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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Tue. Feb. 19 - 8:47 pm
Tue. 02/19/19
Hillsboro Police K-9 Receives Protective Vest (Photo)
Hillsboro Police Dept. - 02/19/19 8:12 PM
Oso
Oso
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1408/122163/thumb_Oso.jpeg

Hillsboro Police Department’s K-9 Oso received a bullet- and stab-protective vest from Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. The cost to provide a protective K-9 vest is $950. Each vest is valued between $1,744 – $2,283 with a 5-year warranty, weighing 4-5 lbs.

The program is open to certified law enforcement dogs at least 20 months old employed in the U.S. New K-9 graduates, and those with expired vests, are eligible to participate.

Oso’s vest, sponsored by Joseph Newsom of Tigard, is embroidered with the sentiment, “This gift of protection provided by Skin City Tattoo,” a business owned by Newsom.

Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. is a 501c(3) charity in East Taunton, MA whose mission is providing bullet- and stab-protective vests and other assistance to law enforcement dogs and related agencies throughout the U.S. It was established in 2009 and has provided more than 3,000 protective vests in 50 states, through private and corporate donations, valued at $5.7 million dollars.

For more information or volunteer opportunities, please call 508-824-6978 or visit www.vik9s.org.




Attached Media Files: Oso

Gresham-Barlow School District to break ground for renovation/addition to Deep Creek campus
Gresham-Barlow Sch. Dist. - 02/19/19 5:09 PM

What: The Gresham-Barlow School District will hold a Groundbreaking Ceremony to mark the start of a renovation/addition to the Deep Creek Campus. The project is being funded by the 2016 school bond.

Speakers:

School Board Chair Kris Howatt

Superintendent Dr. Katrise Perera

Deep Creek-Damascus K-8 Principal Barb Keeton

Date: Monday, February 25, 2019

Time: 1:00 to 1:30 p.m.

Where: Deep Creek Campus

             15600 SE 232nd Drive

             Damascus, OR  97089

Information about the Deep Creek Campus Project:

More information about the project can be found on the Gresham-Barlow School District school bond webpage at:https://www.gresham-barlowbond.org/school/deep-creek-damascus-k-8/

Information about the 2016 GBSD School Bond:

 In November of 2016, Gresham-Barlow School District voters approved a $291.17 million bond for capital construction improvements across the district. The school bond funds two replacement schools—East Gresham Elementary and North Gresham Elementary and major renovations of Gresham High School and Sam Barlow High School. The bond also funds improvements at every school in the district that will increase student and staff safety, improve access to modern technology, address chronic overcrowding, and upgrade and update aging schools and classrooms.

More information about the GBSD 2016 school bond can be found at: www.gresham-barlowbond.org


PPB Investigating Shooting in Vernon Neighborhood-Adult Male Injured
Portland Police Bureau - 02/19/19 4:55 PM
On Tuesday, February 19th, 2019, at 3:54 p.m., North Precinct officers responded to the report of a subject shot in the area of Northeast 10th Avenue and Northeast Killingsworth Street.

Officers and medical personnel arrived in the area and located an injured adult male. The injured male was transported by medical personnel to a Portland hospital for treatment for serious injuries.

Members of the Tactical Operations Division's Gun Violence Reduction Team responded to conduct an investigation. There is no confirmed suspect information at this time.

Neighborhood traffic will be affected due to this active crime scene and investigation. Northeast Killingsworth and Emerson Streets from 9th to 11th Avenues are closed and expected to remain so while this investigation proceeds.

Anyone with information about this incident should call non emergency dispatch at (503) 823-3333.

###PPB###

Clark County measles outbreak at 62 confirmed, one suspect case
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/19/19 3:47 PM

Clark County Public Health is continuing its measles outbreak investigation. Since Jan. 1, Public Health has identified 62 confirmed cases and is currently investigating one suspect case. Public Health has identified one new location, and extended the timeframe for another location, where people may have been exposed to measles.

Here are the details of the confirmed cases:

  • Age
    • 1 to 10 years: 44 cases
    • 11 to 18 years: 15 cases
    • 19 to 29 years: one case
    • 30 to 39 years: two cases
  • Immunization status
    • Unimmunized: 54 cases
    • Unverified: six cases
    • 1 MMR vaccine: two cases
  • Hospitalization: one case (none currently)

Public Health is not providing any additional information about the two cases with one dose of MMR in order to protect the patients’ privacy.

Here are the new locations where people may have been exposed to measles:

Health care facility:

  • PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center Emergency Department, 400 NE Mother Joseph Place, Vancouver 7:45 to 11:05 pm Saturday, Feb. 16.

School:

  • Pacific Middle School, 2017 NE 172nd Ave., Vancouver all day until 4:30 pm on Tuesday, Feb. 12. The school was already listed as an exposure site. This extends the exposure period into after-school activities.

For a complete list of exposure sites, visit the Public Health measles investigation webpage.

Clark County Public Health is urging anyone who has been exposed at an identified location and believes they have symptoms of measles to call their health care provider prior to visiting the medical office to make a plan that avoids exposing others in the waiting room. People who believe they have symptoms of measles should not go directly to medical offices, urgent care centers or emergency departments (unless experiencing a medical emergency) without calling in advance.

Additional resources

For information about additional exposure sites in Oregon, linked to the confirmed case in Multnomah County, visit the Oregon Health Authority measles webpage. For information about other measles cases in Washington, visit the Washington State Department of Health measles webpage.

Public Health has established a call center for questions related to the investigation. Anyone who has questions about public exposures should call 360.397.8021. The call center is open daily.

Anyone with questions about their measles immunity or the measles vaccine should contact their primary care provider. Clark County Public Health does not provide immunizations or testing for immunity.

If you are unsure of your family's immunization status, you can view, download and print your family's immunization information online at MyIR or request a copy of your immunization record from the Washington State Department of Health.


Washington County Farm Bureau offers scholarships
Oregon Farm Bureau - 02/19/19 3:21 PM


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 19, 2019

Washington County Farm Bureau offers scholarships

Washington County Farm Bureau is proud to announce the availability of two scholarships: one for high school graduates and another for current college students.

The Washington County Farm Bureau High School Graduate Scholarship is open to high school graduates from Washington County, Oregon, who intend to pursue a degree in agriculture, education, nursing, or vocational training.

The Washington County Farm Bureau Collegiate Scholarship is open to full-time college or university students from Washington County, Oregon, who are pursuing a degree in agriculture or a related field.

The deadline for applications for both scholarships is April 3, 2019.

Find the application at www.OregonFB.org/scholarships.

For more information, contact Jacqueline Jones, jduyckjones@gmail.com, 503.997.0209.

###


Update #2: Pursuit Suspect Who Crashed Into Gales Creek Arrested (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/19/19 3:01 PM
Jeremiah Libbee
Jeremiah Libbee
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1128/122158/thumb_Jeremiah_Libbee.jpg

This information is being released by the Washington County Sheriff's Office on behalf of the North Plains Police Department, which is the lead agency for this incident.

Earlier this afternoon, North Plains Police Department officers arrested 23-year-old Jeremiah Libbee in Portland. They were assisted by Portland Police Bureau officers.

He is being held at the Washington County Jail on charges of third-degree assault, attempt to elude, reckless endangering, reckless driving, and driving while criminally suspended.

The earlier media releases are below.

# # #

Update #1: Investigation Continues Regarding Pursuit That Led to Gales Creek Water Rescue

February 18, 2019 -- The North Plains Police Department continues to investigate Friday’s pursuit that ended with the water rescue from Gales Creek.

The rescued passenger is being identified as a 21-year-old Gaston woman. She is listed in stable condition at a Portland hospital. She is considered a victim in this ongoing investigation.

The suspect, driver Jeremiah Libbee, has been discharged from the hospital. We anticipate additional information will be released in the coming days as the investigation progresses.

The earlier media release is below.

# # #

Pursuit Leads to Crash into Gales Creek, Water Rescue of Passenger

Videos and photos of the scene are available here (caution for language).

February 15, 2019 -- On Friday, February 15, 2019, at 8:14 a.m., a North Plains Police Officer saw a car driving recklessly at a high rate of speed on Highway 26 westbound near Northwest Glencoe Road. The officer tried to pull the car over but the driver, later identified as 23-year-old Jeremiah Libbee of Hillsboro, did not stop. The pursuit went from Highway 26 and then west on Highway 6.

Near the intersection of Highway 6 and Northwest Gales Creek Road, a Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputy set up spike strips. The deputy saw Mr. Libbee was sideways in the on-coming lane of traffic at a high rate of speed. The deputy was attempting to remove the spike strips from Mr. Libbee’s path because the car was out of control, but Mr. Libbee drove over the spike strips before the deputy could get out of his way.

Mr. Libbee then crashed over a steep embankment, hit a large tree, and landed 20 feet below in Gales Creek. The violent crash heavily damaged the car and officers saw Mr. Libbee was being washed hundreds of yards down the fast-flowing creek before emergency responders were able to pull him out. Mr. Libbee was taken to a Portland hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

Officers also saw there was an adult woman trapped in the front seat of the car. Because of the crash, she was pinned inside the car in the middle of the river. Emergency crews had to use a boat to hook tow cables to the car, in order to pull it out of the water so that she could be extricated. That complicated rescue effort involved dozens of people and took over an hour and a half to complete. At one point, the woman was underwater while trapped inside the car. She was taken to a Portland hospital with critical injuries.

The Oregon State Police responded to help with the crash investigation. The North Plains Police Department will continue the criminal investigation into the pursuit and any additional charges against Mr. Libbee. Multiple agencies were involved in helping rescue Mr. Libbee and his passenger from the river and the North Plains Police Department specifically wishes to thank the tow truck operators who worked together to pull the woman trapped in the car out of the river.




Attached Media Files: Jeremiah Libbee

Hermiston Woman Sentenced to Six Months In Federal Prison For Dealing Fentanyl
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/19/19 2:23 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. – Veronica Rivera, 46, of Hermiston, Oregon, was sentenced today to 6 months in federal prison and 3 years of supervised release for selling fentanyl.

            According to court documents, in October 2017, the Tactical Diversion Squad of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and the Blue Mountain Enforcement Narcotics Team began investigating a drug trafficking organization selling small blue pills pressed to look like 30 milligram oxycodone tablets but that actually contained fentanyl.

On two separate occasions in March 2018, Rivera sold a total of 167 of the fentanyl pills in Hermiston. In April 2018, investigators seized approximately 100 pills from a location where Rivera had hidden them and an additional 129 pills from her Hermiston residence.

            On April 25, 2018, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a two-count indictment charging Rivera with distribution of fentanyl and possession with intent to distribute fentanyl. She pleaded guilty to one count of distribution of fentanyl on August 14, 2018.

This case was investigated by DEA and the Blue Mountain Enforcement Narcotics Team.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/6325/122157/SENTENCING-Rivera-final.pdf

***Update 2*** Oregon State Police Seeks Public Assistance on Deceased Female Found North of Road's End in Lincoln County
Oregon State Police - 02/19/19 1:59 PM

Star had last been seen February 11,2019 not 2018.

###

Update

Based on tips received through the hotline, Oregon State Police has identified the deceased female as Satin Fever Star (aka Kahrin Jean McDonald), age 63, from Lincoln City, Oregon.

Star was seen on February 11, 2019. The investigation remains active but at this time there is no known threat to the community and her death does not appear suspicious.

The Oregon State Police would like to thank everyone who called the tip-line.

###

On February 17, 2019 at approximately 5:00 PM, Oregon State Police, with the assistance of US Coast Guard and Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office, recovered the body of a deceased female in the ocean, in a cove, just north of “God’s Thumb”.

The female is described as a white adult female with long dark brown hair. She was approximately 5’7” and 190-200 pounds.

The Oregon State Police is continuing its investigation as to the specifics of her death but we are asking for the public’s assistance for information on her identity.

If anyone has any information on a recent missing female, matching this description, please call (800) 452-7888 and reference case number SP 19-058230. Detective Carla Urbigkeit is the lead investigator.

No photos are available or additional information is available at this time.

###


Results: Deputies Conduct 370 Traffic Stops During Enhanced Patrols
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/19/19 1:33 PM

Between the dates of February 4 and February 17, 2019, Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies conducted 370 traffic stops during our enhanced seat belt patrols. In addition to issuing citations for drivers not wearing seatbelts, deputies also cited drivers for other issues related to driver safety.

Here’s a breakdown of what deputies found during the two week period:

  • 27 seat belt citations
  • 87 cell phone citations
  • 49 speed citations
  • 10 driving while suspended citations
  • 61 other citations
  • 1 DUII arrest
  • 2 wanted suspect arrests

The Sheriff’s Office Traffic Safety Unit is dedicated to promoting and improving traffic safety through education, analysis, and enforcement. Learn more about the team:

www.co.washington.or.us/sheriff/fightingcrime/patrols/traffic-safety-unit.cfm

# # #

Deputies Conducting Enhanced Seat Belt Patrols in Early February

February 4, 2019 -- The Washington County Sheriff’s Office, in partnership with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT), and Oregon State Sheriff's Association (OSSA), will be joining other law enforcement agencies across the state to promote proper seat belt use and increase public safety.

Between the dates of February 4 and February 17, 2019, extra deputies will be on the roadways looking for vehicle occupants not wearing, or improperly using seat belts. They will also be checking for proper child safety seat use.

According to the NHTSA, motor vehicle crashes are still the leading cause of death or disability in children from two to fourteen years of age. This number is due in large part to non-use, or improper use of seat belts and child safety seats. Proper seat belt and child restraint use is the number one way to prevent injury or death if you or your children are involved in a crash.

For safety belt systems, proper use means the lap belt must be placed low across the hips and the shoulder belt should cross the center of the chest over the collar bone. Belts should be free of slack and have no twists or knots. The shoulder belt should NOT be placed under the arm or behind the back; this can cause serious internal injuries or ejection in a crash.

Information regarding proper child safety seat use and local car seat clinics can be found at www.oregonimpact.org/.

The Sheriff’s Office Traffic Safety Unit is dedicated to promoting and improving traffic safety through education, analysis, and enforcement. Learn more about the team:

www.co.washington.or.us/sheriff/fightingcrime/patrols/traffic-safety-unit.cfm




Attached Media Files: PDF of Media Release

UPDATE -- CORRECTED VIDEO LINK: Sheriff's Office seeks tips after early morning armed robbery at Lake Oswego Jackson's; video available (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/19/19 1:32 PM
2019-02/624/122154/19-003995-Suspect4.JPG
2019-02/624/122154/19-003995-Suspect4.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/624/122154/thumb_19-003995-Suspect4.JPG

Please reference CCSO Case # 19-003995


UPDATE -- CORRECTED LINK: Surveillance video of robbery:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/5gx2rnpfoxho11p/19-003995-JacksonRobbery.mp4?dl=0


The Clackamas County Sheriff's Office is investigating an early morning armed robbery at the Jackson's gas station and convenince store at 14951 SW Bangy Rd. in Lake Oswego. Surveillance video of the crime is linked above, and investigators are seeking tips from the public.

The crime occurred at 3:43 a.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2019. As seen in the surveillance video, a male suspect entered the Jackson's wearing a dark face mask. He produced a large handgun from the front pocket of his jacket and demanded cash from the store employee at the register. The suspect then took approximately $75 from the till and exited the Jackson's.

Multiple units from the Sheriff's Office, Tigard Police and Lake Oswego PD responded to the scene and searched for the suspect -- including starting a K9 track from the store -- but were unable to locate the armed robber.

The suspect is described as follows:

  • White male adult in his 20s
  • Approximately 5'8" tall
  • Wearing a black baseball cap with an orange bill, a black face mask, a dark jacket with a fur-lined hood, light tan pants, and dark sneakers with white tread.

Photos of the suspect are attached.


TIPS SOUGHT

The Sheriff’s Office is seeking additional information in this case. Anyone with information is urged to contact the Sheriff’s Office Tip Line — by phone at 503-723-4949 or by using the online email form at https://web3.clackamas.us/contact/tip.jsp . Please reference CCSO Case # 19-003995.

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/624/122154/19-003995-Suspect4.JPG , 2019-02/624/122154/19-003995-Suspect3.JPG , 2019-02/624/122154/19-003995-Suspect2.JPG , 2019-02/624/122154/19-003995-Suspect1.JPG

Lebanon Firefighters Battle Large Shop Fire (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 02/19/19 1:24 PM
2019-02/1191/122153/20190219_085349.jpg
2019-02/1191/122153/20190219_085349.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1191/122153/thumb_20190219_085349.jpg

The Lebanon Fire District responded to the report of a structure fire at 1046 F Street in Lebanon. Crews arrived on scene to a large shop fully involved. The initial incident commander called for a second alarm to request additional units from neighboring fire districts. Crews immediately began extinguishment efforts. Exposure control hose lines were setup to stop the spread of fire into the office building approximately five feet away. Explosions could be heard do to the storage of acetylene, propane and gas tanks. There were numerous cars and a forklift that were parked outside of the building. A ladder truck was used to knock down a bulk of the fire and allowed crews to get a quick knockdown. The fire was brought under control in approximately one hour. The fire was contained to the building of origin. The district responded with five engines, a ladder truck, medic unit, and four staff vehicles. A total of 27 firefighters were on scene.  Albany, Sweet Home and Scio fire departments provided coverage for the city during the blaze. No injuries were reported during the incident. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

For HD photos of this and other LFD incidents, please follow the Lebanon Fire District Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/LebanonFireDistrict/?ref=bookmarks




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/1191/122153/20190219_085349.jpg , 2019-02/1191/122153/20190219_083606.jpg , 2019-02/1191/122153/20190219_083806.jpg

Pacific Power brings smart meters to the Gorge in March
Pacific Power - 02/19/19 1:11 PM

Media Contact:                                                           February 19, 2019

Pacific Power media line                                            FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

800-570-5838
 

Pacific Power brings smart meters to the Gorge in March

 

The new meters help shorten outages, provide daily usage data, and keep Oregon a leader in using clean, renewable energy.

 

HOOD RIVER Ore. — Pacific Power is bringing more efficient and effective smart meters to residential and business customers in the Columbia Gorge area, replacing thousands of aging electric meters throughout the winter and spring.

 

About 9,000 new meters will be installed in Hood River, Grass Valley, Moro, Mosier, Rufus and Wasco. The installations are set to begin the week of March 4 and will continue through April. The project is part of a statewide rollout of 590,000 smart meters which began in January 2018 in Independence, Oregon, and continues through 2019.

 

“We’re installing smart meters here in the Gorge area as part of an upgrade for the homes and businesses we serve,” said Lori Wyman, Pacific Power’s regional business manager for Hood River and Eastern Oregon. “Nearly two-thirds of our customers in Oregon are already enjoying the benefits of a smart meter, and we look forward to bringing this technology to our community.”

 

The new smart meters will:

 

  • Instantly track outages, meaning faster service response and shorter outages overall.
  • Let customers view their power usage hour-by-hour, so they can adjust their activity to reduce both their carbon footprint and bill.
  • Provide businesses with detailed usage reporting which will help them cut costs and make investments in items that help their businesses grow.
  • Update the grid to work more efficiently and better integrate renewable power sources.

 

Nationwide, more than 70 million smart meters are installed at homes and businesses, which includes half of all households in the U.S. Smart meters are a key component to updating the energy grid originally built for technology from 100 years ago. They also help Pacific Power hold down operating costs, improve customer service and reliability while maintaining the highest standards of security and customer privacy.

“This upgrade brings the future of reliable and efficient power to our region and to our state,” said Wyman. “We are connecting communities throughout Oregon, improving the way we power our customers’ lives both at home and at work.”

 

Access to daily energy usage information will be available to customers via a secure website. The near real-time energy usage information will let customers better understand what is driving their electric bills and help them make decisions that can save energy and money. This capability will come about six weeks after a new meter is installed.

 

Here’s what customers can expect during the installation process:

 

  • Customers will be notified before installation through the mail and will receive detailed information about the new smart meters. Reminder calls will be made to customers as their scheduled installation date approaches.

 

  • Pacific Power’s authorized installer, Aclara, will arrive between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. to make installations. Installers will drive vehicles and carry badges that identify them as an authorized contractor of Pacific Power. Unless an electric meter is inside, they will not need to enter customer homes or businesses. There is no charge for the installation or the meter.

 

  • During the installation, Pacific Power technicians will remove the old meter, install the new meter, restore service and verify the new meter is working properly. This process will require a brief power outage (less than five minutes). The technicians will leave a door hanger to let customers know they were there, and successfully installed the new smart meter.
     
  • Pacific Power will manually read the newly installed smart meters for at least one month to confirm everything is working correctly. After confirmation activities are complete in the area, meter reading will happen remotely.
     
  • Approximately six weeks following the installation when all area installs are complete, customers can sign in to their Pacific Power account to access the newly available usage data. Customers can sign up for their web account here.

 

If customers have any concerns, have not received the proper series of notices or have any reason to think a notification is not legitimate, customers should hang up and call Pacific Power’s customer service at 1-800-221-7070 immediately to verify whether they are scheduled for an installation.

 

Additional information, including installation updates are available at www.pacificpower.net/smartmeter. Customers can also call 866-869-8520 for help with any questions.

 

-###-

 

About Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 740,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with 1.9 million customers in six western states Information about Pacific Power is available on the company’s website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages, which can be accessed via pacificpower.net.


JSD 14J Budget Committee Vacancy
Jefferson Sch. Dist. - 02/19/19 1:03 PM

Budget Committee Vacancy

Applications are being accepted for two openings on the Jefferson School District Budget Committee.  If you are a qualified district voter and are interested in being considered, please contact Amber Hopkins at 541-327-3337 x 1051 or er.hopkins@jefferson.k12.or.us">amber.hopkins@jefferson.k12.or.us.  The individual selected will be appointed for a term of three years by the Jefferson School District Board of Directors at their regular meeting on Monday, March 11, 2019.  Applications will be accepted until 4:00 PM, Wednesday, March 8, 2019.


Eight Grants Announced to Support the Acquisition of Artworks by Oregon Artists in the 10th year of The Ford Family Foundation Acquisition Support (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 02/19/19 1:02 PM
Elizabeth Malaska, “Legacy of Ruin,” 2014, Oil, flashe, spray paint, & charcoal & pencil on canvas
Elizabeth Malaska, “Legacy of Ruin,” 2014, Oil, flashe, spray paint, & charcoal & pencil on canvas
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1418/122150/thumb_Schneider01.jpg

Salem, Oregon – The Oregon Arts Commission is excited to announce eight grants made through The Ford Family Foundation’s Art Acquisition Fund, which supports our state’s collecting visual arts institutions, the artists whose work they are able to acquire, and the public who will be guaranteed access to these important works in perpetuity. Funds were awarded by a panel of art professionals to: the City of Halsey, Coos Art Museum, High Desert Museum, Portland Art Museum, Portland State University, Reed College, The Schneider Museum of Art, and Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at University of Oregon. More details about each artist and work are listed below.

This year marks the 10th that the Arts Commission has administered these funds for The Ford Family Foundation’s Visual Arts Program. Since 2010, funds have been granted to 20 organizations throughout the state and advanced the careers of more than 50 artists: Robert Adams, Corey Arnold, Rick Bartow (1946–2016), Carol Benson, Christine Bourdette, Harrison Branch, Michael Brophy, Pat Courtney Gold, John Van Dreal, Gale Everett, Judith Poxson Fawkes. Betty Feves (1918–1985)

Sally Finch, Stephen Hayes, Robert Hess (1935–2014), Yuji Hiratsuka, Deborah Horrell (1953–2018), Jeffrey Hull, Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Malia Jensen, Chris Johanson and Jo Jackson, Mel Katz, Lee Kelly, Arnold J. Kemp, Kristan Kennedy, Michael Knutson, Cynthia Lahti, James Lavadour, Ellen Lesperance, Evan La Londe, Elizabeth Malaska, Victor Maldonado, Akihiko Miyoshi, Christiaan H. Mostert, Multiple quilt artists and Sisters Quilt Festival, Jay Stratton Noller, Whitney Nye, Geraldine Ondrizek, Andy Paiko and Ethan Rose, Henk Pander, Lucinda Parker, Don Prechtel, Wendy Red Star, Vanessa Renwick, Susan Seubert, Randall David Tipton, Samantha Wall, Heather Watkins, Marie Watt, and Phyllis Yes.

