled for Friday, June 4th.

To learn more about how you can help reduce pedestrian fatalities in Oregon, please visit OregonImpact.org.

 

MCSO Pedestrian Safety Campaign PSA


Fire season starting in three more ODF districts
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/11/21 1:45 PM

With conditions drier than normal for this time of year, the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Western Lane, South Cascade and West Oregon districts will enter fire season at 12:01 a.m. on Wednesday, June 16.  This applies to ODF-protected lands in Benton, Linn, Lincoln, Polk, and Lane counties, the southern portion of Yamhill County and the northern portion of Douglas County.  Separately, Linn, Benton and Lane counties traditionally impose a burn ban beginning June 16 each year.  In all counties, the burning of backyard debris is prohibited during fire season.

“With our current fuel moistures, conditions are what we typically see in early to mid-July.  All signs are pointing to a busy fire season as we progress further into the year,” said West Oregon District Forester Michael Curran.  “The majority of our fire starts in the southern Willamette Valley are human caused, and we urge the public to be aware of Public Use Restrictions,” Curran said. The public can find information on use restrictions on ODF’s interactive map, social media, or by contacting their local ODF office.

Benton County Fire Defense Board Chief Rick Smith said, “We hope the public has an increased awareness of wildfires.” He recommends that landowners “Create defensible space around your property by removing dead vegetation, keeping grass and brush mowed short, and landscape plants green and well-watered. It can make the difference between losing and saving a structure in the event of a wildfire.”

For updates on fire danger levels, call the South Cascade Office (eastern Lane & Linn Counties) at 541-726-3588, ext. 1, the Western Lane Office (Includes northern Douglas County) at 541-935-2222, or the West Oregon Office (Benton, Polk, Lincoln & southern Yamhill Counties) at 541-929-6300.


*Update* Detectives investigate homicide at north Salem motel
Salem Police Dept. - 06/11/21 12:30 PM

UPDATE

DATE: Friday, June 11,2021

Detectives have identified the victim in the homicide fom June 08,2021 as Davontae Deshawn Smith, age 21, of Portland. His next of kin have been notified. 

Detectives are still investigating the incident and continue to ask the public for information regarding the incident. 

 

FOR IMMDIATE RELEASE

DATE:     Tuesday, June 08, 2021

Salem, Ore. — Patrol officers responded to a call of shots fired at the Capital Inn on Fisher Road NE at 3:30 a.m. this morning, Tuesday, June 8, 2021.

Arriving officers found one person deceased. Detectives are on scene conducting the investigation. No further details are available for release at this time.

Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call the Salem Police Tips Line at 503-588-8477.

# # #


Columbia County Sheriff Brian Pixley reports an Adult in Custody (AIC) has died of an apparent suicide.
Columbia Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/11/21 12:06 PM

On June 10, 2021 at approximately 3:43pm, Deputies were conducting a routine check of Adults in Custody and located 54 year old Bryan Deardon inside his cell, unresponsive.  The Deputy immediately entered the single man cell, notified Fire and EMS and began life saving measures.  Medics arrived at the jail at about 3:47pm. Deputies and medics continued life saving measures on Mr. Deardon until he was pronounced deceased at about 4:02pm.   

Mr. Deardon had been in the Columbia County Jail since his arrest on June 17, 2020 on charges including Attempted Murder, 3 counts of Assault II, 2 counts of Strangulation I, Kidnapping I, Burglary I and Unlawful Use Of A Weapon.  Sheriff Pixley has asked the Oregon State Police to conduct the investigation into this death.  Further information will be provided upon the completion of the investigation


Salem Man Arrested for Attempted Murder
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/11/21 11:37 AM
2021-06/1294/145788/Smith.jpg
2021-06/1294/145788/Smith.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1294/145788/thumb_Smith.jpg

On June 10th, 2021, Detectives from the Marion County Sheriff’s Office charged Quintin Smith, 36, with in connection with a May shooting in the unincorporated area of East Salem.  The shooting was first reported to deputies on May 9th, 2021, at just after 4:00 a.m. when medics were called to the 2500 block of Phipps Lane NE to assist a male with a gunshot wound.  When deputies arrived at the scene, they located one victim, a 44 year-old male with a gunshot wound to the chest.  The suspect had already fled from the scene by the time law enforcement arrived.

Following a month long investigation into the shooting, Smith was taken into custody yesterday afternoon during a traffic stop in northwest Salem by officers from the Salem Police Department. 

Smith is currently in custody at the Marion County Jail with Attempted Murder in the 2nd Degree and Unlawful Use of a Firearm charges in connection with the shooting.  Additionally, Smith had outstanding warrants for his arrest for a parole violation as well as drug delivery and possession charges.

Smith is scheduled to be arraigned this afternoon, June 11th, 2021, at 2:30 p.m. at the Marion County Circuit Court Annex.

The Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the Keizer Police Department, Marion County District Attorney’s Office, Oregon Department of Justice, and Salem Police Department for their assistance during this investigation.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/1294/145788/Smith.jpg

UPDATE: Oregon reports 370 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/11/21 9:55 AM

This is an update of yesterday’s Daily Media Release with information about COVID-19 deaths.

June 10, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 370 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 10 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,726, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 370 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 204,291.

Interim update to release time of this daily news release

To align with the daily Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) update of the numbers of people in Oregon ages 18 and older who have received at least one dose of their COVID-19 vaccine, OHA will be releasing this daily news release later in the day, beginning today.

The CDC posts the number of people in Oregon ages 18 and up who have received at least a first dose daily, generally by 5 p.m. Eastern time.

OHA then pulls the data from the CDC site at 3 p.m. Pacific time daily and subtracts the number of people ages 18 and older who have had at least one dose from Oregon’s target of 2,345,823 (70% of those 18 and over). This calculation shows how many people ages 18 and older still need to be vaccinated to achieve Oregon’s goal of 70%.

OHA will update the website banner to reflect these numbers by 5 p.m. Pacific time daily.

Note: If the CDC has not updated its website by 3 p.m. Pacific time, when OHA pulls the data, OHA communications will add a note in this daily media release and on the dashboard on the Governor’s website stating that CDC’s website has not been updated and OHA will update the banner and dashboard at 9 a.m. Pacific time the next day.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 27,113 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 11,182 doses were administered on June 9 and 15,931 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 9.

The 7-day running average is now 15,761 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 2,337,634 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,659,139 first and second doses of Moderna and 153,424 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 1,991,717 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 2,303,485 people who have had at least one dose. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 93,234.

Note: OHA is working to determine why CDC's COVID-19 vaccination update today indicates minimal change. We will have a more complete update tomorrow.

A daily countdown can be found on the OHA website

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,861,055 doses of Pfizer, 2,173,680 doses of Moderna and 299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 173, which is nine more than yesterday. There are 41 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is five more than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,328, which is a 22.3% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 219.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

One Community Health: collaboration is key

Tomorrow, One Community Health will be administering Pfizer vaccines in The Dalles while offering free food and live music to all who attend the event. Preventative health manager Gladys Rivera readily admits that Friday’s event is more of a celebration than a formal clinic because Wasco County has almost reached a 65% percent vaccination rate. 

Rivera attributes the clinic’s vaccination success to the organization’s great partnership with Oregon Health Authority (OHA), as well as with other community partners, including growers, employers and local businesses.  

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) deployed three mobile vaccination units throughout Oregon’s rural communities, which have successfully vaccinated more than 2,500 people across the state.  

“Collaboration is really the key to make all of this happen,” emphasized Rivera. “It’s relying on all those partners and really sharing the workload.” 

You can read more of this story on OHA’s Oregon Vaccine News blog. For more information about tomorrow’s vaccine clinic in The Dalles, contact One Community Health at 541.386.6380.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (8), Clackamas (30), Clatsop (1), Columbia (4), Coos (2), Crook (11), Deschutes (85), Douglas (17), Harney (1), Hood River (4), Jackson (15), Jefferson (1), Josephine (8), Klamath (10), Lane (23), Linn (11), Malheur (2), Marion (35), Multnomah (59), Polk (7), Umatilla (8), Union (1), Washington (22) and Yamhill (4).

Note: Due to a delay in laboratory reporting, OHA received 767 electronic laboratory reports (ELRs) on June 9, 2021 for Deschutes County. The reports are from April 17, 2021 to June 9, 2021. As a result, case counts, ELR totals and percent positivity is higher in Deschutes County for June 9, 2021 than anticipated.

Oregon’s 2,717th death is an 89-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on May 4 and died on May 23 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,718th death is an 83-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive on Jan. 27 and died on Feb. 26 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,719th death is a 90-year-old woman from Crook County who tested positive on June 7 and died on June 8 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,720th death is an 80-year-old man from Linn County who tested positive on May 21 and died on May 23 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,721st death is an 84-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on May 22 and died on June 8 at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,722nd death is a 75-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on May 15 and died on May 21 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,723rd death is a 73-year-old man from Yamhill County who tested positive on April 17 and died on May 13 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,724th death is a 55-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on May 4 and died on May 21 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,725th death is a 55-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on May 4 and died on May 21 at Hillsboro Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,726th death is a 73-year-old man from Wasco County who tested positive on April 13 and died on May 21 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.# # #


EMD Workgroup Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/11/21 8:11 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

June 7, 2021

Contact:   Sara Stewart
                503-378-2424

                sara.stewart@state.or.us

Notice of Special Meeting

The EMD Workgroup, a subgroup of the Telecommunications Curriculum Committee, will hold a regular meeting on June 21, 2021 from 07:00 a.m. - 09:00 a.m.  The meeting will be held virtually via Zoom for public and workgroup members who choose this option over onsite, in-person attendance.  For a link, please contact Sara Stewart at the email address listed above.  A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Agenda Items:

  1. Check-In
  2. EMD Card Review & Comparison

              a.  Recommendations

               b.  Corrections

      3.  Next Steps

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Curriculum Committee Workgroup members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Smith Creek Village at Silver Falls State Park opens June 11; lodging reservations available
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/11/21 8:00 AM

SILVERTON, Oregon—The Smith Creek Village in Silver Falls State Park is now open after a six-month closure. Silver Falls Hospitality is the new management company operating the village in an agreement with the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). The area was previously known as Silver Falls Lodge and Conference Center.

“We’re very happy that park visitors now have these overnight options and services once again,” said Park Manager Guy Rodrigue. “Silver Falls Hospitality has hit the ground running and we’re eager to help them succeed in this new partnership.”

Cabin and lodge reservations are now available for stays beginning June 11 and beyond via a new website, www.smithcreekvillage.com. Information regarding the Foothills and Davidson Ranches, weddings, group events and meeting spaces is available by contacting Partnerships & Events Manager Shalimar at shalimar@silverfallshospitality.com.

"Hosting has become both a lifestyle and a practice for us. We started Silver Falls Hospitality with the intention of providing comfortable experiences in the outdoors," said co-owner Brooke Gerken. "We are so grateful to have been given the honor of being the stewards of this space and are looking forward to working closely with OPRD to bring our vision to life. We are stoked to be getting started and to have our guests on-site very soon!"

Big Leaf Coffeehouse will be open daily to all park visitors from 7 a.m.-11 a.m. They will be serving both hot breakfast and take+trek meal options, with a full espresso bar coming soon.

The South Falls Café at the South Falls Lodge in the park day-use area is open daily, 10 a.m.-
6 p.m. The café is managed under a separate agreement with the Oregon Commission for the Blind Business Enterprise Program team.
# # #


Thu. 06/10/21
Vancouver Police arrest suspect in sexual motivation burglaries
Vancouver Police Dept. - 06/10/21 5:05 PM

Vancouver, Wash. –On June 3, 2021and June 4, 2021, Vancouver Police responded to two separate incidents involving a male entering the apartments of female victims and groping them.

During one of the incidents, the victim grabbed the mask the intruder was wearing. That mask was retrieved by police and sent to the Washington State Crime Lab for expedited processing.

On June 9, 2021, the Washington State Crime Lab contacted the Vancouver Police Department with information that the DNA on the recovered mask matched the profile of Benjamin Jerome T. White, 21 years old, of Vancouver.

Mr. White was located by detectives, interviewed, and was subsequently arrested and booked into the Clark County Jail for Burglary I (two counts) and Indecent Liberties (three counts).

 

###


UPDATE: Juveniles Wanted in Robberies Arrested, Additional Suspects Sought (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 06/10/21 4:42 PM
Photo 1 Suspect 1 standing by car
Photo 1 Suspect 1 standing by car
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/3056/145162/thumb_Suspect_1_Standing_outside_car.png
Detectives with the Portland Police Robbery Unit have arrested four juveniles related to this series of crimes, and are still seeking information about two suspects still outstanding.

On Wednesday, June 9, 2021, detectives arrested the following suspects, whose names are not being released due to their status as juveniles, and booked them into the Donald E. Long Juvenile Detention Center:

Female, 14, of Portland: Robbery in the Second Degree (4 counts), Unauthorized Use of a Motor Vehicle, Burglary in the Second Degree, Theft in the Second Degree (3 counts), Harassment.

Male, 15, of Portland: Robbery in the Second Degree (4 counts), Unauthorized Use of a Motor Vehicle.

Female, 13, of Portland: Robbery in the Second Degree (3 counts), Unauthorized Use of a Motor Vehicle.

Male, 12, of Portland: Robbery in the Second Degree (3 counts), Unauthorized Use of a Motor Vehicle.

Tips from the public assisted detectives in identifying these suspects, and the Portland Police Bureau is grateful for all who responded to the request for information.

Two suspects remain outstanding, and photos of them are attached. Anyone with information is asked to contact Detective Bob Boylan at Bob.Boylan@portlandoregon.gov .

Anonymous tips can be sent through Crime Stoppers. Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

Photo 1 Description: Suspect 1, wearing a black hooded sweatshirt with white writing on the front and blue pants standing outside of an open car door

Photo 2 Description: Suspect 1 in roughly the same position, with a different facial expression

Photo 3 Description: Suspect 2 standing in the aisle of a bus, wearing a black beanie cap, black face mask, black jacket with cartoon character faces printed on it, black pants, black shoes


###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

On Monday, May 17, 2021, people called 9-1-1 to report a series of robberies, thefts, and vandalism between 3:05 p.m. and 7:34 p.m. in four different neighborhoods in southeast Portland. The suspect descriptions and actions, as well as the relatively close locations of these crimes, suggests that the same group of suspects are responsible and may have committed similar crimes over several days.

The first three incidents took place in the Montavilla neighborhood. At about 3:05 p.m., the group entered a convenience store in the 9100 block of Southeast Division Street. A small group entered the store, spread out and began stealing things. They began to leave and pushed an employee out of their way as they left with stolen property (case 21-132906).

At about 3:22 p.m., the group entered a restaurant in the 8700 block of Southeast Division. They began yelling loudly at staff, creating a disturbance while one of the group stole the tip jar, then the whole group left (case 21-132917).

At about 3:46 p.m., the group entered a salon in the 8200 block of Southeast Division and began throwing products from shelves and table tops onto the floor. Individuals from the group moved into marked “employee only” areas and stole property. At least one person attempted to take a purse from a customer before leaving with the rest of the group (case 21-132937).

At about 4:15 p.m., the group approached a person parking a car in the 2700 block of 82nd Avenue, in the Powellhurst-Gilbert neighborhood. They surrounded the car and approached the driver, demanding money. One of the group stole property from inside the car before the group ran off (case 21-132954).

At about 4:50 p.m., the group surrounded a car as it drove through a parking lot in the 5200 block of Southeast 82nd Avenue, in the Foster-Powell neighborhood. The driver of the car stopped and one of the people in the group opened the driver’s door and pulled the driver out of the car. The group got into the car and drove off (case 21-132990).

At about 7:34 p.m., the group was driving the stolen car in the area of Southeast 86th Avenue and Southeast Bush Street in the Lents Neighborhood. They blocked the way of a person driving through that area, forcing the car to stop. People from the group in the stolen car tried to get into stopped car, but the driver was able to drive off (case 21-132131).

The people in the group were described as one black female and up to four black males, ranging in age from mid to late teens. Detectives are following up on these crimes, including the gathering of photo and video evidence. It is unknown at this time of these were in any way bias crimes. Investigators believe others may have been victims of these suspects, but have not called in to make a report.

Anyone with information can contact Detective Jeff Sharp Jeff.Sharp@portlandoregon.gov or Detective Bob Boylan Bob.Boylan@portlandoregon.gov.

Anyone with information about any of these cases may also reference the associated case number and e-mail crimetips@portlandoregon.gov .

Anonymous tips can be sent through Crime Stoppers. Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/
###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Photo 1 Suspect 1 standing by car , Photo 2 Suspect 1 different angle , Photo 3 Suspect 2 on bus

Missing Endangered Located (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 06/10/21 4:14 PM
Davry Lee
Davry Lee
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/3056/145739/thumb_Davry_Lee.jpg
Davry Lee has been located and is receiving necessary care.

###PPB###
A man who is a danger to himself and others is missing and the Portland Police Bureau is requesting help locating him.

Davry Lee, 52, (photo) was last seen leaving Legacy Good Samaritan Hospital today, June 9, 2021 at about 12:30p.m. He was on a civil hold due to a neurological issue that causes him to act erratically and he needs urgent medical care.

Davry Lee is an African American male, 5'6", 145 lbs, and was wearing green hospital scrubs and tan socks when he left the hospital. At 5:47p.m., Central Precinct officers responded to a call that Lee was near the intersection of West Burnside Street and Southwest 8th Avenue. When Lee saw the officers, he rode away on a bicycle. Due to safety concerns, officers did not follow. They did note that he had changed into a long sleeve tan shirt with white stripes and khaki pants. He was riding a black road bicycle.

If anyone sees him or has information about where he is now, please call 911. If anyone has information that is not time sensitive please e-mail the PPB Missing Persons Unit at missing@portlandoregon.gov .

Photo description: photo of Davry Lee

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Davry Lee

Mt. Tabor Park Statue Vandal Identified And Cited
Portland Police Bureau - 06/10/21 3:23 PM
Portland Police officers from the East Precinct Neighborhood Response Team (NRT) conducted follow up on vandalism to a statue in Mt. Tabor Park, which occurred on June 8, 2021.

Investigators developed information identifying 43-year-old Jeanette K. Grode as the suspect.

On June 10, 2021, NRT contacted Grode and issued a citation in lieu of custody for ORS 164.354 Criminal Mischief II, ORS 166.075 Abuse of Venerated Objects, ORS 164.383 Unlawful Applying of Graffiti, and Portland City Code 20.12.100 Vandalism - Protection of Park Property and Vegetation, and was not lodged at jail due to booking restrictions.
###PPB###

Charter Review Commission elects Chuck Green to fill open co-chair position
Clark Co. WA Communications - 06/10/21 3:14 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Charter Review Commission this week elected Commissioner Chuck Green to fill an open co-chair position. Green joins co-chair Kim Harless and secretary Anthony Vendetti as the three elected officers of the review commission.

The position was open due to a resignation on the commission.

The Charter Review Commission meets 5 pm each Wednesday. The virtual meetings are open to the public. Information on how to participate including providing public comment to the commission is on the county website at https://clark.wa.gov/county-manager/meetings-agendas-archives. Meetings also are broadcast on CVTV channel 23/323 and cvtv.org.

The Charter Review Commission is tasked with reviewing the county’s home rule charter approved by voters in November 2014. This will be the first review of the county’s charter.

The 15 commission members were elected in the Nov. 3 general election. Per the charter, three members were elected countywide and each of the four county councilor districts has three commissioners. Any changes to the charter that the review commission recommends would go to a countywide vote in a general election.


Sheriff's Office arrests 40-year-old on multiple rape, sex-abuse charges; additional victims sought
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/10/21 3:08 PM
2021-06/624/145775/bookingphoto-VitaliyYasinskiy.jpg
2021-06/624/145775/bookingphoto-VitaliyYasinskiy.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/624/145775/thumb_bookingphoto-VitaliyYasinskiy.jpg

Please reference CCSO Case # 21-952376

Shortly after 8:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June 10, 2021, detectives and deputies with the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office Human Trafficking Team and Adult Sex Crimes Unit arrested 40-year-old Vitaliy Yasinskiy and booked him into Clackamas County Jail on the following charges:

  • 4 counts of Rape in the 3rd Degree
  • 5 counts of Sex Abuse in the 3rd Degree
  • 5 counts of Sodomy in the 3rd Degree
  • 7 counts of Online Sexual Corruption of a Child in the 1st Degree
  • 6 counts of Prostitution

The Sheriff's Office investigation revealed Yasinskiy was using Snapchat to communicate with and lure his underage victim.

Vitaliy Yasinskiy's complete booking info is here: https://web3.clackamas.us/roster/#inmates . Bail is set at $250,000. A booking photo is attached.

ADDITIONAL VICTIMS SOUGHT: This investigation is ongoing, and investigators are concerned Yasinskiy may have additional victims.

Anyone with information on Vitaliy Yasinskiy's criminal activity -- or possible additional sex-crime victims -- is urged to contact the Sheriff’s Office Tip Line -- by phone at 503-723-4949 or by using the online email form at https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/tip . Please reference CCSO Case #21-952376.

Victims of sexual trafficking can contact Safety Compass at 971-235-0021 for confidential support and advice 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Learn more at https://www.safetycompass.org/contact-us.html .

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/624/145775/bookingphoto-VitaliyYasinskiy.jpg

Virtual Nisei WWII Veterans' Stamp Dedication Program On Monday, June 14
Oregon Historical Society - 06/10/21 3:06 PM
2021-06/2861/145774/Stamp.jpg
2021-06/2861/145774/Stamp.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/2861/145774/thumb_Stamp.jpg

Earlier this month, the U.S. Postal Service released its newest commemorative stamp, the “GO FOR BROKE SOLDIERS: Japanese American Soldiers of WWII” stamp. This Forever Stamp honors the little known contributions of American soldiers of Japanese ancestry (the Nisei) who served courageously during World War II. With the frightening increase in violent attacks on Asian Americans, learning about the patriotism and heroic military history of these Japanese American soldiers during World War II is critical. It teaches us that people of color have contributed to the preservation of freedom and democracy throughout the history of America, often with their lives.

Ceremonies celebrating this Forever Stamp will be or have been held across the nation. Oregon will hold its ceremony on June 14, 5:30pm at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland, Oregon. Due to COVID safety precautions restricting large public gatherings, the public is invited to attend virtually (vimeo.com/543729988). It will also be posted on the website www.StampOurStory.org.

Who were these soldiers and what is the meaning of the motto “GO FOR BROKE”? They were “Nisei,” American citizens born in the United States to immigrants (“Issei”) from Japan. “GO FOR BROKE” characterized their teamwork, spirit and courage. The face of a soldier and the motto of these troops is etched on the stamp. These soldiers served in combat in Europe, as linguists in the Pacific Theatre and in the post-war occupation of Japan. They numbered just 33,000 men and women but suffered huge casualties. They include one of the most decorated military units in history, earning 9,486 Purple Hearts and 21 Medals of Honor. 

While these Nisei soldiers were fighting and dying for their country, America, their grandparents, parents, spouses, children and relatives were incarcerated in American concentration camps. Solely because of their Japanese heritage, over 120,000 Japanese American citizens and others of Japanese ancestry were deemed enemies of the U.S., were ordered to leave almost everything they owned, and were imprisoned in camps surrounded by barbed wire. Four thousand Oregonians were forced to leave their homes, businesses and farms and live in one of ten American concentration camps. The loyalty of these soldiers and their families is indisputable. For more information see www.StampOurStory.org.

In 2005 the “Stamp Our Story” campaign for the “GO FOR BROKE” stamp was launched by three Nisei women in California to honor these soldiers. Support in Oregon has been ongoing since the beginning of the campaign. 

According to Doug Katagiri, son of linguist George Katagiri, veteran of the Military Intelligence Service: “This unique commemoration recognizes and reminds us of the legacy achieved by Nisei veterans of WWII. It’s impossible to overstate their sacrifices in building this legacy, fighting a war abroad while enduring racism and an extraordinary episode of national injustice at home.”

Oregonians across the state are invited to join the celebration (virtually at vimeo.com/543729988) to learn about these patriotic Japanese American soldiers and their families. For Oregonians of Japanese ancestry, it will be a long awaited opportunity to celebrate the contributions of the “GO FOR BROKE” Nisei soldiers and their ancestors.

The program will feature Honorary Chair and former Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski and four generations of Nisei veterans’ descendants. Three vignettes by Asian American actors will portray stories of military service: David Loftus reading an excerpt from Harold Okimoto’s diary, the 522nd Field Artillery Battalion; Alton Chung presenting former Congressman Al Ullman’s tribute to Frank Hachiya, Military Intelligence Service; and Ken Yoshikawa, reading Art Iwasaki’s letter to the HIllsboro Argus, 442nd Regimental Combat Team.

Former Gov. Kulongoski lauded the Nisei veterans in this way: “Our Japanese American World War II veterans fought for democracy while their own families were incarcerated in concentration camps on American soil. They believed in America. We salute them. And we will not forget.”

Sponsors and supporters of the event include the Oregon Nisei Veterans, the Japanese American Museum of Oregon, the Oregon Historical Society, the Portland Japanese American Citizens’ League and the Mary Yamaguchi Foundation at the Community Foundation of Southwest Washington.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/2861/145774/Stamp.jpg

Suspect Arrested After Firing Rifle At Another
Portland Police Bureau - 06/10/21 2:17 PM
Rifle
Rifle
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/3056/145764/thumb_Rifle_21156754.jpg
This update adds a photo of the rifle that was seized as evidence

On June 9, 2021 at about 10:30 p.m., Portland Police officers responded to the report of shots fired in the Montavilla neighborhood, near Northeast 75th Avenue and Northeast Halsey Street. Callers reported hearing people yelling and the sound of gunshots. Callers reported seeing a man armed with a rifle out in the street.

When officers arrived they saw 37-year-old Tsaan Kuang Saelee standing in the street armed with a rifle. There were bystanders and witnesses out in the area who police directed to move away for their own safety. Saelee moved behind a parked car and reemerged without the rifle, then started to run away. Officers took him into custody and recovered the rifle which had been stashed behind a car.

Police found evidence of gunfire, and based on the ensuing investigation believe that Saelee intentionally fired the rifle at an individual present at the scene; however nobody had been shot.

The Enhanced Community Safety Team (ECST) responded to investigate.

Saelee exhibited signs of recent drug use so police had medical personnel examine him at the scene. He was transported to the hospital by ambulance prior to booking.

Later, officers transported Saelee to jail for Attempted Murder, Attempted Assault I, and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.

If anyone has information about this case, please reference case 21-156754 and e-mail crimetips@portlandoregon.gov .

Anonymous tips can be sent through Crime Stoppers. Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Rifle

Tualatin Valley Water District Board of Commissioners Meeting Notice -- June 16, 2021
Tualatin Valley Water Dist. - 06/10/21 1:47 PM

The June Tualatin Valley Water District (TVWD) Board meeting will be held Wednesday, June 16, 2021, at 6:00 p.m. 

This meeting is only available via phone or the web. If you would like to attend, please utilize the contact information found below by 4:30 p.m. on June 16. 

The Board meeting agenda and packet and additional information regarding TVWD are available here.