 

2019 grants are awarded to:

 

 

 

City of Halsey ($1,500) to acquire Gale Everett, “From the Land,” 2016, aluminum, PVC, galvanized steel bolts, plywood (13 panels)

Gale Everett (b.1969. Lives and works in Albany, Oregon) is a visual artist who works and lives in the heart of the Willamette Valley. Her work connects to the forest and rivers, to native plants, farmlands and a love of animals. She moves between hand-cut paper, printmaking, ceramics and sculpture. "From the Land" will be a permanently installed at Halsey City Hall.

Coos Art Museum ($2,800) to acquire Christiaan H. Mostert, “High Truckin',” 2017, acrylic on canvas

Christiaan H. Mostert (Dutch) (b. 1950. Lives and works in North Bend, Oregon) is a prominent artist on Oregon's South Coast. He was born into an artist family in the Netherlands in 1950. The family immigrated to Southern California in 1961 where he attended art classes at the Art Center School of Design in Pasadena. He started his own design and illustration studio in 1979, doing mostly commercial art and architectural renderings. In 1990 he moved to Oregon to open his own fine art studio and gallery. Since then, Dutch has concentrated mostly on painting the maritime environment, in the studio and on location, gathering numerous awards for his work on both coasts. Dutch is the West Coast representative for the American Society of Marine Artists. He helped found the Annual Maritime Art Exhibition at Coos Art Museum 25 years ago.

High Desert Museum ($15,000) to acquire James Lavadour, “Golden,” 2018, oil on panel

James Lavadour (b.1951. Lives and works on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon) is one of Oregon’s premier artists. His work has been exhibited internationally, including recent group exhibitions at Converge 45, “You in Mind,” 2017, Portland, Oregon; “State of the Art” 2014-15, Crystal Bridges, Bentonville AR; and the 2013 Venice Biennale collateral exhibition “Personal Structures,” along with numerous regional one-person exhibitions. Growing up on the Umatilla Reservation, his work reflects his deep connection to the landscape of Eastern Oregon and incorporates Indigenous views of the land and sense of place. The High Desert Museum’s collection currently includes two of Lavadour’s early works. By acquiring one of his more mature works, they expand their capacity to trace his development as an artist and make his artwork accessible to broad audiences in their rural region. Lavadour is represented by PDX CONTEMPORARY ART

Portland Art Museum ($20,000) to acquire Chris Johanson and Jo Jackson, “Furniture Sculptures,” 2018, wood, cotton

Chris Johanson's (b. 1968. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) multidisciplinary art encompasses painting, sculpture, installation and music; his works touch on universal themes of spirituality, sociology and environmentalism. Johanna Jackson (b. 1972. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) transforms common objects and materials to  explore the confluence of life and work, art and craft, magic and the ordinary in her handmade, functional objects and domestically-scaled installations. Both artists have exhibited internationally and are significant members of Portland’s artistic community. Working together, they created the exhibition design that transformed a gallery for the museum’s exhibition series WE.CONSTRUCT.MARVELS.BETWEEN.MONUMENTS. The artist team’s murals, furniture and spatial interventions shifted the white cube into a warm, lively environment. Acquiring these furniture pieces is an important testimony to the transformative, community-centered ambitions of the WCMBM series. Johanson is represented by Mitchell-Inness & Nash, New York.

Portland State University ($27,000) to acquire Jessica Jackson Hutchins, “Woman Be Free,” 2018, fused glass

Jessica Jackson Hutchins (b. 1971. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) is a Hallie Ford Fellow and an important American artist. Her expressive and intuitive studio practice produces dynamic sculptures, collages, paintings and large-scale ceramics, all hybrid juxtapositions of the handmade. She has received recent solo exhibitions at the Columbus College of Art and Design in Columbus, OH (2016); the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum (2014); the Hepworth Wakefield Museum (2013); and the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, MA (2011). Significant group exhibitions include the 55th Venice Biennale, and The Whitney Biennial (2010). Her work has been incorporated into public collections including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Brooklyn Museum, New York; the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles.

Hutchin’s fused glass panel “Woman Be Free” will complete a series of three, with “Totem” and “19 Years Old” –each made in residence at Bullseye Glass, Portland, that will be permanently displayed at PSU’s 724 Harrison building (formerly Neuberger Hall), as part of a collection of works that explore issues of material expression of identity. Other artists represented in the grouping are Ursula von Rydingsvard, Hank Willis Thomas, Lorna Simpson, Wendy Red Star, and Saya Woolfalk. Hutchins is represented by Marianne Boesky, New York.

Reed College ($12,500) Heather Watkins, “Recordings, 2018, twelve individually framed works, thread on linen

Heather Watkins (b. 1969. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) has exhibited her work regionally and beyond since earning her MFA in Typography and Design at RISD in 2000. Trained in type and graphic design, textiles, bookmaking and printmaking, Watkins’ mature work exhibits the sensitive interweaving of these mediums. As an undergrad Watkins studied Classics at Pitzer College, studying in Athens, Greece, and her art evinces this study of classical art and poetics. Watkins has held solo exhibitions at: the Portland Art Museum; The Art Gym; and PDX CONTEMPORARY; and group exhibitions at CANADA NY; the lumber room, and other spaces. Her work is in the collection of: MoMA, NY; the Miller-Meigs Collection; among others. She has installed major public artworks at PSU and PCC. Her accomplished work is critical to the region’s history of design, craft and spiritual abstraction. Watkins created the “Recordings” while “waiting” in various spaces, mainly medical environments. Each intricate embroidery expresses the mind and body negotiating time and space. Watkins is represented by PDX CONTEMPOARY ART.

Schneider Museum of Art, $4,562, Elizabeth Malaska, “Legacy of Ruin,” 2014, Oil, flashe, spray paint, & charcoal & pencil on canvas

Elizabeth Malaska (b. 1976. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) received her MFA from Pacific Northwest College of Art and BFA from California College of the Arts. With a recent critically acclaimed solo exhibition at Russo Lee Gallery in Portland and a 2018 Hallie Ford Fellowship, Malaska is emerging as an important Oregon artist. In a recent Art Form Critic's pick, Stephanie Snyder writes, "Elizabeth Malaska’s recent paintings celebrate the pathos and resilience of the anima, asserting its reproductive and spiritual power over millennia of oppression... Malaska’s pieces exorcise and overcome the clichéd representations of the feminine form seen throughout art history."  Malaska is represented by Russo Less Gallery.

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, $4,500, University of Oregon, Victor Maldonado, “The Fallen,” 2018, Acrylic on canvas

Victor Maldonado (b. 1976. Lives and works in Portland, Oregon) was born in Michoacán, Mexico, and raised in California’s Central San Joaquin Valley. Maldonado draws from their experiences in a family of migrant field laborers to create multidisciplinary art that explores identity, cultural symbols and perceptions… yet they call it “art about nothing,” “Lucha libre” is a recurring theme in the work. The iconic Luchador mask, a symbol of Mexican freestyle wrestlers, stands for the struggle between two forces. In addition to their work as a conceptual, visual, performance, and installation artist, Maldonado is also a freelance curator and writer and assistant dean of diversity and inclusion and chief diversity officer at Pacific Northwest College of Art. This is the first work of Maldonado to enter the JSMA collection. Maldonado is represented by Froelick Gallery.

PLEASE NOTE. More images available on request.

                   

About The Ford Family Foundation Visual Arts Program

Established in the memory of one of its co-founders, Mrs. Hallie Ford, the goal of the Foundation’s Visual Arts Program is to accelerate an enhanced quality of artistic endeavor and bodies of work by mid-career Oregon visual artists through support of their exploration, conceptualization, production, exhibition and documentation of new work, and to improve Oregon's visual arts ecology. 

In addition to the Art Acquisition Funding, other resources are being dedicated to the following:

Fellowships:  five annual Hallie Ford Fellows are provided unrestricted grants to support the conceptualization and the development of new work.

Artists-in-Residences:  bi-annual awards "Golden Spot" residency programs in Oregon that provide opportunities for artists to explore and conceptualize new work.

Exhibition & Documentation:  funding for the curation, preparation, materials and traveling of exhibitions

Capital Projects:  resources to improve and/or expand studio and exhibition space at key Oregon visual arts institutions

Curator/Critic Tour:  visitations by national curators to consult with Oregon's visual artists and interact with the arts community

Opportunity Grants:  resources to Oregon visual artists who face unanticipated circumstances that could aid in significantly advancing the creation, production or exhibition of their work. These grants are managed by the Oregon Arts Commission on the foundation's behalf.

About The Ford Family Foundation

The Ford Family Foundation is the sole funder of this Visual Arts Program.  It partners with Oregon's leading visual arts educators, gallerists, museum and arts professionals to help implement program elements and leverages funding with other state and national resources.

The Foundation was established in 1957 by Kenneth W. and Hallie E. Ford. Its Mission is “successful citizens and vital rural communities” in Oregon and Siskiyou County, California.  The Foundation is located in Roseburg, Oregon, with a Scholarship office in Eugene.  For more information about the Foundation, please visit the website at www.tfff.org.  

About the Oregon Arts Commission

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org.




Attached Media Files: Elizabeth Malaska, “Legacy of Ruin,” 2014, Oil, flashe, spray paint, & charcoal & pencil on canvas , Jessica Jackson Hutchins, “Woman Be Free,” 2018, fused glass , James Lavadour, “Golden,” 2018, oil on panel

OHA receives updates to letters of intent for coordinated care contracts
Oregon Health Authority - 02/19/19 12:25 PM

Resent with link to CCO 2.0 Website

February 19, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA receives updates to letters of intent for coordinated care contracts

The Oregon Health Authority has received 10 updates to the letters of intent (LOIs) from organizations seeking to apply for 2020-2024 coordinated care organization (CCO) contracts. Organizations had until February 15, 2019 to submit updates to their LOIs to OHA.

Oregon first established CCOs in 2012 to transform health care delivery in the state. CCOs bring together physical, behavioral, and oral health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan (Medicaid). They improve health and reduce costs by providing more coordinated, flexible and innovative services. CCOs are rewarded for achieving specific health outcomes and quality measures. Nearly 87 percent of Oregon’s 1 million OHP members are enrolled in CCOs.

Updates to the LOIs include:

  • In the Portland metro area, four organizations have withdrawn their letters of intent (CareOregon, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of the Northwest, Moda Health Plan, and PacificSource Community Solutions - Portland)
  • Providence Health Assurance has changed its service area to Hood River, Clatsop, and Jackson counties, removing Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington counties.
  • PacificSource Community Solutions – Columbia Gorge removed Sherman, Gilliam, and Wheeler counties from its service area.
  • Four organizations have made technical changes to their names and business registration numbers.

Based on the updated LOIs, Oregon Health Plan members in every county in Oregon will continue to have at least one CCO to coordinate their health care. In some parts of the state, multiple organizations filed letters of intent to operate in the same counties, giving Oregon Health Plan members more than one CCO choice.

Complete applications will be due to OHA April 22. Only organizations that submitted letters of intent may submit applications in April. An organization submitting a letter of intent is not obliged to follow with a complete application. Awards for the CCO contracts are expected to be announced in July.

In October 2018, the Oregon Health Policy Board approved a comprehensive set of policies to improve the health of Oregon Health Plan members, address health disparities, control program costs, and continue to transform health care delivery in our state.

These policy priorities will be written into the 2020-2024 CCO contracts, which represent the next phase of health care transformation, known as "CCO 2.0." The new contracts with CCOs represent the largest procurement in state history, totaling more than $20 billion over five years.

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Rex Putnam High School Screening Documentary "Angst"
North Clackamas Sch. Dist. - 02/19/19 11:45 AM

Milwaukie, OR (February 19, 2019)—On March 20 at 6:30 p.m., the North Clackamas School District (NCSD) and the Parent Community Leadership Alliance (PCLA) will hold a special screening of the documentary Angst: Raising Awareness Around Anxietyat Rex Putnam High School’s Auditorium.  

The film’s producers, Scilla Andreen and Karin Gornick, have one goal--starting a global conversation and raising awareness around anxiety. Through candid interviews, they tell stories of several kids and teens who’ve experienced anxiety, and discuss its impact on their lives and relationships, along with how they’ve found solutions and hope. The film also includes a special interview with Olympian and mental health advocate, Michael Phelps. Free tickets are now available and space is limited. Click here to reserve your seats.

In addition to the film, the March 20th event will feature an informative panel discussion, led by Lana Shotwell, LPC, Trillium Family Services, with special guests Ben DeGuilio, Program Supervisor, Clackamas County Mental Health, and Miranda Gambett, LPC, CADCII, Western Psychological & Counseling Services.

According to the World Health Organization, anxiety disorders are the most common mental health challenge in the U.S., impacting 54 percent of females and 46 percent of males, with age seven being the median age of onset. While anxiety disorders are highly treatable, only one-third of those suffering receive treatment. Everyone involved in the development of “Angst” has a personal experience with anxiety. NCSD and PCLA are pleased to assist in the showing of this important documentary.

 

 

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/16/122148/Feb._2019_Angst_Press_Release__.pdf

Northwest Association for Blind Athletes to host Imagine Dinner & Auction on Saturday, February 23rd
Northwest Assn. for Blind Athletes - 02/19/19 11:36 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Melissa Ulrich, Marketing & Communications Coordinator
Northwest Association for Blind Athletes
311 West Evergreen Blvd, Ste. 200
Vancouver, Washington 98660
Toll Free: 1-800-880-9837
http://www.nwaba.org
mulrich@nwaba.org

Northwest Association for Blind Athletes to host Imagine Dinner & Auction on Saturday, February 23rd

Portland, Oregon —— February 19, 2019 — The Northwest Association for Blind Athletes (NWABA) announced today that it will be hosting their 10th annual dinner and auction on Saturday, February 23, 2019 at Red Lion Jantzen Beach Hotel on the River (909 North Hayden Island Drive Portland, OR 97217). Tickets are $125 each or $1,250 for a VIP table of ten guests. There are a limited number of individual seats remaining, please call 360-448-7254 to learn more.

This is Northwest Association for Blind Athletes’ largest event of the year and helps to fuel the organization’s life-changing programs and services for children, youth, adults and military veterans with visual impairments. This year’s event will be especially inspiring as we celebrate NWABA’s growth in improving the quality of life for individuals with visual impairments in our community and the generosity of our supporters who have helped us get there along the way.

Guests will enjoy exciting live and silent auction items, including a trip to Iceland and tickets to Elton John, powerful testimonials from athletes, a delicious meal with fine wine, and VIP after party. All net proceeds will support Northwest Association for Blind Athlete’s mission of helping individuals with visual impairments build confidence, improve self-esteem, enhance physical activity, develop friendships and gain the skills, tools and resources to reach their greatest potential in all areas of life.

About NWABA:
The mission of Northwest Association for Blind Athletes (NWABA) is to provide life-changing opportunities through sports and physical activity to individuals who are blind and visually impaired. A group of visually impaired students formed the Association in 2007 to ensure that people who are blind were participating in sports and physical activity. Today, NWABA is a rapidly expanding charitable organization that provides more than 1,500 children, youth, adults and military veterans with visual impairments tailored programming, which improves self-confidence and self-esteem, promotes independence, creates an inclusive community of supporters, and builds the skills necessary to succeed in all areas of life including school and employment.

For information: http://www.nwaba.org  or
Contact: mulrich@nwaba.org
Phone:  1-800-880-9837

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Health Share of Oregon moves forward with single CCO application in tri-county area
Health Share of Oregon - 02/19/19 11:30 AM

(Portland, OR) – Health Share of Oregon’s Board of Directors voted Friday, February 8 to move forward with a single coordinated care organization (CCO) application for the Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington county region. All other letters of intent to apply for the service area have been withdrawn.

Health Share is a collaborative CCO that was founded and continues to be governed by managed care entities, health care systems, counties, providers, and social service entities serving Oregon Health Plan members in the region. Those same partners will continue to work together through the end of the next five-year CCO contract, with an improved organizational structure.

“We’re ‘all in’ for continuing to serve Health Share’s mission of partnering with communities to achieve ongoing transformation, health equity, and the best possible health for each individual,” said Board Chair Marni Kuyl.

Health Share’s board and member organizations also announced that they have adopted the following principles to guide the development of a refined organizational structure to best serve the region’s OHP members through 2024:

  • Delivering a high-quality health care experience that improves health and reduces inequity for all OHP members in our region is our top priority.
  • Partnering around scarce Medicaid resources is the best way to serve OHP members in our community. We are building on the successes and learnings in our first six years and are excited to work together in new and different ways.
  • Moving toward more integrated care that is easier for members and providers to navigate will improve the experience of care for our members, increase quality, and reduce costs to the system.
  • Reducing administrative costs and duplication is key to driving more resources to our community and supporting safety net services in the tri-county area.
  • Leveraging the collective strengths and resources of our partners toward shared community health initiatives with the goal of eliminating health care disparities and addressing the social determinants of health is fundamental to our mission.

“Our member organizations have, once again, collectively accepted the challenge of breaking down barriers to work together in the best interest of OHP members and a future where we live our vision of a healthy community for all,” said Health Share’s Interim Chief Executive Officer Maggie Bennington-Davis, MD.

Health Share’s partners will now begin to put together an aspirational, community-driven CCO 2.0 application to submit in April.

 

About Health Share of Oregon

Health Share of Oregon is the state’s largest coordinated care organization (CCO), serving Oregon Health Plan (OHP) members in Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington counties. Our mission is to partner with communities to achieve ongoing transformation, health equity, and the best possible health for each individual.

Health Share was founded and continues to be governed by eleven health care and human services organizations serving OHP members: Adventist Health, CareOregon, Central City Concern, Clackamas County, Kaiser Permanente, Legacy Health, Multnomah County, Oregon Health & Science University, Providence Health & Services, Tuality Healthcare, and Washington County.

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Attached Media Files: Press Release_Health Share of Oregon moves forward with single CCO application in tri-county area

Iwagi Island calls the Port of Vancouver USA on her maiden voyage (Photo)
Port of Vancouver - 02/19/19 11:21 AM
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VANCOUVER, Wash.—The Port of Vancouver USA welcomed the Iwagi Island, commanded by Capt. Yi Hai Yu of China, on her maiden voyage Feb. 15.

Capt. Yu and his 17-member Chinese crew were welcomed to the Port of Vancouver by representatives from Kinder Morgan Bulk Terminals, Cascade Marine Agencies Ltd. and General Steamship Agencies.

The Iwagi Island is a 590-foot-long Handymax bulk carrier built in Imabari, Japan. She is owned by Iwagi Island Limited and operated by Pacific Basin Shipping (HK) Limited.

Handymax bulk carriers typically have a deadweight capacity of up to 60,000 metric tons and are used to transport cargoes like cement, steel, lumber and mineral ores. The Handymax bulker is a versatile vessel; due to their size and configuration, they can be used to carry nearly any dry bulk cargo and can load or unload at a variety of ports around the world.

The Iwagi Island departed Japan for the U.S. in January 2019. She will load approximately 26,000 metric tons of copper concentrate at the Port of Vancouver USA before departing for ports in the Black Sea.

Photo credit: Port of Vancouver USA

– POV –

The Port of Vancouver USA is one of the major ports on the Pacific Coast, and its competitive strengths include available land, versatile cargo handling capabilities, vast transportation networks, a skilled labor force and an exceptional level of service to its customers and community. For more information, please visit us at www.portvanusa.com.




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/1489/122146/IwagiIsland_20190214.jpg

Two people accused of cloning credit cards to fraudulently book hotel rooms across Multnomah County
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 02/19/19 11:17 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                 

FEBRUARY 19, 2019

Two people accused of cloning credit cards to fraudulently book hotel rooms across Multnomah County

 

Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced that criminal charges have been filed against two individuals who are accused of cloning credit cards to rent multiple hotel rooms in Multnomah County using stolen identities.

On February 5, 2019, at approximately 1p.m., law enforcement arrested Anthony Wyatt Wingert, 23, and Shay Wright-Mack, 32, in the area of Northwest Frontage Road and Northwest Marine Drive in Troutdale, Oregon.

The indictment, which was filed February 13, 2019, charges both Wingert and Wright-Mack with four counts of burglary in the first degree, four counts of identity theft, four counts of aggravated identity theft, three counts of forgery in the first degree and one count of criminal possession of a forgery device. Wingert is separately accused of one additional count of identity theft and one additional count of aggravated identity theft. Wright-Mack is separately accused of one additional count of aggravated identity theft.

According to a probable cause affidavit, this investigation started in the fall of 2018 when Portland Police responded to a business in the 300 block of Southwest Pine Street. Law enforcement learned that a hotel room had been rented with a fraudulent credit card.

During the investigation, law enforcement learned three other businesses had previously reported rooms were rented with a fraudulent credit card and/or fraudulent identities, according to court documents.

The locations include a hotel in the 300 block of Southwest Lincoln Street in Portland, a hotel in the 800 block of East Burnside in Portland and a motel in the 1600 block of Northwest Frontage Road in Troutdale, according to the probable cause affidavit.

It is alleged in court documents that upon searching some of the rented rooms, law enforcement located documents containing personal identifying information, plastic sleeves, embossing powder, a stamp to place the name of “Shay Mack” on credit card stock, counterfeit checks, counterfeit Oregon driver’s licenses with Wright-Mack’s photo, a printer, a laptop, power tools, a label maker, and other items used to commit identity theft.

Additionally, law enforcement located two ledgers that contained more than 20 credit card numbers and more than 20 identification profiles of individuals other than Wingert and Wright-Mack, according to court documents.

On February 5, 2019, law enforcement recovered more than 20 credit cards that had been re-coded, according to court documents.

A copy of the indictment and probable cause affidavit can be obtained using case number 19CR08869 and 19CR08870 in the Oregon eCourt Information (OECI) system.

Both Wingert and Wright-Mack are scheduled to appear back in court on March 29, 2019

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime. Both defendants are innocent unless and until proven guilty.

#MCDA#


Contact: Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Phone: 503.988.6567

Email: Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/5769/122145/PR-19-36-Anthony_Wyatt_Wingert_23_and_Shay_Nicole_Mack.pdf

City engineering applications going digital March 1; free training available Feb. 21-28
City of Vancouver - 02/19/19 11:12 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – On March 1, the City of Vancouver’s Development Review Division will take the next step towards going 100 percent digital when it starts requiring all engineering applications be submitted to the City electronically.

This means that if you want to submit an engineering application to the City of Vancouver, you must use the ePlans electronic plan review software provided by the City.

At the same time, the City will be rolling out several improvements to ePlans that were identified thanks to feedback from staff and customers. These improvements will shorten review periods and help applicants better prepare for pre-application meetings.

“We’re looking forward to continuing to find ways to improve and simplify our plan review process for our customers to save them time and money,” said City Development Review Division Manager Jason Nortz.

Engineering applications join a growing list of development review applications and permits that the City now only accepts electronically.

Electronic submittals reduce the need for physical trips to Vancouver City Hall to drop off or pick up plans or make payments, and reduce the need to print hard copies. It also reduces plan review turnaround time because reviewers at the City are able to make comments and markups on the same document at the same time, instead of one at a time as they used to do. Customers can also check the status of their submittals or review at any time.

Customers can visit www.cityofvancouver.us/ePlans to learn more and get started.

Training available

The City is offering three free ePlans training courses to its customers Feb. 21-28. Each class will cover the basics of how to use the ePlans platform to upload plans and documents, submit applications, respond to correction notices and check the status of a submittal. They will also cover the new changes to the engineering workflow. All the classes will be held at Vancouver City Hall in the Aspen Conference Room, 415 W. 6th St.

  • Thursday, Feb. 21from 4 to 5 p.m.
  • Tuesday, Feb. 26 from 10 to 11 a.m.
  • Thursday, Feb. 28 from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.

To reserve your spot, please send an email to Lisa Eruhow-Hagan at uhow-Hagan@cityofvancouver.us">Lisa.Eruhow-Hagan@cityofvancouver.us with the date of the class you wish to attend and the number of people who will attend.

Not able to attend any of the classes? City staff is also available to visit local companies to provide ePlans training to small groups by request. Please email Lisa Eruhow-Hagan to set that up (see paragraph above for email address).

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Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Job Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 02/19/19 10:51 AM
TT - Job Scams GRAPHIC - February 19, 2019
TT - Job Scams GRAPHIC - February 19, 2019
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Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against new job frauds.

Maybe you are a federal employee who was desperate to pay the bills during the recent shutdown – or you just really need to pay off those Christmas debts. Either way, we are getting more and more reports this month of people looking for jobs who are getting scammed.

In particular, we are hearing accounts of people who find jobs listed on social media platforms and end up losing money. Here’s how it can start:

You are browsing through your favorite social media platform and land in a group post for your area. Maybe the group uses your city’s name with the words “now hiring” or the like. You find a job that fits your skills and pays decently. You shoot off a message through the platform or an email to the employer. After a bit of back and forth, you agree on a salary and schedule.

In another twist on this scam, you sign up for one of the big, very recognizable online employment sites. You start to get job offers that appear to come from that site – but in reality the bad guy is spoofing the look of the offer to make himself appear legitimate.

In both cases, the person interviewing or offering you a job may start to ask for information such as your date of birth, address and Social Security number – personally identifiable information that can be used to open fraudulent bank accounts, take out loans and obtain credit cards.

The scam artist might also send you a signing bonus, first paycheck or funds to buy equipment for your work-at-home office. The bad guy tells you to cash the check, take a bit out for yourself and send the rest to a specified vendor for supplies or needed software. The check, of course, is bogus, and the fraudster actually controls the bank account of what you thought was a legitimate business vendor.

In the end, your bank may close your account due to the fraudulent activity, and you are now responsible for reimbursing that bank for the counterfeit check. Your credit history may take a hit, too.

So how to protect yourself?

  • Never open a bank account for use by strangers.

  • Don’t accept a job that requires accepting money then wiring portions of checks to other individuals or accounts.

  • Look for poor use of the English language in messages, including the incorrect use of grammar, capitalization, and verb tenses. 

  • Confirm that the company that you are dealing with really is hiring. Call the company using a publicly-available number -- such as one off its website - - to confirm that the offer is legitimate, and

  • Be wary of an exceptionally-fast hiring process

How do businesses protect themselves?

  • Make sure your website and social media accounts specify how your hiring process works, and

  • Be very clear about the fact that you would not hire people in the ways described above.

If you have been victimized by an online scam, report your suspicious contacts to the FBI. You can file an online report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.




Attached Media Files: TT - Job Scams AUDIO - February 19, 2019 , TT - Job Scams GRAPHIC - February 19, 2019

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly Sides of Short Term Mission Trips Explored in Faculty Lecture Series (Photo)
Warner Pacific University - 02/19/19 10:42 AM
Warner Pacific University Logo
Warner Pacific University Logo
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The Warner Pacific University Library invites the public to the final presentation in the 2018-2019 Faculty Lecture Series.

The Good, the Bad, the Ugly, and the Way Forward About Short Term Mission Trips
Presented by Dr. Courage Mudzongo
Tuesday, February 26, 2019 at 7:00 pm

Egtvedt Hall, Room 203 at Warner Pacific University, 2219 SE 68th Avenue, Portland
This event is free and open to the public; a panel discussion will follow the lecture.

The Short Term Mission (STM) market is booming, with an estimated 1.5 million people investing billions of dollars in STM trips each year. Previous research shows mixed findings on the impact of STMs on the lives of participating missionaries and the communities they serve. Dr. Courage Mudzongo, Assistant Professor of Psychology, will share his research and explore scenarios that could lead to win-win outcomes for missionaries, researchers, and host communities.

Understanding Impact of Short Term Missions

The sheer magnitude of the financial and time investment in STMs suggests a need to acknowledge the full scope of the missionary movement. Mudzongo will share findings from his research, exploring the impact of STMs on the lives of missionaries from an Upper-Midwest-based church and whether the STMs maintained prescribed best practices.

While it is common to hear stories of spiritual growth and relationship building when discussing STMs, they are not without controversy. Some question the motives of those who go on these trips, suggesting they may be harmful to the receiving community. Others question why missionaries do not utilize these resources to help the poor in their own home countries.

Mudzongo uses qualitative interviews to pull learnings from STM participants who traveled to Nicaragua. Other examples are drawn from STMs done in Honduras and Japan. The lecture explores the extent to which churches and missionaries adhere to best practices and discusses scenarios that help improve global STMs. In light of the mounting evidence that many STM trips are causing harm, Mudzongo will seek to find a way forward.

Dr. Courage Mudzongo

Dr. Courage Mudzongo’s doctoral training emphasized a lifespan approach to human development, preparing him to participate in curriculum development and design, as well as teach a variety of courses related to human development.

Dr. Mudzongo’s approach is to empower students to share and articulate their thoughts and ideas. His philosophy is to teach students to master the art of learning and develop the confidence to ask and discuss questions about human development across the lifespan.

As a native Zimbabwean, Mudzongo’s cultural heritage and international experiences add a unique touch to his teaching and research. Such experiences include working as a Youth Development and AIDS Prevention Consultant for UNICEF and serving as a Youth Advocate for the Hospice Association of Zimbabwe.

Learn more about Dr. Mudzongo’s work by visiting CourageMudzongo.weebly.com

# # #

About Warner Pacific University

Founded in 1937, Warner Pacific University is Oregon’s most diverse four-year institution. Offering associate, bachelor, and master degrees, Warner Pacific University empowers students through personalized attention, relational support, and career-focused liberal arts education. Degrees are available in the traditional undergraduate format, as well as one night a week, and online. Earlier this year, Warner Pacific announced tuition reductions for all undergraduate degrees as part of its mission to provide equitable access to higher education for every student. Warner Pacific was recently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as the #1 Most Ethnically Diverse Campus in the West, as a Best College in the West (10), and a Best Value School (8). Warner Pacific is the only university in Oregon to be named a Hispanic-Serving Institution by the Department of Education. Learn more about Warner Pacific University at warnerpacific.edu.

 




Attached Media Files: Warner Pacific University Logo , Dr. Courage Mudzongo, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Warner Pacific University

Port of Vancouver USA seeks developer for Columbia River waterfront blocks (Photo)
Port of Vancouver - 02/19/19 10:34 AM
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Submittals for mixed-use development due March 21

VANCOUVER, Wash.—The Port of Vancouver USA is seeking proposals from development firms interested in designing, permitting, constructing and managing a mixed-used development on a portion of the port’s 10-acre site on the Columbia River in Vancouver, Washington.

Submissions are due by 5 p.m. Pacific Standard Time on Thursday, March 21, 2019.

The available property at the port’s Terminal 1 includes two blocks on the north side of Columbia Way between the riverfront and Vancouver’s thriving downtown. The concept and vision for a mixed-use development at this property, which is in the city’s Downtown-South/Waterfront Opportunity Zone, includes office, residential, ground-floor retail and parking.

“Our request for qualifications is an important step toward reinventing this remarkable waterfront property as the premier gateway to Washington state and the connection to all our community has to offer, from public trails and historic sites to distinctive shopping and restaurants,” said Mike Schiller, port director of business development.

“Terminal 1, and specifically the mixed-use development, will be vital to the ongoing revitalization of the Columbia River waterfront.”

In 2017 the City of Vancouver approved the port’s Concept Development Plan, which includes land use entitlements for the site’s proposed mixed use.

The port’s overall development concept and vision for Terminal 1 includes mixed-use blocks as well as adaptive reuse of the historic Terminal 1 facility, including open spaces and other public amenities. The port is the lead on development phases that include public spaces; overwater, moorage and dock space; visitors’ center, and; other public uses planned for the site.

Visit the RFQ Web page to learn more about the Port of Vancouver and Terminal 1 and download the RFQ requirements.

About the Port of Vancouver USA

Since 1912, the Port of Vancouver USA has been an economic engine and job creator in Washington state. Located at the hub of the Pacific Northwest on the Columbia-Snake River System, the deep-water port has five marine terminals and 13 berths that handle more than 400 ocean-going vessels and river barges annually, with a total cargo volume of more than 7 million metric tons.

– POV –

The Port of Vancouver USA is one of the major ports on the Pacific Coast, and its competitive strengths include available land, versatile cargo handling capabilities, vast transportation networks, a skilled labor force and an exceptional level of service to its customers and community. For more information, please visit us at www.portvanusa.com.




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/1489/122140/POV-T1_rendering_092018.jpg

Telecommunications Commission to conduct review of Comcast performance
City of Vancouver - 02/19/19 8:29 AM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – The City/County Telecommunications Commission will conduct its biennial public review of Comcast Cable’s performance at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 6 in Vancouver City Council Chambers, 415 W. 6th St. The session will also be televised live on Clark/Vancouver Television (CVTV) Cable Channel 23/323 HD and www.cvtv.org.  

“Cable television subscribers are encouraged to give us their feedback about how they think Comcast is doing by either testifying during the hearing or by sending their comments to us in writing,” said City/County Telecommunications Commission Chair Paul Dicker.

Citizens interested in submitting written testimony about Comcast's performance are asked to mail their comments to City/County Cable Television Office, P. O. Box 1995, Vancouver, Washington, 98668, or email them to acie.ramirez@cityofvancouver.us">tracie.ramirez@cityofvancouver.us. Written comments will be accepted through May 10.

Comcast is operating under a 10-year franchise, granted in July 2013, to provide cable television services in Vancouver and Clark County, Washington. Under the terms of the franchise agreement, the Telecommunications Commission conducts regular reviews of the cable operator’s performance.

The eight-member Telecommunications Commission is a volunteer citizen board that advises the Vancouver City Council and the Clark County Council on all matters related to the cable television franchise agreement with Comcast. For more information about the Commission, including meeting agendas and minutes, visit www.cityofvancouver.us/tc.

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Information Sought in Sex Abuse Case (Photo)
Clatsop Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/19/19 8:25 AM
Similar vehicle
Similar vehicle
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/3864/122138/thumb_Example_Vehicle.jpg

A 37-year-old Hillsboro man was arrested late Friday night after he contacted the Clatsop County Sheriff's Office to request assistance with his snow-bound rental car in the Clatsop State Forest near Knappa, Oregon. Sheriff’s Deputies located the man approximately 5 miles from Hwy 30 on Big Noise Road. When they arrived, Deputies discovered the man was in the company of 13-year-old female who he initially introduced as his daughter. After further investigation, Deputies on scene determined the girl was not related to the man—she had left her home without the knowledge or consent of her parents. It was further determined that that man had sexually abused the girl near her home in King County, Washington before bringing her to Oregon. The girl was transported to a local hospital where she was examined and later transferred back into the care of her parents.

            Christopher Thomas Knox, born March 17, 1981, was lodged in the Clatsop County Jail on February 16, 2019 on one count each of Attempted Rape II and Custodial Interference I. Investigators determined Knox was known to the girl and her mother whom he had met online. Investigators also discovered Knox was recently released from the Washington County Jail in Hillsboro, Oregon after being arrested by the Forest Grove Police Department for Carrying a Concealed Firearm and Recklessly Endangering Another Person. A single count of Violation of Release Agreement was added to Knox’s list of charges based on the terms of his release from the Washington County jail. Additional charges may be added as the multi-agency investigation continues.

Investigators believe Knox may have sexually abused the girl on the evening of February 15, 2019 while stopped in a state park or rest area somewhere between Tacoma, Washington and Astoria, Oregon. The suspected abuse would have occurred after 3:00 p.m. Knox is known to have been driving a black 2018 Dodge Journey with California license plates similar to the one seen in the attached image. It is also believed Knox and the girl may have been observed outside the vehicle while wrapped in a blanket for warmth. Investigators further believe it may have been foggy at the time and location where this occurred. Anyone who observed the vehicle or suspect is asked to contact Detective Ryan Humphrey at the Clatsop County Sheriff's Office, 503-338-3633 or by email at rhumphrey@co.clatsop.or.us.   

This joint investigation is being conducted by the Clatsop County (OR) Sheriff's Office, Hillsboro (OR) Police Department, Pacific (WA) Police Department, and King County (WA) Coalition of Small Police Agencies Major Crimes Task Force.




Attached Media Files: Similar vehicle , Photo of Knox

Vancouver Police Activities League distributing sports equipment to local youth
Police Activities League of Vancouver - 02/19/19 8:24 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – On Sunday, February 24, 2019, the Vancouver Police Activities League will be holding a FREE community-wide sports equipment distribution event at Clark College, in conjunction with the Clark Penguins’ doubleheader. This event is possible thanks to a partnership with The Good Sport Equipment Connection (GSEC).

Date:   February 24, 2019

Time:   11:00 a.m.

Location: Clark College (1933 Fort Vancouver Way)

GSEC is a collaborative special project involving a number of community organizations and businesses including: iQ Credit Union, Vancouver PAL, Clark County Association of Realtors, Parks Foundation of Clark County, Clark College Athletics, Evergreen School District, and Nautilus, Inc. Vancouver PAL collects and distributes gently used sports equipment for the big five sports – basketball, soccer, football, volleyball, and baseball/softball, to families in need to help ensure that financial strain is never a barrier to playing organized sports.

This event begins with the Clark College Penguins doubleheader beginning at 11am. Distribution of equipment will be from 1-3pm.  All equipment is FREE and will be distributed while supplies last.

This event is open to the public and members of the media are encouraged to attend.

For more information on The Good Sport Equipment Connection visit: http://www.parksfoundation.us/special-projects/good-sport-equipment-connection  or on Facebook, @GoodSportEquipmentConnection.

For more information on the Vancouver Police Activities League visit www.vancouverpal.org.

 

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Oregon Lottery to Present CJ's Pub in Fairview with $13,000 Selling Bonus Check
Oregon Lottery - 02/19/19 8:08 AM

Fairview man wins $1,000 a week for life

WHO: Oregon Lottery officials

WHEN: 11 a.m., Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2019

WHERE: CJ’s Pub, 20101 NE Sandy Blvd., Fairview OR

WHAT: Oregon Lottery officials will present an oversized check to representatives of CJ’s Pub for selling a winning Win for Life ticket. Lottery officials will also be handing out a limited number of free promotional Scratch-it tickets at the event.

BACKGROUND: A recently-retired Fairview man won the top prize of the Win for Life game and will take home $1,000 per week for life. CJ’s Pub will receive a retailer sales bonus of $13,000 for selling the winning ticket. Chris Taylor, owner of CJ’s Pub said that the bonus money would be going back into the business.
“We need some (heating and air conditioning) work and will get new chairs,” Taylor said. “It’s all going back into the business.”

Taylor said he has a number of regular customers who will love the fact he sold the winning ticket.

VISUALS: Oregon Lottery officials will present an over-sized ceremonial check to representatives of CJ’s Pub and will also distribute a limited amount of free promotional Scratch-it tickets to patrons of the bar.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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Robert Greene Homicide Remains Unsolved After Seven Years - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #12-09 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 02/19/19 8:00 AM
2019-02/5183/122099/Victim_Robert_Greene.jpg
2019-02/5183/122099/Victim_Robert_Greene.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/5183/122099/thumb_Victim_Robert_Greene.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau, in cooperation with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for your help in solving a 2012 homicide that occurred in Southeast Portland.

On Sunday February 19, 2012, at 1:28 a.m., Central Precinct officers responded to the report of a shooting outside the Grand Central Restaurant and Bowling Lounge, located in the 800 block of Southeast Morrison Street.

Officers arrived and located a shooting victim, 30-year-old Robert Greene, suffering from traumatic injuries. Medical personnel arrived and determined that Mr. Greene was deceased. An autopsy conducted later in the day determined that Mr. Greene died of single gunshot wound. Mr. Greene was employed at the Grand Central Restaurant and Bowling Lounge.

The only suspect information at this point is that the shooter is a Black male. Investigators know that there were several witnesses outside at the time of the shooting but these eyewitnesses have not provided information to detectives.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip: Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2019-02/5183/122099/Victim_Robert_Greene.jpg

K-9 Tucker aids in narcostics arrest (Photo)
McMinnville Police Dept. - 02/19/19 7:02 AM
2019-02/1837/122135/frye.jpg
2019-02/1837/122135/frye.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1837/122135/thumb_frye.jpg

On February 15, 2019, at about 10:15 pm, McMinnville Police Officers contacted two vehicles on a traffic stop in 2000 block of South Hwy 99W.  One of the vehicles stopped was a red Dodge Neon driven by Gary Steele.  During the traffic stop, Officer Maierhofer deployed his narcotics detection canine Tucker.  Canine Tucker indicated the presence of a controlled substance was contained within the vehicle.  A search of the vehicle was conducted.  The search yielded a total of approximately 36.8 grams of methamphetamine, 1.6 grams of heroin, packaging materials, a scale, and a smoking device.

Based on the investigation, Steele was lodged at the Yamhill County Correctional Facility on the following charges:

Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine                                                              $10,000

Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine (more than 2 grams)                              $7,500

Unlawful Possession of Heroin                                                                                  $10,000

 

A female passenger, Jaunita Frye was also lodged at the Yamhill County Correctional Facility on the following charge:

 

Unlawful Possesion of Methamphetamine (less than 2 grams)                   $5000




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/1837/122135/frye.jpg , 2019-02/1837/122135/steele.jpg , 2019-02/1837/122135/tucker.jpg

Mon. 02/18/19
UPDATE: Victim from Portland's Mill Park Neighborhood Shooting Identified
Portland Police Bureau - 02/18/19 8:40 PM
The victim from Monday morning's homicide has been identified as 25 year-old Charles Exzavyer Gaines. The Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office determined Gaines died as a result of a gunshot wound.

While the original call was reported to have occurred at the Tik Tok Restaurant, investigators do not believe the victim was inside the establishment prior to the incident. Additionally, there is no information to suggest the crime is connected to the Tik Tok Restaurant.

This is an on-going investigation. Detective Brad Clifton is interested in any information that could assist in this investigation. He can be reached at (503) 823-0696 or at brad.clifton@portlandoregon.gov.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved homicide or other felony crime, and tipsters can remain anonymous.

To submit tips:

- Visit the App Store and download "P3 Tips" to submit secure and anonymous tips.
- Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823
- Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

To see other featured and unsolved cases, please visit https://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

PPB Investigating Shooting in Mill Park Neighborhood-One Person Deceased

On Monday, February 18, 2019, at 12:47 a.m., East Precinct officers responded to the report of gunfire at the Tik Tok Restaurant, located at 11215 Southeast Division Street.

Officers and medical personnel arrived in the area and located an injured adult male. The injured male was transported by medical personnel to a Portland hospital for treatment for traumatic injuries. This male was later pronounced deceased at an area hospital.

Members of the Tactical Operations Division's Gun Violence Reduction Team responded initially to investigate the incident. Once it was determined the victim had died, the Detective Division's Homicide Team responded and continued the investigation.

Based on preliminary information, it does not appear that there is any ongoing risk to the public.

Neighborhood traffic may be affected due to this active crime scene and investigation. Southeast 112th Avenue from Division to Lincoln Streets is closed and expected to remain so for several hours.

Anyone with information about this incident should contact Detective Brad Clifton at (503) 823-0696.

###PPB###

West bound Mission St at I5 open after crash
Salem Police Dept. - 02/18/19 4:38 PM

Crash involving tractor trailer is no longer blocking west bound Mission lanes off I-5.  All clear.  


Measles outbreak update: One new confirmed case, one new exposure site
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/18/19 4:20 PM

Clark County Public Health is continuing its measles outbreak investigation. This afternoon, Public Health identified one new confirmed case and one new location where people may have been exposed to measles. Since Jan. 1, Public Health has identified 62 confirmed cases and is not currently investigating any suspect cases.

Here are the details of the confirmed cases:

  • Age
    • 1 to 10 years: 44 cases
    • 11 to 18 years: 15 cases
    • 19 to 29 years: one case
    • 30 to 39 years: two cases
  • Immunization status
    • Unimmunized: 54 cases
    • Unverified: six cases
    • 1 MMR vaccine: two cases
  • Hospitalization: one case (none currently)

Public Health is not providing any additional information about the two cases with one dose of MMR in order to protect the patients’ privacy.

Here is the new location where people may have been exposed to measles:

  • Fred Meyer, 401 NW 12th Ave., Battle Ground from 3:30 to 10 pm Wednesday, Feb. 13.

For a complete list of exposure sites, visit the Public Health measles investigation webpage.

Clark County Public Health is urging anyone who has been exposed at an identified location and believes they have symptoms of measles to call their health care provider prior to visiting the medical office to make a plan that avoids exposing others in the waiting room. People who believe they have symptoms of measles should not go directly to medical offices, urgent care centers or emergency departments (unless experiencing a medical emergency) without calling in advance.

Additional resources

For information about additional exposure sites in Oregon, linked to the confirmed case in Multnomah County, visit the Oregon Health Authority measles webpage. For information about other measles cases in Washington, visit the Washington State Department of Health measles webpage.

Public Health has established a call center for questions related to the investigation. Anyone who has questions about public exposures should call 360.397.8021. The call center is open daily.

Anyone with questions about their measles immunity or the measles vaccine should contact their primary care provider. Clark County Public Health does not provide immunizations or testing for immunity.

If you are unsure of your family's immunization status, you can view, download and print your family's immunization information online at MyIR or request a copy of your immunization record from the Washington State Department of Health.


A Longtime Teacher's Classroom Legacy (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 02/18/19 3:46 PM
Union Ridge Elementary School teacher, Sara Eastham (at left) with Karen Stolberg, her teacher when she attended elementary school in Ridgefield.
Union Ridge Elementary School teacher, Sara Eastham (at left) with Karen Stolberg, her teacher when she attended elementary school in Ridgefield.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/889/122131/thumb_Teacher_Legacy2.jpg

Tuesday, February 19, 2019 – Ridgefield, Washington – Karen Stolberg was happy to visit Union Ridge Elementary for Take Your Parent to School Day.  And she has an interesting connection to her granddaughter’s second grade teacher, Sara Eastham.  Stolberg was actually Eastham’s teacher when she was in elementary school.

Eastham, a Ridgefield native, said, “Ms. Stolberg—she was Anderson then— was my third-grade teacher at South Ridge.” 

Stolberg smiled.  “I can tell you she was a really good student.” 

“But I was really, really, really shy!” Eastham laughed. 

Stolberg taught in the Ridgefield School District for 34 years; Eastham was one of many students.  But Eastham was in one of Stolberg’s first classes as a teacher, so she remembers it well.  Stolberg is glad to spend time with her former student and thrilled that Eastham became a teacher too.  “We’ve stayed in touch all these years,” she said.  “I’m so proud of her!” 

Eastham remembered going to visit Stolberg’s home.  “I would take groups of four or five students home with me as a reward—with their parents’ permission of course.  We couldn’t take students home with us now!” Stolberg laughed.  When Eastham became a teacher herself, she created a similar reward activity she calls Secret Lunch, where students can have lunch with her in the classroom instead of the cafeteria.

Interestingly, Stolberg’s granddaughter is not the first member of her family to have Eastham as a teacher.  Eastham also taught Stolberg’s son, Nick, when he was in elementary school.  The connection between the two families is a surprising and wonderful legacy in the school district.