About TVWD

TVWD serves about 215,500 customers in parts of Washington County, Oregon. Our service area covers more than 44 square miles including portions of Beaverton, Hillsboro, Tigard and unincorporated Washington County.

TVWD is the managing agency for the Willamette Water Supply System (WWSS), an additional water supply for the region which is being constructed in partnership with the City of Hillsboro and the City of Beaverton. The WWSS includes intake facilities, over 30 miles of pipes, a water treatment plant and two storage reservoirs. The system will deliver fresh, high-quality, treated water from the Willamette River to 400,000 Washington County residents and businesses, and is being built to the highest seismic safety standard to recover quickly after a major earthquake. The investments in the system will provide reliable, quality drinking water for generations to come.


Bureau of Land Management Western Oregon Resource Advisory Council to meet virtually June 24 to 25
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 06/10/21 1:21 PM
Western Oregon RAC Map
Western Oregon RAC Map
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/5514/145770/thumb_Western_OregonRAC1.jpg

Medford, Ore.  – The Bureau of Land Management’s Western Oregon Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet virtually June 24 to 25, 2021.

The Western Oregon RAC will be reviewing a business plan to modify fees at day-use sites, campgrounds, and group facilities across the BLM’s Northwest Oregon District. The proposal would modify fees at two existing day-use sites, and 13 campgrounds and group facilities. It would establish new fees at 16 day-use sites, campgrounds, and group facilities that currently do not charge fees. A fee approval is also requested for two campground facilities that are proposed for future development. The Northwest Oregon District is also proposing an annual pass that could be used to cover fees at day-use sites.

The Western Oregon RAC has the authority under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act to make formal recommendations on specific recreation fee proposals, an important step ahead of a fee or fee change being implemented. The RAC approval will not result in an immediate increase in fees, but is one important step in the public input process.

In addition, the Western Oregon RAC will be reviewing Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act Title II funding proposals and recommending projects for funding. The projects provide community-based solutions to pressing public lands challenges like wildland fire prevention, trash clean-up, watershed restoration, road maintenance, control of noxious weeds and more. Over the years, Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act projects have provided trail maintenance, culvert replacement or removal, soil improvement, vegetation/density management, wildfire hazard reduction, stream channel enhancement, control of noxious and exotic weeds, and opportunities for youth training and employment. 

“The Western Oregon RAC is made up of valuable partners who represent the diverse perspectives of Western Oregon communities,” said BLM Medford District Manager Elizabeth Burghard. “Their input on recreation fee proposals is a critical step in collecting fees to help operate, maintain and improve popular recreation sites,” continued Burghard.

The meeting runs from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. each day.  The meetings are open to the public, with a  comment period scheduled for 2:00 p.m. on June 24.  Individuals who want to make a statement during the public comment period are encouraged to also submit a written copy of their statement at the meeting for the administrative record.

To participate in the meeting, please register: https://blm.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_1ybd8Yr-RheOXXOgvDCe_Q or contact Kyle Sullivan, RAC Coordinator, ksullivan@blm.gov or at (541) 618-2340.

The Western Oregon RAC meets multiple times a year and is one of six citizen advisory councils throughout Oregon/Washington. The RAC’s 15 members are appointed by the Secretary of the Interior and represent a broad range of public land interests, including environmental, local government, recreation, timber, and commercial activity. The Western Oregon RAC advises the BLM’s Coos Bay, Medford, Roseburg, Northwest Districts, and parts of the Lakeview District.

For more information about the Western Oregon RAC, visit:

https://www.blm.gov/get-involved/resource-advisory-council/near-you/oregon-washington

###

This year, we invite everyone to reimagine your public lands as we celebrate 75 years of the BLM’s stewardship and service to the American people.?The BLM manages approximately 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. 




Attached Media Files: Western Oregon RAC Map

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board -- Training Subcommittee meets June 11
Oregon Health Authority - 06/10/21 1:11 PM

June 10, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board – Training Subcommittee meets June 11

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Training Subcommittee

Agenda: Available at: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PREVENTIONWELLNESS/Pages/psilocybin-services-act.aspx

When: Friday, June 11, 1-3 p.m. No public comment period available.

Where: Via Zoom Meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16018821728

Meeting ID: 160 1882 1728

Background: Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 years of age and older in this state for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Nic Riley at 971-673-0404, 711 TTY, or iley@dhsoha.state.gov">nic.riley@dhsoha.state.gov, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Garment Factory 3rd Alarm Fire Suspect Arrested
Portland Fire & Rescue - 06/10/21 12:59 PM

The suspect in the Garment Factory 3rd Alarm fire, 48-year-old Andrea Renee Cadle, was arrested during the evening of June 9th on charges of Arson II and Reckless Burning. A search warrant was executed where evidence was located connecting them to the incident. For questions related to the charges please contact the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office.

PF&R investigators have evidence that an act of arson was responsible for an early morning fire at a building that houses an iconic Portland business.

Just after 3:30am, 911 dispatchers at the Bureau of Emergency Communications began receiving phone calls that a tree was on fire and spreading to an adjacent commercial building, the Portland Garment Factory at 408 SE 79th Ave. When crews arrived, they found heavy fire and smoke coming from the second floor of the two-story building. Firefighters attempted to extinguish the fire by using multiple large hose lines inside the structure but were forced to withdraw to an exterior strategy. Incident Commanders (IC) directed this change in strategy due to the amount of fire that had burned through on the exterior front wall, and its effect on the structural components of the building. This fire weakened the structural components to a point that they posed a serious threat to firefighters inside.

Firefighters were ordered out of the building, and only 22 minutes into the firefight, crews began to radio to the IC that they could see “bulging” in areas of the exterior walls near the roofline.  Crews were directed to confirm over the radio that they had accountability of their members and minutes later large sections of the roof collapsed.

12 occupants of an apartment building next door were evacuated by firefighters as smoke and heat began threatening their apartments and other buildings nearby. Red Cross volunteers were requested to assist with the apartment residents who were then directed to a Tri-Met bus that had been provided as a warm area for them to re-coup..

This fire was upgraded to a level of 3rd alarm due to the size of the fire, potential for structural collapse, evacuation of an adjacent apartment and businesses, potential fire spread to nearby buildings, and rotation of crews. This meant 25 fire engines, ladder trucks, command SUV’s and support equipment and nearly 100 firefighters in total.

Over 20 of the 31 fire stations in the city were emptied while battling this commercial fire, evacuating residents in the immediate hazard zone and protecting adjacent property. This left PF&R staffing specialists scrambling to callback firefighters from home and request help from neighboring fire departments to staff those empty stations for critical medical and fire calls that continued to occur.

Fire investigators were also called to the scene to determine how this fire started. After reviewing witness testimony and physical evidence at the scene they determined the fire to be arson. A security camera captured a suspect starting the fire in a nearby dumpster that spread up an exterior wall and into the building. 

VIDEO AND PHOTO LINK:

https://vimeo.com/538929767/fef4a516c2


Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council meets June 16, 2021
Oregon Health Authority - 06/10/21 12:56 PM

June 10, 2021

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-535-9134, i.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council meets June 16, 2021

What: A public meeting of the Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council.

Agenda: Council will learn about strategies and engagement for youth and staff from Oregon Housing and Community Services will present on housing and wraparound services.

When: Wednesday, June 16, 2021, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.

Where: Virtual. YouTube link with live captions (English and Spanish). https://youtu.be/loKE47aCb7c

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Addiction Recovery Centers throughout Oregon. The OAC will hold regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the centers.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brandy L. Hemsley at 971-239-2942 711 TTY or RANDY.L.HEMSLEY@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">brandy.l.hemsley@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee meets July 8
Oregon Health Authority - 06/10/21 12:30 PM

June 10, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee meets July 8

What: The Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee is holding its quarterly meeting. Members of the public may attend.

Agenda: House Bill 2076; HERO Kids; Pediatric EMS & Suicide Data; Suicide Prevention Project; EMSC Program; AmeriCorps VISTA Member Project; State EMS and Trauma Program.

When: Thursday, July 8, 9 a.m. to noon. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Join the meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1603380406?pwd=TVlTdWRudlZPSWtyOUFlNmc0UXZHQT09

One tap mobile: +16692545252,,1603380406#

Dial: 1-669-254-5252

Meeting ID: 160 338 0406

Passcode: 918677

Background: The Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee provides recommendations to the Oregon Emergency Medical Services for Children Program under ORS 431A.105(2)(d). For more information, see the Emergency Medical Services for Children Program website at www.oregonemsc.org.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Rachel Ford at 971-673-0564, 711 TTY or achel.l.ford@state.or.us">rachel.l.ford@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

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Charter Review Commission seeks applicants for open at-large seat
Clark Co. WA Communications - 06/10/21 12:08 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Charter Review Commission is seeking applicants to fill an open position on the commission. The seat is for an at large position. Applicants must be registered voters currently residing anywhere in Clark County.

The unexpired term begins immediately upon appointment and ends Dec. 31, 2021, at the latest.

The commission meets regularly 5-7 pm on Wednesdays. In addition, special meetings, including public open houses, and committee meetings may be scheduled. Meetings are held virtually on Webex and shown on CVTV channel 23/323 and www.cvtv.org.

The Charter Review Commission is tasked with reviewing the county’s home rule charter approved by voters in November 2014. This will be the first review of the county’s charter.

Fifteen commission members were elected in the Nov. 3, 2020, general election. Per the charter, three members were elected countywide, and each of the four county councilor districts has three commissioners. Any changes to the charter that the review commission recommends would go to a countywide vote in a general election.

Anyone interested in volunteering should send a biographical statement of 100 words or less allocated between the four section headings below and a general statement limited to 200 words or less as would be required for the Local Voters’ Pamphlet. Section headings are not included in the word count.  

  • Elected Experience or Legal/Judicial Experience
  • Professional/Work Experience
  • Education
  • Community Service

Applicants also may include supplemental information such as a résumé. Application materials should be sent to Michelle Pfenning, County Manager’s Office, at Michelle.Pfenning@clark.wa.gov. Applications also may be mailed to P.O. Box 5000, Vancouver, WA 98666-5000.

Application deadline is noon Friday, June 25, 2021. The Charter Review Commission will discuss potential applicants at its June 30 meeting. Applicants should plan to be available during the June 30 meeting to answer potential questions and to provide a two-minute dialogue on why they are interested in being on the commission.

More information on the Charter Review Commission can be found on the county’s website at https://clark.wa.gov/county-manager/charter-review-commission-overview


Progress report on development of new Transportation System Plan to be presented at June 14 city council workshop
City of Vancouver - 06/10/21 12:03 PM

Vancouver, Washington—Vancouver City Council will get an update from staff on the development of the city’s long-term 20-year vision for Vancouver’s entire transportation system at a workshop at 4 p.m. Monday, June 14.

The comprehensive transportation system planning project, also known as Vancouver Moves, examines travel conditions for all users of the city's transportation system, including those who drive, walk, bicycle, use mobility aids, ride transit or deliver freight.

At the workshop, city staff will establish how the updated Transportation System Plan will reflect the council’s core values of equity, safety, sustainability and climate action. They will also provide an update on the work done so far, including the existing conditions analysis and “Vancouver Moves” community engagement efforts, and discuss next steps.

Community members can watch the workshop live or on demand at www.cvtv.org. Council workshops and meetings continue to be held remotely.

The updated Transportation System Plan creates a transportation vision for 2040. The plan’s framework will analyze current and projected transportation conditions and outline projects and policies that will help the city make strategic investments that allow us to move more people on our roadways as the population grows. It will reflect the community’s values and needs for traveling and moving goods and services, and includes all modes of transportation, from walking, biking and public transit to cars and commercial trucking.

“The city is growing and most of its land is already built out,” explained Rebecca Kennedy, deputy director of the city’s Community and Economic Development Department. “Widening streets is expensive and in many cases impossible due to the impacts it has on nearby homes and businesses. Instead, we need to look at new ways to carry more people more efficiently using our existing street infrastructure.”

Vancouver’s Transportation System Plan is part of the city’s larger Comprehensive Plan, a coordinated effort required by the state’s Growth Management Act to guide land use and zoning for the entire city. Land use and transportation decisions naturally go hand in hand because how an area is developed, whether it’s a busy commercial district or a single-family residential neighborhood, dictates resulting transportation needs. The city’s current Transportation System Plan was adopted in 2004.

Project staff anticipates the updated plan will be completed by end of 2022. After the June 14 council workshop, next steps include developing the goals and values that will guide the plan, establishing policies for future transportation investments, and identifying priority routes for each transportation mode. Throughout this process, the city will continue to offer a variety of opportunities for the community to get involved, provide input and help shape the plan.

To learn more about the Transportation System Plan update, stay up to date on the project, and find out how to get involved, visit www.beheardvancouver.org/VancouverMoves.

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Hitachi High-Tech Selects Hillsboro Technology Park for Expansion
City of Hillsboro - 06/10/21 11:33 AM

Hitachi High-Tech Corporation, a major supplier in the semiconductor industry and a long-time Hillsboro business, has announced expansion plans to construct a “Center of Excellence” in a centralized facility in the Hillsboro Technology Park in Oregon.

The expansion announcement comes as a worldwide shortage of semiconductor chips is in the spotlight. From automakers to smartphone manufacturers, many industries rely on the chips to make their products; however, current demand greatly outpaces the available supply.

Supporting Oregon’s Ecosystem of High-Tech Businesses

Hitachi’s “Center of Excellence” investment in Hillsboro underscores the opportunity and necessity to continue supporting Oregon’s semiconductor industry with a collaborative business environment – and to develop and position this industry for future growth opportunities, such as the federal Chips for America Act.

“We are humbled that Hitachi High-Tech has the confidence in the City of Hillsboro to select this site for its expansion, knowing at the onset that a lot of infrastructure would need to be completed to make this facility operational,” said Dan Dias, Hillsboro’s Economic and Community Development Director.

“The establishment of Hitachi’s Center of Excellence within our community is a prime example of the key innovation and research and development role that Hillsboro, Washington County, and Oregon businesses play in the area of advanced semiconductor technology development,” Dias continued. “We are fortunate to have a mature and expanding ecosystem of the semiconductor supply chain within our community and region made up of great partners, including Hitachi High-Tech.”

Preparing the Hillsboro Technology Park

Seeking to retain Hitachi as a major employer, and to be prepared to attract additional investment in Hillsboro, the City’s Economic Development Department staff worked in conjunction with partners including Business Oregon, Clean Water Services, and Portland General Electric to make the Hitachi site and the rest of the Hillsboro Technology Park development-ready.

  • The City of Hillsboro’s urban renewal agency, the Hillsboro Economic Development Council, purchased and sold the site to national turnkey developer Trammell Crow to construct the building for Hitachi.
     
  • In partnership with Business Oregon, the City of Hillsboro and the Hillsboro Economic Development Council are investing more than $8 million for right-of-way acquisition and improvements, as well as advanced infrastructure investments, to serve the Hillsboro Technology Park and the Hitachi site.
     
  • The greenfield site did not initially have utility and transportation infrastructure. The City of Hillsboro Public Works Department is working to complete utility installations and the extension of NE 30th Avenue and NE Huffman Avenue.
     
  • Clean Water Services, the local sewer and waste water agency partner, is constructing a sewer pump station that will serve all businesses in the Hillsboro Technology Park and beyond.

“Our City Council priority is to bring opportunities for living-wage jobs to Hillsboro, the Portland region, and Oregon,” said Hillsboro Mayor Steve Callaway. “This announcement by Hitachi to continue investing in Hillsboro helps us continue our progress in supporting local families, local businesses, and our regional economy – which benefits every Oregonian by increasing revenues and funding for state services such as education, transportation, public safety, and parks.”


DPSST Applicant Review Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/10/21 11:25 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

June 10, 2021

Contact:  Mona Riesterer 
               (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Applicant Review Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 1:00 p.m. June 23, 2021 at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Mona Riesterer at (503) 378-2431.

The Applicant Review Committee meeting will be live streamed on the DPSST Facebook page @ https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Approve May 26, 2021 Meeting Minutes

3.  Shawnee Wallace, DPSST No. 61966; Curry County Sheriff’s Office

     Presented by Jordan James-Largent

4.  Inquiry Closure Memos – Information Only

     Presented by Jordan James-Largent

5.  Next Applicant Review Committee Meeting – July 28, 2021 at 1:00 p.m.

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Applicant Review Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


County Charter Review Commission seeks community feedback in online survey
Clark Co. WA Communications - 06/10/21 10:55 AM

Commission also has virtual town hall sessions scheduled in June

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Charter Review Commission is seeking community input through an online survey.

Residents can access the survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/CharterSurvey2021. The survey will be open until 5 pm Friday, June 18.

Results from this survey will help inform the commission of public opinion regarding specific charter amendment proposals including partisan and non-partisan elected positions, councilor districts and government ethics oversight.

Virtual town hall meetings

The Commission also scheduled a series of virtual town hall meetings that will be held on WebEx.

The town hall meetings will be:

  • 11 am to 1 pm Saturday, June 12
    • Dial: 1.408.418.9388
    • Access code: 187 926 8432
  • 5-7 pm Wednesday, June 16
    • Dial: 1.408.418.9388
    • Access code: 187 576 7506

Charter Review Commissioners will present information on potential changes to the county’s charter and seek feedback from town hall participants. Anyone wishing to provide written comment to the commission may do so via the county’s website at https://clark.wa.gov/county-manager/meetings-agendas-archives.

Any changes to the charter that the review commission recommends would go to a countywide vote in a general election. The review commission has set a target of July 7 for submitting any potential changes to the charter to Elections.

The Charter Review Commission is tasked with reviewing the county’s home rule charter approved by voters in November 2014. This will be the first review of the county’s charter.

Information on the Charter Review Commission can be found on the county’s website at https://clark.wa.gov/county-manager/charter-review-commission-overview.


Cryptosporidium Monitoring Update: Detections from routine monitoring in the Bull Run. Customers do not need to take any additional precautions at this time.
Portland Water Bureau - 06/10/21 10:52 AM

Since 2017, the Portland Water Bureau has detected low levels of Cryptosporidium from routine monitoring of source water. The Portland Water Bureau received results from ongoing monitoring from the Bull Run Watershed intake for Cryptosporidium, a potentially disease-causing microorganism. One Cryptosporidium oocyst was detected in the 50-liters collected on June 8. Prior to this detection, Cryptosporidium was last detected from the Bull Run Watershed intake on April 25, 2021.

The Bull Run watershed is Portland’s primary source of drinking water. The Portland Water Bureau does not currently treat for Cryptosporidium, but is required to do so under drinking water regulations. Portland is working to install filtration by September 2027 under a compliance schedule with the Oregon Health Authority. In the meantime, Portland Water Bureau is implementing interim measures such as watershed protection and additional monitoring to protect public health. Consultation with public health officials has concluded that at this time, customers do not need to take any additional precautions.

Exposure to Cryptosporidium can cause cryptosporidiosis, a serious illness. Symptoms can include diarrhea, vomiting, fever and stomach pain. People with healthy immune systems recover without medical treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people with severely weakened immune systems are at risk for more serious disease. Symptoms may be more severe and could lead to serious or life-threatening illness. Examples of people with weakened immune systems include those with AIDS, those with inherited diseases that affect the immune system, and cancer and transplant patients who are taking certain immunosuppressive drugs.

The Environmental Protection Agency has estimated that a small percentage of the population could experience gastro-intestinal illness from Cryptosporidium and advises that customers who are immunocompromised and receive their drinking water from the Bull Run Watershed consult with their healthcare professional about the safety of drinking the tap water. The Portland Water Bureau and Burlington, City of Gresham, City of Sandy, City of Tualatin, Green Valley, GNR, Hideaway Hills, Lake Grove, Lorna Domestic Water, Lusted, Palatine Hill, Pleasant Home, Raleigh, Rockwood, Skyview Acres, Tualatin Valley, Two Rivers, Valley View and West Slope Water Districts receive all or part of their drinking water supply from Bull Run. To learn if your drinking water comes from Bull Run, please contact your local drinking water provider.

The public and the media are encouraged to view all sampling results posted to the City’s website at portlandoregon.gov/water/cryptoresults. The bureau will notify the media and public immediately should further test results indicate a risk to public health and precautions are necessary.

Customers with questions regarding water quality can call the Water Line at 503-823-7525.

About the Portland Water Bureau

The Portland Water Bureau serves water to almost a million people in the Portland area. Portland’s water system includes two great water sources, 53 tanks and reservoirs, and 2,200 miles of pipes. With 600 employees working on everything from water treatment to customer service, the Water Bureau is committed to serving excellent water every minute of every day.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/1240/145754/MEDIA_RELEASE_06102021.docx

Pacific University News Capsule
Pacific University - 06/10/21 10:45 AM

Greetings from Pacific University, where creative inquiry continues into summer, and from which a flock of new graduates are making their ways into an awakening world. We don't take lightly the role we play in this cycle of academic, intellectual and human renewal and we thank the students and families who share their journeys with us.

Here's some of the things going on around here:

Psychology professor Laura Edwards-Leeper discusses gender dysphoria on 60 Minutes.

Creative Inquiry Summer Institute calls for participation

Pacific joins celebration of Pride Month

Bui, Morales and Santellano awarded diversity scholarships

Here are some highlights from the university calendar:

June 18 — Juneteenth celebration

June 26 — MFA Mapmakers Alumni Institute summer session

July 5 — Independence Day holiday observed

Full university calendar

— pacificu.edu —

Pacific University is a diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn, as well as healthcare clinics throughout the Portland area. Pacific is ranked the No. 1 private research university in the Pacific Northwest and is also committed to civic engagement, sustainability and interprofessional education as part of its core teaching philosophy.


Local Girl Scouts Donate 13,000 Boxes of Cookies to Senior Nutrition Program
Meals on Wheels People - 06/10/21 10:01 AM

Local Girl Scouts will donate more than 13,000 boxes of Girl Scout Cookies to distribute to homebound seniors. The cookies will be delivered on Monday, June 14, at 2 p.m. to the Meals on Wheels People Central Kitchen at 7710 SW 31st Avenue in Portland. Local Girl Scouts will be on location to help deliver the large donation.

Cookies were donated as part of the Girl Scout Gift of Caring program. During the annual Girl Scout Cookie Program each spring, customers can opt to donate their purchased cookies through the Gift of Caring program. More than 65,000 boxes of cookies donated through the Digital Cookie platform are distributed to seniors and people in need throughout the region via several partnerships with social service agencies, including Meals on Wheels People.

“This donation is really appreciated by our homebound participants, especially now,” said Meals on Wheels People CEO Suzanne Washington. “So many of those we serve are continuing to stay at home more than ever before and had no way to access a traditional Girl Scout Cookie sale. And, a donation of this size substantially reduces our costs for providing desserts with our meals.”

“I am inspired by the life skills being developed in the Cookie Program and this past season was like no other,” said Victoria Foreman, Director of Product Sales for Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington. “Girls continue to develop a strong sense of self by participating and were resilient and impressive as they problem solved, managed setbacks and reimagined their plan to build their cookie businesses. I am very proud of the girls’ commitment and success with the Gift of Caring Program this year.” 

About the Girl Scout Cookie Program: A little more than a century ago, girls began participating in what would evolve into the largest entrepreneurial training program for girls in the world: the Girl Scout Cookie Program. To learn more about the history of the Girl Scout Cookie Program, visit girlscoutcookies.org.

About Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington: In partnership with more than 6,800 adult members, Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington prepares more than 11,500 girls in grades K-12 for a lifetime of leadership, adventure and success. GSOSW’s programs in civic engagement, financial literacy, the outdoors and STEM serve girls in 35 counties in Oregon, and Clark, Klickitat and Skamania counties in Southwest Washington. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence and character, who make the world a better place. For more information or to join Girl Scouts today, visit girlscoutsosw.org.

About Meals on Wheels People: Meals on Wheels People has been changing lives, one meal at a time, since 1970. We provide more than a meal to thousands of older adults in the greater Portland metro area. Our service not only alleviates hunger and social isolation, but allows seniors to live independently with dignity in their own homes. Aging in place reduces depression, falls and hospitalization as well as the high cost of institutional care. For more information, visit: mowp.org.


Science on Tap Online -- As The Crow Flies Part II: Corvid Intelligence, Culture, and Communication (Photo)
Via Productions - 06/10/21 10:00 AM
2021-06/4849/145658/rect.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/4849/145658/thumb_rect.jpg

Date: Thursday, June 24th, 2021

Time: 7 p.m.

Location: Zoom only. Register on Zoom

Tickets: $15

Event Website: https://www.scienceontaporwa.org/events/online_june_24_crows2/

In this sequel to her extremely popular talk on Corvid Behavior, Play, and Funerals, Dr. Kaeli Swift will continue her exploration of the corvid brain to include areas of research on intelligence, culture, and communication. Come learn how crows think, how they relate to each other, and how they solve complex problems in their environments and within their own family groups. 

Crows are everywhere: they are found on nearly every continent and thrive in human dominated environments. They have influenced art and literature throughout history, and whether they inspire love or hate, they have certainly impacted the hearts and minds of the humans who share their space. Because crows are so common, it may be easy to overlook the fact that they are very intelligent and have complex behaviors and social structures, including play, tool use, communal roosting, and being able to recognize specific humans.

Kaeli Swift, PhD, studies crows and other corvids (ravens, jays, and magpies), and will introduce and explain to us the world of these fascinating birds, including, of course, crow funerals. You can find Dr. Swift on Twitter and Instagram @corvidresearch where she talks about crows, corvids, and other wildlife and plays a weekly game called #CrowOrNo to help people learn how to correctly ID and distinguish different kinds of corvids.
 


Science on Tap is a science lecture series where you can sit back, drink a pint, and enjoy learning. Listen to experts talk about the science in your neighborhood and around the world. You don't have to be a science geek to have fun--all you need is a thirst for knowledge! For more information on this event or about Science on Tap, visit Science on Tap OR WA.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/4849/145658/rect.jpg

Mental Health Response Team Expanding in Washington County
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/10/21 9:48 AM

The Washington County Sheriff's Office Mental Health Response Team (MHRT) is expanding to provide more specialized mental health services to the community, adding more local police departments to its roster. Until recently, the Sheriff's Office MHRT consists of law enforcement members from the Washington County Sheriff's Office and the Sherwood Police Department. Recently, a member from the Hillsboro Police Department joined the team. In addition, plans are currently in the works to add a member from the Beaverton, King City, Tigard, and Tualatin Police Departments - making this team a truly multi-agency effort.

MHRT consists of a deputy or officer and an experienced, masters-level trained mental health clinician who responds to calls for service that may have a mental health or crisis component. Now in its eleventh year, this unique county-wide program is a collaborative approach. It offers optimum care to those in need by having a skilled deputy and trained clinician available for immediate intervention anywhere in the county. The goal of MHRT is to connect people with needed treatment services rather than potentially lodging them in jail or taking them to a nearby hospital.

Recently, a family in Washington County called non-emergency dispatch requesting a welfare check for their 30-year-old son, a veteran, experiencing PTSD and suicidal thoughts. An MHRT deputy contacted the veteran by phone, and the veteran agreed to meet with the MHRT unit at his home. The deputy and clinician confirmed he was safe and spoke with him about his suicidal thoughts. The clinician and deputy worked with the veteran to develop a safety plan, including securing firearms and medication in a locked safe and having a family member hold onto the key temporarily. Together, the deputy and clinician arranged for him to connect with services at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Additionally, MHRT provided check-in calls to the veteran until his scheduled appointment at the VA.    