As Stolberg and Eastham reminisced about their connection over the years, Stolberg’s granddaughter gazed up at them.  Who knows?  With such great inspiration, maybe someday she will decide to be a teacher too.

###




Attached Media Files: Union Ridge Elementary School teacher, Sara Eastham (at left) with Karen Stolberg, her teacher when she attended elementary school in Ridgefield.

PPB Releases Picture of Suspect Arrested for Homicide Warrant and New Gun Charges (PHOTO) (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 02/18/19 2:40 PM
Cooper Photo
Cooper Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/3056/122130/thumb_Cooper_pic_021819.png
Thomas E. Cooper, Jr., the 31 year-old male arrested and booked on a Washington State homicide warrant and new gun charges was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center. (PHOTO).

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESAGE BELOW###

UPDATE: Correction on News Release - 02/18/19

The original case related to the out-of state warrant is from a Lakewood Police Department incident. Please direct any inquiries related to the original investigation to Lakewood Police Department, not Seattle Police Department.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

Suspect Wanted for Out-of-State Homicide Arrested in Southeast Portland-Gun Seized (PHOTO)

On Monday, February 18th, 2019, members of the Portland Police Bureau's Gun Violence Reduction Team located a suspect with a warrant for an out-of-state homicide at the 24-hour Fitness at 4546 SE McGloughlin Boulevard. Officers safely took 31 year-old Thomas Cooper into custody. A loaded handgun was seized from the locker Cooper was using in the workout facility. (PHOTO)

Cooper will be lodged at the Multnomah County Detention Center on the out-of-state warrant and local charges of Unlawful Possession of a Firearm and Possession of a Loaded Firearm in Public. Cooper has not been booked yet and a photo of him will be available after his booking.

For details related to the case precipitating the warrant, refer to Seattle Police Department for comment.

This arrest highlights the on-gong efforts of the Gun Violence Reduction Team to locate and apprehend those involved in gun-related crimes. The public can help in these efforts to increase safety in the community by providing information, even anonymously.
Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved homicide or other felony crime, and tipsters can remain anonymous.

To submit tips:

- Visit the App Store and download "P3 Tips" to submit secure and anonymous tips.
- Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823
- Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

To see other featured and unsolved cases, please visit https://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/



Attached Media Files: Cooper Photo

West bound Mission St closed at I5 due to motor vehicle accident
Salem Police Dept. - 02/18/19 2:36 PM

On scene of a crash of a traffic trailer, fuel spill, no injuries.  


PeaceHealth Offers Free Teen Heart Screenings Saturday
PeaceHealth - 02/18/19 2:30 PM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center in Vancouver, WA, and PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center in Longview, WA will offer free heart screenings for teenagers this coming Saturday.

It is estimated that up to 7,000 American teens die every year from undetected heart conditions. Those who appear in the best of health are at the greatest risk of Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA), as SCA is three times more likely to strike youth athletes than their less active friends.  Many of those deaths could be prevented through basic testing, education, and parental awareness.

In Cowlitz County, PeaceHealth St. John is excited to partner with Spencer’s HeartStrong Foundation for the 7th consecutive year, offering free screenings to local student athletes. In Clark County, PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center is partnering with the Quinn Driscoll Foundation for the 9th consecutive year of free community screenings. Both organizations will happily accept donations, which will go to enhance emergency cardiac care in the community.

HOW TO REGISTER:
In Clark County:
Young Champions Teen Heart Screenings
PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center – Firstenburg Tower
Saturday, Feb. 23 from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Register online at www.peacehealth.org/southwest/young-champions-teen-heart-screenings

In Cowlitz County:
Spencer’s HeartStrong Teen Heart Screenings
PeaceHealth Medical Group Lakefront Clinic
Saturday, Feb. 23 from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Register online at www.stopyouthsca.org/

Screening includes:
ECG/EKG
Abbreviated echocardiogram (based on family history and/or ECG findings)
Blood pressure check
Review of personal and family health history.
No physician referral is required, and all results are confidential.

Who is eligible?
Any middle or high school athlete, band member or cheerleader from 12-18 years old is eligible. Although designed for the student athlete, this screening also accommodates all children in the age group who may be at risk. This screening does not take the place of the pre-performance examination requirement for all student athletes who wish to participate in a school sport.

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 900 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.

About the Quinn Driscoll Foundation:
The Quinn Driscoll Foundation is named for 13-year-old Quinn Driscoll, a student athlete at Wy' East Middle School who died in 2009 after suffering cardiac arrest while running on the track during gym class. Quinn had undiagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a serious heart condition that is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young athletes. Learn more at www.quinndriscollfoundation.org

About Spencers HeartStrong Foundation
On September 9, 2012, Spencer Best, an otherwise healthy 16 year old, went to a basketball workout in his high school gym. 30 minutes later, he collapsed…his heart stopped working. His  coach and a nearby adult began the "chain of survival" by calling 911  and starting CPR. An AED arrived and delivered a shock to Spencer's  heart nearly 8 minutes later. Because of the actions of adult bystanders, his coach, and medical first responders, Spencer was able to survive his Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA), and have another chance at life.  As a result, Spencer’s HeartStrong Foundation was formed. Learn more at www.stopyouthsca.org

 


Ridgefield School District Schedules Take Your Parent to School Day (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 02/18/19 2:10 PM
Ruby Wheelon shows her mother, Andrea, the book she is reading in Sara Eastham's second grade class at Union Ridge Elementary during Ridgefield School District's Take Your Parents to School Day.
Ruby Wheelon shows her mother, Andrea, the book she is reading in Sara Eastham's second grade class at Union Ridge Elementary during Ridgefield School District's Take Your Parents to School Day.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/889/122128/thumb_UR2.jpg

Monday, February 18, 2019 – Ridgefield, Washington – Ridgefield School District held its third annual Take Your Parent to School Day in January.  Students at all area schools had the opportunity to bring their parents with them for a partial or full day of class.  Parents were active participants in the classes, and for many of them, what they saw was very different than what they experienced as kids in school. 

At South Ridge Elementary, Principal Jill Neyenhouse met with parents to explain how problem-solving and critical thinking are now interwoven into the elementary school curriculum.  Parents worked together in groups to solve “alphabet equations” like There are 26 L in the A (26 Letters in the Alphabet) and “perplexers” (complex riddles). 

In Sara Eastham’s second grade class at Union Ridge Elementary, students demonstrated how they made notes as they read books.  They showed parents and grandparents books full of sticky notes, marking pages that had words they didn’t know, important plot points, and more.  The process helps them read carefully and critically.    

At View Ridge Middle School, David Jacobson’s history class brought parents and students into a “four corners discussion”.  A statement is read about the topic they have been studying.  Each corner of the room has a sign:  Agree, Somewhat Agree, Disagree, or Somewhat Disagree.  Everyone chooses a position, then an active discussion begins, with students engaging with others and defending their thoughts on the topic. 

At every grade level, parents were excited to experience firsthand the classrooms where their children learn every day.  Parent Heliodoro Garcia has one son in high school, one in elementary school, and one toddler.  He was at South Ridge Elementary School with his middle son, Mateo.  “With my older son, I used to come to school only to play soccer with kids in the field.  Now it’s good to have a time to come to the school and have lunch with him, see his class.” 

Parent and teacher Audrey Scott enjoyed the opportunity to participate in the event at View Ridge Middle School.  “As a middle school parent and a kindergarten teacher in the Ridgefield School District, I have often wondered what the classroom environment is like at the middle school level,” she said.  “I attended Mrs. Allen’s literacy class and thoroughly enjoyed the thought-provoking text, meaningful discussion and the overall warmth and thoughtfulness of her classroom.”

Participation in Take Your Parent to School Day was higher than expected; parents welcomed the opportunity to see students and teachers in action.  While there is only one Take Your Parent to School Day this year, parents are always welcome as volunteers in the schools.  Background checks are required, and forms can be obtained at the school office.

###




Attached Media Files: Ruby Wheelon shows her mother, Andrea, the book she is reading in Sara Eastham's second grade class at Union Ridge Elementary during Ridgefield School District's Take Your Parents to School Day.

UPDATE: Correction on News Release
Portland Police Bureau - 02/18/19 1:50 PM
The original case related to the out-of state warrant is from a Lakewood Police Department incident. Please direct any inquiries related to the original investigation to Lakewood Police Department, not Seattle Police Department.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

Suspect Wanted for Out-of-State Homicide Arrested in Southeast Portland-Gun Seized (PHOTO)

On Monday, February 18th, 2019, members of the Portland Police Bureau's Gun Violence Reduction Team located a suspect with a warrant for an out-of-state homicide at the 24-hour Fitness at 4546 SE McGloughlin Boulevard. Officers safely took 31 year-old Thomas Cooper into custody. A loaded handgun was seized from the locker Cooper was using in the workout facility. (PHOTO)

Cooper will be lodged at the Multnomah County Detention Center on the out-of-state warrant and local charges of Unlawful Possession of a Firearm and Possession of a Loaded Firearm in Public. Cooper has not been booked yet and a photo of him will be available after his booking.

For details related to the case precipitating the warrant, refer to Seattle Police Department for comment.

This arrest highlights the on-gong efforts of the Gun Violence Reduction Team to locate and apprehend those involved in gun-related crimes. The public can help in these efforts to increase safety in the community by providing information, even anonymously.
Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved homicide or other felony crime, and tipsters can remain anonymous.

To submit tips:

- Visit the App Store and download "P3 Tips" to submit secure and anonymous tips.
- Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823
- Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

To see other featured and unsolved cases, please visit https://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###PPB###

Portland police monitoring rumors of bias attacks
Portland Police Bureau - 02/18/19 1:26 PM
On Sunday, February 10, 2019, police responded to a report of an assault in the area of SE 15th Avenue and SE Morrison Street. The officer who responded talked to the community member, but the officer noted that the person was intoxicated and appeared to have fallen. The person was transported by ambulance for medical treatment.

The victim called to make an assault report later from the hospital. Initially it was not reported as a bias attack, but online posts suggested the victim believed it may have been. At that time, the case was assigned to bias crime detectives in the Detectives Division Assault Detail for follow up. Detectives reached out to community members, including the reporting person. So far the detectives have been unable to confirm that a crime occurred or that anyone else was involved in the injury to the reporting person. However, the investigation continues, and detectives ask for anyone with information to come forward.

Since then, PPB has learned of numerous social media posts suggesting there have been a rash of attacks on LGTBQ community members in southeast Portland. As of now Bias Crimes Detectives have not received any recent bias related attacks.

PPB has proactively reached out to community stakeholders to brief them on what we have learned, and to encourage any victims or witnesses to contact law enforcement.

The Bureau investigates all reports of bias-motivated crimes and encourages any member of our community who is the victim of such a crime to contact law enforcement. Under Oregon law, bias crimes are defined as any criminal act that targets a victim based on the suspect's perception of the victim's race, color, religion, sexual orientation, disability, or national origin. Detectives work to determine whether or not bias elements are present during the reported crime that align with Oregon law as defined in the Oregon Revised Statutes (ORS):

ORS 166.165 - Intimidation in the First Degree - https://www.oregonlaws.org/ors/166.165

ORS 166.155 - Intimidation in the Second Degree - https://www.oregonlaws.org/ors/166.155

If you have been the victim of a bias crime assault or you are witnessing one, immediately call 9-1-1. If you have been the victim of a different bias crime and the suspect is no longer present, such as vandalism or graffiti, please call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

To learn more about bias crime investigations and reported bias/hate crime statistics within the City of Portland, please visit https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/77066

Additionally, the City of Portland is a partner in Portland United Against Hate, which is a community initiated partnership of Community Based Organizations, Neighborhood Associations, concerned communities and the City. To learn more, please visit https://www.portlandoregon.gov/oni/72583

###PPB###

Suspect Wanted for Out-of-State Homicide Arrested in Southeast Portland-Gun Seized (PHOTO) (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 02/18/19 12:57 PM
Firearm photo
Firearm photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/3056/122123/thumb_Cooper_Gun.jpg
On Monday, February 18th, 2019, members of the Portland Police Bureau's Gun Violence Reduction Team located a suspect with a warrant for an out-of-state homicide at the 24-hour Fitness at 4546 SE McGloughlin Boulevard. Officers safely took 31 year-old Thomas Cooper into custody. A loaded handgun was seized from the locker Cooper was using in the workout facility. (PHOTO)

Cooper will be lodged at the Multnomah County Detention Center on the out-of-state warrant and local charges of Unlawful Possession of a Firearm and Possession of a Loaded Firearm in Public. Cooper has not been booked yet and a photo of him will be available after his booking.

For details related to the case precipitating the warrant, refer to Seattle Police Department for comment.

This arrest highlights the on-gong efforts of the Gun Violence Reduction Team to locate and apprehend those involved in gun-related crimes. The public can help in these efforts to increase safety in the community by providing information, even anonymously.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved homicide or other felony crime, and tipsters can remain anonymous.

To submit tips:

- Visit the App Store and download "P3 Tips" to submit secure and anonymous tips.
- Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823
- Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

To see other featured and unsolved cases, please visit https://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Firearm photo

Update: Investigation Continues Regarding Pursuit That Led to Gales Creek Water Rescue
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/18/19 12:50 PM

This information is being released by the Washington County Sheriff's Office on behalf of the North Plains Police Department, which is the lead agency for this investigation.

The North Plains Police Department continues to investigate Friday’s pursuit that ended with the water rescue from Gales Creek.

The rescued passenger is being identified as a 21-year-old Gaston woman. She is listed in stable condition at a Portland hospital. She is considered a victim in this ongoing investigation.

The suspect has been discharged from the hospital.

We anticipate additional information will be released in the coming days as the investigation progresses.

# # #

Pursuit Leads to Crash into Gales Creek, Water Rescue of Passenger

Videos and photos of the scene are available here (caution for language).

On Friday, February 15, 2019, at 8:14 a.m., a North Plains Police Officer saw a car driving recklessly at a high rate of speed on Highway 26 westbound near Northwest Glencoe Road. The officer tried to pull the car over but the driver, later identified as 23-year-old Jeremiah Libbee of Hillsboro, did not stop. The pursuit went from Highway 26 and then west on Highway 6.

Near the intersection of Highway 6 and Northwest Gales Creek Road, a Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputy set up spike strips. The deputy saw Mr. Libbee was sideways in the on-coming lane of traffic at a high rate of speed. The deputy was attempting to remove the spike strips from Mr. Libbee’s path because the car was out of control, but Mr. Libbee drove over the spike strips before the deputy could get out of his way.

Mr. Libbee then crashed over a steep embankment, hit a large tree, and landed 20 feet below in Gales Creek. The violent crash heavily damaged the car and officers saw Mr. Libbee was being washed hundreds of yards down the fast-flowing creek before emergency responders were able to pull him out. Mr. Libbee was taken to a Portland hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

Officers also saw there was an adult woman trapped in the front seat of the car. Because of the crash, she was pinned inside the car in the middle of the river. Emergency crews had to use a boat to hook tow cables to the car, in order to pull it out of the water so that she could be extricated. That complicated rescue effort involved dozens of people and took over an hour and a half to complete. At one point, the woman was underwater while trapped inside the car. She was taken to a Portland hospital with critical injuries.

The Oregon State Police responded to help with the crash investigation. The North Plains Police Department will continue the criminal investigation into the pursuit and any additional charges against Mr. Libbee. Multiple agencies were involved in helping rescue Mr. Libbee and his passenger from the river and the North Plains Police Department specifically wishes to thank the tow truck operators who worked together to pull the woman trapped in the car out of the river.


"Shrek The Musical" at Valley Catholic School (Photo)
Valley Catholic School - 02/18/19 11:56 AM
Cast members left to right: Quinn Schroeder, Lauren White, Major Johnson, Maggie Trash
Cast members left to right: Quinn Schroeder, Lauren White, Major Johnson, Maggie Trash
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/90/122121/thumb_shrek_the_musical.jpg

"Shrek The Musical” at Valley Catholic School

Based on the DreamWorks Animation Motion Picture and the book by William Steig

Produced by special arrangement with the Musical Theatre International (MTI)

BEAVERTON, Ore. – Shrek The Musical – based on the DreamWorks Animation Motion Picture and the book by William Steig – comes to life on the Valley Catholic stage this Spring.The Valley Catholic High School Theatre Department will present their spring production on March 1-3 and March 8-10. Friday and Saturday performances are at 7:00 p.m. Sunday matinees begin at 2:00 p.m. Valley Catholic High School is located at 4275 SW 148th Ave., Beaverton. The high school is on the Sisters of St. Mary of Oregon campus on Murray Blvd. between TV Highway and Farmington Rd.

Tickets can be purchased online at ValleyCatholic.org. Tickets purchased online will be available at "will call" on the day of the performance. Tickets are $10 for adults, $6 for students and seniors and $3 for children under five.

Originally produced on Broadway by DreamWorks Theatricals and Neal Street Productions, Shrek The Musical explores the themes of self-acceptance and true love, adapting the original film into a high energy musical that is both hilarious and touching. It is a fairytale adventure and an inspirational story that makes this the perfect show for the whole family.

"What makes this musical special is its heart. The fact that it is performed by students with some of the kindest and most generous hearts I’ve ever known, makes this a very, very special production indeed,” said Ginnie Sutfin, director and drama teacher at Valley Catholic. "We have a cast and crew of 50 students from sixth through twelfth grades who have gone ‘all in’ to make sure the production is a great success.”

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Attached Media Files: Cast members left to right: Quinn Schroeder, Lauren White, Major Johnson, Maggie Trash

Clark County measles outbreak remains at 61 confirmed cases
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/18/19 10:46 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health is continuing its measles outbreak investigation and has not identified any new confirmed or suspect cases. Since Jan. 1, Public Health has identified 61 confirmed cases. Public Health has not identified any new locations where people may have been exposed to measles.

Here are the details of the confirmed cases:

  • Age
    • 1 to 10 years: 44 cases
    • 11 to 18 years: 14 cases
    • 19 to 29 years: one case
    • 30 to 39 years: two cases
  • Immunization status
    • Unimmunized: 54 cases
    • Unverified: five cases
    • 1 MMR vaccine: two cases
  • Hospitalization: one case (none currently)

Public Health is not providing any additional information about the two cases with one dose of MMR in order to protect the patients’ privacy.

For a complete list of exposure sites, visit the Public Health measles investigation webpage.

Clark County Public Health is urging anyone who has been exposed at an identified location and believes they have symptoms of measles to call their health care provider prior to visiting the medical office to make a plan that avoids exposing others in the waiting room. People who believe they have symptoms of measles should not go directly to medical offices, urgent care centers or emergency departments (unless experiencing a medical emergency) without calling in advance.

Additional resources

For information about additional exposure sites in Oregon, linked to the confirmed case in Multnomah County, visit the Oregon Health Authority measles webpage. For information about other measles cases in Washington, visit the Washington State Department of Health measles webpage.

Public Health has established a call center for questions related to the investigation. Anyone who has questions about public exposures should call 360.397.8021. The call center is open daily.

Anyone with questions about their measles immunity or the measles vaccine should contact their primary care provider. Clark County Public Health does not provide immunizations or testing for immunity.

If you are unsure of your family's immunization status, you can view, download and print your family's immunization information online at MyIR or request a copy of your immunization record from the Washington State Department of Health.


Lunar New Year: Celebrate the year of Pig at WSU Vancouver
WSU Vancouver - 02/18/19 10:29 AM

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Washington State University invites community members to learn about and celebrate Lunar New Year—the Spring Festival celebration. Enjoy live traditional music and Tai chi performances, Chinese cuisine, make-and-take crafts, games, a live Lion dance and other family-friendly activities. The free event will be held from 3 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 20 in the Firstenburg Student Commons on the WSU Vancouver campus.

For Chinese, in China and other ethnic communities around the world, the lunar new year is the most important and festive holiday of the year. It celebrates the end of the coldest days and the beginning of spring including planting and new starts.

2019 is the Year of the Pig. Their chubby faces and big ears are signs of fortune. In Chinese culture, pigs are the symbol of wealth.

About WSU Vancouver

WSU Vancouver is located at 14204 N.E. Salmon Creek Ave. in Vancouver, east of the 134th Street exit from either I-5 or I-205, or via C-Tran bus service.

As one of six campuses of the Washington State University system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

# # #


Missing Mother and Child Located at Silver Falls State Park **Update** (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/18/19 10:06 AM
2019-02/1294/122117/SAR1.jpeg
2019-02/1294/122117/SAR1.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1294/122117/thumb_SAR1.jpeg

The updated images show the mother and son as they exited the trails with members of Team 18.  

Early this morning, around 3:00 a.m., deputies with the Marion County Sheriff’s Office and troopers with the Oregon State Police responded to a call for help at Silver Falls State Park.  Joshua Dixsen, age 25, of Salem called to report his girlfriend and her 3 year old child were lost somewhere inside the state park.

Mr. Dixsen, his girlfriend Josie Chysm, age 24 of Salem and her three year old son left for a hike around noon on Sunday.  Sometime during the hike the family became disoriented and lost. After the sunset, the couple decided that Ms. Chysm and her son would wait under a tree while Mr. Dixsen walked out for help.  

Searchers with the Marion County Search and Rescue Team responded to the area and began coordinating efforts both on foot and in vehicles.  At 8:30 a.m., ground searchers located Ms. Chysm and her son along the Rim Trail inside of the park. The Sheriff’s Office is happy to report that the pair are cold and wet but otherwise unharmed.  

At the time of this release rescuers are walking the pair out where they will be evaluated by paramedics and reunited with family.  When the family set out they had very limited gear and were not prepared for the winter weather.

Experts with our Search and Rescue recommend you always carry enough supplies to survive at least 24 hours even when setting out on a day hike.  These items should consist of food, water, first aid supplies, warm clothing and instruments for navigation. Often times in these remote areas cell coverage is not an option so hikers should be prepared to treat emergencies until rescuers can arrive.    

The Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the Oregon State Police, Oregon State Parks, Oregon Office of Emergency Management, Mountain Wave Search and Rescue, Marion County Sheriff’s Office Team 18 and the Marion County Sheriff’s Office Jeep Patrol.  




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/1294/122117/SAR1.jpeg , 2019-02/1294/122117/SAR2.jpeg , 2019-02/1294/122117/C53DD30A-30B1-4C73-992B-D2CB73E093F6.jpeg , 2019-02/1294/122117/157CFE01-51A9-438C-A4B3-981D81151E98.jpeg

Driver arrested after crashing vehicle into house in Brentwood-Darlington neighborhood (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 02/18/19 9:50 AM
Oleg Fedosov photo
Oleg Fedosov photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/3056/122118/thumb_Oleg_Fedosov_photo.jpg
On Monday, February 18, 2019, at 2:39 A.M., Portland Police received a call of a crash involving a vehicle into a house in the 4900 Block of Southeast Harney Drive. Responding officers found the house was occupied at the time of the crash. However, there were no injuries to anyone in the house.

Officers contacted the driver of the vehicle, who was also not injured, and determined that he was impaired by intoxicants. They arrested 40-year-old Oleg Fedosov and booked him at the Multnomah County Detention Center on charges of Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants (DUII), Reckless Driving, Criminal Mischief in the First Degree, and two counts of Reckless Endangerment. (Photo)

Drivers impaired by alcohol or drugs injure and kill thousands of people every year. People consuming alcohol or drugs are urged not to get behind the wheel and should have a sober driver or utilize taxis, rideshare companies or transit so everyone is safe on our streets.

The Portland Police Bureau is committed to working with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work towards reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Oleg Fedosov photo

Pilot Butte Master Plan Advisory Committee meets Feb. 28 in Bend
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 02/18/19 7:00 AM

BEND, Ore. – The Pilot Butte Master Plan Advisory Committee will be working to guide and develop recommendations to the update of the master plan for Pilot Butte State Scenic Viewpoint 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Feb. 28 at the Bend Park and Recreation District Office, 799 SW Columbia St., Bend. The meeting is open to the public.