You can learn more about MHRT in this Sheriff's Office Special Teams Spotlight video.




Attached Media Files: PDF Media Release

UPDATE: Oregon reports 269 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 16 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/10/21 9:45 AM

This is an update of yesterday’s Daily Media Release with information about COVID-19 deaths.

June 9, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 269 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 16 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 16 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,716 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 269 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 203,933.

COVID-19 weekly cases, hospitalizations decline

The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Weekly Report, released today, shows the sixth consecutive week of declining cases and lowest since weekly case tally since last September. OHA reported 1,725 new daily cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, May 31, through Sunday, June 6. That represents a 26% decline from the previous week.

New COVID-19 related hospitalizations also declined from 190 to 112. That’s also the lowest since last September.

There were 20 reported COVID-19 related deaths.

There were 72,443 tests for COVID-19 for the week of May 30 through June 5. The percentage of positive tests was 3.8%.

People 70 years of age and older have accounted for 38% of COVID-19 related hospitalizations and 75% of COVID-19 related deaths.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 19 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.

New Variant Labels added to OHA Tableau Dashboards

On May 31st, the World Health Organization (WHO) released a new, “easy-to-pronounce and non-stigmatizing”, labeling convention for Variants of Concern and Variants of Interest using the Greek alphabet as an easier way to discuss variants by non-scientific audiences. 

Starting today, OHA’s  COVID-19 Daily Data Update dashboard and Variants dashboard will include WHO labels added alongside with the current  labels.

OHA uses the Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) guidelines for reporting and there are some differences between how the WHO and CDC groups variants of both classifications. 

  • The WHO groups the B.1.427 and B.1.429 variants together and has given them a label of “Epsilon”. OHA will continue to follow how the CDC reports these variants separately and they will both have the “Epsilon” label added to each.
  • The CDC has also identified some Variants of Interest for the U.S. that the WHO has not. As a result, these will not have a Greek alphabet label assigned to it.

Explanations about these WHO label additions will be included in the notes at the bottom of each of the dashboards. Additional information about Variants of Concern and Variants of Interest can be found here.

OHA refreshes vaccine administration trends and metrics dashboard

Today, OHA refreshed the data for the vaccine administration trends and metrics dashboards with a new extract from ALERT IIS. The data are periodically refreshed, which allows for quality assurance and review. The data were last refreshed on April 9.

Following the refresh today, race and ethnicity data for approximately 1,200 people was updated, predominantly affecting Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander and American Indian/Alaska Native vaccination rates. County status toward the 65% vaccination goal was not affected by the data refresh, but vaccination rates for five counties decreased minimally - by 1% or less. Those counties are Baker, Benton, Clatsop, Sherman and Wheeler.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 21,934 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 12,736 doses were administered on June 8 and 9, 198 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 6.

The seven-day running average is now 15,264 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,319,302 first and second doses of Pfizer,1,651,646 first and second doses of Moderna and 152,192 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 1,951,646 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 2,292,591 who have had at least one dose. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 93,444.

A daily countdown can be found on the OHA website.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,861,055 doses of Pfizer, 2,171,060 doses of Moderna and 299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

Hospitals across the state have received questions from the public about the need to continue to manage and limit visitation policies for patients. Unlike other public settings, hospitals are subject to special visitation requirements. The COVID-19 policies for hospitals and medical centers are based on federal rule and state law. Visitation guidance can be found here.

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 164, which is eight fewer than yesterday. There are 36 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which represents no change from yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,383, which is a 20.4% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 228.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (2), Clackamas (37), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Coos (1), Crook (2), Curry (3), Deschutes (19), Douglas (14), Gilliam (1), Grant (6), Harney (3), Hood River (1), Jackson (15), Jefferson (6), Josephine (7), Klamath (4), Lake (1), Lane (10), Lincoln (3) Linn (8), Malheur (7), Marion (40), Morrow (2), Multnomah (32), Polk (7), Umatilla (7), Union (3), Wallowa (1), Washington (14), Yamhill (7).

Oregon’s 2,701st COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on May 9 and died on May 27 at Providence Portland Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,702nd COVID-19 death is a 97-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive on April 29 and died on June 2 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,703rd COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on April 15 and died on May 21 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,704th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman from Clackamas County who died on May 19 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,705th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on May 15 and died on May 24 at Portland Adventist Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,706th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old man from Grant County who tested positive on May 9 and died on May 27. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,707th COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on May 14 and died on June 7 at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,708th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man from Hood River County who tested positive on April 28 and died on May 21 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,709th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive on May 22 and died on May 26 at Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,710th COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on May 24 and died on May 26 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,711th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on May 17 and died on June 3 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,712th COVID-19 death is a 51-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on May 3 and died on June 6 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,713th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive on May 29 and died on June 7 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,714th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on May 4 and died on May 27 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,715th COVID-19 death is a 60-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on May 3 and died on May 14 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,716th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive on April 28 and died on June 7 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


Military Banner Program Comes to Battle Ground's Main Street
City of Battle Ground - 06/10/21 9:22 AM
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Battle Ground, Wash. - The Battle Ground community has a long-standing tradition of honoring those who serve. The Battle Ground Veterans Memorial, dedicated in 2015, was fully funded and constructed by community donations.  

The Battle Ground City Council has launched a new Main Street Military Banner program designed to honor veterans, active duty personnel, and those who are entering the military with a commitment to serve. Banners featuring individual honorees will be displayed on Battle Ground’s Main Street.

“There is such wonderful support in our community for the men and women who serve our country”, said Councilmember Shauna Walters who introduced the idea of the Military Banner program, “It will be very special to see banners honoring service members lining Main Street.” 

Individuals or organizations may purchase a customized banner that features an honoree’s photo, name, branch of service, rank, and years of service.  The city will install and display banners along Main Street each year during the month of May – Military Appreciation Month – through the third week of June.  

The purchase cost of a customized banner is $150.00 and includes installation for display on Main Street the initial year of purchase. Purchasers retain ownership of their banners which are returned to them after the display period has concluded.  Banners recognizing veteran and active-duty honorees may be reinstalled at the request of the owner during subsequent years’ display periods.

The first banner display period will occur in May through the third week of June, 2022. Banners are produced annually in March. Orders are accepted throughout the year, but must be received no later than March 1 to meet that year’s display period.

Detailed information about the banner program, including an order form and sample image is available on the city’s Bricks & Banners website page. The new banner program joins the existing Commemorative Brick program in which personalized, engraved bricks may be purchased for placement at the Battle Ground Veterans Memorial to honor any U.S. veteran.  




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/2812/145748/Bricks_and_Banners_Graphic_.png

Vancouver Fire Marshal issues recreational burn ban
City of Vancouver - 06/10/21 8:49 AM

Vancouver, Washington—Due to extremely dry conditions, Vancouver Fire Marshal Heidi Scarpelli has issued a total ban on recreational burning, effective at 12:01 a.m. Friday, June 11 for the city of Vancouver.

The burning ban is based on weather conditions and community fire safety needs. It will likely remain in effect throughout the summer months or until weather and fire danger conditions greatly improve. Citations may be issued to those who violate the order. An update will be provided when the recreational burn ban is lifted.

These types of fires are prohibited during the ban:

  • Recreational fires and bonfires
  • Campfires
  • Fires in outdoor fireplaces, fire pits and chimney-type devices

Cooking outdoors in propane or charcoal barbecues approved for that type of use is still allowed during the burning ban. Cooking and heating fires in unmanaged situations, such as homeless camps, are illegal under city ordinance and will be extinguished.

“The risk for fire is extremely high and state officials have said that this year’s wildfire season has the potential to be record-breaking,” said Vancouver Fire Marshal Heidi Scarpelli. “It is vital that everyone be extra vigilant about fire safety during this time. In addition to not using any recreational fires, we also ask that smokers never put out their cigarettes in bark mulch or planters or toss lit cigarettes out car windows.”

While the recreational burn ban is in place, all fires will be illegal within the city limits. Community members are encouraged to call 9-1-1 and report any fire-related activity so it can be promptly extinguished by the fire department.

Those who violate the recreational burn ban may be subject to a fire code citation and a $500 fine, which may include criminal penalties.

Learn more about fire and life safety prevention at www.vanfire.org.

###


Western Oregon University Board of Trustees Appoints Interim President, Approves Standing Diversity Committee
Western Oregon University - 06/10/21 8:07 AM
Dr. Jay Kenton
Dr. Jay Kenton
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MONMOUTH, Ore. – The Western Oregon University Board of Trustees on Wednesday approved the appointment of Jay Kenton as interim president for 2021-22. It also approved the creation of a Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee, the first standing committee of its kind at an Oregon public university.

 

Kenton’s nomination for interim president had been reviewed June 1 during the regular Executive, Governance and Trusteeship Committee (EGTC) meeting and then shared with the campus community. The appointment was several months in the making and involved an advisory committee comprising nine members from across campus.

 

Kenton earned his doctorate in public administration from Portland State University and has served in multiple senior administrative roles at various Oregon universities, including interim president at both Oregon Institute of Technology and Eastern Oregon University. He briefly worked as interim vice president of Finance & Administration at WOU in 2018.

 

“Dr. Kenton comes to WOU with a deep wealth of experience that should serve the university well as we search for the regular successor,” said Board of Trustees Chair Betty Komp. The search for a regular president will start in fall 2021.

 

Also Wednesday, the board approved a recommendation from the EGTC for the creation of a standing committee on diversity, equity and inclusions, bringing the number of board committees to four. The standing committee is the first of its kind among Oregon public universities, and its first work will be creating a charter.

 

“The creation of this important committee reflects WOU’s commitment to keeping this priority at the forefront of our actions,” said Chair Komp. “Diversity and inclusion are core values at Western, as specified in the strategic plan. The students have called for this commitment. The campus community has called for this commitment. We’ve responded and are excited to move forward.”

 

Also during the meeting the board:

  • Heard an update from President Rex Fuller about recommendations from the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Task Force, which was created earlier this spring.
  • Heard presentations from the University Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Committee, the University Cultural Competency Advisory Committee and the department of Multicultural Student Services and Programs.
  • Approved the FY22 Preliminary Budget as presented in the docket.
  • Elected Trustee Doug Morse to a two-year term as vice chair of the board, effective July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2023.
  • Approved the recommendation made by the Finance & Administration Committee to invest additional money into quasi-endowment to support initiatives related to diversity, equity and inclusion moving forward.

 

# # #

 

About Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University, founded in 1856 in Monmouth, is the state’s oldest public university. Serving about 4,500 students, WOU is a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution with about 70% of the student population being from Oregon. A significant portion of attendees are members of under-represented groups, veterans or non-traditional students. WOU is Oregon’s campus of choice for those seeking a transformative education in a supportive, student-centered learning community where classes are taught by faculty. Together we succeed.




Attached Media Files: Dr. Jay Kenton

Fatal Crash on Hwy 20 - Harney County
Oregon State Police - 06/10/21 8:03 AM

On Wednesday, June 9, 2021 at approximately 3:55 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle crash on Hwy 20 near mile post 152.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Subaru Forester, operated by Lillie Gray (66) of Dallas, was westbound when it moved into the eastbound lane to pass 2 motorcycles and collided with a eastbound Dodge Van operated by Rollie Brubaker (64) of Oceanside, CA. 

Gray sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Brubaker and passenger, Maria Brubaker (56) of Oceanside, CA, were transported to Harney District Hospital.

One of the motorcyclists, Neil Postal (22) of Burns, was unable to avoid the crash and was transported to Harney District Hospital.

A fourth vehicle sustained minor damage when it drove off the road and struck a highway sign to avoid the crash. 

OSP was assisted by the Harney County Sheriff's Office, Burns Fire Department, Harney District Ambulance, and ODOT.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 27 - Crook County
Oregon State Police - 06/10/21 7:29 AM

On Wednesday, June 9, 2021 at approximately 8:10 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 27 near mile post 5.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Kia Spectra, operated by Clayton Gray (19) of Halfway, was northbound when it crossed the southbound lane, left the roadway, and rolled.

Gray sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

A juvenile passenger was transported by Airlink to St. Charles Hospital with serious injuries.

OSP was assisted by the Crook County Sheriff's Office, Crook County Fire Department, and ODOT


Fatal Crash on Hwy 51 - Polk County
Oregon State Police - 06/10/21 7:10 AM

On Wednesday, June 9, 2021 at approximately 11:45 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 51 near mile post 3.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Chevrolet Trax, operated by Richard Davis (74) of Independence, was southbound when it left the roadway and rolled. 

Davis sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by the Polk County Sheriff's Office, Polk County Fire and Medics, and ODOT.


Tip of The Week for June 14, 2021 - Summer Crime Prevention Tips
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/10/21 6:42 AM
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  TIP OF THE WEEK

 

Date:          June 10, 2021         FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Contact:     Sheriff Curtis Landers

                   541-265-0654

                   lcsheriff@co.lincoln.or.us

 

SUMMER CRIME PREVENTION TIPS

Summer brings warmer weather, longer days and, unfortunately, an increase in burglaries.  You can exercise renewed diligence to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of these crimes.

Keep vehicles locked with the windows up at all times when parked at your home.  Remove all valuables including purses, cell phones, electronic devices, gym bags, briefcases etc.

Avoid Home Improvement scamsBeware of anyone offering to perform an unscheduled home repair or asking to gain entry into your home.  Ask for identification, contact the company they say they work for to verify employment and ask for authorization for them to be at your property. Never agree to pay for home improvement services until the work has been completed.  Don’t sign home improvement contracts without reading the entire contract carefully and discussing anything that doesn’t seem clear with the company and trusted family members.

Keep doors closed and locked.  This includes garages, sheds and patio doors.  Burglaries from open garages, sheds and residences are more prevalent in summer months and often occur while the homeowner is outside in the backyard.

Unattended bicycles should always be locked to something sturdy.  Remember when you stop to rest, eat or use restroom facilities, an unlocked and unattended bike is an invitation to theft.

Vacation plans?  Have a trusted neighbor or friend pick up your mail and newspapers.  Set inside lights on a timer.  Set your home alarm. Use a home security camera so you can check in while you are away. Have a neighbor keep an eye on your house and make sure to leave a contact phone number for them to reach you in case of an emergency.

Take some simple steps to reduce your risk of becoming a victim of crime.

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net  and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/5490/145741/061021_Summer_Crime_Prevention.pdf , 2021-06/5490/145741/Summer_Crime_Prevention.PNG

Wed. 06/09/21
Monday, June 14, 2021 Virtual Executive & Working Session Board Meeting
Parkrose Sch. Dist. - 06/09/21 6:40 PM

The Parkrose Board of Education of School District No. 3, Multnomah County, Oregon, will convene in a Virtual Executive and Working Session Board Meeting on Monday, June 14, 2021 online virtually with Zoom at the hour of 6:30 pm. 

The agenda is posted on our website at: https://www.parkrose.k12.or.us/index.php?id=275

Please click this URL to join: https://zoom.us/j/94961285856 or join by phone: 1-253-215-8782  Webinar ID: 949-6128-5856

If you wish to submit a public comment during this Board Meeting please fill out this electronic public comment form before "Reading of Public Comments" on the agenda: https://forms.gle/5sUjRZjxJikqmqVg9

For those of you who cannot participate virtually we will post a recording of the meeting on our website at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXajhxrPxMclOQ6J00JUszQ.

Questions welcomed, please email: questions@parkrose.k12.or.us or leave a voice message at 503-408-2100.


Police Seek Assistance of Missing Vancouver Man
Vancouver Police Dept. - 06/09/21 6:24 PM
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Brandon Majors, a 35 year old Vancouver man has been missing from the Vancouver area since May 12, 2021. While some of the circumstances to Majors’ disappearance are unknown at this time, it is unusual he has not been heard from or seen since.

 

Majors is a white male, 5’11”, 160 lbs with hazel eyes and short brown hair. He was last seen wearing a white T-shirt, black Nike pants, black Nike Slides and used a black bandana for a face covering. He was associated with a dark blue Mercedes with black rims as well as a grey BMW X5 on the day he went missing.

 

Police are seeking any information into Brandon Majors’ whereabouts and who he was last seen with. Brandon is believed to be last seen in the area of the 4500 block of St. Johns road, St. Johns/Fourth Plain Blvd and the 2900 block of SE 164th Ave.

 

If you have surveillance camera in these areas and believe you captured Majors’ or one of the associated vehicles, or you have information surrounding Majors’ disappearance please contact Detective Jensen at 360-487-7446 david.jensen@cityofvancouver.us or Detective Ripp at 360-487-7391 zachary.ripp@cityofvancouver.us.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/385/145736/Majors_2.png , Brandon Majors

Brush and Grass fire
Canby Fire Dist. - 06/09/21 4:29 PM
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Fire escapes burn pile.

23 people on scene for one hour to suppress the fire threatening a grass seed field.

drier than expected conditions are surprising people burning in the area.

Use caution and have enough water, equipment, and personnel on scene if you decide to burn.

call your local burn line number before you decide to burn.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/864/145733/17864F1C-83E1-4EF6-99B0-5C097DB7488F.jpeg

Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update - June 9, 2021 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 06/09/21 4:00 PM
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The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for June 9, 2021, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here. These updates will now be released bi-weekly with the next release on June 16, 2021.

Photo Captions:

Oregon Office of Emergency Management Wildfire Recovery Logo: Oregon Rising - Stronger Together.
File: OEM RISING LOGO JPG

FEMA Douglas County Outreach Flyer
File: FEMA Douglas County Outreach June 11.pdf

FEMA Lincoln County Outreach Flyer                                                                                                                                                  File: FEMA Lincoln County Outreach June 18.pdf




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/3986/145714/FEMA_Lincoln_County_Outreach_June_18.pdf , 2021-06/3986/145714/FEMA_Douglas_County_Outreach_June_11.pdf , 2021-06/3986/145714/OEM_RISING_LOGO_W_SUN.png

Lori Coyner to leave Medicaid Director role to focus on new 1115 Medicaid waiver agreement with the federal government
Oregon Health Authority - 06/09/21 3:36 PM

June 9, 2021

Contact: Robb Cowie, 503-945-7849, obb.cowie@state.or.us">robb.cowie@state.or.us

Lori Coyner to leave Medicaid Director role to focus on new 1115 Medicaid waiver agreement with the federal government

(Portland, Ore. – June 9, 2021) Lori Coyner, the director of Oregon’s Medicaid program, will leave her current role at the end of this month to serve as primary leader to provide strategic guidance in the development of Oregon’s next 1115 Medicaid waiver agreement with the federal government. In her role, Coyner will be instrumental in forging a new agreement with health officials in the Biden administration about the way the Oregon Health Plan (OHP) delivers health care to more than 1.1 million people (or nearly 1 in 4 Oregonians).

In her role as Medicaid Director, Coyner oversees the state’s Medicaid program, which has a biennial budget of approximately $18 billion for the 2019-2021 biennium.

Oregon’s 1115 Medicaid waiver is an agreement with the federal government which provides the state flexibility to pursue innovative Medicaid reforms, such as Oregon’s coordinated care organizations (CCOs) which are accountable to local communities and incentivized to achieve specific cost-saving and health care quality outcomes (such as fewer unneeded emergency department visits). Oregon’s 16 CCOs serve more than 900,000 Oregonians on the Oregon Health Plan. Oregon’s current Medicaid waiver expires at the end of June, 2022.

Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen said, “As Medicaid Director, Lori Coyner has been a catalyst in changing health care in Oregon. She was instrumental in winning timely approval of our current Medicaid waiver, developing new standards for CCOs and gaining federal agreement to our recent waivers to strengthen behavioral health services for Oregonians and give us more flexibility to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. I’m excited that she’ll remain on board to guide our next waiver.”

Dana Hittle will serve as OHA’s interim Medicaid Director. For the past two and a half years, Hittle has served as Deputy Medicaid Director, working with teams across OHA to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of Oregon’s Medicaid program and its ability to deliver services to the state’s most vulnerable populations, including children in foster care and people who need behavioral health services.


DA Mike Schmidt announces Multnomah County Child Abuse Team secures 20-year prison sentence
Multnomah County District Attorney's Office - 06/09/21 3:31 PM

June 09, 2021

Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us


DA Mike Schmidt announces Multnomah County Child Abuse Team secures 20-year prison sentence 

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that Glenn Robinson received a 20-year prison sentence for sexually abusing two children.

Robinson pleaded guilty to two counts of Sodomy in the First Degree and two counts of Sexual Abuse in the First Degree.

This investigation started in January of 2020 when the Portland Police Bureau received information about suspected child abuse.

During the investigation, law enforcement learned Robinson sexually abused the two children—one 11 years old, the other seven years old.

The abuse occurred over a span of more than a year.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the Portland Police Bureau and the Multnomah County Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team for their dedicated work on this case.

This case was prosecuted by Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Melissa Marrero. The Victim Advocate was Malia Bruni. The lead investigator was Portland Police Detective Steven Forland.

District Attorney Mike Schmidt thanks Detective Forland, DDA Marrero and Victim Advocate Bruni for their tireless work on this case and for supporting the victim and the victim’s family.

It was through the coordination, communication and collaboration of the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team that this case was investigated and prosecuted.

The Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team includes representatives from CARES Northwest, local law enforcement, public schools, hospitals, health departments, local mental health service providers, the Oregon Department of Human Services, and Multnomah County’s Department of Community Justice.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team works with community partners to protect children who have been abused and neglected while ensuring that all practices are trauma-informed and mitigate the life-long consequences of child abuse. The team also handles child homicides, felony child physical abuse cases, felony child abandonment cases, custodial interference cases, and felony sex crimes where the victim is currently under the age of 18 and where the suspect is determined not to be a stranger to the child.

CARES Northwest, Multnomah County’s child abuse assessment center, is a community-based medical program for the assessment, treatment and prevention of child abuse. The organization is one of the largest child abuse assessment centers in the nation and serves more than 5,000 children annually.

#MCDA#




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/5769/145731/PR-21-86-DA_Mike_Schmidt_announces_Multnomah_County_Child_Abuse_Team_secures_20-year_prison_sentence.pdf

Ryan Javier Gonzalez Sentenced to Five Years in Prison in Child Sexual Predator Case
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 06/09/21 2:47 PM
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HILLSBORO, Ore.- On June 9, 2021, Ryan Javier Gonzalez, age 36, pleaded guilty to first-degree online sex corruption and two counts of luring a minor. Judge Erik Buchér then sentenced the defendant to five years in prison. Deputy District Attorney Matt Wise prosecuted the case against the defendant.

In March of 2020, Beaverton Police Detective Chad Opitz created a profile on a social networking site known to be associated with illegal activity. The profile purported to belong to a mother of a 10-year-old girl. That same day, Mr. Gonzalez, who was already a convicted sex offender at the time, messaged the account. The defendant offered to be the girl’s “teacher” and described in graphic detail the sexual activities he wanted to subject the child to. He also sent graphic videos to the account and asked that they be shown to the girl.

A few days after this initial contact, the defendant messaged the account again. He sent additional graphic images and agreed to meet the mother and daughter at a location in Beaverton, Oregon. He did arrive at that location but noticed a police car and fled the area.

Just four days later, the defendant began messaging the account again. He agreed to meet the child at a park and promised to bring a condom with him. Undercover officers watched as Mr. Gonzalez arrived at the park. He was then arrested. Officers found a condom in his pocket.

The Washington County District Attorney’s Office wishes to acknowledge the work of Detective Chad Opitz and the Beaverton Police Department on this case.

In addition to his prison sentence, Mr. Gonzalez was also ordered to undergo three years of post-prison supervision, register as a sex offender and complete child sex abuse treatment. Mr. Gonzalez will be transferred to the Oregon Department of Corrections to begin serving his sentence.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/6208/145730/RYAN_JAVIER_GONZALEZ.pdf , 2021-06/6208/145730/Gonzalez_Ryan_Javier.jpg

WSU Vancouver students create virtual museum of digital literature
WSU Vancouver - 06/09/21 1:32 PM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – A virtual museum/library of more than 2,500 digital literary works from around the world is now accessible at the-next.eliterature.org.

Called The NEXT, it was created for the Electronic Literature Organization, an international arts group, by 39 recent graduates of WSU Vancouver’s Creative Media and Digital Culture program, along with staff and faculty of the Electronic Literature Lab. The project was part of the CMDC’s senior seminar course in spring 2021.

The museum responds to the growing need for open-access, travel-free cultural and research experiences for today’s public and scholars, making its archives accessible for the next generation of readers. Since its launch on May 24, The Next has attracted more than 1,000 visitors from 21 countries.

The virtual museum is designed so that visitors can interact with and experience the collections. It includes more than 50 videos, more than 4,000 images, some 30 3D models that visitors can manipulate, and several interactive GIFs. Visitors may download selected works.

Five of the students who helped create The Next participated in the ELO’s 2021 virtual conference in May and presented the class’s work to the international electronic-literature community. In April, the project was awarded second place in the Podium Competition of WSU Vancouver’s Research Showcase.

About WSU Vancouver

As one of six campuses of the WSU system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

# # #


DA Mike Schmidt announces 17-year prison sentence following a child sexual abuse investigation
Multnomah County District Attorney's Office - 06/09/21 1:30 PM

June 09, 2021

Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us


DA Mike Schmidt announces 17-year prison sentence following a child sexual abuse investigation

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that Mark Burlingame received a 17-year prison sentence for child-related sex crimes.

Burlingame pleaded guilty to one count of Using a Child in a Display of Sexually Explicit Conduct and two counts of Sexual Abuse in the First Degree.

In August of 2020, the Miami Field Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) contacted the Gresham Police Department after the FBI’s Violent Crimes Against Children Unit discovered a person, later identified as Burlingame, making online statements about sexually abusing a 12-year-old.

During the investigation, law enforcement determined Burlingame took video of the sexual abuse and used a social media platform to share and distribute the material with an undercover FBI special agent in Florida.

Gresham Police executed a court-authorized search warrant at Burlingame’s residence and an electronic device, which revealed evidence of child sexual abuse.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office recognizes the FBI Field Office in Miami, the Gresham Police Department and the Multnomah County Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team for their dedicated work on this case.

This case was prosecuted by Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Amber Kinney. The Victim Advocate was Malia Bruni. The lead investigator was Gresham Police Detective Adam Wright.

District Attorney Mike Schmidt thanks Detective Wright, DDA Kinney and Victim Advocate Bruni for their tireless work on this case and for supporting the victim and the victim’s family.

It was through the coordination, communication and collaboration of the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team that this case was investigated and prosecuted.

The Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team includes representatives from CARES Northwest, local law enforcement, public schools, hospitals, health departments, local mental health service providers, the Oregon Department of Human Services, and Multnomah County’s Department of Community Justice.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Multidisciplinary Child Abuse Team works with community partners to protect children who have been abused and neglected while ensuring that all practices are trauma-informed and mitigate the life-long consequences of child abuse. The team also handles child homicides, felony child physical abuse cases, felony child abandonment cases, custodial interference cases, and felony sex crimes where the victim is currently under the age of 18 and where the suspect is determined not to be a stranger to the child.

CARES Northwest, Multnomah County’s child abuse assessment center, is a community-based medical program for the assessment, treatment and prevention of child abuse. The organization is one of the largest child abuse assessment centers in the nation and serves more than 5,000 children annually.

 

#MCDA#

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/5769/145727/PR-21-85-DA_Mike_Schmidt_announces_17-year_prison_sentence_in_child_sexual_abuse_investigation.pdf

UPDATE - Fatal Crash on Hwy 126E - Lane County
Oregon State Police - 06/09/21 12:38 PM

The operator is being identified as Staci Jackson (56) of Eugene.

On Tuesday, June 8, 2021 at approximately 11:48 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 126E near milepost 17.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Ford Escort was westbound when it left the roadway and struck a power pole.

The operator was transported to Riverbend Hospital where she was pronounced deceased.  The name of the operator will be released when appropriate.

OSP was assisted by Emergency Medical Services and ODOT 


Ridgefield School District seventh grader selected for National Youth Leadership Forum
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 06/09/21 11:46 AM
View Ridge Middle School seventh grader Teegan Moore
View Ridge Middle School seventh grader Teegan Moore
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/889/145726/thumb_Teegan_Moore.jpg

This summer, View Ridge Middle School seventh grader Teegan Moore will join other outstanding middle school students from across the nation to take part in the National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Explore STEM, a unique academic and career-oriented development experience in Denver, CO. NYLF Explore STEM is one of the Envision by WorldStrides family of programs that enable students to explore their interests and experience learning beyond the classroom.

Earlier this spring, Moore was nominated by Sheila Davis, his seventh grade STEM teacher, to participate in the program.  Outside of school, Moore is involved in his local church and youth group and loves to build, be creative, hike and explore nature.  Moore says he is most looking forward to exploring the forensics and robotics portions of the forum. 

“Teegan has shown so much growth this year,” Davis said. “I thought he was a perfect candidate for the National Youth Leadership Forum for STEM because he approaches every challenge with an inquisitive and eager mind. He is driven, asks great questions and is clearly interested and excited about the work we do in STEM class each day. I really appreciate his attention to detail in his designs and his ability to turn his thoughts into drawings and models that communicate those ideas thoroughly. I am so excited for him to expand his interest and knowledge in STEM fields by taking part in the NYLF!”

“At NYLF Explore STEM, students build the confidence and skills needed to excel in high school, college, and the workplace,” said Amanda Freitag Thomas, Senior Vice President for Envision. “They learn how to adapt to and communicate in new situations, to new challenges, and with new people, which, given how rapidly the world is changing due to technology and innovation, are essential skills for success.”

For over 35 years, Envision by WorldStrides has empowered extraordinary students to become their best selves through programs that enable them to discover their passion, explore a career, and positively impact their world. In 2018, Envision became part of the WorldStrides family. The largest provider of educational travel and experiences in the United States, WorldStrides works with over 50,000 educators each year to help more than 550,000 students see the world—and themselves—in new ways. 

The expenses for this unique experience are approximately $3,700. A fundraiser has been set up for those interested in supporting this local youth. You may contact the family directly at enmoore40@gmail.com">benmoore40@gmail.com for additional information about how to make a donation. 




Attached Media Files: View Ridge Middle School seventh grader Teegan Moore

Ridgefield Students to return to Cispus Outdoor School in the fall
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 06/09/21 11:38 AM
Allene Wodaege, who helped found Ridgefield’s Cispus Outdoor School with Union Ridge Elementary School principal John Hudson, joined a group of students as they left for camp in 2018
Allene Wodaege, who helped found Ridgefield’s Cispus Outdoor School with Union Ridge Elementary School principal John Hudson, joined a group of students as they left for camp in 2018
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/889/145725/thumb_Cispus_4.jpg

After a two-year hiatus, Ridgefield fifth graders will be returning to the Cispus Learning Center for a weeklong Outdoor School experience. For over 50 years, Ridgefield fifth graders have taken part in the annual camp experience, making it one of the longest-running traditions that has built bonds across generations. Sadly, COVID put Cispus attendance on hiatus for 2020 and 2021.

In the fall of 2021, for the first time ever, there will be two trips to Cispus. “We didn’t want any students to miss out on this amazing experience,” said Todd Graves, Sunset Ridge Intermediate School principal. “So we are doing something we have never done before and going to Cispus twice. That way this year’s fifth graders, who missed out on attending, and next year’s fifth graders will all get to enjoy going to Outdoor School.”

Learning is an all-day activity at Cispus. At the camp, students learn more than just academics. Their classes include hands-on activities like soil and water sampling and tree and plant identification. But kids also learn to build survival shelters and fires, practice manners at family-style dinners, and keep cabins and dining rooms clean. 

Rain or shine, students have fun with outdoor classes, hiking, and campfires. The time they spend together leads to some of the best Cispus memories, like walking behind a waterfall or competing in the Golden Marshmallow contest at the campfire. While there are cabins for sleeping and common areas for dining and gathering, students spend as much time as possible enjoying the campgrounds, trails, and forest. 

The whole Ridgefield community comes together to help with Cispus. Teachers and students are joined by camp counselors, who are high school students that likely attended Cispus as kids themselves. Volunteers take charge of many activities, from unloading suitcases to guiding hikes to teaching survival training. 

Cispus is a once-in-a-lifetime event for fifth graders. For many of them, it’s a first taste of independence away from home, and a chance to challenge themselves with completely new activities. Ensuring that no students will miss out on attending Cispus is important for Sunset Ridge. 

“We want all students to have the opportunity to attend,” Graves said. “It was hard to miss going last year, especially right after our 50th anniversary. So we are making Cispus a priority for next year, making sure those students can share all the same experiences every other fifth grader has had for the last fifty years.” 

Next year’s Cispus experience will be double the fun, with twice as many students enjoying a unique week of camp that opens new doors to learning. 

Ridgefield High School students are still needed as camp counselors, especially for the boys’ cabins. With two Cispus camps in the same year, there will be more than 50 camp counselor positions available. Relive your favorite Cispus memories from a new perspective! To apply, please visit www.ridgefieldsd.org/o/intermediate-school/page/counselor-application-2021.




Attached Media Files: Allene Wodaege, who helped found Ridgefield’s Cispus Outdoor School with Union Ridge Elementary School principal John Hudson, joined a group of students as they left for camp in 2018 , Students in previous years enjoyed hands-on outdoor learning, including taking and analyzing water samples , Favorite hikes feature beautiful views of waterfalls , The camp at Cispus is the site for a week of outdoor learning for Ridgefield students

Beaverton Man Sentenced for Laser Assault on Federal Officer During Portland Protest
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/09/21 11:30 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Beaverton, Oregon man was sentenced today for shining a high-powered green laser at a uniformed Federal Protective Service (FPS) officer providing security at the Mark O. Hatfield U.S. Courthouse during a protest in July 2020.

Andrew Steven Faulkner, 25, was sentenced to three years’ federal probation to include six months of home detention and 40 hours of community service.

According to court documents, in the early morning hours of July 5, 2020, Faulkner shined a high-powered green laser at an FPS officer working as a member of the security team at the Hatfield Federal Courthouse. The officer was struck in the eye by the laser and quickly moved to avoid prolonged exposure. The officer was able to identify Faulkner and observed him shining the laser in the direction of other officers. When officers approached Faulkner, he attempted to flee, but was ultimately apprehended. The laser, a SDLaser 303 with a warning label cautioning direct eye exposure, was located in Faulkner’s possession.

On July 6, 2020, Faulkner was charged by criminal information with one count of misdemeanor assault on a federal officer. He pleaded guilty to the charge on January 13, 2021.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by FPS and the FBI. Assistant U.S. Attorney Ashley R. Cadotte prosecuted the case.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

9-1-1 Operators to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy / DPSST
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/09/21 11:13 AM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 124th  Basic Telecommunications Class.

The three-week course includes emergency call handling techniques, stress management, civil liability, ethics, criminal law, overview of fire-rescue and law enforcement operations, and a number of other topics. Upon completion of the course, students will return to their employing agency to continue their training for a number of months with a field training officer.

The 9-1-1 training program began in 1993 when the Oregon Legislative Assembly enacted legislation which requires that individuals who receive emergency calls for assistance from the public, meet professional standards for training and certification. There are approximately 950 men and women across the state who work in this profession in city, county, tribal, regional, and state public safety communications centers.

Basic Telecommunications #BT124 Graduation will be held at 9:00 a.m. on Friday, June 11, 2021, at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, in Salem, Oregon. Telephone: 503-378-2100.  Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the need for social distancing, the graduation will be closed to the public.  However, we would like to publicly congratulate Basic Telecommunications Class #BT 124 for a successful completion of their Basic Training.
 

Graduating Members of Basic Telecommunications Class # BT124:

Dispatcher Artigas Bonifacio
Bureau of Emergency Communications

Dispatcher Bradden Cappoen
Bureau of Emergency Communications

Dispatcher Kevin Casey
Lincoln City Police Department

Dispatcher Tobia Cochran
Coos County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Mileena Edwards
Warm Springs Police Department

Dispatcher Shyla Feddersen
Clackamas County Communications

Dispatcher Kirstin Fossum
Harney County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Zook Gango
Lake Oswego Police Department

Dispatcher Deena Josue
Umatilla County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Jasmine Lee
Springfield Police Department

Dispatcher Shannon Leib
Oregon State Police

Dispatcher Kim Lentz
Corvallis Police Department

Dispatcher Kara Minck
Clackamas County Communications

Dispatcher Cody Mock
Oregon State Police

Dispatcher Kathleen Mossel
Bureau of Emergency Communications

Dispatcher Scott Naumann
Bureau of Emergency Communications

Dispatcher Ashley Reardon
METCOM 9-1-1

Dispatcher Emily Roadarmel
Bureau of Emergency Communications

Dispatcher Adam Russell
Clackamas County Communications

Dispatcher Logan Schnoor
Bureau of Emergency Communications

Dispatcher Ernest Slye
Oregon State University DPS

Dispatcher Jason Stephens
Curry County Sheriff's Office

Dispatcher Joanna Szynal
Lake Oswego Police Department

 

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Jerry Granderson serves as the Director and Darren Bucich, Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Megan McCarter Named Executive Director of Instructional Services
NW Regional ESD: Washington Co. - 06/09/21 10:58 AM
2021-06/108/145723/McCarter_Megan_v2.jpeg
2021-06/108/145723/McCarter_Megan_v2.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/108/145723/thumb_McCarter_Megan_v2.jpeg

HILLSBORO - Northwest Regional Education Service District (NWRESD) has selected Megan McCarter as the executive director of instructional services, effective July 1.

“We are extremely impressed by Megan’s track record and her unwavering focus on excellence and equity,” says Dan Goldman, superintendent. “I am excited to see her lead our instructional services team as we aim to improve student success in Northwest Oregon. Megan puts her values of collaborative leadership, innovation, growth and results on display, and I know our staff and school districts have a lot to look forward to with her at the helm.” 

McCarter’s list of accomplishments demonstrates her ability to build innovative teams, lead for racial equity, and foster her team’s professional growth and leadership development. 

She spent the past three years as principal of Scott Elementary School in Portland, Oregon, which offers a Spanish immersion program to some of its 500+ students. While at Scott, the percentage of students meeting or exceeding reading growth targets increased from 22% in the spring of 2019 to 52% in the winter of 2019. She also rebuilt the school’s leadership team to reflect the racial diversity of the school community and started weekly social justice lessons with students.   

In Chicago, Illinois, she collaboratively led a school turnaround effort moving the Dewey School of Excellence, a prekindergarten to eighth grade school, from the bottom three schools in Illinois to the top 15% in Chicago in a three-year period. And while teaching at Rowe-Clark Math & Science Academy in Chicago, she set a historical record for math growth on state end-of-grade assessments for algebra students receiving special education services.

“I’m thrilled to join an organization with ambitious goals and that’s at the forefront of reimagining and reinventing our 100-year-old education system so it will work for more of our students,” says McCarter. “I look forward to partnering with school districts, their educators and their communities to anticipate and prepare students for jobs that don't even exist yet.”

McCarter received a Master of Education in school building leadership from Columbia University. She also holds a Master of Arts in teaching and Doctor of Education from National-Louis University. McCarter will replace Johnna Timmes, who will lead NWRESD’s early learning programs.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/108/145723/06.09.2021_Megan_McCarter_Named_Executive_Director_of_Instructional_Services.pdf , 2021-06/108/145723/McCarter_Megan_v2.jpeg , 2021-06/108/145723/McCarter_Megan.jpg

With Waste Connections support PAL gives Away 21 bikes!
Police Activities League of SW Washington - 06/09/21 10:10 AM
Cyndi of Waste Connections unloading bikes
Cyndi of Waste Connections unloading bikes
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/6402/145721/thumb_IMG_1959.JPG

Vancouver, Wash. – Over the past weekend, the Police Activities League of SW Washington partnered with Waste Connections to honor 21 local youth with a bike and helmet before the start of summer! Tied to their literacy program, PAL worked with partner schools to identify young people who had been good leaders, practiced positive citizenship, and shared their love of reading with others to be the recipients of the bikes.

Before the youth even showed up though, PAL had a team of officers, deputies, troopers, and volunteers from Bike Clark County who arrived early to build the 21 bikes. The smiles on the faces of the children as they received their bike was priceless and we hope to continue this tradition into next year!

Feel free to email Jenny at jenny.thompson@cityofvancouver.us to learn more about the bike give-a-way.

Learn more about PAL by visiting https://palofswwa.org




Attached Media Files: Cyndi of Waste Connections unloading bikes

Snake River Correctional Institution reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 06/09/21 9:58 AM
Texelle Hendricks
Texelle Hendricks
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1070/145720/thumb_Hendricks_T.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Texelle Hendricks, died the morning of June 9, 2021. Hendricks was incarcerated at Snake River Correctional Institution (SRCI) in Ontario and passed away while on hospice care. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Hendricks entered DOC custody on May 21, 2008, from Multnomah County with an earliest release date of November 25, 2027. Hendricks was 86 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of approximately 12,600 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

SRCI is a multi-custody prison in Ontario that houses approximately 3,000 adults in custody. SRCI has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, intensive management, infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care, and an administrative segregation unit. SRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including a contact center, laundry, and sign shop. SRCI specializes in incentive housing, specialized housing, individuals with mental health/medical vulnerabilities, education and trades programs, cognitive and parenting programs, and institution work programs. SRCI opened in 1991 and is the largest correctional institution in the state.

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Attached Media Files: Texelle Hendricks

Commissioner Hardesty to Introduce Budget Amendment to Provide Safety Interventions to High Crash Corridors
Portland Comm. Jo Ann Hardesty - 06/09/21 9:40 AM

This afternoon, Commissioner Hardesty will introduce a budget amendment to urgently respond to the crisis of vehicular violence that has so far caused 25 traffic-related deaths on the streets of Portland this year. 

These last 15 months have been a whirlwind of crisis – first and foremost a global pandemic, but also including a racial justice uprising, economic devastation, wildfires, a nationwide increase in gun violence, and here in Portland a 47% increase in traffic deaths for 2021 so far as of June 8, 2021.  

“It’s clear our City is seeing a tragic increase in loss of life from vehicular violence and we need to treat this like an emergency. Recently I directed the Portland Bureau of Transportation to identify and plan out actions that could be taken to prevent traffic deaths as quickly as possible. This amendment includes ready to go action items proven to improve street safety that can be acted on within the next 4-6 months.” – Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty  

These safety interventions will in some cases begin brand new projects while accelerating and enhancing other projects that were already in development. 

The $450,000 in General Funds will go to the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) for High Crash Corridor safety interventions including:  

  • Speed Safety Cameras: Install additional cameras on High Crash Corridors to reduce high-risk speeds.

Local impact: Portland’s existing cameras have reduced overall speeding by an average 71 percent and top-end speeding decreased by 94 percent, compared with the period before the cameras were in place.  

  • Increase Safety and Visibility at Intersections on the High Crash Network, including: 

Pull parking farther from intersections (sometimes called “daylighting”) 

Install signals that give pedestrians a head start  to help people see each other and avoid crashes 

Local impact: Nearly three-fourths of pedestrian crashes occur at intersections in Portland 

  • Turn Calming Infrastructure: Add small rubber bumps to high-crash intersections that help left-turning drivers see and avoid pedestrians in the crosswalk.  

Local impact: 20% of pedestrian crashes result from left-turning drivers failing to yield to pedestrians in the crosswalk at signalized intersections 

  • Center Turn Lane Delineation: Install flexible posts to help prevent misuse of open center turn lanes approaching major intersections, which can increase the risk of crashes. 

  • Speed Limit Reductions: Speed limits are a proven tool in supporting safer speeds.  

Local impact: Speed is a major factor in nearly half of Portland traffic deaths. 

It is crucial to focus on High Crash Corridors. While they make up only 8 percent of Portland streets, high crash streets consistently account for the majority of traffic deaths. In 2020, 62 percent of Portland’s 54 traffic deaths occurred on High Crash Corridors, and they account for the majority of traffic deaths so far this year as well. 

Many High Crash Corridors have four or more lanes of fast-moving traffic, unprotected pedestrian crossings and bike lanes, and long distances between signals. These are the places where deadly crashes happen most often. They include a network of High Crash Intersections. Fixing these streets is a central element of Portland’s Vision Zero strategy.  

These high crash streets are disproportionately in East Portland and generally in areas with higher rates of people living on low incomes and people who are Black, Indigenous or People of Color. The death rate from traffic crashes among Black residents in Multnomah County was nearly twice the rate among white residents during the period 2013-2017, according to a recent study by the county

The City of Portland is among dozens of cities in the United States that have adopted Vision Zero as the city's goal for traffic safety, and PBOT leads the citywide effort. Vision Zero is the goal of eliminating traffic fatalities and serious injuries from city streets, and acknowledging that these deaths are not inevitable. With the right combination of infrastructure, education, enforcement, and other strategies, we can reduce and eventually eliminate traffic deaths. Learn more at VisionZeroPortland.com 

The time to take action is now. 


Sandy Police Log 05-23-21 to 06-05-21
Sandy Police Dept. - 06/09/21 9:22 AM

Please be advised that the Bulletin does not include all calls for service to which officers respond.  Many calls do not require that a report be written; such as:

•Traffic Stops

•Advising/Referring a Person to the Proper Agency to handle their request

•Restoring the Peace

•Premise Checks

•Welfare Checks

•Flagged Down by Citizen




Attached Media Files: Bulletin

Conference of Local Health Officials meets June 17 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 06/09/21 9:19 AM

June 9, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Conference of Local Health Officials meets June 17 via Zoom

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO). 

Agenda: Approve letter of support for CDC Environmental Health grant; approve COVID immunization funding; discuss public health modernization; recruit CLHO representative for upcoming Rules Advisory Committee; hear updates on TPEP funding awards and Ballot Measure 108 funding; hear update on HIV 5-year plan.

Agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/ prior to meeting.

There is no public comment period during this meeting.

When: Thursday, June 17, 9:30-11 a.m.

Where: Via Zoom meeting. Join at

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1607711675?pwd=S2pzRlErUUE0SjNyenhDTTlCcm1rQT09

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340)

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766 711 TTY or a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Top Money Tips for Recent Grads
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 06/09/21 9:09 AM

                                        Do these things to avoid debt and be financially well.

SeaTac, Washington (June 8, 2021) — Congratulations to all the awesome students who’ve just graduated from high school or college. Whew! You’ve made it through 12 or more years of school, mastering music and acing Algebra II. But as you toss your cap into the bright blue sky, remember what you learned in financial education classes offered by Washington credit unions. Now it’s time to apply those lessons and set yourself up for financial success.

Media: DOWNLOAD infographics showing top money tips for recent high school and college grads




Attached Media Files: Infographic: Top Money Tips for New College Grads , Infographic: Top Money Tips for New High School Grads , Full news release

Death Row gifting club scam prevalent in Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/09/21 9:07 AM

Salem, Ore. – The pyramid scheme has a new look and the Oregon Division of Financial Regulation is warning consumers to steer clear. Gifting clubs, such as Death Row, are illegal pyramid schemes that are scamming several Oregonians. 

The Death Row gifting club, not associated with Death Row Records, was operating in Oregon last year. It advertised on social media and in online forums as a community wealth share group. More than 20 Oregonians lost their initial $1,400 investments.  

The Death Row gifting scheme promised financial returns of at least $9,000. The division was alerted to the scheme when an Oregonian reported not receiving anything in return for their $1,400 investment. The investment was not registered with the division and no one was licensed to sell investments in Death Row. Victims invested their money using a cloud-based payment platform and communicated with others about the investment during online forums for the Death Row program.

The division is still investigating the Death Row gift club. Anyone who has information about the scheme or was a victim of it are asked to contact the Division of Financial Regulation Advocacy team at 888-877-4894 (toll-free). 

“If someone invites you to join a gifting club, just say no to their high-pressure tactics and stories of high earnings,” said TK Keen, Division of Financial Regulation administrator. “The simple reality is that only a few people profit from these schemes at the expense of everyone else who ultimately lose their investments.”  

Gifting club schemes are similar to pyramid schemes because no new money is created. Members of the scheme encourage friends, family, and co-workers to give gifts of cash to higher ranking members. The only way for a person to recover the initial investment is to bring new members into the scheme.

The division has three tips to spot an illegal gifting scheme:

  • Promises of cash, gifts, or electronic payments via mail, email, or social media
  • The primary focus is to recruit new investors – no goods or services are being sold
  • No written agreements and the promoters boast about high earnings of a few people

Oregonians are encouraged to contact the Division of Financial Regulation’s consumer advocacy team if they spot a gifting scheme or believe they are a victim of one. Advocates can be reached at 888-877-4894 (toll-free), email .financialserviceshelp@oregon.gov">dfr.financialserviceshelp@oregon.gov, or by visiting dfr.oregon.gov.  

Do not become a victim of an illegal gifting scheme. Be skeptical about investment opportunities, avoid giving your personal information to strangers, and remember – if it seems too good to be true, it probably is.

For more information about investments and protecting yourself from investment fraud, visit the division’s avoid investment fraud page. 

###

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov.  

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx


Top Money Tips for Recent Grads
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 06/09/21 9:04 AM

                                           Do these things to avoid debt and be financially well.

Tigard, Oregon (June 8, 2021) — Congratulations to all the awesome students who’ve just graduated from high school or college. Whew! You’ve made it through 12 or more years of school, mastering music and acing Algebra II. But as you toss your cap into the bright blue sky, remember what you learned in financial education classes offered by Oregon credit unions. Now it’s time to apply those lessons and set yourself up for financial success.

Media: DOWNLOAD infographics with top money tips for high school and college grads!




Attached Media Files: Infographic: Top Money Tips for New High School Grads , Infographic: Top Money Tips for New College Grads , Full news release

Crash On I-5 North At SW Terwilliger - Northbound Lanes Blocked
Portland Police Bureau - 06/09/21 5:21 AM
Police photo of trailer on top of car
Police photo of trailer on top of car
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/3056/145709/thumb_Interstate_5_at_SW_Terwilliger.jpg
On June 9, 2021 at about 4:29 a.m., Portland Police responded to a crash on northbound Interstate 5 at Southwest Terwilliger Boulevard. A semi-tractor trailer crashed onto its side and came to rest on top of another vehicle. First responders are talking with the people in the vehicle under the trailer (photo). The extent of any injuries is unknown, but this is not a fatal crash.

Police expect I-5 north to be blocked for a few hours while the crash is investigated and cleared.
###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Police photo of trailer on top of car

Tue. 06/08/21
Dogged Determination and DNA Technology, Gresham Police Make Arrest in 1980 Cold Case Homicide
Gresham Police Dept - 06/08/21 9:12 PM
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2021-06/1278/145708/RP.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1278/145708/thumb_RP.png

Using DNA technology not available to detectives in the 1980s, Gresham Police have identified a Troutdale man as the suspect in the city’s oldest cold case homicide.  Robert Plympton, 58, was arrested by detectives during a surveillance mission earlier today. Investigators allege Plympton is responsible for the murder of 19-year-old Barbara Mae Tucker, 41 years ago.

 

Tucker was a sophomore at Mt. Hood Community College at the time, studying business.  Walking to an evening class on January 15, 1980, she was seen running onto Northeast Kane Dr. from the wooded area on the west edge of campus. At the time, multiple witnesses driving by recalled thinking the young woman was waiving at someone and trying to get people’s attention, but did not stop. A witness saw a man emerge from the shrubs and led her back toward campus.  A fellow student found Tucker’s lifeless body in some nearby bushes the following morning.  The medical examiner determined Tucker had been sexually assaulted and beaten to death.  

 

For more than four decades, police were unable to clearly identify a suspect, make an arrest, or charge anyone for the gruesome act. 

 

However, based on physical evidence from the original crime scene, modern advances in DNA technology, DNA ancestory databases and research and analysis by Parabon NanoLabs, LLC, they recently made a DNA profile match that furthered the case and led to Plympton’s arrest. 

“These ‘cold cases’ are not lost or forgotten for our department,” Chief Claudio Grandjean noted. “Each one represents a person to our officers, and their tragic stories are passed down through the generations in hopes of one day bringing honor to their names and a sense of justice and closure to their cases.”

 

Although Barbara Tucker’s case is not completely closed yet, Plympton’s arrest marks the waypoint to clearing the oldest unsolved homicide from Gresham Police’s cold case files. 

 

“I’m proud of our detectives, especially Detective Aaron Turnage, and criminalist Deanna Grossi who have worked this case for so many years.  And I’m hopeful this development will help Barbara’s family and our community heal,” Chief Grandjean added.

 

Anyone who has additional information about this case or other unsolved homicides is asked to call Detective Aaron Turnage at 503-618-3136.

 

 

###GPD###




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/1278/145708/RP.png

Vancouver fire Responds to an accidental gas leak.
Vancouver Fire Dept. - 06/08/21 5:20 PM

Vancouver Fire Department Engine 8 was dispatched to the report of a natural gas leak at 03:36 this AM at 305 SE Chaklov in Vancouver, WA. This is Cascade Park Plaza.  Initial crews arrived to find a strong smell of natural gas in the area.  A contractor had breached a 2" high pressure natural gas line.  Vancouver Fire isolated the scene and denied entry to a large area south of Mill Plain around the 117th Ave as there were very high levels of natural gas in nearby buildings and surrounding streets.  Vancouver Police helped to block roads.  Vancouver Fire Department's regional HazMat team was activated as well as resources from Northwest Natural Gas.  Vancouver Fire had 12 responders on scene.  Northwest Natural was able to stop the leak  at 05:16 and surrounding businesses were allowed to occupy structures as the levels of natural gas returned to zero.  


State Land Board Approves Land Exchange to Expand Deschutes County Fairgrounds
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 06/08/21 4:13 PM

Land Board also approves easement for the replacement of Van Buren Bridge in Corvallis and other land transactions

SALEM, OR – The State Land Board today approved a land exchange between the state and Deschutes County. The transaction will allow the county to expand its Redmond fair and expo center, as well as its ability to provide emergency services.

The exchange traded 140 acres of the state’s South Redmond Tract for 137.27 acres of industrial land in Redmond, properties of equal value.

Deschutes County Commissioner Phil Chang told the Land Board the fairgrounds have been crucial for recent emergency response. More than 100,000 people have received COVID-19 vaccines on-site. Circuit court proceedings have been held at the fairgrounds to accommodate social distancing needs. The fairgrounds also provided refuge for hundreds during the 2020 fire season. Chang anticipates it will shelter future Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake evacuees.