On the agenda: review information gathered by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) to inform advisory group process; hold workshop exercises to develop design or management recommendations for access, trails and various park zones; determine areas of agreement and questions for public input.

A detailed meeting agenda will be available online: pilotbuttemasterplan.com

No public comments will be accepted during the meeting. The next opportunity for in-person comment will be at a public meeting about the plan April 8 in Bend.

The 16 member advisory committee consists of volunteers from various local and statewide groups with an interest in outdoor recreation. A full list of committee member affiliations is available on the master plan website: pilotbuttemasterplan.com/q-and-a/

A park master plan guides the development and use of park facilities. It also provides guidelines for the protection and management of important natural, cultural and scenic resources within the park. Master plans are on a 20-year update cycle and are subject to final approval by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.

An initial draft master plan for Pilot Butte State Scenic Viewpoint, last updated in 1995, is expected to be completed by July 2019.

Learn more about the master plan at pilotbuttemasterplan.com.

Individuals that require special accommodations to attend the meeting must contact Rachel Hill, OPRD Park and Recreation Planner, at least three days in advance: 503-947-8618 or achel.Hill@oregon.gov">Rachel.Hill@oregon.gov.


PPB Investigating Shooting in Mill Park Neighborhood-One Person Deceased
Portland Police Bureau - 02/18/19 5:20 AM
On Monday, February 18th, 2019, at 12:47 a.m., East Precinct officers responded to the report of gunfire at the Tik Tok Restaurant, located at 11215 Southeast Division Avenue.

Officers and medical personnel arrived in the area and located an injured adult male. The injured male was transported by medical personnel to a Portland hospital for treatment for traumatic injuries. This male was later pronounced deceased at an area hospital.

Members of the Tactical Operations Division's Gun Violence Reduction Team responded initially to investigate the incident. Once it was determined the victim had died, the Detective Division's Homicide Team responded and continued the investigation.

Based on preliminary information, it does not appear that there is any ongoing risk to the public.

Neighborhood traffic may be affected due to this active crime scene and investigation. Southeast 112th Avenue from Division to Lincoln Streets is closed and expected to remain so for several hours.

Anyone with information about this incident should contact Detective Brad Clifton at (503) 823-0696.

###PPB###

Armed Robbery
Vancouver Police Dept. - 02/18/19 4:27 AM

Vancouver, Wash. - On February 17, 2019, at approximately 2131 hours, Vancouver Police responded to the Plaid Pantry at 1002 W. Fourth Plain Boulevard, for an armed robbery that had just occurred.  Information received was a male entered the store, pointed a small semi-automatic handgun at the clerk, and demanded cash and cigarettes.  The suspect fled with an undisclosed amount of cash and several packs of cigarettes.  Initial reports were the suspect left on foot westbound away from the store, but it was later learned the suspect actually fled eastbound.  A K9 track was attempted, but the suspect was not located.  

The suspect is described as a black male, late teens or early twenties, 5'8" to 6'-0" tall, thin build.

Investigation is continuing, and no further information available at this time.  


Sun. 02/17/19
Man Dies Two Days After Single Vehicle Crash Into a Tree (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/17/19 6:17 PM
Scene photo
Scene photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1128/122113/thumb_Bronson_crash.JPG

On Friday, February 15, 2019, at 6 p.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a single vehicle crash at NW Bronson Road and NW Roseburg Terrace in the community of Bethany.  A witness reported seeing a car leave the road and hit a tree.  Responding emergency crews had to extricate the driver, 27-year-old Zachary Benjamin of Hillsboro.  Mr. Benjamin was taken to a Portland hospital with life-threatening injuries.  On Sunday, February 17, Mr. Benjamin died at the hospital.

The Washington County Crash Analysis Reconstruction Team responded to assist with the investigation.  Deputies do not yet have a suspected cause for the crash which remains under investigation.




Attached Media Files: Media Release , Scene photo

Clark County measles outbreak grows to 61 confirmed cases
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/17/19 4:01 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health is continuing its measles outbreak investigation and has identified two new confirmed cases. Since Jan. 1, Public Health has identified 61 confirmed cases and currently is not investigating any suspect cases. Public Health has identified two new locations where people may have been exposed to measles.

Here are the details of the confirmed cases:

  • Age
    • 1 to 10 years: 44 cases
    • 11 to 18 years: 14 cases
    • 19 to 29 years: one case
    • 30 to 39 years: two cases
  • Immunization status
    • Unimmunized: 54 cases
    • Unverified: five cases
    • 1 MMR vaccine: two cases
  • Hospitalization: one case (none currently)

Public Health is not providing any additional information about the two cases with one dose of MMR in order to protect the patients’ privacy.

Here are the two new locations where people may have been exposed to measles:

Schools:

  • Image Elementary School, 4400 NE 122nd Ave., Vancouver on Monday, Feb. 11; Tuesday, Feb. 12; Wednesday, Feb. 13; Thursday, Feb. 14; and Friday, Feb. 15.
  • Pacific Middle School, 2017 NE 172nd Ave., Vancouver on Monday, Feb. 11; Tuesday, Feb. 12; and Wednesday, Feb. 13.

For a complete list of exposure sites, visit the Public Health measles investigation webpage.

Clark County Public Health is urging anyone who has been exposed at an identified location and believes they have symptoms of measles to call their health care provider prior to visiting the medical office to make a plan that avoids exposing others in the waiting room. People who believe they have symptoms of measles should not go directly to medical offices, urgent care centers or emergency departments (unless experiencing a medical emergency) without calling in advance.

Additional resources

For information about additional exposure sites in Oregon, linked to the confirmed case in Multnomah County, visit the Oregon Health Authority measles webpage. For information about other measles cases in Washington, visit the Washington State Department of Health measles webpage.

Public Health has established a call center for questions related to the investigation. Anyone who has questions about public exposures should call 360.397.8021. The call center is open daily.

Anyone with questions about their measles immunity or the measles vaccine should contact their primary care provider. Clark County Public Health does not provide immunizations or testing for immunity.

If you are unsure of your family's immunization status, you can view, download and print your family's immunization information online at MyIR or request a copy of your immunization record from the Washington State Department of Health.


DUII Enforcement Patrol Scheduled During Seafood & Wine Festival (Photo)
Lincoln City Police - 02/17/19 12:18 PM
2019-02/6142/122111/Dont_Drink__and__Drive.jpg
2019-02/6142/122111/Dont_Drink__and__Drive.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/6142/122111/thumb_Dont_Drink__and__Drive.jpg

The Lincoln City Police Department plans on utilizing DUII Grant funds to put an extra patrol officer on duty on Saturday, February 23, 2019 for DUII Enforcement. This enforcement operation will occur in conjunction with enhanced DUII Enforcement efforts by the Newport Police Department, the Oregon State Police and the Lincoln County Sheriff’s during the Newport Seafood & Wine Festival weekend. This county wide enforcement effort is designed to increase the number of law enforcement officers on patrol with an emphasis on seeking out drivers who are impaired by alcohol or drugs. The goal of these enhanced enforcement efforts are to increase the safety of the citizens and visitors of Lincoln County by getting drunk and impaired drivers off the roadways. 

The police department last utilized the DUII Grant funds for two enhanced enforcement operations during the Christmas / Years “High Visibility Enforcement” time period, which ran from December 13th, 2018 through January 1st, 2019. During those operations several traffic citations were issued including three for driving while suspended, and three drivers were arrested for DUII. 

The Enhanced DUII Enforcement grant funds are a valuable resource that assists us in improving the traffic safety in our community. Our goal is simple; to save lives and prevent injuries caused by impaired driving crashes. These grant funds were made possible through the Oregon Department of Transportation and Oregon Impact.

Submitted By:

Sergeant Jeffrey G. Winn

Lincoln City Police Department




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/6142/122111/Dont_Drink__and__Drive.jpg

Vancouver Firefighters fight house fire in West Vancouver
Vancouver Fire Dept. - 02/17/19 7:39 AM

Vancouver Firefighters battled another structure fire Saturday evening with the help of Clark County Fire District 6. A total of 5 fire engines, 1 ladder truck, and 3 battalion chiefs were sent to 2120 E 8th st after the homeowner called 911 when a fire started inside the kitchen of his home. Crews arrived to find heavy fire and smoke showing from the 2 story house and immediately pulled a hose line to keep the fire from spreading as it was rapidly growing inside. Once additional fire crews arrived, they were able to get the fires progress stopped by an aggressive interior fire attack and had the fire under control in less than 20 minutes from the time of dispatch. Unfortunately 1 cat died during the fire after not being able to escape. 1 resident was treated on scene for smoke inhalation, but was not transported. 3 people are displaced, and are being assisted by the Red Cross. Vancouver Firefighters would like to remind residents of a couple important safety messages, use caution when cooking, have an extinguisher readily available in the event of a fire, and never reenter a burning structure for pets or personal belongings.  

Picture will be attached


Sat. 02/16/19
UPDATE: Missing Girl Found Safe
Portland Police Bureau - 02/16/19 9:58 PM
The missing 13-year-old girl with autism, Arianna Runs Through, has been found safe and has been reunited with family. A social media tip led to locating her at Lloyd Center. The Portland Police Bureau thanks the public, the media, and those on social media who helped look for her.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

PPB Seeks Public's Help Locating Missing 13-Year Old Girl with Autism (PHOTO)

The Portland Police Bureau is asking for the public's help to locate a missing 13-year-old girl named Arianna Runs Through. Arianna was last seen in the area of the Gateway Transit Center on an Eastbound Max train at approximately 9:45 a.m. on Saturday, February 16, 2019.

Arianna is a Native American female, 5'1", 100 pounds and was last seen wearing knee high black boots, a blue jacket and gray pants. Her hair is long in the back. Arianna has autism, but is able to communicate verbally. She likes to go into stores, but does not have money to pay for anything.

Officers are searching for Arianna and are asking for the public's help to locate her.

Based on the information thus far, it is believed that Arianna snuck out of the hotel she was staying at and likely got lost. There are no indications of foul play

Anyone seeing Arianna is asked to immediately call 9-1-1.

###PPB###

PPB Seeks Public's Help Locating Missing 13-Year Old Girl with Autism (PHOTO) (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 02/16/19 6:14 PM
Missing Arianna
Missing Arianna
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/3056/122106/thumb_Arianna_Missing.jpg
The Portland Police Bureau is asking for the public's help to locate a missing 13-year-old girl named Arianna Runs Through. Arianna was last seen in the area of the Gateway Transit Center on an Eastbound Max train at approximately 9:45 a.m. on Saturday, February 16, 2019.

Arianna is a Native American female, 5'1", 100 pounds and was last seen wearing knee high black boots, a blue jacket and gray pants. Her hair is long in the back. Arianna has autism, but is able to communicate verbally. She likes to go into stores, but does not have money to pay for anything.

Officers are searching for Arianna and are asking for the public's help to locate her.

Based on the information thus far, it is believed that Arianna snuck out of the hotel she was staying at and likely got lost. There are no indications of foul play

Anyone seeing Arianna is asked to immediately call 9-1-1.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Missing Arianna

Fatal Crash Outside Harrisburg
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 02/16/19 5:39 PM

Linn County Sheriff Jim Yon reports this morning at 0957 a.m. his deputies investigated a single vehicle fatal motor vehicle crash on Diamond Hill Drive near the intersection of Weatherford Road, east of Harrisburg.    

The driver of a white 2011 Jeep Patriot was identified as Jamie Michelle Nephew, 51 of Salem Oregon.  She was deceased upon arrival of first responders.  The passenger, Robert Earl Sims Jr, also of Salem, was unable to exit the vehicle and had to have his seatbelt cut off so that he could get out of the car.  He was transported to Riverbend Medical Center in Springfield with minor injuries.    
 
The investigation revealed Nephew drove off of the roadway, striking a culvert which caused the vehicle to go airborne for approximately 80 feet before landing back on Diamond Hill drive.  The vehicle then drove back off of the roadway and into a field.  The vehicle ultimately came to rest in the field.  Once the vehicle stopped, Nephew was able to exit the vehicle but she succumbed to her injuries in the field.  Drugs may have played a part in the crash.  
 
Linn County Deputies were assisted by members of Harrisburg and Coburg Fire Departments.   A Linn County Deputy Medical Examiner assisted with the investigation.   Aasum-Dufour Funeral Home out of Albany responded to the scene and removed the deceased.  The investigation is continuing.


More than 300 Firefighters Attend Weekend Training in Salem (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/16/19 3:37 PM
Winter Fire School
Winter Fire School
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1187/122103/thumb_2019_WFS_J.jpg

More than 300 career and volunteer firefighters from more than 100 fire agencies (city and tribal fire departments, fire districts, and wildland) throughout the state are at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem this weekend for the State's annual Winter Fire School.

This is the 16th annual Winter Fire School hosted by the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) at the Oregon Public Safety Academy 4190 Aumsville Highway in Salem.

Eleven classes are being offered by the National Fire Academy, DPSST, and the City of Dallas Fire & EMS Department.
Classes range from leadership topics such as Health and Safety Officer, Strategy and Tactics for Initial Company Operations, Decision Making for Initial Company Operations, Leadership in Supervision: Creating Environments for Professional Growth, Perspectives in Thinking, Leadership in Supervision: Frameworks to Success, Wildland Urban Interface Firefighting for Structural Company Officer, and hands-on classes such as Vehicle Extrication and Back to the Basics: Hose and Ladders Instructor Course.

DPSST Director Eriks Gabliks said "DPSST is proud to offer this weekend training event each year.  This event is held in a weekend setting because over 80% of the firefighters in Oregon are volunteers. This two-day event is the largest two-day fire training experience in the Pacific Northwest that is offered free of charge.  The hands-on classes being offered are using training props which DPSST recently received thanks to a FEMA Assistance to Firefighters Grant."

While many people are aware of DPSST's law enforcement training programs, they may not realize that DPSST is also the state fire training organization for Oregon and provides hundreds of training opportunities to firefighters each year at the Academy and at regional locations statewide.

DPSST appreciates the red carpet hospitality local businesses, and the Salem community as a whole, roll-out for the career and volunteer firefighters attending this weekend training opportunity.

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 45,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.




Attached Media Files: Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School , Winter Fire School

Attempted abduction reported revised assault IV
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/16/19 3:10 PM

Today, 02/16, about 9:15 am, Clark County Sheriff’s Office responded to a reported attempted abduction occurring at the 10700 block of NE 117th Ave, (HWY 503)

A lone 15 year old teenage female walking south bound on the sidewalk, eastside of the roadway.

Suspect and vehicle had stopped on the west side of the roadway at the intersection of NE 107th street as observed by a witness in the area. The witness then noticed the female walking and the driver/suspect of the parked vehicle exit it.

Witness observed the suspect walk to a point directly across the street from the teenage female, then crossed the four lane roadway making contact with the female.

In the mind of the witness he believed he was witnessing an abduction in process. The witness taking action approached the suspect and teenage female to intervene.

The teenage female was aware of the approaching suspect crossing the lanes of the roadway who engaged her in conversation. She was not interested in his conversations admiring her and told him to leave her alone of she would call the police.

Between the declines by the teenage female of the suspects verbal advances and the approaching witness the suspect left.

Vehicle and license plate recorded in addition to the suspect’s description by the witness. The registered owner of vehicle and suspect’s description are similar but are not released at this time while investigation continues and attempted contact is made.

There were no overt physical efforts by the suspect to physically abduct the female.  After discussion with the prosecutor of call for law enforcement inquires, our case facts lack the “substantial step” of this attempted crime.


I-84 EASTBOUND is now open at Exit 216, 6 miles east of Pendleton (Photo)
ODOT: East. Ore. - 02/16/19 2:58 PM
Slow down around MP 257 crash site
Slow down around MP 257 crash site
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1204/122101/thumb_61B8E6F8-E3FF-428C-A433-CABDF8C063CF.jpeg

I-84 EASTBOUND is now open to traffic at Exit 216, 6 miles east of Pendleton. The route was closed earlier today due to a truck on fire near MP 257, 4 miles west of La Grande. The westbound lanes were not impacted and remain open. Expect winter conditions throughout eastern Oregon and drive with extra caution, especially around the crash site work zone (see photo). For update highway and weather conditions check TripCheck.com or call 511 / 800-977-6368. Outside Oregon call 503-588-2941

 




Attached Media Files: Slow down around MP 257 crash site

Clark County measles outbreak at 59 confirmed cases
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/16/19 2:42 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health is continuing its measles outbreak investigation and has identified six new confirmed cases. Since Jan. 1, Public Health has identified 59 confirmed cases and currently is investigating one suspect case. Public Health has identified one new location where people may have been exposed to measles.

Here are the details of the confirmed cases:

  • Age
    • 1 to 10 years: 43 cases
    • 11 to 18 years: 13 cases
    • 19 to 29 years: one case
    • 30 to 39 years: two cases
  • Immunization status
    • Unimmunized: 52 cases
    • Unverified: five cases
    • 1 MMR vaccine: two cases
  • Hospitalization: one case (none currently)

Public Health is not providing any additional information about the two cases with one dose of MMR in order to protect the patients’ privacy.

Here is the one new location where people may have been exposed to measles:

Health care facility:

  • The Vancouver Clinic Salmon Creek, 2525 NE 139th St., Vancouver, from 7 to 10 pm Thursday, Feb. 14, and from 10:30 am to 3:45 pm Friday, Feb. 15.

For a complete list of exposure sites, visit the Public Health measles investigation webpage.

Clark County Public Health is urging anyone who has been exposed at an identified location and believes they have symptoms of measles to call their health care provider prior to visiting the medical office to make a plan that avoids exposing others in the waiting room. People who believe they have symptoms of measles should not go directly to medical offices, urgent care centers or emergency departments (unless experiencing a medical emergency) without calling in advance.

Additional resources

For information about additional exposure sites in Oregon, linked to the confirmed case in Multnomah County, visit the Oregon Health Authority measles webpage. For information about other measles cases in Washington, visit the Washington State Department of Health measles webpage.

Public Health has established a call center for questions related to the investigation. Anyone who has questions about public exposures should call 360.397.8021. The call center is open daily.

Anyone with questions about their measles immunity or the measles vaccine should contact their primary care provider. Clark County Public Health does not provide immunizations or testing for immunity.

If you are unsure of your family's immunization status, you can view, download and print your family's immunization information online at MyIR or request a copy of your immunization record from the Washington State Department of Health.


Update: Homicide Victim and Suspect Identified
Salem Police Dept. - 02/16/19 11:52 AM

UPDATE:

The victim of yesterday's homicide on Watson Av NE has been identified as LeAnn Baty of Salem. The suspect, Derek S. Beaton of Salem has been lodged at the Marion County Correctional Facility on charges of Murder and Unlawful Use of a Weapon. He is scheduled to be arraigned at 3:00 p.m. on Tuesday, February 19, 2019 at the Marion County Circuit Court Annex. 

All future information releases will be by the Marion County District Attorney's Office.

###

On Friday, February 15, 2019, at approximately 11:00 a.m., Salem Police patrol officers responded to a residence in the 3600 block of Watson AV NE on the report of a stabbing. When officers arrived they found inside the residence a deceased 55-year-old woman.

The male suspect was detained at the location. The scene was locked down and Salem Police detectives are continuing their investigation.

The identity of the victim will not be released until next-of-kin have been notified. The suspect’s identity will not be released until detectives have formally charged him.

After identifications future information releases will be handled by the Marion County District Attorney’s Office.

 ###


Fri. 02/15/19
Police Identify Shooting Victim
Gresham Police Dept - 02/15/19 8:45 PM

Gresham, Ore.— Gresham Police have identified the victim of yesterday’s shooting at 911 SE 187th Ave. The victim is John Romanger, 25, of Cathlamet, Washington. Detectives are still investigating the circumstances of the shooting. Further information will be released when available. 

Anyone who saw or heard anything in regards to the shooting is asked to call the Gresham Police at 503.628.2719.


Driver attempts to elude police (Photo)
McMinnville Police Dept. - 02/15/19 7:34 PM
2019-02/1837/122095/bonds.jpg
2019-02/1837/122095/bonds.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1837/122095/thumb_bonds.jpg

On 2/15/19 at about 3:11 pm, a McMinnville Officer attempted to stop a blue Honda Civic for a speeding violation in the 1400 block of SW Fellows Street.   Instead of stopping, the Honda began running stop signs and speeding in an attempt to elude the officer.  The Honda lost control, crashed into a curb and travelled into the front yard of a residence in 1600 block of SW Apperson Street.  The driver was able to drive the now damaged Honda out of the yard and he continued to flee through the surrounding neighborhoods.  With the vehicle severely damaged and difficult to control after crashing into the curb, the driver soon stopped the vehicle and fled on foot on SW Sunset Drive near SW Ashley Drive.  The officer chased the suspect on foot into the area of SW Fellows Court, where containment was established with the assistance of the Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office.  The suspect was soon located hiding in the yard of a residence on SW Fellows Court and he was taken into custody.  The suspect driver is identified as Paul Anthony Bonds, 26, of McMinnville. 

 

As the investigation into who the owner of the car Bonds was driving during the pursuit progressed, it was learned that Bonds was performing some mechanical work for the owner of the car, who identified himself as a friend of Bonds.  Due to the extensive damage he recklessly caused to the friend’s car during the pursuit, Bonds was additionally charged with Criminal Mischief in the Second Degree.

 

Bonds was lodged at the Yamhill County Correctional Facility on the following charges:

Felony Attempt to Elude in a Vehicle                     $7500

Misdemeanor Attempt to Elude on Foot               $5000

Reckless Driving                                                       $5000

Driving While Revoked Misdemeanor                    $5000

Criminal Mischief II                                                  $5000




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/1837/122095/bonds.jpg

Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 02/15/19 6:12 PM
Clinton Adams
Clinton Adams
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1070/122094/thumb_Clinton_Adams.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Clinton Adams, died the evening of February 14, 2019. Adams was incarcerated at Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. 

Adams entered DOC custody on September 5, 2012, out of Washington County, with an earliest release date of January 5, 2022. Adams was 62 years old.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. 

Next of kin has been notified. No other details are available at this time.

EOCI is a multi-custody prison located in Pendleton that houses over 1,700 individuals. The institution is known for its Oregon Corrections Enterprises industries, including a garment factory that produces Prison Blues©, whose products are sold in and outside the United States. Other industries are its embroidery and laundry facilities. EOCI provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, drug and alcohol treatment, mental health treatment, religious services, and inmate work crews. The buildings that make up EOCI were constructed in 1912 and 1913 and were originally used as a state mental hospital. After two years of renovation, EOCI received its first adults in custody in June 1985.

####

 

 




Attached Media Files: Clinton Adams

Man Convicted of Murder in 2015 Shooting (Photo)
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 02/15/19 5:38 PM
2019-02/6208/122093/Moret_Andrew_Guy.jpg
2019-02/6208/122093/Moret_Andrew_Guy.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/6208/122093/thumb_Moret_Andrew_Guy.jpg

HILLSBORO, Ore.- On February 15, 2019, a Washington County jury found Andrew Guy Moret guilty of Murder and Unlawful Use of a Weapon. Judge Andrew R. Erwin oversaw the case. Senior Deputy District Attorney Bracken McKey and Deputy District Attorney Rayney Meisel prosecuted the case against Moret.

On September 13, 2015, Moret shot Alonzo Sentel Gregg nine times near Dandy’s Deli in Hillsboro. Gregg died at the scene. Moret was arrested three days after the shooting and charged with Gregg’s murder.

Moret, who served as his own attorney in the case, claimed self-defense in the shooting of Gregg. The jury disagreed and found him guilty.

The Washington County District Attorney’s Office would like to acknowledge the Hillsboro Police Department and Detective Sean Magnuson for their work on this case which spanned more than three years.