“This land exchange will expand these possibilities—it will expand what our fairgrounds can do for our community,” Chang said.

The transaction is part of a collaborative effort between the Department of State Lands, Deschutes County, the City of Redmond and other partners to plan for the use of the South Redmond Tract, a 940-acre parcel of state-owned land southeast of Redmond. Planning has resulted in the creation of new large-lot industrial land that will enhance economic development, as well as the sale of land to the Oregon Military Department for a new readiness center. This, along with the fairgrounds expansion will support emergency services in Central Oregon.

Other Approved Items

The Land Board also approved a permanent easement for a bridge at the crossing of Oregon Route 34 over the Willamette River in Corvallis that would replace the Van Buren Bridge. The Oregon Department of Transportation applied for the easement to create a new two-lane eastbound bridge with a multi-use path. The new bridge will be built slightly north of the current structure.

Additional approved transactions included the sale of 15.23 surface acres at North Tongue Point in Astoria to Bergerson Construction, Inc. for the appraised value of $188,000, as well as an exchange of rangelands in Harney County. The state traded surface rights to approximately 164 acres for 160 acres of similarly valued privately owned rangelands. The exchange will allow for more cohesive management of the property for DSL and the private owner.

Update to the Territorial Sea Plan’s Rocky Habitat Management Strategy

DSL also presented on efforts to update the Territorial Sea Plan’s Rocky Habitat Management Strategy. The strategy supports coordinated protection and management of Oregon’s unique coastal rocky habitats by identifying sites that may be designated for marine research, education, or conservation. Efforts to date have included engagement with the public to determine priorities for rocky habitat site designations and resource protection, an update to coastwide policies that protect resources, like kelp and eelgrass, and a review of proposed sites. The Oregon Policy Advisory Council has recommended the adoption of two new designated rocky habitat sites, Coquille Point Marine Garden, near Bandon, and Cape Blanco Marine Research Area, located near Port Orford. Rulemaking by DSL and other state agencies will be needed to implement these new designations.

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Shemia Fagan and State Treasurer Tobias Read. Established by the Oregon Constitution in 1859, the Land Board oversees the state’s Common School Fund. The Department of State Lands is the Land Board’s administrative agency, managing the lands and resources that help fund Oregon’s public schools and protecting the state’s waterways and wetlands for the many benefits they provide.

###

http://www.oregon.gov/dsl


Oregon reports 307 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths (Photo)
Oregon Health Authority - 06/08/21 3:36 PM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/3687/145705/thumb_metric.jpg

June 8, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 307 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are six new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,700, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 307 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 203,671.

Updates to County Risk Levels

Governor Kate Brown today announced updates to county risk levels under the state's public health framework to reduce transmission and protect Oregonians from COVID-19. Lane, Coos, and Wasco counties will move down to Lower Risk, and Josephine and Yamhill counties will move down to Moderate Risk, effective Wednesday, June 9.

Harney County will move up from Lower Risk to Moderate Risk due to rising case counts, effective Friday, June 11. A complete list of counties and their associated risk levels is available here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 17,285 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 6,688 doses were administered on June 7 and 10,597 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 7.

The 7-day running average is now 14,560 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 2,305,442 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,645,747 first and second doses of Moderna and 151,144 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 1,951,646 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 2,292,591 people who have had at least one dose. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 106,455. 

A daily countdown can be found on the OHA website

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,856,645 doses of Pfizer, 2,170,640 doses of Moderna and 299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations and visitations

Hospitals across the state have received questions from the public about the need to continue to manage and limit visitation policies for patients. Unlike other public settings, hospitals are subject to special visitation requirements. The COVID-19 policies for hospitals and medical centers are based on federal rule and state law. Visitation guidance can be found here.

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 172, which is 34 fewer than yesterday. There are 36 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is 14 fewer than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,446, which is an 18.9% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 228.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (5), Clackamas (35), Clatsop (6), Columbia (6), Coos (4), Crook (4), Curry (1), Deschutes (8), Douglas (21), Harney (3), Hood River (1), Jackson (18), Jefferson (3), Josephine (7), Klamath (3), Lane (27), Linn (12), Malheur (3), Marion (35), Multnomah (31), Polk (4), Umatilla (14), Union (3), Wasco (1), Washington (45), Yamhill (4).

Oregon’s 2,695th death is a 71-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on May 18 and died on June 6 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,696th death is a 57-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive on May 19 and died on May 31 at Legacy Silverton Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,697th death is a 93-year-old woman from Klamath County who tested positive on May 28 and died on June 4 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,698th death is a 100-year-old man from Union County who tested positive on May 10 and died on June 4 at Grande Ronde Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,699th death is a 75-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on June 2 and died on June 5 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,700th death is a 70-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive on May 18 and died on May 27 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon updates vaccine waste disclosure1,2,3

Oregon Health Authority recognizes that as we create more opportunities to vaccinate more people, we also increase the likelihood of leaving unused doses in a vial.

While OHA and the state’s vaccine providers continue to follow best practices to use every dose possible, we do not want that to be at the expense of missing an opportunity to vaccinate every eligible person when they are ready to get vaccinated.

Our vaccine waste table has been moved to the tableau dashboard. You can find that link to the weekly tab here. OHA reports updates on vaccines not being used each Tuesday in our daily media release.

Vaccine Type

Doses Recalled

Wasted Spoiled Expired

Grand Total

Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine

 

2,682

2,682

Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine

 

13,304

13,304

Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine

 

4,372

4,372

Grand Total

0

20,358

20,358

1Updated: 06/08/21 

2Data source: ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS) 

3Data is preliminary and subject to change.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.# # #




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/3687/145705/metric.jpg , How can counties move to lower risk?

Baker City Man Pleads Guilty in COVID-Relief Fraud Scheme
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/08/21 3:12 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Baker City, Oregon man pleaded guilty today for fraudulently converting loans intended to help small business during the COVID-19 pandemic to his personal use.

Jeremy Clawson, 32, pleaded guilty to one count of theft of public money.

Clawson took advantage of economic relief programs administered by the Small Business Administration (SBA) through Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDLs) and the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), as authorized by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. The CARES Act, signed into law on March 27, 2020, was designed to provide emergency financial assistance to millions of Americans and small businesses suffering the economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to court documents, on August 11, 2020, the proceeds of an SBA EIDL totaling $145,200 were deposited into an Umpqua Bank account owned by Jeremy Clawson and his girlfriend. Shortly after receiving the deposit, Clawson began making multiple large cash withdrawals at the drive-through window of an Umpqua Bank in Baker City. On August 17, 2020, Clawson withdrew $49,905 in the form of a cashier’s check to purchase a 2016 Dodge Challenger. Umpqua Bank investigators detected the unusual activity and reported it to the SBA.

SBA loan documents showed that the loan was made for the benefit of Halperin Manufacturing Company in San Diego, California. Though there is no record of any such company, the loan application listed the company’s owner and claimed it employed 350 people. Investigators contacted the person listed as the owner, but that person denied owning or being affiliated with any such company. The purported owner further stated that the company’s supposed address in San Diego was that individual’s personal residence and not a commercial property with 350 employees.

In early September 2020, investigators learned that, in late August, Clawson had been arrested by the Baker City Police Department for driving under the influence, reckless driving, driving with a suspended license, and attempting to allude police. Clawson was driving the 2016 Dodge Challenger at the time of his arrest. Clawson later told authorities that he had received a large inheritance from his father, including $30,000 in cash he had on his person during a subsequent arrest.

On September 11, 2020, investigators interviewed Clawson at the Baker County Jail where he was incarcerated on an unrelated charge. Clawson claimed to have received the $145,200 from a woman with whom he had an online dating relationship. He further claimed that he didn’t know what to do with the money and, after he stopped communicating with the woman, began spending the money himself. Clawson admitted to using the SBA money to purchase the Dodge Challenger and several other vehicles.

On December 21, 2020, Clawson was charged by criminal complaint with theft of government property. Later, on February 2, 2021, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a single-count indictment charging Clawson with theft of public money.

Federal agents seized the Dodge Challenger and approximately $50,000 in cash derived from the fraudulent EIDL pursuant to seizure warrants issued by the federal court and voluntary abandonment of funds in third parties’ possession.

Theft of public money is punishable by up to 10 years in prison, a $250,000 fine, and three years’ supervised release. With Clawson’s continued acceptance of responsibility, the U.S. Attorney’s Office will recommend a 24-month prison sentence followed by three years’ supervised release. Clawson will be sentenced on September 13, 2021.

As part of the plea agreement, Clawson has agreed to pay $125,200 in restitution to the U.S. Treasury.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the SBA and U.S. Secret Service. It is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

Anyone with information about fraud involving COVID-19 can report it by calling the Department of Justice’s National Center for Disaster Fraud (NCDF) Hotline at 866-720-5721 or via the NCDF Web Complaint Form at: www.justice.gov/disaster-fraud/ncdf-disaster-complaint-form.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Officers Arrest Suspect From Weekend Shooting Where One Person Was Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 06/08/21 2:53 PM
On June 6, 2021 at about 6:27 p.m., Portland Police officers from Central Precinct responded to the report that someone had been shot in the 5200 block of Southwest Barbur Boulevard, at a large camp nearby.

Officers arrived and located a male victim suffering from a single gunshot wound. Officers provided immediate medical aid until the victim could be treated and transported to an area hospital by ambulance. The injury was serious, but later determined to be non-life threatening. Officers searched the area for the suspect, but did not find him.

The Enhanced Community Safety Team (ECST) responded and began an investigation. ECST detectives identified 45-year-old Kelly J. Winkels as the suspect in this case.

On June 8th, at about 7:38 a.m., Central Precinct officers located Mr. Winkels in the 8600 block of Southwest Barbur Boulevard and took him into custody without incident.

Mr. Winkels was booked in jail on charges of Attempted Murder II, Assault I, Unlawful Use of a Weapon (Firearm), and Felon in Possession of a Firearm.
###PPB###

Clark County Historical Museum Partners with Four Non-Profits for Collaborative Fundraiser
Clark County Historical Museum - 06/08/21 2:32 PM

Vancouver, Wash. –  Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM) has joined together with four other local nonprofits (Police Activities League of SW WA, Ridgefield Main Street, Rocksolid Community Teen Center, and Leadership Clark County) to bring a new fundraising experience to our community: Friday Night Flicks!

This outdoor film experience is set for this summer at the Port of Ridgefield and will run for five weeks starting July 9th. Each week a different nonprofit will take the lead to organize a fun evening of film and food. Here's the schedule for Friday Night Flicks:

July 9th with PAL: Zootopia
July 16th with CCHM: Clue
July 23rd with RMS: Field of Dreams
July 30th with RSTC: School of Rock
August 6th with LCC: Remember the Titans

You can learn more about the event by visiting, cchmuseum.org/calendar/fnf, where you can buy tickets for individual nights or even tickets for the whole series. 

We hope you to see you at Friday Night Flicks and a huge thanks to the Port of Ridgefield and Realvest who have made this community event possible.

Feel free to email CCHM at outreach@cchmuseum.org to learn more about Friday Night Flicks or visit the website for the event at cchmuseum.org/calendar/fnf.

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Attached Media Files: Friday Night Flicks poster , Friday Night Flicks PR

Public Health Advisory Board Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee meets June 15 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 06/08/21 2:20 PM

June 8, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee meets June 15 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Discuss Equity as the Foundation of a Strategic Data Plan; article on White Supremacy and the Core Functions of Public Health; Public Health Modernization presentation; PHAB Health Equity Review Policy and Procedures.

When: Tuesday, June 15, 1-2 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Zoom meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 669-254-5252; meeting ID 969 8167 3410; passcode: XNz1kX; or by computer, tablet or smartphone by launching this Zoom link: https://zoom.us/j/96981673410?pwd=ZGVudHUwU01iVytlQVNvVTB6anUrZz09

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Strategic Data Plan subcommittee develops recommendations for a plan that is grounded in equity and centers community values and experiences. 

Program contact: Cara Biddlecom, a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, 971-255-6370

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Cara Biddlecom at 971-255-6370 711 TTY, or a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


City of Battle Ground Offering Tourism Grants
City of Battle Ground - 06/08/21 1:49 PM
Battle Ground Event
Battle Ground Event
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/2812/145697/thumb_Tourism_Grant_Photo.jpg

The City of Battle Ground is offering grants to help fund programs that attract tourists to Battle Ground. Tourism creates opportunity and a positive economic impact on the local community.   

Grant applications are now open for activities that will take place in 2022.  Funding is granted for the marketing or operations of special events, programs, and activities designed to bring visitors to Battle Ground.  Previous grants included funding for wayfinding signs, marketing materials, and event operations. 

Those interested in receiving grant funds should submit an application summarizing the activity or event, how it supports tourism, and a proposed budget indicating how lodging tax dollars will be used.  Applications are due by Tuesday, August 31 at 5:00 pm.

The estimated amount of grant funding for 2022 is $55,000. The City’s Lodging Tax Advisory Committee will review proposals and forward recommendations to the Battle Ground City Council for final determination of awards in November of this year. Grant awards are distributed on a reimbursement basis. 

Questions regarding tourism grants may be directed to Finance Director Meagan Lowery at 360-342-5025 or by email at y@cityofbg.org">meagan.lowery@cityofbg.org




Attached Media Files: Battle Ground Event

Vancouver City Council previews $107.9 million proposed supplemental budget
City of Vancouver - 06/08/21 1:46 PM

Vancouver, Washington—Vancouver City Council was presented with a preview of the city’s first supplemental budget of the year at a June 7 workshop. A first reading of the supplemental budget will take place at the June 14 regular council meeting, followed by a public hearing June 21.

Supplemental budgets reflect adjustments made each year to show changes in revenues and expenditures that occur after the biennium budget is adopted. The city council adopted the 2021-22 $1.3 billion budget in November 2020.

The expenditure increases for the city’s operating and capital funds proposed in the supplemental budget total $107.9 million. An increase of $50.7 million is aligned with recommended changes in the operating budget, with the remaining increase of $57.2 million representing changes in capital projects and supporting funding transfers.

The first supplemental budget of 2021 primarily includes administrative items, such as bond refinancing, carryforwards of project funding from 2020, grants related to stimulus support, and one-time investments that are now possible from an increase in revenues that were initially unexpected due to the coronavirus pandemic.

“The city’s financial position is strong, and we are pleased to have a positive outlook with better than expected revenues,” said Vancouver Chief Financial Officer Natasha Ramras. “The city acted conservatively when the pandemic hit to ensure stability when we were unsure how revenues would come in as businesses and residents were impacted by the economic downturn. We can now make the appropriate adjustments to ensure that capital projects, hiring needs and other administrative priorities move forward.”

Some of the key updates to the budget include adjustments to the general fund as well as one-time expenditures.

Revenue projections were updated to include an additional $8.9 million due to improved economic indicators, which allows for reinstatement of 20 full-time positions across the organization who were either furloughed or unfilled when the pandemic began.

Coupled with the use of $3.5 million in reserves, other highlights to the supplemental general fund, street and fire budget include:

  • Adding four full-time employees to increase administrative support capacity
  • One-time proposed investments, including:
    • Turning the city’s Chkalov building into a police training facility
    • Infrastructure and utilities design and construction drawings for the Heights District
    • Updating critical areas code
    • Complete Streets evaluation
    • Building new streets for Section 30

COVID relief funds from the 2021 American Rescue Plan Act are not included in the supplemental budget.

The presentation on the proposed supplemental budget is available here: https://vancouvercity.novusagenda.com/agendapublic/AttachmentViewer.ashx?AttachmentID=4623&ItemID=1961

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Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board meets Aug. 25
Oregon Health Authority - 06/08/21 1:08 PM

June 8, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board meets Aug. 25

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board.

Agenda: TBD

When: Aug. 25, 1-4 p.m. There will be a public comment period, time permitting.

Where: Via Zoom meeting

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16018821728

Meeting ID: 160 1882 1728

Background: Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 years of age and older in this state for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Nic Riley at 971-673-0404, 711 TTY, or iley@dhsoha.state.gov">nic.riley@dhsoha.state.gov, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Tractor Accident Injures One
Forest Grove Fire & Rescue - 06/08/21 11:11 AM
2021-06/1797/145692/A7651B95-4098-47FE-AFC1-3C99861F9B99.jpeg
2021-06/1797/145692/A7651B95-4098-47FE-AFC1-3C99861F9B99.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1797/145692/thumb_A7651B95-4098-47FE-AFC1-3C99861F9B99.jpeg

This morning at 9:10, Forest Grove Firefighters were dispatched to a reported Fall patient on NW Timmerman Road in the rural community of Gales Creek. While responding it was determined that this incident was a trauma patient due to a tractor accident. It was found that a local resident had last been seen at 6pm last night while out mowing areas of the property with a small tractor. They were discovered by family around 9am and 911 was called. Our first arriving crews found the patient down approximately 15 feet in a ditch along Timmerman Road. They were stuck under the tractor and not able to get back to the roadway. Firefighters safely moved the patient from under the tractor and used a rope system to bring them back to the roadway.

It took firefighters 25 minutes to immobilize and bring the patient to the roadway with the rope system. Once at the roadway, the patient was further assessed and then transported by a Life Flight helicopter to a trauma hospital in Portland with reported serious but non-life threatening injuries. 

We used Highway 6 to land the helicopter, which caused intermittent closures of the highway. It is back open at this time.

Forest Grove Fire & Rescue was assisted on scene by Banks Fire District, Metro West Ambulance, Life Flight Network, Oregon Department of Transportation, Oregon State Police and Washington County Sheriff Office.

Scene Information
Engines - 2
Rescue - 1
Chiefs - 2
Ambulance - 1
Air Ambulance - 1
Law/Road Crews - 4

Total Personnel - 20

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/1797/145692/A7651B95-4098-47FE-AFC1-3C99861F9B99.jpeg , 2021-06/1797/145692/BC08F9B9-0527-4B09-A57F-D0B7ACBEC4DB.jpeg , 2021-06/1797/145692/B1DB3F6C-4FBE-46EF-AFA8-B4811FFF5B54.jpeg , 2021-06/1797/145692/92ABB352-DAB1-4946-9CFA-82DF6DB7DB1C.jpeg , 2021-06/1797/145692/56437D82-854A-4256-BA17-91F934C2854C.jpeg

David Harrelson appointed to Oregon Arts Commission
Oregon Arts Commission - 06/08/21 10:35 AM
David Harrelson
David Harrelson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1418/145691/thumb_David_H_Headshot_2020.jpg

Salem, Oregon – David Harrelson, the Cultural Resources Department manager for The Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde and a Grand Ronde tribal member, has been appointed to the Oregon Arts Commission by Governor Kate Brown.

Harrelson has championed the use of his people’s ancestral art forms for the purpose of public art. His support for this work has resulted in five public art installations in the last four years throughout Northwestern Oregon. He has worked in the field of cultural resources for 10 years and before that worked as a wildland firefighter.

“We are thrilled to have David join the Arts Commission at this important time,” said Commission Chair Anne Taylor. “As we pursue ensuring greater equity and inclusion in all we do, his experience and expertise in tribal artistic practices will enhance our conversations.”

Besides supporting art in an administrative capacity, Harrelson currently approaches art as a hobby, believing that the process of creating art should be a part of everyone’s life. The primary areas of inspiration for his art include his indigenous heritage and the landscape of western Oregon.

“It is an honor to join the Oregon Arts Commission,” said Harrelson. “I look forward to lifting up indigenous artists and art forms while ensuring broad reach and accessibility of the arts statewide. No matter where you live,” he added, “you are on indigenous land. Seek out and know your area’s indigenous people and their art.”

Harrelson is active in his community and currently sits on the State Advisory Committee for Historic Preservation, is a former board member of the Chehalem Cultural Center in Newberg and was an editorial board member for Smoke Signals, a free and independent newspaper covering the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Community of Oregon. He has a bachelor’s in history from Lewis and Clark College; some of his research interests include ethnobotany, contact era Pacific Northwest history and Western Oregon indigenous art.

His four-year term begins immediately.

                   

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org.




Attached Media Files: David Harrelson

The Pedal Powered Talk Show Bike Donated to the Oregon Historical Society; Takes Final Joy Ride on June 10
Oregon Historical Society - 06/08/21 10:35 AM
2021-06/2861/145690/Joy_Ride_path.jpg
2021-06/2861/145690/Joy_Ride_path.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/2861/145690/thumb_Joy_Ride_path.jpg

Portland, OR — The Oregon Historical Society (OHS) is excited to share the most recent addition to its collections: the one-of-a-kind cargo bike from “The Pedal Powered Talk Show.” The bike, which has pedaled to rooftops, canyon rims, shoe factories, roller skating rinks, and goat fields, will take its final joy ride through downtown Portland at 4:30pm on Thursday, June 10.

A decade ago, Boaz Frankel and Phillip Ross embarked on a mission to combine two of their favorite things: talk shows and cargo bikes. Hailing from a state where bicycling is beloved, cargo bike builder Ross accepted the challenge of designing a mobile talk show — and a few months later, the Pedal Powered Talk Show was born. Built from aircraft grade steel, locally sourced bamboo, and custom wheels, the eight foot, seventy-five pound bike has transported host Frankel to interviews with unicycling bagpipers, best-selling authors, 80-year old drag queens, famous musicians, and the Baldwin brothers. 

After recording 64 episodes over five seasons, concluding in 2016, Frankel and Ross decided that the bike deserved its own place in Oregon history, and contacted OHS Deputy Museum Director Nicole Yasuhara, who oversees the museum’s vast collections. The over 75,000 objects safeguarded in the OHS museum collection include costumes and textiles, Native American belongings, artworks, and both notable and everyday items. While the OHS collections contain various vehicles from the Benson automobile to a horse drawn hearse, a mobile talk show bike is a unique addition to the collection.

“Boaz and Phillip have created something so quintessentially Oregon with The Pedal Powered Talk Show,” said Yasuhara. “The bike has been privy to so many local stories through its travels across the state and beyond, and we are grateful that they have decided to entrust OHS with this important piece of local pop culture.”

“I’ve been a fan of OHS’s mission since I came here during an elementary school field trip,” said Frankel. “Since then, I’ve been a frequent participant in their festive Holiday Cheer author celebration, too. So, when we were deciding where we should pedal the talk show bike on its final ride, OHS was the obvious choice. We’re honored to have it join their collection and are excited to share our bicycling adventure with future generations.”

A small group of Oregon Historical Society staff and friends of The Pedal Powered Talk Show will gather at 4pm in the South Park Blocks between Madison and Jefferson for a 3.71 mile ride down to the Eastbank Esplanade and back. The route of the joy ride is included with this press release. Boaz Frankel and Nicole Yasuhara will both be available for media interviews that afternoon.
 



About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/2861/145690/Joy_Ride_path.jpg

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board meets July 28
Oregon Health Authority - 06/08/21 10:21 AM

June 8, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board meets July 28

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board.

Agenda: TBD

When: July 28, 1-4 p.m. There will be a public comment period, time permitting.

Where: Via Zoom meeting

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16018821728

Meeting ID: 160 1882 1728

Background: Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 years of age and older in this state for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Nic Riley at 971-673-0404, 711 TTY, or iley@dhsoha.state.gov">nic.riley@dhsoha.state.gov, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Port of Vancouver USA's 2020 Port Report Available Online
Port of Vancouver - 06/08/21 10:12 AM

For Immediate Release

June 8, 2021

 

Contact:                       Therese Lang, Director of Communications

                                    360-518-8590 cell

 

Port of Vancouver USA’s 2020 Port Report Available Online

Annual state of the port highlights record year amidst the challenges of 2020

VANCOUVER, Wash. – The Port of Vancouver USA premiered its annual Port Report following Tuesday’s Board of Commissioners meeting. The 10-minute “state of the port” presentation provides a summary of the organization’s performance in 2020, as well as a look ahead to 2021.

In years past, Port Report was the final presentation in the port’s annual Lecture Series but was moved to a virtual format to follow social distancing and safety protocols during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Viewers will join Julianna Marler, Chief Executive Officer; Alex Strogen, Chief Commercial Officer; and members of the International Longshore Workers Union (ILWU) Local 4 for an overview of last year’s successes and challenges. Featuring behind-the-scenes footage of port marine and commercial operations, the report highlights the Terminal 1 renovation project, environmental efforts and several port tenants.

“We came away from 2020 with an incredible story of teamwork and resiliency,” said Marler. “Port Report is an important opportunity for us to communicate the successes and challenges of the year that just ended, and to also thank our staff, the ILWU, our customers, tenants and the community for all of their support,” she added.

A clear overarching theme was that 2020 was an unprecedented year in terms of the pandemic, but also in revenue with the port posting its most successful year to date.

“The pandemic really brought to light how important ports are in the global supply chain,” said Strogen. “From moving grain, wind energy components, autos and steel, our operations never shut down. In fact, the ILWU posted a record-setting number of hours worked as they kept cargo moving, generating millions of dollars in local wages and spending in our community.”

Port finances are not finalized until the Washington State Auditor’s Office completes its annual audit, which took place in March. Shortly after, the port received its 12th consecutive clean audit and staff was able to move forward in reporting the year-end numbers and statistics in Port Report.

View the 2020 Port Report on the port’s website or YouTube channel at https://youtu.be/cWXebBvPRBA.

Port staff look forward to presenting Port Report in person next year. To sign up for e-mail notification of Port Report and the port’s Lecture Series, contact Community Relations Manager, Julie Rawls, at awls@portvanusa.com">jrawls@portvanusa.com.

###

The Port of Vancouver USA is one of the major ports on the Pacific Coast, and its competitive strengths include available land, versatile cargo handling capabilities, vast transportation networks, a skilled labor force and an exceptional level of service to its customers and community. For more information, please visit us at www.portvanusa.com.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/1489/145688/060821-PortReport-FINAL.pdf

Virginia Garcia launches search for new Foundation Executive Director
Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Center - 06/08/21 9:39 AM
Serena Cruz
Serena Cruz
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VIRGINIA GARCIA LAUNCHES SEARCH FOR NEW FOUNDATION EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Virginia Garcia Memorial Foundation Executive Director Serena Cruz will be taking a new position as Multnomah County’s Chief Operating Officer, leaving Virginia Garcia after eight years in the role.

“I am sad to leave Virginia Garcia and our wonderful team here. Six-year-old Virginia’s story and our mission to remove barriers to high-quality healthcare personally motivated me to share our story throughout the community, engaging caring members in supporting the work we do, our patients’ care, and to advocate for health equity,” said Cruz.  “You can be sure I will take Virginia Garcia’s commitment to removing barriers, delivering high quality services, and a passion for equity with me to my new role.”

The search for a new executive director will focus on an individual with strong connections to the community as well as a desire to ensure decisions at the organization continue to be made with diversity, equity and access to health care as the primary focus.  It will be critical they are able to continue developing community relationships to build a greater understanding and support for both the Health Center and Foundation’s mission, vision and goals. The job description can be found here. Virginia Garcia will begin reviewing applications on June 10, 2021.

The Foundation Board named Development Officer Stefanny Caballero as interim executive director while the search takes place.