Sentencing is set for February 28 at 8:30. Moret will remain in custody until he is transferred to the Oregon Department of Corrections to begin serving his sentence.




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/6208/122093/Andrew_Guy_Moret.pdf , 2019-02/6208/122093/Moret_Andrew_Guy.jpg

Ridgefield School Board to Review Resolution for Ballot Measure to Renew Levy Funding
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 02/15/19 4:30 PM

Friday, February 15, 2019 – Ridgefield, WA – On Tuesday, February 19, Ridgefield School District’s board members will review a resolution to place before voters a ballot measure to renew levy funding for the Ridgefield School District.  The Replacement Educational Programs and Operations Levy the Board will consider replaces the levy currently in place, which expires at the end of 2019.

The current levy is funded by a tax rate of $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed value, which is limited by law.  Although the district can project a levy rate based on estimated assessed value, levy rates cannot exceed this limit.  With voter approval, levy funding will be renewed at this same current rate of $1.50 per $1,000 of assessed value for calendar years 2020, 2021 and 2022.

The district uses levy funds to pay for expenses in excess of state funding such as professional development for teachers, curriculum, technology, classroom support (additional teachers and teacher assistants), extra-curricular activities (athletics), community education, and early childhood education activities.

“The operations levy is vital to the successful operation of the district,” said Superintendent Nathan McCann.  “Renewal of levy funding ensures that we can continue to deliver the comprehensive, high-quality education expected by our students and families.”

To view the agenda for the school board meeting, visit the school district’s website at www.ridgefieldsd.org, click on Explore, About Us and Board of Directors.

###


MESD Board Regular Session meeting 2/19 at 6:00 p.m.
Multnomah ESD - 02/15/19 3:13 PM

The Multnomah Education Service District Board of Directors will meet in Regular Session at 6:00 p.m. on February 19, 2019, in the Board Room at 11611 NE Ainsworth Circle, Portland, OR 97220.   The Board will also meet in Executive Session at the conclusion of the Regular Session meeting under ORS 192.660(2)(I) To review and evaluate the employment-related performance of the chief executive officer of any public body, a public officer, employee or staff member who does not request an open hearing.


Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets February 20
Oregon Health Authority - 02/15/19 3:00 PM

February 15, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets February 20

What: The second public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup.

Agenda: Review themes from the January meeting; review opportunities, barriers and resources identified at the November 6, 2018, kickoff meeting; discuss options for focus of workgroup.

When: February 20, 9-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

•         Sign language and spoken language interpreters

•         Written materials in other languages

•         Braille

•         Large print

•         Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Suspected Serial Bank Robber Arrested in Beaverton
FBI - Oregon - 02/15/19 2:47 PM

Washington County Sheriff's Office deputies, with the assistance of Portland Police Bureau, Beaverton Police Department and the FBI, arrested Robert Norman Benham on Wednesday, February 13, 2019, at his Beaverton home without incident. According to the federal criminal complaint filed in this case, Benham, age 53, faces charges related to a series of bank robberies that occurred starting in mid-December. Those charged robberies include:

  • December 11, 2018 - Wells Fargo Bank (located inside a Thriftway), 7410 SW Oleson Road, Portland
  • December 24, 2018 - Columbia Bank, 4805 SW 77th Avenue, Washington County
  • January 30, 2019 - Columbia Bank, 4805 SW 77th Avenue, Washington County

Benham appeared before a federal magistrate judge on Wednesday, and the judge ordered himheld pending further court proceedings.

Investigators are gathering information related to as many as six other unsolved bank robberies in this area between November 2018 and now. Anyone with information on these other robberies is asked to call the FBI at (503) 224-4181, Washington County Sheriff's Office at (503) 846-2700, the Beaverton Police Department at (503) 526-2282 or Portland Police Bureau at (503) 823-3333. Information may also be submitted via the online portal at https://tips.fbi.gov/

A criminal complaint is only an accusation of a crime, and all defendants should be presumed innocent until proven guilty.

###


Cryptosporidium Monitoring Update Detections from routine monitoring in the Bull Run. Coordination with health officials continues.
Portland Water Bureau - 02/15/19 2:39 PM

The Portland Water Bureau received results from ongoing monitoring from the Bull Run Watershed intake for Cryptosporidium, a potentially disease-causing microorganism. In the 50-liters sampled daily, between Sunday, Feb. 10 and Wednesday, Feb 13, three Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected. One oocyst was detected in a sample collected on Feb. 10, one oocyst was detected in a sample collected on Feb. 12, and one oocyst was detected in a sample collected on Feb. 13. Cryptosporidium was not detected in the sample collected on Feb. 11. Prior to these detections, Cryptosporidium was last detected from the Bull Run Watershed intake in a sample collected on Feb. 5.

The Bull Run watershed is Portland’s primary source of drinking water. The Portland Water Bureau does not currently treat for Cryptosporidium, but is required to do so under drinking water regulations. Portland is working to install filtration by September 2027 under a compliance schedule with Oregon Health Authority. In the meantime, Portland Water Bureau is implementing interim measures such as watershed protection and additional monitoring to protect public health. Consultation with public health officials has concluded that at this time, customers do not need to take any additional precautions.

Exposure to Cryptosporidium can cause cryptosporidiosis, a serious illness. Symptoms can include diarrhea, vomiting, fever and stomach pain. People with healthy immune systems recover without medical treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people with severely weakened immune systems are at risk for more serious disease. Symptoms may be more severe and could lead to serious or life-threatening illness. Examples of people with weakened immune systems include those with AIDS; those with inherited diseases that affect the immune system; and cancer and transplant patients who are taking certain immunosuppressive drugs.

The Environmental Protection Agency has estimated that a small percentage of the population could experience gastro-intestinal illness from Cryptosporidium and advises that customers who are immunocompromised and receive their drinking water from the Bull Run Watershed consult with their healthcare professional about the safety of drinking the tap water. The Portland Water Bureau and Burlington, City of Gresham, City of Sandy, City of Tualatin, Green Valley, GNR, Hideaway Hills, Lake Grove, Lorna Portland Water, Lusted, Palatine Hill, Pleasant Home, Raleigh, Rockwood, Skyview Acres, Tualatin Valley, Two Rivers, Valley View and West Slope Water Districts receive all or part of their drinking water supply from the Bull Run. To learn if your drinking water comes from Bull Run, please contact your local drinking water provider.

The public and the media are encouraged to view all sampling results posted to the City’s website at www.portlandoregon.gov/water/cryptoresults. The bureau will notify the media and public immediately should further test results indicate a risk to public health and precautions are necessary.

Customers with questions regarding water quality can call the Water Line at 503-823-7525.




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/1240/122085/Crypto_Press_Release_2-15-19.docx

Pursuit Leads to Crash into Gales Creek, Water Rescue of Passenger
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/15/19 1:50 PM

ATTENTION: This information is being released by the Washington County Sheriff's Office on behalf of the North Plains Police Department, which is the lead agency for this incident.  After 2/15/2019, please direct media inquires related to this incident to the North Plains Police Department.

Videos (caution for language) and photos of the scene are available at bit.ly/2IhooNb

MEDIA RELEASE:

On Friday, February 15, 2019, at 8:14 a.m., a North Plains Police Officer saw a car driving recklessly at a high rate of speed on Highway 26 westbound near NW Glencoe Road.  The officer tried to pull the car over but the driver, later identified as 23-year-old Jeremiah Libbee of Hillsboro, did not stop.  The pursuit went from Highway 26 and then west on Highway 6.

Near the intersection of Highway 6 and NW Gales Creek Rd., a Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputy set up spike strips.  The deputy saw Mr. Libbee was sideways in the on-coming lane of traffic at a high rate of speed.  The deputy was attempting to remove the spike strips from Mr. Libbee’s path because the car was out of control, but Mr. Libbee drove over the spike strips before the deputy could get out of his way.

Mr. Libbee then crashed over a steep embankment, hit a large tree, and landed 20 feet below in Gales Creek.  The violent crash heavily damaged the car and officers saw Mr. Libbee was being washed hundreds of yards down the fast-flowing creek before emergency responders were able to pull him out.  Mr. Libbee was taken to a Portland hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

Officers also saw there was an adult woman trapped in the front seat of the car.  Because of the crash, she was pinned inside the car in the middle of the river.  Emergency crews had to use a boat to hook tow cables to the car, in order to pull it out of the water so that she could be extricated.  That complicated rescue effort involved dozens of people and took over an hour and a half to complete.  At one point, the woman was underwater while trapped inside the car.  She was taken to a Portland hospital with critical injuries.

The Oregon State Police responded to help with the crash investigation.  The North Plains Police Department will continue the criminal investigation into the pursuit and any additional charges against Mr. Libbee.  Multiple agencies were involved in helping rescue Mr. Libbee and his passenger from the river and the North Plains Police Department specifically wishes to thank the tow truck operators who worked together to pull the woman trapped in the car out of the river.


Providence White Caps: The Memoir of a St. Joseph's Nurse (Photo)
Clark County Historical Museum - 02/15/19 12:40 PM
Author Judith Jacobs Litchfield, right, with Bernice (Lorang) Bartel
Author Judith Jacobs Litchfield, right, with Bernice (Lorang) Bartel
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/6254/122080/thumb_Bernice_Lorang_Bartel_and_Judy_Litchfield.jpg

Vancouver, WA – As part of Women’s History Month, Clark County Historical Museum will hold a talk Thursday, March 7, with Judith Jacobs Litchfield, author of the 2017 memoir “Providence White Caps: The Diary of Bernice Lorang, RN.” Litchfield’s book recalls the story of her aunt, Bernice (Lorang) Bartel, who enrolled in the registered nurse program at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Vancouver, Washington, during World War II.

“Bernice Lorang’s diary and our one-on-one interviews provided the heart and soul of this historical time capsule,” said Litchfield. “Bernice’s vibrant voice afforded a stirring recall of her youthful family life and student nursing journey, bringing a slumbering seventy-year-old past back to life.”

During the early 1940s at the age of 19, Lorang became one of thousands of student nurses in the United States to join the Cadet Nurse Corps. This book and presentation chronicle the experiences she and fellow nurses had at that time.

“A recovered history links us to the past. It preserves our individual and collective culture for the future,” Litchfield said. “This book could not have been written without the historical archives that the various museums offered.”

This presentation, titled “Providence White Caps: The Memoir of a St. Joseph’s Nurse,” is part of the 2019 CCHM First Thursday Speaker Series. Doors open at 5 p.m., and the event begins at 7 p.m.

The CCHM First Thursday Speaker Series is sponsored by the Clark County Historic Preservation Commission. General admission is $5; seniors and students are $4; children under 18 are $3; and the evening is free with a CCHM membership. Attendees are encouraged to arrive early, as it is first-come, first-served seating.

For more information, contact the museum at 360-993-5679 or by email at events@cchmuseum.org.

###




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/6254/122080/CCHM_March_FT_Providence_White_Caps_Press_Release.pdf , Author Judith Jacobs Litchfield, right, with Bernice (Lorang) Bartel , The exterior of St. Joseph’s Hospital in Vancouver, Washington (1911)

Firefighters Rescue One from Submerged Vehicle (Photo)
Forest Grove Fire & Rescue - 02/15/19 12:02 PM
2019-02/1797/122078/IMG_0104.jpg
2019-02/1797/122078/IMG_0104.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/1797/122078/thumb_IMG_0104.jpg

This morning at 8:20, firefighters were dispatched to a reported motor vehicle crash on NW Wilson River Highway (Oregon Highway 6) near the 55900 block. It was reported that the vehicle was involved in a pursuit with law enforcement and had crashed into the Gales Creek. The driver of the vehicle had made it out of the vehicle and was pulled to shore by law enforcement officers prior to fire units arriving. Minutes later, firefighters arrived and began to deploy water rescue equipment to try and access the heavily damaged vehicle that sat partially submerged in the very cold water. It was found that a passenger was entrapped in the vehicle and a plan was established to use tow trucks to pull the vehicle to shore and then bring it up to the roadway.

It took crews about 30 minutes from dispatch time to bring the vehicle to shore and another 30 minutes to get the vehicle from the shore up the steep embankment to the roadway to extricate the passenger from the vehicle. Using heavy hydraulic rescue tools, it took firefighters 20 minutes to free the passenger from the vehicle and transport them to a local trauma hospital.

Please refer to Washington County Sheriff’s Office or Oregon State Police for further details regarding the incident.

Forest Grove Fire & Rescue was assisted on scene by Banks Fire District, Metro West Ambulance, Oregon State Police, Washington County Sheriff’s Office, Forest Grove Police, Beaverton Police, North Plains Police, ODOT, Gales Creek Towing, Cops Towing and Hillsboro Towing.

 

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/1797/122078/IMG_0104.jpg , 2019-02/1797/122078/IMG_0114.jpg , 2019-02/1797/122078/IMG_0130.jpg

Vancouver Safe Streets Task Force arrests violent fugitive (Photo)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 02/15/19 11:46 AM
2019-02/385/122077/SSTF_3.jpg
2019-02/385/122077/SSTF_3.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/385/122077/thumb_SSTF_3.jpg

Vancouver, Wash. –On February 13, 2019, Detectives from the Safe Streets Task Force and Neighborhood Response Team East arrested Washington State Department Of Corrections fugitive, and Norteno gang member, Mario Barasa, 35, of Vancouver.  When located by police, Barasa was found in possession of a loaded handgun along with methamphetamine and heroin for distribution.  Inside Barasa’s residence another handgun, methamphetamine along with scales and packaging were located. 

Barasa was booked into the Clark County Jail on his fugitive warrant and the following charges:

  • 2 counts Unlawful Possession of a Firearm
  • Possession of the Controlled Substance with Intent to Deliver Heroin
  • Possession of the Controlled Substance with Intent to Deliver Methamphetamine
  • Possession of the Controlled Substance Heroin
  • Possession of the Controlled Substance Methamphetamine
  • Escape Community Custody

The investigation is ongoing and nothing further is releasable at this time.

###

The Vancouver Police Department is seeking applicants for Entry and Lateral Police Officers. If you are interested in a career with us, visit https://www.cityofvancouver.us/police/page/how-do-i-become-vancouver-police-officer.




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/385/122077/SSTF_3.jpg

UPDATE: PPB Statement on Public Records Release-Listening Session Scheduled
Portland Police Bureau - 02/15/19 11:44 AM
The Portland Police Bureau continues to look into the public records that have been released this week involving text messages between Lieutenant Jeff Niiya and Joey Gibson. There is an on-going investigation and the Bureau cannot comment further on details involving personnel matters. While this investigation proceeds, direction has been given to Lieutenant Niiya to cease any further conversation with any event organizers. Additionally, Lieutenant Niiya is not participating in Rapid Response Team (RRT)-related activities until an investigation can be completed.

A community listening session has been scheduled for Thursday, February 21, 2019, from 6-8 P.M. This event will be hosted at the Maranatha Church located at 4222 NE 12th Avenue. The goals of the listening session are to hear concerns and solutions from the public. There is nearby parking and the use of public transportation is encouraged.

"It is imperative that we come together to hear people's concerns and ideas," said Chief Danielle Outlaw. "2019 is a year for solutions. We would like for the public to have the opportunity to share with the Portland Police Bureau their ideas for how to move forward."

If anyone planning to attend has an accommodation request, they can email: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/30697?action=UpdateItem&category_id=1143

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

PPB's Response to Public Records Release:
During the week of February 11th, 2019, The Portland Police Bureau released documents in accordance to multiple public records requests for text conversations between Lieutenant Jeff Niiya and Joey Gibson. These conversations have generated a lot of public interest. For transparency, the Portland Police Bureau has posted all of the documents in their entirety at the following link: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/78708

"The Portland Police Bureau has strong organizational values that encompass integrity and accountability. We have also pledged transparency to our community," said Chief Danielle Outlaw. "I have directed an internal investigation to review the context of these communications and determine if any Bureau directives were violated. If anything is identified that is deemed outside of our values and directives, it will be addressed."

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Evergreen Habitat for Humanity in Washington, DC, to advocate for comprehensive affordable housing policies (Photo)
Evergreen Habitat for Humanity - 02/15/19 11:13 AM
2019-02/3419/122074/USDC-19-JA-110-02244.jpg
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[VANCOUVER, WA (2/15/2019)] Representatives of Evergreen Habitat for Humanity joined hundreds of other Habitat leaders, homeowners, and volunteers in Washington, DC, this week to encourage lawmakers to support policies that promote broader access to safe, decent and affordable housing to address the affordable housing crisis facing communities across the U.S., including Clark County, WA.

 

“With scarce affordable housing options available, many families in Clark County are forced to decide between spending money on a safe and stable place to live and food to eat,” said Josh Townsley, Executive Director. “No one should have to make that choice, and so we are telling Congress to prioritize affordable housing this year.”

 

Bold action is needed to address the increasing costs of housing. Habitat is calling on federal lawmakers to support comprehensive legislation that addresses the housing affordability crisis across the rental and homeownership spectrum. Recent budget requests submitted by the current administration have proposed eliminating programs that are used by local communities to finance the development of new, affordable homes. Habitat and other affordable housing advocates have worked with Congress to reject those cuts in previous years.

 

Josh Townsley and Dakota Palmore, local Habitat homeowner, met with Senator Murray and staffers for Senator Cantwell to impress upon them the need for CDBG, HOME, and AmeriCorps funding to advance the development of affordable housing in Clark County.

 

These programs are vital to Habitat’s work locally and around the US. AmeriCorps is a critical component of Evergreen Habitat’s work to partner with more families working toward homeownership. Thousands of AmeriCorps members have served their communities in a variety of ways, including more than 10,000 members working through Habitat where they have helped build homes and helped rebuild in disaster-stricken areas.

 

Like Evergreen Habitat, hundreds of local organizations across the country are concerned about the impact that affordable housing cuts will have on families and children.

 

Evergreen Habitat is calling on Congress to prioritize budget solutions that will invest more resources, not less, in programs that support efforts to build and maintain affordable housing.

 

“More than 18 million American families are spending at least half their paychecks on housing. Even middle-class workers like teachers are unable to find housing that fits within their budgets,” said Chris Vincent, vice president of government relations and advocacy for Habitat for Humanity International. “It should come as no surprise that we want to make sure our voices are heard in Washington this week so that programs critical to Habitat are fully funded.”
 

The Home Depot Foundation is the premier sponsor of Habitat on the Hill 2019, and has been a key supporter of Habitat for over 10 years, investing more than $19 million in new construction, repair and rehabilitation projects for U.S. military veterans and their families through the Habitat's Repair Corps program. In addition to its commitment to Habitat, last year The Home Depot Foundation committed an additional $250 million to other veteran causes taking their total veteran commitment to half a billion dollars by 2025.

 

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About Evergreen Habitat for Humanity

Since 1991, Evergreen Habitat for Humanity has worked to improve living conditions for low-income Clark County residents. The non-profit organization works in partnership with people in need from all walks of life to develop communities by building safe, affordable housing. Homes are sold at no profit with a zero percent interest rate mortgage after the partner families complete their sweat equity hours.

For additional information or to schedule an interview with an Evergreen Habitat for Humanity beneficiary, please contact Josh Townsley, Executive Director, Evergreen Habitat for Humanity, at 360-737-1759.

 

About The Home Depot Foundation

The Home Depot Foundation works to improve the homes and lives of U.S. veterans, train skilled tradespeople to fill the labor gap and support communities impacted by natural disasters. Since 2011, the Foundation has invested $250 million in veteran causes and improved more than 41,000 veteran homes and facilities in 4,000 cities. In 2018, the Foundation committed an additional $250 million to veteran causes taking the total to half a billion dollars by 2025.

 

To learn more about The Home Depot Foundation and see Team Depot in action, visit thd.co/community and follow us on Twitter and Instagram @teamdepot and on Facebook at facebook.com/teamdepot.




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/3419/122074/USDC-19-JA-110-02244.jpg

Jefferson School Board names finalists for district's next superintendent
Jefferson Sch. Dist. - 02/15/19 11:10 AM

Jefferson School Board names finalists for district's next superintendent

After completing an extensive multi-state search, the Jefferson School District Board of Directors is pleased to announce that four finalists have been selected for further consideration to be the next Superintendent of Schools with a term beginning July 1, 2019. The finalists were selected from a field of 24 applicants. The board and a screening committee of 14 administrators, staff and community members thoroughly reviewed the applications and the board has conducted initial interviews with several candidates. The four selected finalists are:

Brad Capener: Mr. Capener is currently the interim superintendent for the Jefferson School District. Previously he was the K-12 director of Special Programs in the Salem-Keizer School District for seven years. Prior to working in the Salem-Keizer School District Mr. Capener was an educational specialist at the Oregon Department of Education (ODE). He has a master’s degree from Portland State University in Education Administration.

Ryan Hawkins: Mr. Hawkins is the director of district operations in Nyssa. He has worked for the Nyssa School District since 2016. Mr. Hawkins also worked in the Sumner (WA), Lincoln County and McMinnville school districts as a high school principal, assistant principal, and elementary/middle school teacher for a total of 12 years. Mr. Hawkins has a master’s degree from George Fox University in the area of Educational Administration. He completed his administrative licensure program at Concordia Chicago (Illinois). 

Kevin Hunking: Since July 2014, Mr. Hunking has been the superintendent of the Arlington School District. Prior to becoming a superintendent, he worked for the Multnomah Education Service District for six years as the program coordinator for Special Education Mr. Hunking has a master’s degree in Education from Oregon State University. He completed his administrative licensure program at the University of Phoenix (AZ).

Dawn Moorefield : Ms. Moorefield currently works in the Cascade School District where she is the assistant  superintendent in charge of human resources and instructional services. Previously she was the principal of Cloverdale and Turner elementary schools in the same school district. Ms. Moorefield has worked for the Cascade School District since 1997. Ms. Moorefield has a master’s degree from Oregon University in Educational Management and Policy. She completed her administrative licensure program at Portland State University.

The school board will begin background checks for the finalists over the next few weeks. The checks will include telephone reference checks, site visits and licensure investigation.  After the background checks are completed the school board will invite each finalist for a "day in the district” on Monday, February 25, 2019. At that time district staff and members of the community will have an opportunity to meet the candidates. The staff/community forum will be held from 6:00 – 8:00 pm at the Jefferson School Board Room located  behind the district offices.

 




Attached Media Files: Finalist

Clark County measles outbreak at 53 confirmed cases, three suspect
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/15/19 10:41 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health is continuing its measles outbreak investigation and has identified one new suspect case. Since Jan. 1, Public Health has identified 53 confirmed cases and is currently investigating three suspect cases. Public Health has not identified any new locations where people may have been exposed to measles.

Here are the details of the confirmed cases:

  • Age
    • 1 to 10 years: 38 cases
    • 11 to 18 years: 13 cases
    • 19 to 29 years: one case
    • 30 to 39 years: one case
  • Immunization status
    • Unimmunized: 47 cases
    • Unverified: five cases
    • 1 MMR vaccine: one case
  • Hospitalization: one case (none currently)

Public Health is not providing any additional information about the one case with one dose of MMR in order to protect the patient’s privacy.

For a complete list of exposure sites, visit the Public Health measles investigation webpage.

Clark County Public Health is urging anyone who has been exposed at an identified location and believes they have symptoms of measles to call their health care provider prior to visiting the medical office to make a plan that avoids exposing others in the waiting room. People who believe they have symptoms of measles should not go directly to medical offices, urgent care centers or emergency departments (unless experiencing a medical emergency) without calling in advance.

Additional resources

For information about additional exposure sites in Oregon, linked to the confirmed case in Multnomah County, visit the Oregon Health Authority measles webpage. For information about other measles cases in Washington, visit the Washington State Department of Health measles webpage.

Public Health has established a call center for questions related to the investigation. Anyone who has questions about public exposures should call 360.397.8021. The call center is open daily.

Anyone with questions about their measles immunity or the measles vaccine should contact their primary care provider. Clark County Public Health does not provide immunizations or testing for immunity.

If you are unsure of your family's immunization status, you can view, download and print your family's immunization information online at MyIR or request a copy of your immunization record from the Washington State Department of Health.


Oregon Farm Bureau statement on Hammonds grazing permit reissuance
Oregon Farm Bureau - 02/15/19 10:36 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Oregon Farm Bureau statement on Hammonds grazing permit reissuance

SALEM, OREGON, February 15, 2019 – “On Feb. 14, 2014, the Bureau of Land Management revoked the grazing permit of Hammond Ranches. Almost five years to the day later, on Feb. 13, 2019, BLM signed documents that reissued the permit, allowing the Hammond family to get back to the business of raising cattle in eastern Oregon.

“This reissued grazing permit signals that justice has finally been achieved for this rural family. While nobody can restore what the Hammonds have lost to years of prosecutorial overreach and bureaucratic vendetta, we are grateful that this awful chapter is closed.

“Oregon Farm Bureau was proud to play a role in advocating on the Hammonds’ behalf, including gathering over 25,000 online signatures and working directly with officials, so the family can return to doing what they love and keep a proud heritage of ranching alive.”

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Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Sharon Waterman is an OFB Hall of Fame honoree and operates a Century Ranch raising sheep, cattle, and timber in Bandon. She is OFB’s 16th president.


City of Battle Ground's online reporting policy facilitates management of fire protection systems
City of Battle Ground - 02/15/19 10:05 AM

Required fire protection systems are essential to public safety and the protection of property.  The City of Battle Ground fire code requires that fire protection systems are regularly inspected, tested and maintained (ITM), ensuring that that the systems will operate as intended in the event of an incident, minimizing the risk of life and property loss.

The three components of a comprehensive ITM program are inspections - a visual examination of a system to verify that it appears to be operating condition and is free of physical damage; testing - the physical trying or operation of a system, or part of the system, to ensure or prove that it is functioning properly, as intended, or to an acceptable standard of operation; and maintenance - the work performed to repair, clean and/or maintain equipment in operable condition. 

Those who own or operate commercial facilities with fire protection systems are responsible for obtaining a certified/licensed contractor to perform inspections, testing and maintenance.  The ITM contractor is required to submit all reports (compliant and non-compliant) on behalf of their customers to the Fire Marshal’s Office. 

Effective February 15, 2019, all ITM reports must be filed electronically via a reporting service at www.TheComplianceEngine.com.   

The reports are received by the Fire Marshal’s Office where they are reviewed for accuracy and code compliance.  If fire code violations are identified, a follow-up is conducted by the Fire Marshal’s Office through fire code enforcement.

Fire Protection Systems tracked by the city include, but are not limited to: 

  • Automatic Fire Sprinkler Systems
  • Fire Alarms
  • Commercial kitchen hood suppression systems
  • Commercial kitchen exhaust systems (hood cleaning)
  • Standpipes
  • Active smoke control systems
  • Fire pumps
  • Spray booth suppression systems
  • Elevators
  • Emergency generators
  • Special Suppression/clean-agent systems

Additional information, including the municipal code reference to required systems, test reports and submittal frequency, is available on the Fire Marshal’s ITM website page at www.cityofbg.org/746/ITM-Reporting.  

The new online reporting policy and service facilitates management of the ITM program with the objective of protecting the public through compliance.  It also supports the city’s ongoing goal of using technology to increase efficiencies and improve the delivery of service.

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Portland Commissioner Hardesty Files Ordinance to Amend Unreinforced Masonry Building Rules; Recruitment for New URM Work Group Kicks Off
Portland Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty - 02/15/19 10:00 AM

Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty filed an ordinance amending the process and timeline for placing earthquake warning signs on unreinforced masonry (URM) buildings and notifying tenants about the danger. The first reading will be on Feb 20 and the second reading Feb 27.

On October 10, 2018, the City Council passed Ordinance No. 189201 that, among other actions, requires property owners of unreinforced masonry buildings to post a warning sign in a public place near the main entrance and notify future tenants that the building may be unsafe in the event of a major earthquake.  It also requires the owner to record evidence of compliance with the county Recorder’s Office. 

 “I am asking for changes to the URM ordinance because building owners have told me loud and clear that they don’t understand the new rules and they don’t see how retrofitting will be possible for them financially,” said Commissioner Hardesty.  “With an expanded timeline, we will look for ways to offer financial support for these important safety upgrades and give building owners more time to examine the inventory.  I also want to simplify the process for documenting compliance.  This will improve the situation for owners and make the rules easier to understand and enforce in the future.” 

The ordinance Commissioner Hardesty filed extends the timeline for most buildings to comply with the sign and notification requirements, and it eliminates the requirement to record anything with the title.  Specifically, changes are to:

  • extend the timeline required for posting a warning sign for all privately-owned buildings to November 1, 2020;
  • modify the tenant notification requirement so that landlords are required to notify prospective tenants that a building is URM when they complete a rental application, rather than when they sign the lease;
  • set a deadline of June 1, 2019 for landlords to begin notifying prospective tenants;
  • modify the required documentation of compliance so that URM building owners do not need to record their agreement with the county Recorder’s Office.

A new committee to discuss URM policy is now open for applications. Those interested can apply at:

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/civic/article/712316

For more information about the urm project see: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/pbem/urm


Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Economic Development Corporation Awarded $257,900 Grant to Expand Micro Lending Program (Photo)
Wells Fargo - 02/15/19 9:46 AM
Wells Fargo representatives present ATNI-EDC with a $257,900 grant during ATNI's winter convention in Portland. Photo credit: Timothy J. Gonzalez
Wells Fargo representatives present ATNI-EDC with a $257,900 grant during ATNI's winter convention in Portland. Photo credit: Timothy J. Gonzalez
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Portland, OR – February 15, 2019 – Wells Fargo has awarded the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Economic Development Corporation (ATNI-EDC) with a two-year $257,900 grant to support the expansion of a small business micro-lending program for tribal members. The nonprofit organization will use the funding to build infrastructure including hiring a loan program manager, renting office space and developing marketing materials for the loan program.

The ATNI-EDC Revolving Loan Fund provides access to capital to help Native entrepreneurs start or grow their businesses in the Pacific Northwest. The Wells Fargo grant will enable ATNI-EDC to double its lending capacity to $500,000 with a goal of 10 loans per year.

“This grant is a game-changer for our organization,” said Amber Schulz-Oliver, executive director for ATNI-EDC. “With increased capacity, we will be in a strong position to better serve the economic development needs of tribes. When we leverage the vast economic power generated by Pacific Northwest tribes, we succeed in elevating our communities out of poverty and into prosperity.”

In April 2019, ATNI-EDC will host an economic summit in Portland to help tribal leaders implement economic development initiatives, share best practices, strengthen inter-tribal relationships and advance solutions to common barriers. 

The Wells Fargo Foundation grant is part of the company’s five-year, $50 million commitment to expand its focus on tribal philanthropy to provide greater economic empowerment in Native American and Alaska Native communities. The philanthropic investment aims to increase homeownership, energy sovereignty, and workforce development on tribal lands, promote development of Native-owned small businesses, and help build capacity for nonprofits to better serve their clients in Indian Country.

“Wells Fargo has been serving American Indian and Alaska Native communities for more than 50 years,” said Jon Campbell, president of the Wells Fargo Foundation. “We believe it is important to support nonprofit and community organizations that empower tribal communities to determine their own way of life on their own lands — according to their time-honored cultures, traditions and beliefs — while also providing access to the tools and opportunities that can lead to financial success and well-being.”

National nonprofit organizations serving individuals, families and businesses in Indian Country who wish to be considered for a grant under the foundation’s commitment should contact AIANPhilanthropy@wellsfargo.com to determine eligibility. Community-based, local 501(c)(3) organizations serving the American Indian/Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian communities can continue to apply for grants through Wells Fargo’s online tool.

 

About Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Economic Development Corporation  

Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Economic Development Corporation provides community and

economic services to nearly 60 Tribes in the Pacific Northwest, including all nine tribes of Oregon, all 29 tribes of Washington, and all five tribes of Idaho, as well as four tribes in California, two tribes in

Nevada, four tribes in Montana and three tribal communities in Alaska.

About Wells Fargo

Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) is a diversified, community-based financial services company with $1.9 trillion in assets. Wells Fargo’s vision is to satisfy our customers’ financial needs and help them succeed financially. Founded in 1852 and headquartered in San Francisco, Wells Fargo provides banking, investment and mortgage products and services, as well as consumer and commercial finance, through 7,800 locations, more than 13,000 ATMs, the internet (wellsfargo.com) and mobile banking, and has offices in 37 countries and territories to support customers who conduct business in the global economy. With approximately 259,000 team members, Wells Fargo serves one in three households in the United States. Wells Fargo & Company was ranked No. 26 on Fortune’s 2018 rankings of America’s largest corporations. In 2017, Wells Fargo donated $286.5 million to 14,500 nonprofits and Wells Fargo team members volunteered a record 2 million hours. Wells Fargo’s corporate social responsibility efforts are focused on three strategic priorities: diversity and social inclusion, economic empowerment, and environmental sustainability. News, insights and perspectives from Wells Fargo are also available at Wells Fargo Stories




Attached Media Files: Wells Fargo representatives present ATNI-EDC with a $257,900 grant during ATNI's winter convention in Portland. Photo credit: Timothy J. Gonzalez

Shooting Leads to Arrest (Photo)
Gresham Police Dept - 02/15/19 9:36 AM
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Gresham, Ore.— Gresham Police made an arrest in yesterday’s deadly shooting. Yesterday at approximately 1:00 p.m., police responded to the report of a shooting at 911 SE 187th Ave. Officers arrived on scene and discovered that one person was deceased. As a result of the investigation, 23-year-old Schwanna Waters, of Gresham, was arrested for Manslaughter in the First Degree.

Detectives are still combing through the evidence to discover what lead up to the shooting. We are not releasing the name of the victim pending notification of next of kin. No other information is available at this time. Anyone who saw or heard anything in regards to the shooting is asked to call the Gresham Police at 503.618.2719.




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/1278/122068/Schwanna_Waters.jpg

Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici to Visit Beaverton Dining Center
Meals on Wheels People - 02/15/19 9:00 AM

Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici, who represents Oregon District #1, will visit with seniors who dine at the Meals on Wheels People Beaverton Center on Thursday, Feb. 21, beginning at 11:30 a.m. Congresswoman Bonamici has been a long-term supporter of Meals on Wheels People and senior issues in Washington County.

Meals on Wheels People Beaverton Center is located inside the Elsie Stuhr Center at 5550 SW Hall Blvd. Jay Gilbertson is the manager and can be reached at 503.643.8352.

About Meals on Wheels People: Meals on Wheels People has been changing lives, one meal at a time, since 1970. We provide more than a meal to thousands of older adults in the greater Portland metro area. Our service not only alleviates hunger and social isolation, but allows seniors to live independently with dignity in their own homes. Aging in place reduces depression, falls and hospitalization as well as the high cost of institutional care. For more information, visit: mowp.org.


Region 12 Tournament in Hillsboro (Photo)
Chess for Success - 02/15/19 8:51 AM
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2019-02/1811/122064/IMG_0200.jpg
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Region 12 Tournament in Hillsboro

 

When: February 23rd starting at 8:30 a.m.

 

Where: South Meadows Middle School

 

Students in grades 6-12 from Columbia and Washington counties will compete in the Chess for Success Region 12 Tournament at South Meadows Middle School (4690 SE Davis Rd). Individual and team winners will be invited to the 52nd Chess for Success State Chess Tournament March 8th and 9th at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland.

 

Chess for Success is a Portland based non-profit organization whose mission is to help children succeed in school and in life through learning chess. The organization runs chess clubs in more than 86 schools throughout the state of Oregon and Southwest Washington serving more than 2,000 students. To learn more visit their website, www.chessforsuccess.org.

 

Excellent photo opportunity!

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Attached Media Files: 2019-02/1811/122064/IMG_0200.jpg , 2019-02/1811/122064/Girls_shaking_hands_cropped.jpg

Celebrate 32 years of Waterfront Blues during the July 4th holiday weekend Preliminary line-up announced, passes on sale February 15 for the award-winning event July 4 - 7 at Waterfront Park in Portland, Ore. (Photo)
Waterfront Blues Festival - 02/15/19 8:46 AM
Waterfront Blues Festival 2018 -crowd shot
Waterfront Blues Festival 2018 -crowd shot
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Celebrate 32 years of Waterfront Blues during the 

July 4thholiday weekend

Preliminary line-up announced, passes on sale February 15 for the award-winning event
 July 4 - 7 at Waterfront Park in Portland, Ore.

 

Portland, Ore. (February 15, 2019)– Join blues legends, up-and-comers and regional favorites to mark the 32nd  Annual Waterfront Blues Festival July 4-7, 2019 at Tom McCall Waterfront Park. 4-Day passes go on-sale Friday, February 15

This year’s festival will feature more than 100 acts on four stages. Highlights include:

Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue • St. Paul & the Broken Bones • Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe • Vintage Trouble • California Honeydrops • Shemekia Copeland  • Cyril Neville • Roy Rogers & the Delta Rhythm Kings with special guest & Carlos Reyes 
Christone “Kingfish” Ingram  • Chubby Carrier & the Bayou Swamp Band • Sugaray Rayford • Songhoy Blues • Southern Avenue • Brother Yusef • Lucious Spiller • Kevin Burt • Feu Follet • Curley Taylor • Vanessa Collier • Sarah Grace of The Voice

 

…and many more to be announced, including additional headliners!

This year’s lineup includes new, as well as some festival favorites from years past. Closing headliner TroyTrombone Shorty” Andrewsmade his first public Northwest appearance at Waterfront Blues Festival more than a decade ago, playing on the festival’s Front Porch Stage and on a late-night cruise. “We’ve been trying to get Shorty back to our main stage ever since,” said festival Artistic Director Peter Dammann, who first encountered a scrawny Shorty, then in his mid-teens, busking on a street corner more than 15 years ago in New Orleans’ French Quarter. “Even in those days, playing for tips on the sidewalk, Shorty was already considered by those-in-the-know to be one of the major up-and-coming horn players on the planet.” In the interim Shorty has headlined major stages all over the world, including five appearances at the White House. The festival is thrilled to welcome him back this year.  

Joining Shorty on the Festival’s Sunday salute to the Crescent City will be legendary vocalist/percussionist Cyril Neville and his Uptown Rulers; and ‘zydeco junkie’ Chubby Carrier & the Bayou Swamp Band who headline two-days of Cajun/zydeco dancing on the festival’s Front Porch Stage. 

Newcomers this year include the high voltage, horn-driven soul-rock of Alabama-based St. Paul & the Broken Bones; the swaggering rock-soul of Vintage Trouble; North Africa desert grooves of Songhoy Blues; the powerful Oakland bluesman Kevin Burt,winner of the 2018 International Blues Challenge in threecategories; Arkansas/Mississippi Delta bluesman Lucious Spiller; the masterful, up-and-coming vocalist/saxophonist Vanessa Collier (“Amazing!” – Buddy Guy); Louisiana’s ‘future of Cajun music’, Feufollet; and Houston’s 16-year-old “pint-sized powerhouse,” Sarah Grace, whose soulful vocals carried her into the final 10 on this season’s The Voice.

Returning are some of the festival’s favorites from years past, including: the bluesy soul/funk of Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe; the California Honeydrops (“the most refreshing act to roll down the blues highway in some time.” – Living Blues); the searing vocalist Shemekia Copeland (“A powerhouse, a superstar, she can do no wrong,” Rolling Stone); slide guitar virtuoso Roy Rogers(“One of the rare guitar heroes who values feeling over flash” - Rolling Stone) in a collaboration with Parguayan violinist/harpist Carlos Reyes; young Mississippi guitar phenom Christone “Kingfish” Ingram, about to release a debut album produced by Buddy Guy (festival fans may remember Guy brought Kingfish on stage for his headlining WBF set four years ago); ‘Fatback Blues’ master, Brother Yusef,a favorite of swing/blues dancers.

“Stay tuned, we have some more announcements to come,” said Dammann, “including of course our world-class soul and blues acts from the Northwest.”

“This is the concert deal of the summer,” continues Dammann. “Four days, four stages, more than 100 eclectic performances, starting at just $50 for a 4-day pass—that’s only $12.50 a day!”

The following four-day passes offered this year: 

4-Day Fan Pass($50—just $12.50 a day!) — Four-day pass, priority re-entry.

Blues Buddy Pass($75 early bird discount) — Four-day pass, EARLY entry, priority re-entry, and discounted admission to Waterfront After-Hours Concerts in the Marriott Ballroom (just $5 each, these after hours shows are otherwise $20 advance; first-come, first-served).

Gold Pass($350) — Four-day EARLY entry and priority re-entry, access to Main Stage shaded seating, access to central stage shaded seating, admission to After-Hours concerts, four meal and drink vendor coupons, festival T-shirt and poster, parking pass & more! SOLD OUT LAST FEW YEARS!

Platinum Pass($1,250) — Four-day EARLY entry & priority re-entry, priority access to on-stage seating at Main Stage and Blues Stage, access to central stage shaded seating, access to VIP Hospitality Pavilion with catered buffets and VIP restrooms, admission to After-Hours concerts, parking passand many other VIP perks. SOLD OUT LAST FEW YEARS!

Also on sale now are tickets to the Festival’s exciting After-Hours Shows in the Marriott Ballroomacross Naito Parkway from the festival site. Featured this year:

Friday, July 5: California Honeydrops • Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe presents “Eat Lots of Peaches” Allman Brothers tribute

Saturday, July 6: Southern Avenue with special guest Christone “Kingfish” Ingram • Vintage Trouble.

Tickets and lineup information for the popular Blues Cruisesaboard the Portland Spirit, will be available in early April

For artist bios, preliminary schedule, videos and music samples, visit the newly updated: waterfrontbluesfest.com.    

 

About Waterfront Blues Festival:

Since 1988, the Waterfront Blues Fest has raised funds and awareness to fight hunger in our region. Since its inception, the festival has raised nearly $11 million and more than 1,000 tons of food to fight hunger in Oregon. Last year Oregon Food Bank, producer of the event since its inception, turned over ownership and production responsibilities to its long time production company, Waterfront Blues Production LLC, so the agency could refocus on its core hunger mission. The 2018 festival featuring George Thorogood, The Revivalists and Beth Hart was the first under the management/ownership of WBP. The Festival again this year welcomes as its Community Partner, the Portland Sunshine Division, which will run the event’s food drive to help stock its two emergency food pantries.

This Portland flagship festival has become a treasured tradition for locals and visitors alike, and has served as downtown Portland’s signature Fourth of July Celebration. It is the largest blues festival west of the Mississippi, the second-largest blues festival in the nation, and one of the most revered festivals of its kind in the world. It is a recipient of numerous awards, including the Memphis-based Blues Foundation’s coveted Keeping the Blues Alive Award for ‘Best Festival.’ Since its inception, the festival has been committed to elevating the presence of local non-profits through fundraising and exposure. 

Major sponsors: Buick GMC of Beaverton, KGON radio, KOIN-TV, The Oregonian.

More information: waterfrontbluesfest.com 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Peter Dammann, Festival Artistic Director
503-283-3225, 503-341-2068 c
damray@europa.com




Attached Media Files: Waterfront Blues Festival 2018 -crowd shot , Waterfront Blues Festival 2018 - Revivalists , Waterfront Blues Festival 2018 - Mavericks , 2019-02/6319/122063/TromboneShorty_2019_(hi-res-0).jpg

Region 4 Tournament in Portland (Photo)
Chess for Success - 02/15/19 8:43 AM
2019-02/1811/122062/IMG_0200.jpg
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Region 4 Tournament in Portland

 

When: February 23rd starting at 8:30 a.m.

 

Where: Harrison Park School

 

Students in grades K-5 from the Portland area will compete in the Chess for Success Region 4 Tournament at Harrison Park School (2225 SE 87th Ave). Individual and team winners will be invited to the 52nd Chess for Success State Chess Tournament March 8th and 9th at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland.

 

Chess for Success is a Portland based non-profit organization whose mission is to help children succeed in school and in life through learning chess. The organization runs chess clubs in more than 86 schools throughout the state of Oregon and Southwest Washington serving more than 2,000 students. To learn more visit their website, www.chessforsuccess.org.

 

Excellent photo opportunity!

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Attached Media Files: 2019-02/1811/122062/IMG_0200.jpg , 2019-02/1811/122062/Girls_shaking_hands_cropped.jpg

Thu. 02/14/19
PPB's Response to Public Records Release:
Portland Police Bureau - 02/14/19 10:39 PM
During the week of February 11th, 2019, The Portland Police Bureau released documents in accordance to multiple public records requests for text conversations between Lieutenant Jeff Niiya and Joey Gibson. These conversations have generated a lot of public interest. For transparency, the Portland Police Bureau has posted all of the documents in their entirety at the following link: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/78708

"The Portland Police Bureau has strong organizational values that encompass integrity and accountability. We have also pledged transparency to our community," said Chief Danielle Outlaw. "I have directed an internal investigation to review the context of these communications and determine if any Bureau directives were violated. If anything is identified that is deemed outside of our values and directives, it will be addressed."

###PPB###

Deputies Make Arrest of Theft Suspect After Pursuit
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 02/14/19 8:02 PM


Linn County Sheriff Jim Yon reports this afternoon his deputies were involved in a pursuit of a theft suspect.  The suspect vehicle, a red 2000 Honda Civic with Illinois plates, was involved in a gas theft on February 2 at Porter’s on Hwy 99E in Tangent.  

Today at 1:38 p.m., deputies found the vehicle at the east side Albany McDonald’s with the driver matching the theft suspect’s description.  When deputies tried to contact the driver about the theft, he put his vehicle in reverse and crashed into the patrol vehicle causing extensive damage to the front and passenger side before fleeing. Deputies were outside their patrol vehicle when it was hit and were not injured.

Deputies pursued the Honda through Albany and onto Highway 20.  The pursuit continued towards Sweet Home where the vehicle was spiked on Highway 20 near the intersection of Wiley Creek Road.  Two of the tires were successfully deflated, but the Honda continued until it finally stopped near Mile Post 48 on Highway 20 east of Cascadia.  Speeds during the pursuit were between 20 and 85 mph.

When the Honda finally stopped, the driver got out and ran down a steep embankment.  An Albany Police Department K-9 unit assisted the deputies.  The K-9 was sent to capture the suspect as he continued to run.  He resisted and drug the K-9 50 yards into the woods before the deputies caught up to them.  The suspect continued to resist and was taken into custody after being tased.  He was the sole occupant of the vehicle.

The suspect was identified as Derrick Tyree Smallwood, 28 of Lebanon.   Smallwood is from Georgia but has been living in Lebanon for the last month.  

Smallwood was taken to Lebanon Community Hospital to be treated for non-life threatening injuries.  He is being charged with Attempt to Elude (in a vehicle), Attempt to Elude (on foot), Fail to Perform Duties of a Driver (property damage), Reckless Endangering, Criminal Mischief II, Escape III, Reckless Driving, Resisting Arrest, and Theft III.

Linn County Sheriff’s Office deputies were assisted by Albany Police Department, Lebanon Police Department, Sweet Home Police Department and Sweet Home Fire Department.

At the time of the press release, there is no mug shot available.  


Hopper Fire at Cabinetry Business (Photo)
Albany Fire Dept. - 02/14/19 7:36 PM
Exterior Hopper
Exterior Hopper
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At 11:21 a.m., Albany Fire Department responded to a First Alarm Fire at Santiam Cabinets, 2626 Three Lakes Road SE, Albany, Oregon.  When crews arrived they found pressure release panels from an exterior hopper dust bin were blown out due to an explosion and evidence of fire.  No injuries occurred.  Crews remained on site to investigate and for fire watch. 