Attached Media Files: Serena Cruz

Oregon State Fire Marshal announces 2021 Sparky Award Recipients
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/08/21 9:38 AM
Kris Babbs
Kris Babbs
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1062/145683/thumb_Kris_Babbs_Sparky_Award.jpeg

SALEM, Ore. – The Office of the Oregon State Fire Marshal (OSFM) is excited to announce the 2021 Gold and Silver Sparky Award recipients. Every year the OSFM awards the Golden Sparky award to a fire service member and the Silver Sparky award to a public member for the contributions to fire prevention and fire safety.

This year's Golden Sparky was awarded to Firefighter John Rossi, a Public Information Officer with Mt. Angel Fire. Rossi's public information and education work has elevated the community and the region's fire prevention and preparedness efforts.

"He spends countless hours installing smoke alarms for those that need it the most," Oregon Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. "John's commitment to his community and service to others shines through in his work through his tireless dedication to community prevention efforts. 

Rossi has created a social media following that has allowed for great reach in the community to educate on various topics, including smoke alarms, defensible space, and burn bans.

This year, Kris Babbs, the president of Keep Oregon Green, was awarded the Silver Sparky. Keep Oregon Green is a non-profit that focuses on fire prevention across the state of Oregon. Babbs puts in countless hours and possesses a remarkable dedication to prevent fires across the state. In addition, Babbs leadership has elevated relationships among state and federal agencies. Her projects have brought OSFM and the fire service into the conversation and leveraged our programs and footprint in Oregon to further prevention and life safety.

"Oregon has never needed such an important leader in this space now and into our future," Ruiz-Temple said. "I want to thank Kris for being a friend to OSFM, the fire service, and for being a strong partner."

ABOUT THE SPARKY AWARDS

The Sparky Award is the highest award presented by the Office of the Oregon State Fire Marshal and been awarded to a member of the fire service and a member of the public every year since 1977. The award honors the efforts in fire prevention and fire safety education in the state of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: Kris Babbs , John Rossi

Salem Health offers multiple vaccination locations as its Polk County mass vaccine clinic winds down
Salem Health - 06/08/21 9:26 AM

(Salem, Ore. – June 8, 2021) – Salem Health’s Polk County vaccine clinic at Western Oregon University (WOU) in Monmouth has administered more than 34,000 vaccinations since opening on Jan. 11. As walk-in and scheduled appointment demand declines, Salem Health will shift to other options, including mobile vaccine clinic events and Salem Health’s primary care and urgent care clinic locations in Marion and Polk counties. 

The vaccine clinic at WOU will administer vaccine second doses, both scheduled and walk-ins, through Friday, June 25. Walk-ins for first doses are also welcome and those who receive a first dose starting June 9 will be given various options for their second dose location. The vaccine clinic at WOU will be open June 9, 11, 16, 18, 23 and 25, and walk-ins are welcome from 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

“The mass vaccination clinics have successfully vaccinated large numbers of people when demand was at its highest,” said Brandon Schmidgall, chief administrative officer, Salem Health West Valley Hospital. “A big thank you to WOU for their partnership and support of our vaccination efforts over these past six months. As vaccination rates continue to climb, it is important to deploy a more on-demand model, with multiple sites and flexible scheduling. We are grateful for each person who took the initiative to get the vaccine when they became eligible. We will continue to make the process easily accessible to reach those who still need to be vaccinated.”

Salem Health Medical Clinics

Vaccinations are now available at Salem Health Medical Clinics – at all eight of its primary care clinic locations in Marion and Polk counties. There are three Polk County locations in the Dallas/Monmouth area:  Salem Health Medical Clinic – Miller Ave., Salem Health Medical Clinic – Uglow Ave. and Salem Health Medical Clinic – Monmouth. Walk-ins are welcome and open to the public during clinic hours, up to one hour before closing each day. Appointment scheduling is also available, for ages 12 and over, online at www.salemhealth.org/vaccine.

Mobile Vaccine Team

The Mobile Vaccine Team focuses on equity in vaccinating Oregonians, prioritizing hard-to-reach and vulnerable populations, as well as those for which travel to one of the larger vaccine clinics is a barrier. Mobile vaccine clinic sites which are open to the public will be posted on www.salemhealth.org/vaccine. No appointment is needed for the mobile vaccine clinic public sites.

In Polk County, Salem Health will host two upcoming public mobile vaccine clinics:

Wednesday, June 16, 2:00 – 6:00 p.m.

Talmadge Middle School

51 S 16th Street

Independence, OR

 

Wednesday, June 23, 12:30 – 4:30 p.m.

Dallas High School

1250 SE Holman Avenue

Dallas, OR

Nearly 9,000 vaccines have been given through almost 80 mobile vaccine clinic events since March 18. Scheduling is ongoing with more mobile vaccine events currently planned for food packaging plants; migrant and seasonal agricultural workers; churches, parishes and religious groups; senior living communities; homeless communities; rural communities in Marion and Polk counties; and events which are open to the public at schools and other locations across both counties.

Salem Health’s vaccine clinic at the Oregon State Fair and Expo Center in Marion County remains open. Current hours of operation are Tuesday through Saturday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., for both scheduled appointments and walk-ins. Visit www.salemhealth.org/vaccine for information on all available sites across Marion and Polk counties, including Salem Health Medical Clinic primary and urgent care locations and hours, and public mobile vaccine clinic events.

About Salem Health Hospitals and Clinics

Salem Health offers exceptional care to people in and around Oregon’s mid-Willamette Valley. It comprises hospitals in Salem and Dallas, a medical group of primary and specialty care providers, plus other affiliated services. Visit us at www.salemhealth.org; “Like” us on www.facebook.com/salemhealth; follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @salemhealth; and view us at www.youtube.com/salemhealth


Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission meets June 22-23 via conference call
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/08/21 9:00 AM

SALEM, Oregon — The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission will convene June 22-23 via conference call.

On June 22, commissioners will attend a virtual work training session from 1-2:45 p.m.

On June 23, commissioners will convene an executive session at 8:30 a.m. to discuss real estate, legal issues, and the agency director’s performance evaluation. Executive sessions are closed to the public. A business meeting will begin at 9 a.m. and will be open to the public.

Anyone may listen to the business meeting; instructions on how to attend will be posted on the commission web page prior to the meeting. The agenda also includes a time for public comment. Registration is required to speak at the meeting, and is available online at bit.ly/registerjunecommission. Time per speaker is limited to three minutes. Please submit written public comments by 5 p.m. June 18 to is.havel@oregon.gov">chris.havel@oregon.gov.

The full agenda and supporting documents are posted on the commission web page. Notable requests:

Anyone needing special accommodations to join the meeting should contact Denise Warburton, commission assistant, at least three days in advance: denise.warburton@oregon.gov or 503-986-0719. People who plan to present oral testimony are asked to email a copy of their statement to Warburton in advance.

The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission promotes outdoor recreation and heritage by establishing policies, adopting rules and setting the budget for the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. The seven members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. They serve four-year terms and meet several times a year at locations across the state.


Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Scams Targeting Doctors (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 06/08/21 9:00 AM
TT - Doctor Scams - GRAPHIC - June 8, 2021
TT - Doctor Scams - GRAPHIC - June 8, 2021
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-05/3585/145270/thumb_TT_-_Doctor_Scams_-_GRAPHIC_-_June_8_2021.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against drug scams targeting doctors. 

The FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center is seeinge more and more reports of a scam that is targeting both active and retired doctors. The victim receives a call or message from someone claiming to be a Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agent. 

The alleged DEA agent claims that someone is using the doctor’s DEA number to illegally prescribe tens of thousands of units of opioids. The scammer tells the doctor that he or she needs to change her Social Security number and/or is subject to arrest for the illegal activity. 

If you get one of these government impersonation scam calls, here’s how to protect yourself: 

  • Never respond to unsolicited or unknown calls or messages. 

  • If someone asks you for your Social Security number or other personal financial or health information, hang up. 

  • If you receive an email or text message asking you to click on a link – don’t do it. The fraudster is likely trying to get you to download malware onto your device. 

If you are the victim of an online fraud, you should report the incident to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at? www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.?? 

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Attached Media Files: TT - Doctor Scams - AUDIO - June 8, 2021 , TT - Doctor Scams - GRAPHIC - June 8, 2021

State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation meets June 18 via conference call
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/08/21 8:35 AM

SALEM, Ore. – The State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation (SACHP) will meet June 18 via conference call to consider nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. This meeting is open to the public.

 

The SACHP meeting will begin at 9:00 a.m. to consider nominations to the National Register. The weblink for the call is posted on our website at https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/OH/Pages/Commissions.aspx#SACHP

 

Friday’s meeting agenda: hearings of one proposed amendment and three proposed nominations.

 

For specific hearing times, refer to the online agenda: www.oregonheritage.org (click on “Commissions & Committees” at top of page and look under “State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation”).

 

The committee will review one proposed amendment: Oregon State University Historic District (Boundary Decrease), Corvallis.

 

The committee will review three proposed nominations: Portland Golf Club Clubhouse, Portland; O.K. Jeffery Airplane Factory, Portland; West Linn City Hall, West Linn.

 

This effort aligns with the Oregon Historic Preservation Plan goal to increase the thematic diversity of Oregon properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places. It also supports the goals to include more voices and increase access to Oregon heritage that are part of the Oregon Heritage Plan.

 

Nominations recommended by the SACHP go to the National Park Service, which maintains the Register under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

 

The SACHP is a nine-member governor-appointed citizen commission with credentials in many historic preservation-related fields.

 

The conference call is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting may be made with at least three days of advance notice by calling (503) 986-0690.

 

More information about the National Register of Historic Places process is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on “National Register” at left of page).




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/1303/145681/SACHP_AGENDA.pdf , Press Release

Fatal Crash on Hwy 199 - Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 06/08/21 7:36 AM

On Monday, June 7, 2021 at approximately 2:30 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 199 near mile post 25.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Dodge Caravan, operated by Ronald Johnson (73) of Cave Junction, was southbound when it hit the back of a Nissan Frontier, operated by Brandi Millen (39) of Kerby, which was stopped to turn left into a private driveway.  

Johnson sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased while being transported by ambulance. 

Millen was transported to the hospital with non life threatening injuries. 

OSP was assisted by the Illinois Valley Fire District and ODOT. 


Fatal Shooting In Overlook Neighborhood
Portland Police Bureau - 06/08/21 5:32 AM
On June 8, 2021, at about 2:06 a.m., Portland Police responded to the report of shots heard in the Overlook neighborhood, in the area of the 4000 block of North Interstate Avenue. When officers arrived they found a deceased man near North Failing Street and North Montana Avenue, who appeared to have been shot. There is no suspect information at this time.

Portland Police Homicide detectives responded to the scene and are investigating. An autopsy will be scheduled to determine cause and manner of death. This is an ongoing investigation.

Any additional information will be released at the direction of the investigators.

Anyone with information about this incident is asked to contact Detective Brian Sims Brian.Sims@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-2079 or Detective Scott Broughton Scott.Broughton@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-3774.
###PPB###

Oregon Values and Beliefs Center Findings: Tourism in Your Community
Oregon Values and Beliefs Center - 06/08/21 5:30 AM

Oregonians talk about what they think of tourism and how it impacts their communities in both positive and negative ways.

COMMUNITY PLANNING, ECONOMY AND JOBS, ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY, HOUSING, NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

 

From May 4th through 10th, 2021, the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center conducted a statewide survey of Oregonians’ values and beliefs, including their thoughts about tourism and its impact on Oregon communities. This online survey consisted of 918 Oregon residents ages 18+ and took approximately 15 minutes to complete. Responses were analyzed and categorized to allow for a better understanding of trends in Oregonians’ values and beliefs. The survey’s margin of error, for the full sample, ranges from ±1.9% to ±3.2% depending on how the response category percentages split for any given question. Findings will include a citation of the relevant question, which can be referenced in the annotated questionnaire and tabs at the bottom of the page.

Tourism’s Contributions: Positive and Negative

  • When asked how much tourism contributes to a randomized list of potential outcomes, Oregonians are most likely to believe it contributes a lot or somewhat to “a strong economy” (68%) and “traffic congestion” (63%). This makes up the top tier of outcomes, followed by “well-paying jobs” (50%) and “funding for public services” (50%) in tier two. No other outcome reached 50% (Q36-42).  
  • Oregonians ages 18-29 are less likely to think tourism contributes to a strong economy than their older counterparts (56% vs. 69-74%). This dynamic was flipped for the belief that tourism contributes to traffic congestion, with those ages 18-29 more likely than older Oregonians to believe it does (70% vs. 57-63%). Men and women tend to be in strong agreement on these outcomes (Q36-42).

 

Thoughts About Tourism

  • Oregonians were asked, in an open-ended format, what comes to mind when they think of tourism in general. Responses varied, with many participants viewing tourism as a mixed bag, but some common themes emerged, including these positive associations: benefits for the local economy, the draw of Oregon’s outdoors, seeing new places and having new experiences, and a return to normalcy post-pandemic. There are also some negative associations: increased traffic, crowds, risk of wildfires, and trash/litter. Below are some representative quotes (Q35).

“A pro and a con together. It gives our state income for small businesses, but it is annoying to deal with the added crowds during the summer.”
– Female, age 45-64, Native American or American Indian, Lincoln County

“An opportunity for people to explore and experience new things while adding to the local economy.”
 – Male, age 30-44, Marion County, white

“I think tourism has positives and negatives to it. I think a positive side of it is helping local businesses stay open. A negative side would be sometimes tourist do not respect our land here or may be unaware of certain precautions in areas.”
 – Female, age 30-44, Marion County, white

“I think tourism can help drive an economy if it is managed well. I am proud of my state and I want others to experience its beauty too. We have many things to see here, and I want a diversity of people visiting and living here.”
  – Non-binary or gender non-conforming, age 45-64, Washington County, white

Tourism in Oregon This Year

  • A plurality of Oregonians (41%) believes more Oregonians this coming year will stay within the state for their vacations resulting in more people visiting their community, compared to 27% who disagree and 32% who are unsure. The high unsure rate is likely due to the pandemic and a lack of clarity about what COVID-19 restrictions and health risks will look like in the coming months. Demographic differences are modest on this question (Q43).
  • Oregonians who responded that they believe more Oregonians will visit their community in the coming year are overwhelmingly positive about the prospect, with 76% saying they feel very or somewhat positive about it. Only two in ten (19%) feel very/somewhat negative about more Oregonians visiting their community. As before, demographic differences are minimal on this question. For example, men and women hold nearly identically positive views overall (76% vs. 75%), though men are slightly more likely to feel “very positive” (41% vs. 33%) (Q44).

Why Oregonians Feel Positively or Negatively About Tourism in Their Communities

  • Respondents who say they feel either positive or negative about having more Oregonians visit their community were asked, in an open-ended format, why they feel that way. Reasons that resonated earlier in the survey were also top-of-mind here. For example, positive impressions center on benefits for the local economy, the benefits of travel in general, and pride and respect Oregonians hold for the state’s scenic beauty. Negative responses dealt with concerns over traffic and crowding, trash and littering, the risks of COVID spread, and other public safety concerns. Below are some representative quotes (Q45-46).

Positive Opinions

“We need a boost in the economy, especially if we want to bring the country back to” where it needs to be.

– Male, age 30-44, Lane County, Hispanic or Latinx
 

“It is a beautiful place, why not share it, plus they bring in much needed money.”
– Female, age 65+, Jackson County, white

“I think travel in general is good. We shouldn’t limit who is allowed to visit and see what Oregon has to offer.”
– Female, age 18-29, Lane County, Middle Eastern or North African

“People from Oregon will respect it more.”
 – Male, age 45-64, Benton County, white

Negative Opinions

“Because they cause problems when they come to my small town, leaving their garbage all over the beach, and don't appreciate the town or it's people. They think because they come from another town they can take advantage of us, which they do, even though they are spending money. They don't care how dirty they leave the town.”
 – Female, age 65+, Tillamook County, Native American or American Indian
 

“Because they are bringing sickness and are not wearing masks or taking precautions.”

 – Female, age 45-64, Clatsop County, white
 

“Tourists bring too much traffic and then they return and buy property creating more problems.”

 – Male, age 65+, Deschutes County, white


“It's already too many. Gridlocked roads. Public indecency. Drinking and drugs. No respect for private property. Overwhelming emergency resources.”

 – Female, age 65+, Tillamook County, other ethnicity

Demographic Trends
Identifying What Unites Us and Understanding What Divides Us

  • Oregonians of color and white Oregonians disagree on several questions about tourism in their community. For example, whites are more likely than Oregonians of color to believe that tourism contributes to a strong economy for their community (70% vs. 55%). Conversely, Oregonians of color are more likely than whites to believe that tourism contributes to a lack of affordable housing (53% vs. 43%) and homelessness (41% vs. 29%) in their community (Q37-38, Q40).
  • However, there are areas of agreement. Oregonians of color and white Oregonians agree that more Oregonians this coming year will stay within the state for their vacations at nearly equal rates (45% and 42%, respectively), however, whites tend to feel more positive about this outcome than Oregonians of color (77% vs. 66%) (Q43-44).
  • Demographic differences are also evident when comparing the opinions of urban and rural Oregonians. High percentages of urban (75%) and rural (67%) Oregonians believe that tourism contributes to a strong economy in their community, with a slightly higher rate for urbanites. This is also the case for the belief that tourism contributes to a lack of affordable housing (53% vs. 43%), which is perhaps unsurprising given rapidly increasing housing prices in Portland and other metro areas. Urban residents are also more likely than their rural counterparts to believe that tourism contributes to well-paying jobs in their community (58% vs. 46%) and that having more Oregonians visit their community is a positive thing (84% vs. 70%) (Q37-39, Q44).
  • Similar to demographic trends among Oregonians of color and white Oregonians, urban and rural Oregonians are roughly equal in their agreement that more Oregonians this coming year will stay within the state for their vacations (47% and 43%, respectively) (Q43)

This research was completed as a community service by the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center, an independent and non-partisan organization. OVBC is an Oregon charitable nonprofit corporation (www.oregonvbc.org).

For more information, please see the OVBC May 2021 Survey Annotated Questionnaire and Crosstabs.




Attached Media Files: OVBC Full May Crosstabs , OVBC Full May Annotated Questionnaire

Mon. 06/07/21
Vancouver Police Seek Missing Child (Photo)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 06/07/21 9:28 PM
Photo of Kimmy
Photo of Kimmy
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/385/145675/thumb_Capture.JPG

UPDATE Missing Child Located. 

 

Vancouver Police are looking for a missing 11 year old by the name Kimberly Yancy-Berg  AKA "Kimmy"  described as an Asian female 5'0", shoulder length brown hair, brown eyes.  Kimmy has a burn scar on her right forearm and a missing right top tooth.  Last seen wearing a white T-shirt with black stripes, blue jeans and black shoes with a pink watch.  Last seen in the area of W 13th St and Daniels St.  Contact 911 if located.  




Attached Media Files: Photo of Kimmy

Oregon reports 125 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/07/21 5:29 PM

June 7, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 125 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are no new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, and the state’s death toll remains at 2,694, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.  

Oregon Health Authority reported 125 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 203,374.  

Vaccinations in Oregon 

Today, OHA reported that 14,268 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 10,301 doses were administered on June 6 and 3,967 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 6. Note: Today’s totals include data from June 5 and 6 which was not reported due to maintenance of the ALERT Immunization Information System.(IIS) 

The seven-day running average is now 14,545 doses per day. 

Oregon has now administered 2,293,598 first and second doses of Pfizer,1,641,377 first and second doses of Moderna and 150,091 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.  

As of today, 1,939,623 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 2,286,813 who have had at least one dose. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 106,671. A daily countdown can be found on the OHA website

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT IIS. 

To date,?2,852,235 doses of Pfizer, 2,168,120 doses of Moderna and?299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon. 

These data are preliminary and subject to change 

OHA's?dashboards?provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today. 

COVID-19 hospitalizations 

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 206, which is eight more than yesterday.?There are 50 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is eight fewer than yesterday. 

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,512, which is a 16.9% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 238. 

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity. 

More information about hospital capacity can be found here

OHA issues revised quarantine guidance 

New guidance released by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) allows Local Public Health Authorities to consider a shortened quarantine period for a person with COVID-19.  

OHA is now recommending a 10-day quarantine or a seven-day quarantine with a negative COVID-19 test as acceptable alternatives. The shortened quarantine option is not recommended in high-risk settings such as long-term care facilities and other residential care settings. 

However, in all cases, a 14-day quarantine is the safest option to prevent the spread of COVID-19 to others. Revised guidance for this new recommendation is being finalized. 

People who have been fully vaccinated are not required to quarantine even after exposure to a person with COVID-19. A person is considered fully vaccinated if it has been two weeks or longer since they received the final dose of their vaccine series. People who are fully vaccinated are still encouraged to isolate and seek testing if they develop symptoms of COVID-19. 

Cases and deaths 

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (1), Clackamas (19), Clatsop (1), Columbia (3), Crook (1), Deschutes (8), Douglas (5), Grant (1), Harney (2), Jefferson (1), Josephine (2), Klamath (4), Lane (14), Linn (6), Morrow (2), Multnomah (37), Polk (2), Union (1), Wasco (2), Washington (2), Yamhill (10).  

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations?? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information. 

# # # 


Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee meets June 14
Oregon Health Authority - 06/07/21 5:25 PM

June 7, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee meets June 14

What: The state Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee is holding its biannual meeting; the meeting will cover Dental Pilot Project #100, “Oregon Tribes Dental Health Aide Therapist Pilot Project.”

Agenda: Presentations on modification request; overview of program evaluation; program updates.

When: June 14, 9-11:30 a.m. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Remote meeting via Zoom.

Meeting ID: 160 7480 0622

Link:  https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16074800622

Call in option: 669-254-5252, Meeting ID: 160 7480 0622

Background: Dental Pilot Projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce, and efficacy by teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; developing new categories of dental personnel; accelerating the training of existing categories of dental personnel; or teaching new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

Program contact: Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Kowalski at 971-673-1563, 711 TTY or ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Woodland Public Schools thanks retiring employees for their decades of service to public education and caring for the community's children (Photo)
Woodland Sch. Dist. - 06/07/21 4:30 PM
Woodland Public Schools honors its 2021 retirees
Woodland Public Schools honors its 2021 retirees
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/59/145657/thumb_Woodland-Public-Schools-recognizes-its-2021-retirees.jpg

Monday, June 7, 2021-Woodland, WA-As the end of the 2020-2021 school year approaches, Woodland Public Schools recognizes retiring employees who will end their careers after decades of serving the community and ensuring all children receive a high-quality education even during these historic times due to the pandemic.

Read on to learn how each of the retirees dedicated themselves to honing their craft and providing for students in a variety of ways throughout the district in the words of coworkers remembering their colleagues’ years of service.

Columbia Elementary

Cheryl Moir, Paraeducator – 8 Years of Service

  • Most people who worked with us know we look just a little alike!  I started working with Cheryl when I was in high school at the local Hi-School Pharmacy, where we spent almost nine years confusing customers.  When I graduated college and started working at Woodland Primary School, Cheryl was always delighted when kids would come up to her at Hi-School Pharmacy and think she was me. Around 2014, she joined me at the primary school and we continued our tradition of confusing kids and adults alike. Cheryl loves working in schools and was always putting in extra effort creating things together at home to help her connect with and help her students. I know she is really going to miss her “kids” and we are really going to miss her.  I’m even going to miss the occasional kid calling out, “Hi, Ms. M!” as I walk by! -Shelby Linnemeyer

Lorie Vogel, Teacher – 27 Years, 9 Months of Service

  • During the first couple of years I worked for Woodland, we had a major snowstorm which closed school early. There was a major accident on the freeway and I got stuck in Woodland for the night. I didn't know anyone who lived in town who I would be comfortable calling other than Lorie. She took me home, fed me, gave me a place to sleep, and she drove me home the next day. She is fondly known by my family as "the lady who rescued me." I was only comfortable calling her because I had worked with her with students and she always made me feel welcome. We have had a lot of laughs since then and I will always appreciate her generosity! -Felicity Ottis
     
  • Lorie was so welcoming to me when I first started and has continued to always be willing to lend a helping hand, open up her junk drawer, share her tool bag, and bring treats for special occasions. Her white Chex Mix that she brings every year for Christmas is the best stuff EVER!! I have always been impressed with her connection with her kids and parents.  She will be sorely missed here at CES! -Shelby Linnemeyer 

North Fork Elementary

Carl Steinwachs, Custodian – 15 Years, 6 months of Service

  • We will all miss Carl. He's always offered helpful advice and alerted us to safety issues. I don’t think he ever missed a day of work, or, at least, not very often that I know of over the last five or six years. He was always very pleasant, reliable and helpful. Carl is just an all-around nice guy! A pleasure to work with! -Tegan Steen

Woodland Middle School

Cheryl Cline, Library Specialist – 8 Years, 2 Months of Service

  • Cheryl was “Miss Reliable” and could always be counted on to have the library ready and waiting to serve students. She worked to have curriculum and materials prepared in advance to make the staff's lives easier. We wish her the very best in retirement. -James Johnston

Cyndi Duling, Paraeducator – 26 Years, 9 Months of Service

  • Cyndi has been a valuable member of our reading team for years. She made a huge impact on student learning because she is an excellent teacher. She not only delivers instruction with skill, but she cares about and connects with kids, and they work hard to meet her expectations. I will always remember Cyndi’s dedication, especially this year as she wheeled around on a scooter after surgery. Even though she was still in the healing stages, she just kept at it, doing all she could to meet the needs of students, knowing that she would be sorely missed if she was out.  Her shoes will be hard to fill and she will be missed. -Tara Eilts

Randi Isselhardt, Cook – 27 Years, 6 Months of Service

  • When Randi came into our kitchen, we already were a fine-tuned machine, working together getting things done. I knew she might feel out of place, so I tried to give her little hints to help her along. Eventually, she got into the groove and became somebody I could depend on to pick up my slack due to my Head Cook duties. Randi held her own putting our deliveries away, as well as keeping on top of the many different things I threw at her. I am going to miss our morning before-work talks, but I am happy that she chose to take care of herself. I’m not sure she will be able to succeed in retirement since she does not sit still for very long, but I'm sure she will work on it. Shine on, Randi!

Woodland High School

Maxine Gonzalez-Kelly, Teacher – 14 Years, 10 Months of Service

  • Maestra, you have such a colorful personality and wardrobe. I will miss your charm and passion for your students. -Carlotta Propersi

Cindy Hadaller, Building Secretary – 19 Years of Service

  • Thanks for being so incredibly sweet from the get-go. Ages ago when I subbed for the high school, Cindy was always so friendly and helpful. I will never forget how welcoming she was when I was brand-new to the state. I am glad that these past two years I have been able to work with Cindy again. Your beautiful family and all the children you have ever watched are so lucky to have you. -Carlotta Propersi
  • I am going to miss Cindy’s sunny smile and giving heart around WHS. I hope she kicks up her heels and dances; just don't blow out the knee again! -Kim Miller

Jeff Nesbitt, Teacher – 27 Years, 9 Months of Service

  • I appreciate what Jeff brings to the table during our staff meetings. I will miss his happy-go-lucky attitude. -Carlotta Propersi
  • Jeff has been a wonderful addition to our school. His on-point comments at staff meetings will be deeply missed, plus how he keeps Matt in-line! -Kim Miller

KWRL

Michael Dix, Bus Driver – 4 Years, 4 Months of Service

  • Michael has always taken his job to heart and it is proven out by the number of compliments we have received from parents. Dispatchers and office staff feel blessed to have Michael on-route and know that we have our best foot forward as an organization when it comes to the work that Michael does for students. -Shannon Barnett

Tim Dunn, Bus Driver – 3 Years, 5 Months of Service

  • Tim is one of those employees that helps with any organizational needs that our operations may face. We have appreciated Tim being a team player in all efforts to support student transportation. That type of team effort is always missed when lost. -Shannon Barnett

Sue Horal, Bus Driver – 30 Years, 8 Months of Service

  • Sue is a remarkable driver with a history of building strong relationships and connections with the students she transports as the foundation to her exceptional service. Sue has gone out of her way to be a reasonable and wise advocate for school bus drivers and for student transportation services, in general. Sue will be missed by all KWRL staff as well as her students following her many years of dedicated service. -Shannon Barnett

Stephen Martin, Bus Driver – 6 Years, 7 Months of Service

  • Steve has done so much more than just operate home-to-school routes. He helped KWRL train drivers and has thousands of miles of extracurricular trips transporting students late into the night in all sorts of weather conditions. We thank Steve for his years of service to student transportation services. -Shannon Barnett

Donald Zavalney, KWRL Bus Driver – 15 Years of Service

  • Don has been a reliable, dependable and consistent driver throughout his 15 years of service. Don has transported students primarily in the Ridgefield School District but has transported and helped out in each of the KWRL’s member districts. We thank Don for his many years of service to student transportation services. -Shannon Barnett

Maintenance Team

Ken LeFever, Lead Groundsperson – 13 Years, 6 Months of Service

  • Ken has always shared his knowledge of custodial and grounds with staff. He has always been helpful and hardworking. He has such a balanced manner with a great sense of humor. While I will miss him, we are so lucky that he is willing to sub for us for a while. He is still pitching in when we need him! Such a great person! -Tegan Steen

Learn more about how Woodland Public Schools educates our students and serves the community, by visiting our dedicated news webpage at www.woodlandschools.org/news/wsd

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Attached Media Files: Woodland Public Schools honors its 2021 retirees

Ridgefield High School students provide marketing boost to local coffee shop
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 06/07/21 4:26 PM
The students each focus on specific marketing projects, including social media, sales analysis, promotions, and special events
The students each focus on specific marketing projects, including social media, sales analysis, promotions, and special events
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/889/145671/thumb_Birds_and_the_Beans_5.jpg

The students in Andrea Reinertson’s Business Marketing II class at Ridgefield High School have been crunching the numbers and analyzing the data ahead of an important conference call. Big decisions are being made about business strategy, taking into account recent sales figures and market trends. But this isn’t a mere exercise; the decisions these students make will impact an actual business with a staff of employees and a financial bottom line to carefully consider. 

The Birds and the Beans coffee shop was developed and opened in 2019 as a partnership between the founder and president of Killa Bites gourmet foods, Laura Jhaveri, and the business and marketing program at Ridgefield School District’s Center for Advanced Professional Studies (CAPS). The coffee shop is a local gem, featuring organic, regionally roasted Red Leaf coffee and delicious, locally baked treats and sandwiches from Killa Bites. 

Reinertson’s high school class creates all of the business’ marketing, from social media to signage. It’s a win/win collaboration: the students gain valuable job experience, and the coffee shop is the beneficiary of the ideas generated by a group of creative young minds working collaboratively, ultimately leading to an increase in foot traffic and sales.

Instead of reading about business in a textbook, Reinertson’s students are able to dig in and help tackle real business challenges. Market planning and analysis have become second nature for these enterprising young entrepreneurs.

Where is the optimal location to place road signage for advertising? What kind of loyalty and incentive programs will be the most impactful for ensuring that customers keep coming back for more? What flavor combinations will be the most successful when launching new seasonal options? 

These are just some of the questions this group is helping to answer during their weekly deep dive. After brainstorming and planning, Reinertson and her students are now fully prepared for their conference call with Jhaveri and Mike Bomar, the Director of Economic Development at the Port of Vancouver, who joined the group as a business mentor. 

Reinertson and the CAPS students worked alongside Jhaveri and Bomar from the very beginning to conceptualize and create the coffee shop from the ground up. It was a massive undertaking, and a steep learning curve for the CAPS students. After many hours of work, the grand opening of the shop was a great success.  

Since then, the Birds and the Beans has continued to rely on high school students to design, direct, and implement its marketing. Reinertson’s Marketing II class is getting hands-on experience in how to conduct strategic planning, marketing concept development, and sales analysis. Each student plays an integral role in creating and guiding the overall marketing efforts for the shop. They work alone or in small groups to focus on specific projects, then bring all of these elements together to determine how each one impacts the business as a whole. 

The mentors help clarify for the students how marketing concepts apply to real life business management. They might offer ideas on why one promotion worked and another was less successful, or demonstrate how to increase profit margins by analyzing product costs. It is a master class in business marketing, with a local business at the center. 

Jhaveri is impressed with what the students have achieved. “They have done an excellent job. Their marketing efforts have really paid off,” Jhaveri said, noting the steady increase in sales over the last four months. “It is a great real-life incubator for them to be exposed to the impact of marketing.” Jhaveri pauses and smiles. “And I love working with them.” 

Bomar agrees. “This project helps build community,” Bomar said. “It has a local connection, and it gives the students a chance to develop business skills through direct work experience. It’s a great opportunity for them to work with professionals very early in their careers.”

Some students say the class has impacted their long-term career plans. Dallas Martin, a senior, has been working with Bomar on signage, determining where to place yard signs along the roads based on traffic patterns. “I want to have my own business someday, and understanding the marketing side of things is really important,” Martin said. “Mike has helped me get to know people and make connections.” 

Sophomore Dillon Kirksey is also enthused about the work he has done with the coffee shop. He has focused on developing promotions, including flyers, announcements, and special coupons. “With the experience I got from this class, I’m more interested in pursuing marketing and business as a career,” Kirksey said. “What we do every day feels like a real job.” 

As the school year comes to a close, the class is already planning ahead to keep the Birds and the Beans busy in the summer months. They are beta testing a curbside pickup service, text alerts, and even a coffee delivery service for teachers. They’re excited to find new ways to help the coffee shop continue to grow.

When you step into the lobby of the Ridgefield Administrative and Civic Center and walk up to the Birds and the Beans counter for a quick latte, a delicious dessert, or a delectable sandwich, you are helping Ridgefield students experience business, marketing, and entrepreneurship from a truly unique perspective. 

Supporting the Birds and the Beans has an additional benefit: a portion of the coffee shop’s proceeds are donated to the RHS marketing program, allowing them to maintain this innovative partnership. Class period after class period, RHS students and their business mentors are working hard to make the coffee shop a special experience for Ridgefield coffee drinkers and students alike.

The Birds and the Beans is located inside the Ridgefield Administrative and Civic Center at 510 Pioneer Street. The shop is open year-round from 7:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For more information, visit their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/TheBirdsandTheBeansRidgefield, their website at https://the-birds-and-the-beans.business.site/, and follow them on Instagram @the_birds_and_the_beans. 




Attached Media Files: The students each focus on specific marketing projects, including social media, sales analysis, promotions, and special events , Andrea Reinertson’s Marketing II students participate in a conference call with Mike Bomar, Director of Economic Development at the Port of Vancouver , The marketing students designed the yard signs that are placed along city streets to advertise the Birds and the Beans , The hand-lettered menu reminds customers of the partnership between the Ridgefield School District and Killa Bites , The Birds and the Beans coffee shop is located in the lobby of the Ridgefield Administrative and Civic Center

Terrence Woods, State CIO, Named StateScoop GoldenGov: State Executive of the Year
State of Oregon - 06/07/21 3:45 PM

Salem, OR – On Wednesday it was announced that Terrence Woods, State Chief Information Officer and Administrator of Enterprise Information Services was named StateSoop GoldenGov: State Executive of the Year.

The annual StateScoop 50 Awards honor the best and the brightest across the United States who make state government more efficient and effective. The GoldenGov awards those who are leading state government into a new technology landscape with innovative ideas and inspiring others to get on board. Woods was chosen from thousands of individuals and projects nominated for the awards and now joins an esteemed group of individuals who work to improve and innovate in information technology.

“It comes as no surprise that Terrence would be honored with this award,” said Katy Coba, State COO. “His work for the state is incomparable and we are incredibly lucky to benefit from his skillset and drive to improve information technology in the state of Oregon.”

Woods was appointed as State CIO and Administrator of Enterprise Information Services in 2018 and brings more than 20 years of leadership and knowledge to the role. Since his appointment, Woods has established a diverse Executive Team and built the strategic foundations and enterprise capabilities for delivering on the EIS vision — “Ensuring user-friendly, reliable and secure state technology systems that serve Oregonians.” His accomplishments include publication of the EIS 2020-2023 Strategic Framework, Cloud Forward: A Framework for Embracing the Cloud in Oregon, Oregon’s Data Strategy 2021-2023, the EIS Modernization Playbook, and the continuing deployment of Microsoft 365 to all Executive Branch agencies.

Governor Kate Brown shared, “Over the last three years, Terrence has been working to advance the use of digital technology inside state agencies, while remaining focused on building relationships and strengthening our IT teams. Under his leadership, we are making progress on our goals to streamline state government and modernize our systems to better serve Oregonians. It’s an honor that our State CIO was chosen for this award.”  

The complete list of award recipients can be viewed on the StateScoop website where they will also feature interviews with award winners in the coming days.

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Re-Imagined Radio broadcasts science fiction classics in June
WSU Vancouver - 06/07/21 2:17 PM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Re-Imagined Radio, directed by John Barber, faculty member in WSU Vancouver’s Creative Media and Digital Culture Program, will present “X Minus One Tribute” in June. The broadcast will feature two stories from “X Minus One,” a radio anthology program known for high-quality adaptations of original science fiction stories. “It is on every list of the best radio programs ever,” Barber said.

The hour-long episode will air at noon June 21 on two local radio stations: Vancouver’s KXRW-FM (99.9 FM) and Portland’s KXRY-FM (91.1 FM or 107.1 FM). Rebroadcasts will be offered by Portland’s KUIK-AM (1360 AM), Salem’s KMWV-FM (98.3 FM); and CKXU, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, which in turn distributes Re-Imagined Radio across Canada. The performance will also be available online via the stations’ websites and will be archived at reimaginedradio.net.

Radio Re-Imagined will feature two adapted stories by acclaimed authors, “The Veldt,” by Ray Bradbury and “The Cave of Night” by James E. Gunn.

Published in 1950, Bradbury’s “The Veldt” is set in a future home where the children program their playroom to provide a virtual reality of the African veldt, complete with lions. “The Cave of Night,” published in 1955, concerns the pilot of a U.S. experimental rocket ship stranded in space, unable to return to Earth.

Community Partners

Re-Imagined Radio draws on community voice actors, Foley artists, musicians, sound artists and engineers. Partners include KXRW-FM, Marc Rose, Martin John Gallagher, Metropolitan Performing Arts, Holly Slocum Design, the Kiggins Theatre, Regina Carol Social Media Management and Photography, and Willamette Radio Workshop.

About Re-Imagined Radio

Re-Imagined Radio was begun by Barber in 2013 to celebrate sound-based storytelling and pay tribute to the radio programs of the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. Episodes initially were stage productions for live audiences, with limited opportunities for broadcast or streaming. Now, with COVID-19 restrictions, Re-Imagined Radio has become a monthly broadcast and livestreamed event.

About WSU Vancouver

As one of six campuses of the WSU system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. Both in person and online, the university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

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Graphics by Holly Slocum are available to accompany htis story at: www.reimaginedradio.net/performances/xminusone/index.html


MESD Board Legislative and Community Action Committee meeting 6/9 at 4:00 p.m.
Multnomah ESD - 06/07/21 2:06 PM

The Multnomah Education Service District Board Legislative and Community Action Committee will meet at 4:00 p.m. on June 9, 2021. In response to the current health emergency the meeting will be held virtually via Zoom.

https://multnomahesd-org.zoom.us/j/91658400935?pwd=eFl5ZXhCbG1iYkRydGIweW1Ia0w4Zz09
 Meeting ID: 916 5840 0935 
Passcode: 273146


Oregon OSHA cites 4 employers in May for COVID-19 violations, including willful failures to protect workers
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/07/21 1:51 PM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1073/145665/thumb_OSHA_Logo_-_RGB_Green.jpg

(Salem) – Oregon OSHA issued citations with penalties totaling $44,600 to four employers in May, with all of the cases involving willful violations of rules designed to protect workers from potential exposure to the coronavirus disease.

The citations were issued to two restaurants, a bakery, and a wood products company in Deschutes, Wasco, Linn, and Multnomah counties, respectively. Penalties ranged from $8,900 to $17,800. Violations included willfully failing to ensure workers and customers wore face coverings indoors, and willfully allowing indoor dining despite operating in a county that was designated as an “extreme risk” for transmission of COVID-19.

The following employers were cited:

  • Obstructed View Incorporated (Cork Cellars Wine and Bistro) – Sisters – willfully chose to allow indoor dining despite a public health order limiting capacity to zero in Deschutes County.
    • Total penalty: $17,800 (citation has been appealed)
  • Loretta Birky (Country Bakery) – Halsey – willfully did not ensure face coverings were worn inside the establishment (penalty: $8,900). Also committed a serious violation by not posting the required “COVID-19 Hazards Poster” for workers to see.
    • Total penalty: $9,000 (citation has not been appealed but order is not final)
  • Last Stop LLC – The Dalles – willfully chose to allow indoor dining despite a public health order limiting capacity to zero in Wasco County.
    • Total penalty: $8,900 (citation has been appealed)
  • Creative Woodworking Northwest Inc. – Portland – willfully did not ensure face coverings were worn inside the establishment.
    • Total penalty: $8,900 (citation has been appealed)

Ongoing refusals to correct violations and come into compliance with workplace health and safety standards can lead to additional higher penalties. Meanwhile, if an Oregon OSHA inspection documents violations while a county is at extreme risk, but the county’s risk level drops before the citation is issued, the citation will still be issued. The change in risk levels may affect how the violation needs to be corrected, but not whether it is cited.

For an overview of the COVID-19-related citations the division has issued since the beginning of the pandemic, visit: Oregon OSHA Citations Identified as Related to COVID-19 .       

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers and workers free resources that involve no fault, no citations, and no penalties. They include consultation services that provide assistance with safety and health programs, and technical experts who help employers understand requirements.

More workplace guidance and resources regarding COVID-19 are available.

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 

 




Attached Media Files: Covid citations list , Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

Horse Trainer Arrested for Sex Crimes
Tualatin Police Dept. - 06/07/21 1:48 PM

On Monday, June 7, 2021, at approximately 10:20am, Tualatin Police Detectives arrested Richard Rankin Fellers, 61 years of age, of Oregon City, stemming from an indictment for four counts of Second Degree Sexual Abuse.

Over the course of a long investigation, lasting several months, with witnesses in multiple states, Tualatin Police established that Mr. Fellers had a sexual relationship with a female victim who was 17 years old. Mr. Fellers was the victim’s horse trainer and the alleged crimes occurred at the victim’s apartment, located at Eddyline Apartments in Portland.

Mr. Fellers is an American equestrian who competed in the 2012 U.S. Summer Olympics and is a prominently known competitor/trainer in the equestrian industry. The original disclosure/information came from the US Center for SafeSport.

This is an ongoing investigation and no further information is available at this time. Mr. Fellers was lodged at the Washington County Jail. A booking photo can be obtained by contacting the jail directly.

https://bit.ly/3inQfvm




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/858/145664/21-003756.pdf

Missing child alert -- ShaNai K. Daniels is missing and believed to be in danger
Oregon Department of Human Services - 06/07/21 1:44 PM
ShaNai K. Daniels
ShaNai K. Daniels
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/973/145663/thumb_ShaNai_K_Daniels_2.jpg

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, asks the public to help find ShaNai K. Daniels, age 16, a child in foster care who went missing from Clackamas on June 4, 2021. She is believed to be in danger.

ODHS asks the public for help in the effort to find her and to contact 911 or local law enforcement if they believe they see her.

ShaNai is suspected to be attempting to fly to Newark, New Jersey, out of Portland International Airport. She may also be in Salem.

Name: ShaNai K. Daniels
Pronouns: She/her
Date of birth: Dec. 27, 2004
Height: 5-foot-2
Weight: 133 pounds
Eye color: Brown
Hair: Black
Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office Case #21-11593
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1422478

Anyone who suspects they have information about ShaNai’s location should call 911 or local law enforcement.

A small number of children in foster care may be in significant danger when they have gone missing. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and ensure their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

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Attached Media Files: ShaNai K. Daniels , ShaNai K. Daniels

Man Arrested for Sex Abuse, Additional Victims Sought (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/07/21 1:16 PM
Booking Photo
Booking Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1128/145661/thumb_Bauer.jpg

In March 2021, Washington County Sheriff’s Office detectives opened an investigation into 58-year-old Henry Stephen “Steve” Bauer after receiving a report from a woman that Mr. Bauer sexually abused her when she was a child.

On May 27, 2021, a grand jury indicted Mr. Bauer on four counts of Sexual Abuse in the First Degree.

On June 2, 2021, detectives with the sheriff’s office Violent Crimes Unit (VCU) arrested Mr. Bauer at his home. He was lodged at the Washington County Jail.

During their investigation, detectives learned that Mr. Bauer has a lengthy history of volunteering with various organizations where he had access to children. Mr. Bauer’s concerning behavior with children dates back to the late 1970s. He was removed as a Boy Scout leader in 1993 amid allegations of abuse to a young boy. Mr. Bauer also has ties to the Rockaway Beach community, as well.

Detectives strongly believe that Mr. Bauer has other victims that have not made reports to law enforcement. Mr. Bauer has known connections to the following organizations:

  • Boy Scouts of America Troops 1 and 150 (1970s-1993)
  • Alpenrose Dairyville
  • Neah-Kah-Nie High School (2009-2012)
  • Portland Revels (2013-2021)
  • Rockaway Beach Police Department (volunteer until 2017)
  • Tillamook Association for the Performing Arts (TAPA)

Detectives would like to hear from anyone with information about Mr. Bauer, regardless of the length of time it has been. Community members can contact Washington County Sheriff’s Office by calling (503) 846-2700.




Attached Media Files: PDF Media Release , Booking Photo

Independent arborist reviews state hazard tree removal program; finds sound operation underway, provides helpful context for future work
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 06/07/21 1:00 PM

In response to calls for an investigation and as part of the unprecedented effort to remove fire-damaged trees after more than a million acres burned in the 2020 wildfires, an independent arborist reviewed the intricate process underway for evaluating fire-damaged trees for safety purposes. His review finds that the certified arborists and professional foresters performing the work are qualified and the evaluation criteria and marking process are sound.

SALEM, Ore. – A Pacific Northwest arborist with more than 30 years of experience submitted his findings to the state following a thorough review of the hazard tree removal effort underway to support Oregon’s rebuilding and recovery process.

In response to public concerns and calls for an independent investigation into the work underway, Galen Wright, president of Washington Forestry Consultants, Inc., evaluated the state hazard tree removal program and its workers and drafted a report sharing these findings.

Wright’s review found that the certified arborists and professional foresters working in the field generally meet or exceed the experience and qualifications required to evaluate fire-damaged trees. The report also found that the FEMA-required criteria being used is sound for making these determinations and is being applied appropriately in the field.

“It is our finding that ODOT and the Debris Management Task Force have the necessary operational plan, protocols, contracts and requirements necessary to conduct and provide quality assurance for this hazard tree mitigation program for the 2020 Oregon wildfires. No changes are recommended to the current protocols,” said Wright in the report.

In response to public requests for urgency and a timely review process, Wright spent weeks assessing on-the-ground samples of work in the field; reviewing resumes, certifications and other qualification materials of the crews in the field; and diving into emergency response requirements currently guiding the operation.

Wright’s report gives the operation an A grade and finds 96% agreement with the total fire-damaged trees being marked, noting that more than 99% of the trees marked for removal are dead, dying, or pose a safety threat if left standing. In addition to a very small percentage of some smaller trees set back from the highway that could be potentially unmarked moving forward, Wright’s review also found that there were other stands of unmarked fire-damaged trees that should be marked for future cutting.

“We are honored to be asked to perform this important work helping Oregon families and communities recover and ultimately rebuild,” said Mac Lynde, deputy administrator for delivery and operations at ODOT and the head of the three-agency Debris Management Task Force. “We acknowledge that this is a complex and unprecedented effort with many different opinions and approaches, and we stood ready to implement any potential recommendations resulting from this report. Mr. Wright’s objective and independent findings provide a concrete direction that benefits all Oregonians and reinforces the adaptive nature of this emergency response operation. We appreciate Mr. Wright’s conclusions.”

Wright also found that the arborists and foresters under contract possess the experience and qualifications necessary to perform this work effectively. Of the more than 1,200 contracted crew members and more than 40 arborists and foresters in the field, only one arborist was identified as not fully meeting qualifications for the position due to their entry-level status, although they were a certified arborist. This staffer is not responsible for final decisions and is supervised by more senior colleagues as part of a multi-step review system where their work is routinely monitored before any cutting occurs.

The report provides a helpful snapshot of the scope and scale of trees being cut or removed in these corridors. While the state-led hazard tree operation comprises less than 1% of the total 1-million-acre fire burn area, it was found that more than half (58.3%) of the fire-damaged trees in this area are being left for conservation and monitoring purposes, per the criteria used to evaluate these fire-damaged trees.

“With our initial charge to move quickly, and knowing this work is unprecedented for Oregon, Mr. Wright’s review helps underline the good work underway while providing a roadmap for adapting other areas moving forward. While we work to ensure no more lives are lost at the hands of the 2020 wildfires, we will continue to incorporate feedback from a range of partners to make sure this work is done right and look forward to future planning conversations if this operation becomes an unfortunate new reality for Oregon,” said Lynde.

Lynde said that applying Wright’s input is a critical step toward introducing Oregon to the complex recovery task underway. In addition to Wright’s recommendations, staff and crews will continue ongoing internal program appraisals and hazard tree criteria iterations as necessary and will work with the Secretary of State’s office as part of an annual audit plan.

Additional checks-and-balances are also in place to ensure fire-damaged tree evaluations and markings are thorough and accurate. Arborists and foresters overseeing tree marking are paid hourly rather than by the tree to create a clear separation of duties and eliminate conflicts of interest. Tree cutters are liable for a $2,000 fine for each unmarked tree that is cut. ODOT incident commanders, environmental monitors, a monitoring firm acting as operation inspectors, a disaster consulting firm with expertise in FEMA reimbursement procedures, and the Army Corps of Engineers all monitor field operations daily as well.

“Our objective remains to remove only dead or dying fire-damaged trees posing a threat to human life and safety and for those trying to rebuild,” said Lynde. “We accept and welcome all feedback to help inform these efforts and will continue to investigate and take swift and corrective action in response to any reports of mismanagement for the duration of this work.”

The 2020 September wildfires go down in history as one of Oregon’s most devastating disasters, burning more than 1 million acres, destroying thousands of homes, and claiming the lives of nine Oregonians. Afterward, communities were confronted by devastation and loss, with swaths of dead burned trees blocking roads, toppling over highways and interfering with cleanup efforts. For Oregon to receive federal reimbursement as part of an emergency response operation, the Wildfire Economic Recovery Council charged ODOT and the Task Force to immediately start work removing debris from nearly 3,000 damaged home sites and the thousands of hazardous dead or dying trees surrounding these areas.

To accomplish this unprecedented effort, teams of certified arborists, professional foresters, field technicians and environmental consultants worked together with state and federal land managers and environmental regulators to draft an Environmental Protection Plan and criteria for how to evaluate each tree to determine threat levels.

While state-led work is happening only along state highways and near fire-impacted home sites, state crews and independent contractors are not the only ones performing recovery work. Many local groups and landowners, governments and utility companies are also working simultaneously in these areas. Currently, more than half (83,000) of the total estimated 140,000 fire-damaged trees have been assessed and marked, and more than a quarter (40,700) have been cut or removed.

“We recognize and mourn the lasting imprint these fires have left on Oregon as we all work together to recover and rebuild,” said Lynde. “We encourage anyone with a question or concern about any aspect of this work to call our hotline at 503-934-1700 so that we can help coordinate and find solutions together.”

READ THE INDEPENDENT FINDINGS REPORT HERE.

Watch:

For more information:

# # #

You can get this document in other languages, large print, braille, or a format you prefer. For assistance, call 971-719-1183 or email language@oem.or.us. We accept all relay calls, or you can dial 711.




Attached Media Files: Independent Arborist Reviews State Hazard Tree Removal Release

Public notice and request for comment on 1915 (c) #0375, #0117, #0565, #40193, and #40194 waiver amendments
Oregon Department of Human Services - 06/07/21 12:50 PM

June 7, 2021

Contact: Media contact: Angela Yeager, 503-507-3479; angela.yeager@dhsoha.state.or.us

Technical contact: Joli Schroader, 503-507-2083, .schroader@dhsoha.state.or.us">joli.r.schroader@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public notice and request for comment on 1915 (c) #0375, #0117, #0565, #40193, and #40194 waiver amendments.

(Salem, Ore.) -- The Oregon Department of Human Services’ Office of Developmental Disabilities Services is seeking public comment regarding the 1915 (c) # 0375 Adults’ Waiver #0117 Children’s Waiver, #0565 Medically Involved Children’s waiver, #40193 Medically Fragile Model waiver, #40194 Behavioral Model waiver amendments.

The 1915 (c) # 0375 Adults’ Waiver #0117 Children’s Waiver, #0565 Medically Involved Children’s waiver, #40193 Medically Fragile Model waiver, #40194 Behavioral Model waiver amendments are requesting to:

  • Update references from DHS to ODHS and adding Oregon to Department of Human Services throughout the waiver application.
  • Update language regarding the OHA review of ODDS quality assurance reports.
  • Update language regarding risks to be consistent throughout the waiver application.
  • Update language in performance measures.
  • Update references to the Continuous Improvement Committee to reflect current practice.
  • When an emergency has been determined by ODDS, allow face-to-face requirements for service planning meetings to be waived and signatures of service plans to be verbally or by email.

In addition to the above changes, the #0565 Medically Involved Children’s waiver, #40193 Medically Fragile Model waiver, #40194 Behavioral Model waiver also propose to:

  • Remove relative as an option for providing Employment Path to be consistent with current practice. No relatives are currently providing Employment Path services through these waivers.

The proposed 1915 (c) # 0375 Adults’ Waiver #0117 Children’s Waiver, #0565 Medically Involved Children’s waiver, #40193 Medically Fragile Model waiver, #40194 Behavioral Model waiver amendments are online at https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/SENIORS-DISABILITIES/DD/Pages/Compass-Project-Waivers-Rules-Policy.aspx

Print versions of the waivers are posted in local Community Developmental Disabilities Programs (http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/SENIORS-DISABILITIES/DD/Pages/county-programs.aspx) and Support Services Brokerages (http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/SENIORS-DISABILITIES/DD/Pages/Support-Services-Brokerages.aspx). Print versions may also be obtained from Joli Schroader, Medicaid Waiver/State Plan Analyst, 503-507-2083, .schroader@dhsoha.state.or.us">joli.r.schroader@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Interested parties are asked to submit comments via one of two methods: Send an email to odds.info@state.or.us or send written comments addressed to ODDS Medicaid Waiver/State Plan Analyst, 500 Summer Street NE E-09, Salem, OR 97301.

Deadline for comments is July 7, 2021. Mail responses must be received by this date in order to be considered.


Dallas man sentenced to over 12 years in prison for sex abuse.
Polk Co. Dist. Att. Office - 06/07/21 12:48 PM

DALLAS (OR) – Christopher Neil Stebbins, of Dallas, has been sentenced to serve 150 months in prison after being convicted by a jury in Polk County Circuit Court of 12 counts of Sexual Abuse in the First Degree.

Stebbins, 47, was sentenced on June 3, 2021, by Judge Monte S. Campbell after a four day trial in which the jury unanimously returned guilty verdicts on all 12 counts. The alleged incidents occurred between 2016 and 2018 and involved a minor child living in Stebbins’ home. JUdge Campbell also sentecned Stebbins to 10 years of Post-Prison Supervision and to register as a sex offender.

The case was jointly prosecuted and investigated by the Oregon Department of Justice, Polk County District Attorney’s Office, and the Dallas Police Department

 


OHA announces new section and manager for psilocybin programs
Oregon Health Authority - 06/07/21 12:18 PM

June 7, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA announces new section and manager for psilocybin programs

Angie Allbee, former OHA policy advisor, to lead Psilocybin Services Section

PORTLAND, Ore.—The Oregon Health Authority’s Public Health Division has a new section to oversee the state’s new psilocybin services program, and a new manager to lead it.

Angie Allbee, who has served as senior policy advisor for OHA Government Relations, based in the External Relations Division, since 2018, has been named manager for the Psilocybin Services Section. The section, created to develop and administer psilocybin services programs as directed with the passage of Measure 109 last November, will be part of the Center for Health Protection, which houses programs that oversee health care facilities and licensing, and environmental health and regulation.

“We’re all very familiar with Angie’s hard work and commitment to public health from her current and soon-to-be-past role as the Public Health Division’s legislative senior policy advisor,” said Andre Ourso, J.D., administrator of the Center for Health Protection. “I’m looking forward to working with Angie in building the new section and implementing Measure 109.”

Allbee begins her work as section manager on June 1. She’s says she’s honored to lead the new program she hopes will bring innovative therapies to Oregonians with mental health conditions.

“I am excited to help move the agency closer to our strategic plan goal of eliminating health inequities while creating safe, effective and accessible psilocybin services in Oregon,” she said.

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board will make recommendations to OHA and the Psilocybin Services Section on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions. The board also will make recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

Allbee has worked on shaping legislative policy for almost a decade. In addition to serving as senior policy adviser for OHA Government Relations for three legislative sessions, she has served in policy roles with the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Oregon Criminal Justice Commission, Oregon House Majority Office and Oregon Legislative Assembly.

Prior to her policy work in Oregon, Allbee spent nearly a decade in the non-profit sector engaging with a diverse range of clients, including older adults, individuals experiencing disabilities, refugees, asylees, veterans and survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault—work she says “taught me that healing is an essential part of experiencing a healthy, joyful life.”

“Psilocybin therapy offers another option for healing that has been used for centuries by indigenous and tribal communities, and has generated a growing body of research over many decades,” she added. “I am honored to be part of this very important work and to ensure safe, effective and equitable access to psilocybin therapy in Oregon.”

Allbee has recently served on the Board of Advisors for the Voxapod Menstrual Equity Project and worked with community members in rural St. Thomas, Jamaica, to secure infrastructure for the Access to Safe Drinking Water Project. She received her Executive Master of Public Administration degree from the Hatfield School of Government in the College of Urban and Public Affairs at Portland State University.

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MESD Board Finance Committee meeting 6/10 at 1:00 p.m.
Multnomah ESD - 06/07/21 11:59 AM

The Multnomah Education Service District Board Finance Committee will meet at 1:00 p.m. on June 10, 2021. 
In response to the current health emergency the meeting will be held virtually via Zoom.

https://zoom.us/j/92458418733?pwd=TmpKMHpoMmczMERyVW92SGJrSnBjdz09

Meeting ID: 924 5841 8733
Passcode: 290380


Reward Offered in Darren Lockett Homicide - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #21-14 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 06/07/21 11:46 AM
2021-06/5183/145653/Victim_Darren_Lockett.jpg
2021-06/5183/145653/Victim_Darren_Lockett.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/5183/145653/thumb_Victim_Darren_Lockett.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to solve the May 2021 homicide of Darren Lockett.

On Saturday, May 29, 2021, at 1:05 a.m., Portland Police Bureau officers responded to a report of someone shot in the street near Southeast 132nd Avenue and Southeast Center Street. When officers arrived, they located an adult male suffering from an apparent gunshot wound. Paramedics responded to the scene and transported the victim by ambulance to a Portland area hospital, where he later died.

The Medical Examiner conducted an autopsy on the victim, 40-year-old Darren Lockett, and determined that he died as a result of a gunshot wound and ruled his death a homicide.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Anyone wishing to submit a secure and anonymous tip regarding any unsolved felony crime should visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/ or visit the App Store and download P3 Tips for your smart phone or tablet.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, or to view other unsolved cases, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2021-06/5183/145653/Victim_Darren_Lockett.jpg

Traffic Advisory: Sewer construction to close all lanes on SW Vista Avenue from SW Buena Vista Drive to SW Hillcrest Drive June 14 for about 7 weeks
Portland Bureau of Environmental Services - 06/07/21 11:27 AM
Map of SW Vista Ave detour
Map of SW Vista Ave detour
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/5703/145650/thumb_B6948EAD-D1F7-4A0E-AAB6-B7AAAA06836C.png

The City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services advises the traveling public that a sewer construction project will require the closure of SW Vista between SW Buena Vista Drive and SW Hillcrest Drive during daytime for about seven weeks beginning June 14, 2021

The closure will be in effect between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The closure will allow crews to dig a trench and install new sewer pipe and a maintenance access hole.  During non-work hours, crews will cover the pavement with steel plates to allow travel.

Sidewalks will remain open for people walking, bicycling, and rolling. 

A detour will be in place during construction hours that runs along SW Vista Avenue between SW Buena Vista Drive and SW Hillcrest Drive (see map below). The detour allows for TriMet bus line 51, school buses and delivery vehicles to continue service to the neighborhood. Access to SW Vista Avenue and other roads connecting to it will be maintained, although residents may need to use the detour to go around the road closure, depending on the direction they are approaching from.

Please drive slowly, watch for workers in the road, and obey all signs and flaggers

The work is part of the Goose Hollow Sewer Repair Project which is repairing or replacing up to 13,000 linear feet (more than two and a half miles) of public sewers. The work is weather dependent and the schedule may change. 

Many of the existing sewer pipes are 40 to 100 years old and are deteriorating due to age. This project will protect the public and the environment by reducing the possibility of sewage releases to homes, businesses, and streets. More information on the project, as well as a detour map is available on the project website: www.portland.gov/bes/GooseHollow

The Bureau of Environmental Services works with Portland residents and businesses to protect water quality, public health, and the environment through wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration. 




Attached Media Files: Map of SW Vista Ave detour

California Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Distribution of Methamphetamine
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/07/21 10:55 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Coachella, California man was sentenced to federal prison today for transporting five pounds of methamphetamine from Coachella to Aumsville, Oregon.

Gerardo Figueroa-Felix, 36, was sentenced to 70 months in prison followed by four years’ supervised release.

According to court documents, on January 7, 2019, Marion County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a call that squatters had returned to a foreclosed property in Aumsville and that there was methamphetamine inside the house. Deputies had locked the property four days prior in response to a court order. Two deputies approached the house together and spotted a white Chevrolet pickup truck with a California license plate backed into the driveway. As they approached, the deputies saw Figueroa-Felix tying up a tarp near the back of the vehicle.

One of the deputies approached Figueroa-Felix and asked why he was on the property. Figueroa-Felix produced three identification cards with his name and photograph on them. The deputy watched as Figueroa-Felix began to reach his hands into the front pockets of his jacket and ordered him to remove them. The deputy then proceeded to search Figueroa-Felix’s person and located a loaded semi-automatic Ruger 9mm handgun in his left-front pants pocket. The deputy discovered a second loaded handgun tucked into Figueroa-Felix’s waistband. Figueroa-Felix also had a double magazine pouch attached to his belt.

The investigation revealed Figueroa-Felix was a drug mule from Coachella and was paid to transport five pounds of crystal methamphetamine from Southern California to Oregon. He previously sold two pounds of methamphetamine on the Aumsville property and returned that day to sell more. Deputies seized three pounds of methamphetamine and large quantities of live .45 caliber ammunition from his truck along with another handgun.

On March 20, 2019, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a three-count indictment charging Figueroa-Felix with possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine, distribution of methamphetamine, and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

On March 8, 2021, Figueroa-Felix pleaded guilty to one count of distribution of methamphetamine.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the Marion County Sheriff’s Office, Salem Police Department, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF). It was prosecuted by Hannah Horsley and Pamela Paaso, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets June 16 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 06/07/21 9:51 AM

June 7, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets June 16 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Accountability Metrics Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Finalize subcommittee charter; discuss survey modernization and its relation to the subcommittee’s work; discuss timeline for discussions and deliverables; discuss measure selection criteria.

When: Wednesday, June 16, 8-9:30 a.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Zoom meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 669-254-5252; meeting ID 160 116 1415; or by computer, tablet or smartphone by launching this Zoom link: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1601161415?pwd=Tmd1dHhXcGppd0VHOStZY3lOKy80dz09.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Accountability Metrics Subcommittee develops recommendations about public health quality measures for the board's consideration.

For more information, see the board's website.

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, or a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Battle Ground High School drama students return to the stage with original play
Battle Ground Public Schools - 06/07/21 9:45 AM
Battle Ground High School drama students Avarie Rhyasen and Maria Wetzbarger perform in John R. Carroll's "Oh, What a Tangled Web"
Battle Ground High School drama students Avarie Rhyasen and Maria Wetzbarger perform in John R. Carroll's "Oh, What a Tangled Web"
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/20/145645/thumb_BGHS_Drama_Club_-_02.jpg

For the first time in over a year, the Battle Ground High School drama club returned to the stage last week with the words, “Hello, my name is Edward Deadman and I am dead.”

So begins an original sketch written by Battle Ground High School senior Andrew Ovall and junior Lorelei Hunsaker. The simply named “A Radio Play” reads like a murder mystery from the days of Old Time Radio, with fast-paced banter and witty wordplay aplenty.

“Mere moments ago I was dancing with a few friends in my ballroom and, as it goes, I died,” Ovall reads on stage as the recently deceased Deadman. “Icepick through the neck. We’ve all been there.”

The drama club held three shows at The Lair inside Battle Ground High School last Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, entertaining a total of 160 people.

“Being back in the theater space was life-affirming,” said drama teacher and director Stephan “Cash” Henry. “It was so wonderful to share a communal, creative experience with a live, in-person audience again, to be together, to share laughter, to share life.”

The original play by Ovall and Hunsaker took around a month to write, but much longer to finally make it in front of a live audience after the pandemic shut down schools last year. “It was a huge relief for me just knowing that it's out there,” Ovall said after the final rehearsal. “We’re doing it.”

The senior was set to appear in a stage version of Romeo and Juliet last March when school buildings were closed and learning turned remote due to the pandemic. Hunsaker was also part of that production. “It was hard for me because a lot of seniors didn’t get their sendoff and we had an all-star cast. But it’s in the past. I can’t wallow in it or I’ll just never stop hurting.”

Henry said he was “heartbroken” for last year’s seniors when that play was shut down. “The students have shown me such maturity and resilience this year,” he said. “We have organized Zoom play readings and have been able to connect remotely throughout the year, but it just isn’t the same as working together in person.”

Henry said after the state eased restrictions on youth sports he felt the new guidelines were not aligned across activities. “I began writing letters and calling the arts department of the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction,” he said. A few weeks later, the state updated its guidelines and the drama club was able to hold auditions and begin preparing for their first shows in over a year.

In addition to Ovall and Hunsaker’s original play, the drama club also put on a stage production of John R. Carroll’s “Oh, What a Tangled Web,” which involves yet another misunderstanding over a death; only this one is imaginary rather than real.

Ovall calls it “incredibly bittersweet” to be finishing up his time on stage as a Battle Ground High School student. “I’m so sad to leave,” he said, “I love this place.”

Hunsaker and Ovall said they hope to be able to flesh out their play a little further, and perhaps expand it to a stage production with props and costumes. Until then, they’re hopeful their own experience over the past year helps future thespians to appreciate the time they have in the nurturing confines of high school. “Four years sounds like a very long time at the beginning, but it really is not,” Ovall said. “Just take what you have and make the most of it."
 




Attached Media Files: Battle Ground High School drama students Avarie Rhyasen and Maria Wetzbarger perform in John R. Carroll's "Oh, What a Tangled Web" , Battle Ground High School senior Andrew Ovall (center) reads part of an original play he co-wrote with junior Lorelei Hunsaker

Results Are In: Portland Water Bureau continues to deliver clean and safe drinking water
Portland Water Bureau - 06/07/21 9:21 AM

Information about the Portland Water Bureau’s 2021 Drinking Water Quality Report is now landing in mailboxes, making it easy for you to get updates on projects that invest in our infrastructure and learn about your water. Inside, you will find what’s in your water and how people at the Portland Water Bureau work every day to keep your water safe and protected.

The Portland Water Bureau continues to deliver clean and safe drinking water that meets or surpasses drinking water standards to nearly a million customers, performing approximately 11,000 tests per year to track more than 200 potential contaminants.

"Because of careful planning and investment, we are fortunate to have safe, abundant and delicious water. I am proud to introduce you to the people and practices that keep our water protected and our infrastructure resilient,” said Portland Water Bureau Director Gabriel Solmer.

Protecting Public Health

The Portland Water Bureau is committed to public health protection. Portland’s drinking water comes from two high-quality sources, which are the two largest drinking water sources in the state—the Bull Run Watershed and Columbia South Shore Well Field. While this report does not include all substances that we detected in 2020, it does report detected levels of all known health-related contaminants. If a known health-related contaminant is not listed in this report, we did not detect it in our drinking water.  

Improved Treatment Underway

Since 1997, the bureau has taken a comprehensive approach to reducing exposure to lead through its Lead Hazard Reduction Program. The program includes: corrosion control treatment; lead-in-water testing; education, outreach, and testing for all sources of lead; and home lead hazard reduction. Today, the bureau is investing in upgraded treatment that will help reduce the levels of lead in drinking water for everyone.

By April 2022, the Portland Water Bureau will have completed treatment improvements that will reduce the amount of lead that can enter the water from household or building plumbing. The improved treatment will use naturally occurring substances to increase the water’s pH and alkalinity, which will make the drinking water less corrosive to your plumbing. Most consumers won’t notice a change to the great tasting Bull Run water. 

Bull Run Filtration will remove the microorganism Cryptosporidium and other potential contaminants from our water. The new filtration facility will be in operation by September 2027. During the current COVID-19 public health emergency, it’s more important than ever to know what it takes to keep your drinking water safe and protected.

What you will learn in our online report:

  • How we keep Portland’s water safe to drink for future generations.
  • How we'll adjust our water in 2022 to reduce the amount of lead that enters the water from home or business plumbing.
  • How to order a free lead test kit.
  • How the Water Bureau plans and adapts to emergencies to keep water safe and flowing.

The Portland Water Bureau is sending a mailer this week to inform every water user about the availability of this report online. The report is accessible for people who use screen readers and is available in English, Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese, and Chinese. You can request a paper copy online or by phone at 503-823-9444. To request translations in additional languages or accommodations for people with disabilities, call 503-823-7525 (Relay: 711). Interpretation services available.

 

About the Portland Water Bureau

The Portland Water Bureau serves water to almost a million people in the Portland area. Portland’s water system includes two great water sources, 53 tanks and reservoirs, and 2,200 miles of pipes. With 600 employees working on everything from water treatment to customer service, the Water Bureau is committed to serving excellent water every minute of every day.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/1240/145644/FINAL_CCR_Media_Release_2021.docx

Oregon OSHA will repeal parts of COVID-19 workplace rule in line with governor's announced vaccination target
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/07/21 8:52 AM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
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(Salem) – As Oregon Gov. Kate Brown  announced last week, once Oregon reaches the 70 percent vaccination threshold the state will not require masks and face coverings in almost all settings, with some exceptions following federal guidance, including airports, public transit, and health care settings. The governor has also asked Oregon OSHA to review its workplace rules and update them based on this decision.

Consistent with the governor’s decision, Oregon OSHA intends to repeal the basic face covering and physical distancing requirements of its COVID-19 rule when the state reaches 70 percent of its adults vaccinated against the virus with at least one dose. Oregon OSHA is also convening stakeholders to review its COVID-19 rules in light of the governor’s announcement and to determine whether other provisions should be repealed. Oregon OSHA expects to begin those discussions during the week of June 14.

Oregon OSHA extended its rule, which took effect May 4, to maintain risk-reducing safety measures for workers against the coronavirus. Although the rule includes several changes based on the public comments received since the rule was proposed in late January, the basic requirements are largely consistent with those that have been in place since Oregon OSHA adopted a temporary workplace rule in November of last year. The rule largely reflects the guidance produced by the Oregon Health Authority and enforced in the workplace by Oregon OSHA.

When it extended the rule in May, Oregon OSHA committed to an ongoing process to eventually repeal it. As part of that process, Oregon OSHA will consult with the Oregon OSHA Partnership Committee, the Oregon Health Authority, the two Infectious Disease Rulemaking Advisory Committees, and other stakeholders.

Learn more about Oregon OSHA’s workplace guidance and resources related to COVID-19: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/re/covid-19.aspx

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.oregon.gov/dcbs/.  




Attached Media Files: Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

Missing Oregon City Girl Located (Photo)
Oregon City Police Dept. - 06/07/21 7:55 AM
Hailey Smith
Hailey Smith
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1388/145627/thumb_Hailey_Smith.PNG

Update:

Oregon City, Oregon (June 7, 2021, 7:30 am) - The Oregon City Police Department confirmed on June 6, 2021, Hailey Smith was located at a family members house and is safe.  

 

Oregon City, Oregon (June 5, 2021)

The Oregon City Police Department is requesting the public’s assistance in locating a missing/endangered juvenile. 16-year-old Hailey Smith was last seen at her home in Oregon City on the morning of June 5th. Hailey is 4 feet 11 inches tall, 140 pounds, with hazel eyes, brown hair, and a hoop-style nose ring. She was wearing a tan and brown sweatsuit.  If you see Hailey or know where she may be, please contact CCOM by calling 911 or 503-655-8211, re: OCPD case number 21-011743.




Attached Media Files: Hailey Smith

Portland Wife/Husband Duo Releases "Americana" LP: ROOT
Mortensen Communications - 06/07/21 7:45 AM
2021-06/5605/145640/Mojo_Hollo_CD_over_ROOT_.jpg
2021-06/5605/145640/Mojo_Hollo_CD_over_ROOT_.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/5605/145640/thumb_Mojo_Hollo_CD_over_ROOT_.jpg

Local roots Americana duo Mojo Holler is releasing a new full length album, ROOT, featuring ten songs -- seven originals and three unique versions of Americana traditionals -- that span sub genres of folk Americana including hill country blues, cosmic cowboy, blues gospel, and traditional country.

ROOT, a musical reverie on remorse and redemption, was recorded over the course of the 2020 pandemic after the band was forced to cancel performances for the better part of a year. Larry Crane of Jackpot! Studios in Portland mixed the album, which reflects a live and richly intimate performance.

Folk music guitarist and singer-songwriter Nathan Moore (founding band member of ThaMuseMeant and Surprise Me Mister Davis) says of the album: "I love this record! A common question for an act making a record is: will it be a fantasy or will it sound like reality? And if the answer is 'a fantasy,' the next question is: How will we play it live? Mojo Holler has walked the line brilliantly. This record sounds at once fully produced and live. No small feat! And it’s not the only great balance they’ve struck. Origin and destination. Sin and salvation. Root and blossom. Missi and John! I feel like they were right here while they transported me somewhere far away."

The band formed in 2012 as the duo, “Missi & Mister Baker.” The pair released their debut album, “Where Black Ravens Flew,” in late 2014, and were tapped to showcase at South By Southwest in 2016. Its founder, Louis Black, said of the pair: “Why Missi had to move to Portland from Austin in order for The Bakers to channel their inner Mississippi Fred McDowell, I do not know.  But she did, and they did.”  

The late Lisa Lepine, a Portland legend in music promotion, said of their mission: “They weave their dark, modern spirituals from shared roots in magic, ‘mericana, and metaphysics. Mister Baker, like Robert Johnson before him, may have made a deal with the devil -- channelling an innate genius through lap steel, slide and dobro. Missi’s earthy voice brings burning intensity to each song.  Picture them sitting knee-to-knee on a Southern Delta, watching the dark moon rise and singing from their eternal souls.”

Stream ROOT on SPOTIFY 




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/5605/145640/Mojo_Hollo_CD_over_ROOT_.jpg

Officer-involved shooting in Happy Valley; one deceased; section of SE 122nd closed during investigation
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/07/21 6:46 AM

At about 2:10 a.m. on Monday, June 7, 2021, a deputy assigned to the Happy Valley Police Department was involved in a vehicle pursuit that concluded near SE 122nd and SE Eagle Glenn Drive.

The suspect fled on foot from the vehicle, and an officer-involved shooting occurred a short distance away. Lifesaving measures were administered; however, the suspect was pronounced deceased at the scene. It was later found the suspect was driving a stolen vehicle. A handgun was recovered near the suspect.

This investigation is being led by the Clackamas County Major Crimes Team, in collaboration with the Clackamas County District Attorney’s Office. Refer questions to the Clackamas County DA's Office.

SE 122nd between SE Alexa Rose Lane and SE Imperial Crest Street will be closed for several hours while this investigation is conducted.

[END]


Investigation Underway After Shooting In Creston-Kenilworth Neighborhood Leaves Four Dead
Portland Police Bureau - 06/07/21 5:45 AM
On June 6, 2021 at about 10:25 p.m., Portland Police responded to the report of a shooting at a residence in the 4000 block of Southeast Boise Street. Upon arrival officers found four people deceased from apparent gunshot wounds.

Portland Police Homicide detectives responded to the scene and are investigating. Autopsies will be scheduled to determine cause and manner of death. This is an ongoing investigation. Any additional information will be released at the direction of the investigators.

Anyone with information about this incident is asked to contact Michael Greenlee Michael.Greenlee@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-0871 or Detective Brad Clifton Brad.Clifton@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-0696.
###PPB###

142nd Wing memorializes late crew chief with unique F-15 artwork (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 06/07/21 4:30 AM
2021-06/962/145637/shark_art_F-15_151_1.1.1.1.jpg
2021-06/962/145637/shark_art_F-15_151_1.1.1.1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/962/145637/thumb_shark_art_F-15_151_1.1.1.1.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore. - The 142nd Wing hosted family and friends of a late crew chief for an F-15 Eagle memorial artwork reveal, June 6, 2021. The artwork, which includes a name plaque and shark teeth, was put on the wing's F-15 Eagle (tail number 151) to honor Master Sgt. Marty Nance who served at the base for over 30 years and maintained that particular aircraft.

"In the beginning when I found out that his name was going on the jet, that was super special because it just said a lot for how everybody felt about him out here...this was like a second home, a second family," said Marty's sister, Lisa Veber.

Sergeant Nance passed away in 2018 while still an active member of the Oregon Air National Guard. Nance had an affection for shark teeth and fins throughout his life, which he incorporated into designs of his cars and his bobsledding team's "sharkmobile".

B-roll of the F-15 artwork and soundbites from Nance's sister and a fellow servicemember can be downloaded at https://www.dvidshub.net/video/800055/f-15-memorial-artwork-revealed-family-late-crew-chief


For more information, contact Steven Conklin, 142nd Wing Public Affairs, at steven.conklin.6@us.af.mil

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About the 142nd Wing
The Portland Air National Guard Base employs 1,400 Airmen who provide an economic impact of nearly $130 million to the region. The 142nd Wing defends our homeland with F-15 Eagle fighter jets, guarding the Pacific Northwest skies from northern California to the Canadian border, on 24-hour Aerospace Control Alert as part of Air Combat Command and the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Their mission is to provide unequalled, mission-ready units to sustain combat aerospace superiority and peacetime tasking any time, any place in service to our nation, state and community.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/962/145637/shark_art_F-15_151_1.1.1.1.jpg , 2021-06/962/145637/34121297_1882103088500399_7303240588587958272_n.jpg , U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Martin Nance, crew chief from the Oregon Air National Guard 142nd Fighter Wing, directs Capt. James Hastings, an F-15 pilot for the 142nd Fighter Wing, to stand by on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, on March 7, 2015. Sen , Oregon Air National Guard Master Sgt. Martin Nance (left) introduces his Superior Performer for the three-week Weapons Instructor Course (WIC) exercise, Staff Sgt. David Schenk (right) as the last day of training concludes at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., , Oregon Air National Guard Master Sgt. Martin Nance works to secure and tie down an F-15 Eagle assigned to the 142nd Fighter Wing after high wind warnings are issued at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., June 10, 2017. Over 120 Oregon Air Guardsmen are supportin , 2021-06/962/145637/210528-Z-SP755-1007.jpg

Sun. 06/06/21
Semi truck roll over sends one to the hospital
Vancouver Fire Dept. - 06/06/21 9:27 PM

3 Vancouver fire engines and one ladder truck were sent to the I-205 SB exit to WB Hwy 14 for a semi-truck that had rolled over at 7:48 this morning. First arriving units found an unconscious man in the cab of the semi that was being taken care of by an off duty Pararescueman from the 304th out of Portland, and an off-duty Portland Firefighter. The driver was extricated by Vancouver firefighters and after about 25 minutes the man was freed from the semi and transported by AMR in critical condition. The accident is under investigation by WSP.  


Case 21-3629 Follow up - Stabbing Victim's Identity Released
Milwaukie Police Dept. - 06/06/21 8:35 PM

FOLLOW UP - STABBING VICTIM’S IDENTITY RELEASED

CASE: 21-3629

DATE: 6/6/2021

The victim of last night’s stabbing in downtown Milwaukie has been identified as 42-year-old Michael L. King. Mr. King suffered life-threatening injuries during the unprovoked attack by 41-year-old Keeandre J. Scott. Mr. King’s injuries did require surgery. He has since been moved out of ICU and is expected to recover.

The investigation has revealed the altercation occurred shortly after Mr. Scott requested a cigarette from Mr. King, which Mr. King could not provide.

During the attack, a concealed handgun which Mr. King had been in possession of fell to the ground in a holster. The handgun was not used during the altercation and it was recovered from Mr. Scott when he was taken into custody. 

Anyone who witnessed or has information about the incident is asked to contact Milwaukie Police Detective Tony Cereghino at: 503-786-7476.