Deputy Fire Marshals were requested to respond and work with the business owners on how to move forward safely.  Stations 11, 12, 13, and 15 responded for suppression and Medic 12 was onsite for respite care.  The cause of the fire was determined to be from a table saw blade striking a nail, which sparked and ignited wood dust in the dust removal system.   




Attached Media Files: Exterior Hopper

DPSST Hosts FEMA All Hazards Incident Commander Training in Salem (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/14/19 7:12 PM
AHIMT Class
AHIMT Class
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Oregon's law enforcement, fire, EMS, and emergency management personnel manage a wide-variety of incidents on a daily basis.  Some of these incidents (sports events, community gatherings, wildfires, floods, etc.) may require several public safety resources/agencies and may draw large audiences that require a dedicated incident management team.

To help develop personnel who may be called upon to manage large incidents, the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is hosting a week-long FEMA class, All Hazards Incident Commander, at the City of Salem Fire Department Training Center. 

This course provides local- and state- level emergency responders with a robust understanding of the duties, responsibilities, and capabilities of an effective Incident Commander (IC) on an All-Hazards Incident Management Team (AHIMT). These responsibilities fall into two categories:1) Responding to the incident and command needs of the incident and 2) Effectively fulfilling the position responsibilities of an IC on an All-Hazards ICS IMT

This course is an instructor-led training that supports learning through discussion, lecture, and active participation in multiple exercises that provides a realistic, scenario-driven approach to mastering the skills required of an IC. Exercises, simulations, discussions, and a final exam enable participants to process and apply their new knowledge.

More than a dozen public safety leaders from law enforcement, emergency management, fire and EMS agencies around the state will complete the class tomorrow.

DPSST Director Eriks Gabliks said "DPSST is pleased to offer this week-long training class to prepare men and women from our public safety community that may be called upon to help manage a large incident created by either a natural or man-made event.  Oregon experiences a number of large events each year ranging from wildfires and floods to national sporting events and other gatherings that attract thousands of spectators and participants.  With hundreds of public safety personnel retiring over the next few years we need to ensure we are offering all-hazard/all-risk professional development opportunities to develop those who will be moving into incident commander roles."

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 45,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 




Attached Media Files: AHIMT Class

Statement from Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty Regarding PPB Texts with Patriot Prayer Leader
Portland Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty - 02/14/19 5:09 PM

I am not shocked, and I am not surprised at today’s reporting of Lt. Jeff Niiya’s collaboration with Patriot Prayer leader Joey Gibson over text to provide aid and support for their hate marches. This story, like many that have come before it, simply confirms what many in the community have already known –  there are members of the Portland police force who work in collusion with right-wing extremists.

The time for indignation and feigned outrage is past, and the time for meaningful accountability is here. There are many examples of the Mayor and the City Council standing by, wringing our hands, wishing we could take action. Today is a new opportunity to demand the policing our community deserves – policing that treats all community members with respect and allows for peaceful protest free of intimidation and bias.

We have failed before, but we do not need to continue to fail. The incidents we hear about are not “one off’s” but everyday examples of a broken policing system in Portland that must be addressed. I look forward to supporting actions of accountability. I ask that the Mayor and Police Chief Outlaw take swift action and I will also be here to demand justice if that call is not met.

I stand with the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) and other community groups who ask for the following:

  1. The City accelerates the Western States designed training that came out of the recent resolution condemning white supremacy and
  2. An independent investigation into collaboration between Portland Police and alt-right/white supremacists groups and individuals, with the investigator being chosen by community groups

 


Menacing, Theft and Interfering with a 911 Call
Newport Police Dept. - 02/14/19 5:06 PM

On February 11th,2019 Officers responded to a business in the 200 Block of NW Coast Street for a 911 Hang-up call., Dispatchers had attempted to call the business several times with no success. Officers arrived on the scene and learned a  subject had been in the business creating a disturbance.

Investigation revealed, Zebedee Matthew Shultz, 36, of Newport, had entered the business in an enraged state and began arguing with customers, threatening to hurt or kill them. Shultz left the business, but returned, a short time later and demanded his money back for a beverage he had purchased earlier. When an employee was not able to refund him his money, Shultz became violent again, making threats to staff and patrons. Shultz grabbed the money out of the employee tip jar and left the business a second time. About five minutes later Shultz returned a third time. This time he got into a verbal argument with a customer  eventually pushing the customer. The customer entered the business to use the phone to call for police, but Shultz grabbed the phone away and left  with the phone.

An employee followed Shultz out of the business and down the street, attempting to retrieve the phone. Shultz realized the employee was behind him and began threatening the employee, chasing after the employee while verbally threatening to kill him.

Officers located Shultz in the immediate area.. Further investigation revealed Shultz had thrown the business phone on top of a nearby roof, then walked to his own residence,  a short distance away. At his residence, Shultz changed his clothes and grabbed two knives before heading back towards the business  when he was intercepted by police. Shultz told officers he had only grabbed the knives because he was scared of the people at the business and that he was just going for a walk.

Zebedee Matthew Shultz was arrested and  lodged at the Lincoln County Jail for;

  • Menacing
  • Theft 3
  • Disorderly Conduct

Bank Robbery in Salmon Creek (Photo)
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/14/19 4:46 PM
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On February 14th, 2019 just after 3:30pm Deputies from the Clark County Sheriff's Office were sent to the US Bank located at 13001 NE Highway 99 on a report of an armed robbery that had just occurred.

A bank employee related that a white male had entered the bank armed with a knife.  The suspect approached one of the tellers and demanded that she put the money from her cash drawer into a bag that he had brought with him.  The teller complied, and the suspect fled the bank on foot.

A search of the area, with the assistance of a Sheriff's Office K-9 was conducted, but the suspect was not located.

The suspect was described as a white male approximately 6'03" tall, average build.  He was wearing dark clothing, had on black gloves, a dark hat and a dark colored scarf covering most of his face. 

A photo of the suspect provided by the bank is attached.

Nothing further to add at this time.

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/1172/122053/02_Teller_1-8157_Salmon_Creek-20190214____5.jpg

Pacific University Weekly News Brief
Pacific University - 02/14/19 4:21 PM

A digest of recent news from Pacific University:

Professor Andrew Bzowyckyj to be Honored by American Pharmacists Association

CESS Senior Director Celebrates Retirement with New Scholarship for Continuing Students

Pacific University Website Receives Award, Other Recognition

College of Optometry Researchers Seek Children With Nearsightedness for National Clinical Study

Pacific University Leads Region in Research Spending Among Private Universities

Student-Athlete Serena Wallace All-Academic Honors

Pacific CGE Welcomes Anthony Hudson/Carla Rossi in 'Looking for Tiger Lily'

Whiteley Lecture Explores Humans' Place in the Universe

'In Your Face' Lecture Explores Marginalization of Native Americans Through Use of Sports Mascots

Music Department Presents Gilbert and Sullivan’s H.M.S. Pinafore, March 1-3

Marcus Wallace and Maya Okamura Named Boxer Club Athletes of the Month for January

Upcoming Events at Pacific

Boxer Athletics – Basketball, Baseball, Men’s Tennis Teams in Action at Home – Feb. 15-17

Anthony Hudson/Carla Rossi: Looking for Tiger Lily – Thursday, Feb. 21

Stars in the Grove Community Variety Show – Saturday, Feb. 23

Portland Youth Philharmonic Concert – Monday, Feb. 25

Whiteley Lecture – “Feeling Small in a Big Cosmos” – Wednesday, Feb. 27

Cheron Mayhall In Your Face Lecture – “How Native American Sports Mascots Disappear Native People” – Thursday, Feb. 28

Pacific University Music Presents Gilbert & Sullivan’s H.M.S. Pinafore – March 1-3 (Fri-Sun)

                                                                                                                                                                            -pacificu.edu-

Pacific University is a small, but diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Tracing its roots to 1849, when it was chartered as a school for orphans of the Oregon Trail, Pacific has long been devoted to making a difference in the world. Today, students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn. At Pacific, students and faculty develop close, nurturing relationships that provide an extraordinary educational experience. Pacific is currently ranked the No. 1 private research university in the Pacific Northwest.


Washington Man Faces Federal Charge for Disturbance on Flight
FBI - Oregon - 02/14/19 3:53 PM

The FBI charged Douglas B. Smyser, age 21, with interfering with a flight crew for alleged disturbing behavior aboard Compass Air flight 6054 on Wednesday, February 13, 2019. Smyser, a Bonney Lake, Washington, man, boarded the flight at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. The flight, bound for Los Angeles, diverted to Portland International Airport when the crew became concerned about Smyser's actions. The plane landed at 7:51 pm in Portland, and both Port of Portland Police officers and the FBI responded.
 
According to the federal criminal complaint filed in this case late Thursday, witnesses and crew report there were multiple incidents that occurred between the time the plane left the gate in Seattle and when it landed in Portland. About 20 – 30 minutes into the flight, the captain said the crew became concerned that Smyser would rush the cockpit, and he made the determination at that time to divert to Portland.
 
Specifically, witnesses and crew reported incidents involved Smyser throwing his backpack in the aisle and claiming it wasn’t his; his refusal to stay in his seat; and his pacing the aisle with several attempts to move towards the front of the plane. A crew member also said that Smyser told her at one point that “someone has a gun in the back row of this plane.” As the plane was approaching Portland for landing, a passenger helped return Smyser to his seat and used his body weight to physically block Smyser from leaving his seat until Port officers took him into custody.
 
On Wednesday night, Port officers charged Smyser with two state crimes: menacing and disorderly conduct 2. On Thursday, February 14, 2019, the FBI filed the federal criminal complaint charging him with interference with a flight crew. Smyser is expected to make his initial appearance before a federal magistrate at 1:30 pm on Friday, February 15, 2019, at the U.S. District Courthouse in Portland.
 
A criminal complaint is only an accusation of a crime, and all defendants should be presumed innocent until proven guilty.
 
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DPSST Police Career Officer Development Revision Advisory Panel Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/14/19 3:22 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

February 14, 2019

Contact:                Jessie Charlton
                                503-378-2256

Notice of Regular Meeting

 

The Police Career Officer Development Revision Advisory Panel will hold a regular meeting on March 1, 2019 from 9:00a-3:00p.  The meeting will be held in conference room A235 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Agenda Items:

1.  Welcome

2.  PCOD Curriculum Review

3.  PCOD Hour Breakdown Review

4.  Revision Discussion

5.  Conclusion

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Police Career Officer Development Revision Advisory Panel members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


PPB Announces Extra Patrols Focusing On Impaired Driving (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 02/14/19 2:22 PM
Vision Zero
Vision Zero
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During the month of January, Portland Police Officers arrested 86 persons for alcohol and drug impaired driving. As we venture into the month of February, Portland Police will be adding additional DUII enforcement patrols to help ensure our streets stay safe, and to prevent needless tragedies within our community.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, there is one alcohol related fatality in the United States every 48 minutes. In 2017 there were 10,874 people killed in the United States as a result of these alcohol related crashes.

The Portland Police Bureau would like to remind the public that drug-impaired driving is just as dangerous (and illegal) as alcohol-impaired driving. Officers will be taking a zero tolerance approach to all forms of impaired driving.

Drink responsibly and remember buzzed driving is drunk driving.

Support zero tolerance for impaired driving by reporting suspected impaired drivers 911.

The Portland Police Bureau is committed to working with our partners in government and the community to create safer streets and work towards reducing, and eventually eliminating, traffic fatalities as part of Vision Zero.

To learn more about the City of Portland's Vision Zero effort, please visit: http://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40390 Be safe and enjoy the season.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Vision Zero

Advisory: Sewage release to tributary of Tanner Creek at 3263 SW Cascade Terrace
Portland Bureau of Environmental Services - 02/14/19 1:49 PM

Sanitary Sewage Release Advisory (this is NOT a Combined Sewer Overflow [CSO] Advisory)

(February 14, 2019) – Sewage was released from a City-owned pump station at 3263 SW Cascade Terrace. The sewage discharged into a stormwater catch basin for a tributary of Tanner Creek.

The volume of the release is estimated at approximately 2,700 gallons. The release began around 5:45 a.m. City crews are onsite working to stop the release and conduct cleanup. An investigation of the cause of the release is ongoing.

The public should obey the warning signs in the area and avoid contact with the tributary to Tanner Creek for 48 hours.

This sewage overflow is not related to the City of Portland's combined sewer overflow control system, which prevents overflows of stormwater and sewage to the Willamette River and Columbia Slough during rainy periods.

The Bureau of Environmental Services provides city residents with programs to protect water quality and public health, including wastewater collection and treatment, sewer construction and maintenance, stormwater management, and stream and watershed restoration. www.portlandoregon.gov/bes and @BESPortland.


Friends of the Carpenter Welcomes Southwest Washington Woodturners as New Tenant
Friends of the Carpenter - 02/14/19 12:36 PM

Vancouver, WA – Friends of the Carpenter has welcomed Southwest Washington Woodturners as a new tenant at 1600 W 20th Street, Vancouver. Southwest Washington Woodturners will rent 500 square feet of space, which was previously rented to house and operate the Share Day Center.

“Friends of the Carpenter has had a mutually beneficial relationship with Southwest Washington Woodturners for almost 10 years and we are delighted to welcome them as a neighbor,” said Tom Iberle, executive director. “As the staff and board of Friends of the Carpenter imagine a new direction for our organization, we are excited about the opportunity to further the reputation of the Friendship Center as a place of choice for unique, hand-made, heirloom-quality wood products through our partnership with Southwest Washington Woodturners.”

“The Woodturners are very happy to continue this great relationship we have built through the years with Friends of the Carpenter,” said Adam Luna, club president.  “We are pleased about this opportunity to open our School of Woodturning in our new space, which is equipped with eight lathes and tools. We will offer one day classes led by master wood turners on a regular basis, plus our monthly meetings are open to all, from novices to experts, interested in learning more about the art of wood turning. Come check us out, I promise you will have the best time in front of the lathe. There is nothing like the satisfaction of creating a unique handmade piece!”

Southwest Washington Woodturners are committed to serving woodturners in the area. Membership is available through annual dues of $35 (sign up and pay on-line at southwestwashingtonwoodturners.com). The club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month, 7 to 9 p.m., in their new space at Friends of the Carpenter, 1600 W 20th Street, Vancouver.

For more information about SWWT and their schedule of classes, call 360-887-8963, email  info@southwestwashingtonwoodturners.com or visit southwestwashingtonwoodturners.com.

About Friends of the Carpenter

Friends of the Carpenter was incorporated in Vancouver, WA in Oct. 1998 and began as a vision of a practical outreach of simple welcome and personal interaction between volunteers from the church and people living in poverty. Since the beginning, regular contact has been made with vulnerable members of our community through woodworking events scheduled around the area and which, today, are mostly held at FOC’s Friendship Center. Our mission: Friends of the Carpenter is a non-profit, faith-based day facility that provides safety, structure and purpose for vulnerable members of our community. Learn more at friendsofthecarpenter.org.

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Hockinson School District Board of Directors Special Meeting/Work Session
Hockinson Sch. Dist. - 02/14/19 12:00 PM

Date:               Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Time:               6:00 p.m. Special Meeting/Work Session

Location:         Hockinson School District Board Room

Address:          17912 NE 159th St.; Brush Prairie, WA 98606


Pacific University's Annual 'In Your Face' Lecture Explores Marginalization of Native Americans Through Use of Sports Mascots (Photo)
Pacific University - 02/14/19 11:24 AM
2019-02/888/122041/JFKeeler_crop.jpg
2019-02/888/122041/JFKeeler_crop.jpg
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FOREST GROVE -- The public is invited to Pacific University on Thursday, Feb. 28 for a provocative talk by writer and activist Jacqueline Keeler, who will give the university's 2019 Cheron Mayhall In Your Face Lecture.

Keeler will present “How Native American Sports Mascots Disappear Native People” at 7 p.m. in the Marsh Hall Taylor Auditorium (2043 College Way, room 216) on the university’s Forest Grove Campus. Admission is free, but seating is limited and early arrival is encouraged.

Keeler is of Navajo/Yankton Dakota Sioux ancestry and co-founder of Eradicating Offensive Native Mascotry, a movement to end the use of racial groups as mascots, as well as other stereotypical representations in popular culture and cultural appropriation.

Native American sports mascots marginalize the populations they represent, Keeler and other critics contend. The Cleveland Indians baseball club's "Chief Wahoo" mascot, for example, depicts a smiling caricature of a Native American. After appearing on the team's team hats and uniforms and fan apparel for more than 70 years, the team finally agreed to retire the mascot in 2018.  

Mascots like these, Keeler wrote in a 2014 piece for Salon.com, "confer others to act out dated stereotypes about (Native Americans) and ignore our real issues -- even our humanity." Fans at games and elsewhere regularly wear Redface makeup, misuse Native regalia, partake in fake war chants and make gestures, including a tomahawk chop, when rooting for the teams the mascots represent.

Keeler was born in Cleveland rather than her native tribal land as a child of U.S. relocation and termination policies implemented in the 1950s and '60s. The policies were intended to disband Native American tribes, and Cleveland was one of several relocation centers across the country set up by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

“The purported goal of these Congressional laws and resolutions was to “liberate Indians” from the wardship of the U.S. government,” she wrote. “But what they did, in fact, was eliminate tribes’ federally recognized status, sovereignty, and force the sell-off of tribal assets and land. These policies also led to the loss of a generation of young people to urban centers — many of whom, like my parents, never returned home.”

Keeler is the author The Edge of Morning: Native Voices Speak for the Bears Ears. She is a regular contributor to The Nation, Yes! Magazine, TruthOut, High Country News, and many other publications. A forthcoming book, Standing Rock to the Bundy Standoff: Occupation, Native Sovereignty, and the Fight for Sacred Landscapes, will be released later this year.

Pacific University’s annual Cheron Mayhall In Your Face Lecture, presented annually by the School of Social Science’s Politics & Government Department, gives provocative thinkers a space to provide “outside the box” ideas that challenge conventional thinking.

The lecture is named for late Pacific alumna Cheron Mayhall ’64, a tireless champion of community service and social justice. Her family's support of Pacific and its Lead On campaign is helping expand inspiration, opportunity and innovation for Pacific's future. Additional support for the lecture is provided by Pacific’s Undergraduate Student Senate and Elise Elliott Fund.

                                                                                                                                                                       -pacificu.edu-

Pacific University is a small, but diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Tracing its roots to 1849, when it was chartered as a school for orphans of the Oregon Trail, Pacific has long been devoted to making a difference in the world. Today, students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn. At Pacific, students and faculty develop close, nurturing relationships that provide an extraordinary educational experience. Pacific is currently ranked the No. 1 private research university in the Pacific Northwest.




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/888/122041/JFKeeler_crop.jpg

Maps' grants help Marion and Polk teachers innovate
Maps Credit Union - 02/14/19 11:16 AM

SALEM, OR (Feb. 4, 2019) — Maps Credit Union’s Community Foundation awarded $10,000 in grants this year to help ten public school teachers bring their ideas and innovations to life. 

The winners, who each received $1,000, were selected based on the number of online votes they received for the video submission that answered the question “How will this grant make a difference to your students?” 

The funds were awarded as part of the Foundation’s annual education grant program, which has given more than $54,000 to local teachers. This year the Foundation invited public school teachers in Marion and Polk counties to apply for funds. 

“We’re honored to help these talented teachers implement their ideas in the classroom,” said Mitzi Smith, the Credit Union’s Community Development Officer, “These projects will enrich the lives of thousands of students today, and, in many cases, thousands more in years to come.”

The video applications reflect the teachers’ creativity and dedication to students. We heard from nearly 5,000 people who voted for their favorite project, teacher, or school. More than 6,700 students will benefit from the implementation of the winning projects and programs.

Here are the names of the grant recipients and descriptions of what they plan to do with their winnings:

First place winner, Courtney Karns of Gervais Elementary School will buy new Orff instruments for kindergarten through 5th-grade students. The new instruments will allow the entire class to create music at the same time. 

Jennifer Wiken of Mark Twain Elementary School will use grant funds to upgrade classroom furniture including new tables and flexible seating.

Michael Ross of Battle Creek Elementary School and his students will venture to OMSI to explore science, exhibits, and participate in the planetarium show.

Stephen Ackerman of West Salem High School, needed additional pro-panels to display student artwork. The purchase of the pro panels will be used at the 2ndAnnual West Salem Student Art Exhibition.

Alison Stolfus of Silverton High School is committed to developing a passion for natural resources and teaching environmental stewardship to her students. The grant funds will be used to purchase equipment to restore specific sites along Silver Creek.

Aleisha Douthitt and Krysia Wakefield of Monmouth Elementary School will use their teacher grant to purchase read aloud books for the classroom. At least 30 new hardback books and 80 softcover books will be used by students for years to come.

Mary Hayden of Silverton Middle School is creating a bark trail around the school campus for students and the community to run and walk on. This idea will promote exercise and a healthy lifestyle. 

Michele Finicle of Bethany Charter School will purchase a Diversified Mobile Demo Table, a hands-on science lab. The table includes a sink so experiments can be moved around the classroom. 

Emily Allen, of Butte Creek Elementary School, and her students are taking on Oregon History Day. Students will benefit from this grant by having new presentation boards to display their work at the event. 

Brad Lomax of McNary High School, will launch a coffee stand program that allows students to apply business concepts and learn the process for launching a new business. 

The grants are funded by Maps’ Free Community Checking accounts, which invests a penny in the community each time a member uses a Maps Community Checking debit card. Last year, debit card use brought in more than $94,000 for teacher grants, community grants, scholarships, financial education, and non-profit support.

About Maps Credit Union

Maps Credit Union’s roots reach back to 1935 when 17 volunteers ran the co-op out of kitchens and classrooms in Marion County. Today, Maps serves more than 64,000 members from mapscu.com and ten branches throughout the mid-Willamette Valley.


Meeting set Feb. 27 to review hydrology study for Sitka Sedge State Natural Area
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 02/14/19 10:38 AM

PACIFIC CITY, Ore. — Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) will host a public meeting to share results of a hydrology study for Sitka Sedge State Natural Area and Tierra del Mar. The meeting is scheduled from 2 – 3:30 p.m. Feb. 27 at the Kiawanda Community Center, 34600 Cape Kiwanda Dr., Pacific City.

The study, conducted by consultants Pacific Groundwater Group (PGG) and Environmental Science Associates (ESA), analyzes options for improving fish passage and dealing with a failing tide gate that’s part of a human-made dike on the property. The study takes into account state and federal fish passage requirements, as well as flood risks and groundwater effects of different dike and tide gate modification options.

The consultants created models that predict and compare groundwater levels according to different dike configuration scenarios during both average weather conditions and extreme storms. A summary of the study’s initial findings is at oregon.gov/oprd/NATRES/Pages/SitkaSedgeHydrology.aspx.

In the 1930s, a ½-mile dike with two tide gates was constructed to block tidewater and drain the area behind the dike. This also had the effect of preventing native fish — including coho, chum, steelhead and coastal cutthroat trout — from migrating upstream to historic spawning and rearing areas. The original tide gates failed at least 50 years ago and were replaced with the current tide gate. In the past 30 years, the current tide gate has deteriorated and now leaks, allowing some tidewater through and contributing to high water in the marsh during rainstorms. 

Sitka Sedge State Natural Area is a 357-acre state park in Tillamook County. The park includes ocean beach, dunes, forest, tidal marsh, freshwater marsh, shrublands and mudflats that together support an array of important and rare plants, wildlife and fish. OPRD is committed to managing the park in a way that balances natural resource health and visitor recreation, now and for decades to come.

OPRD purchased the area in 2014 using voter-dedicated Oregon Lottery funds and a grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “State Natural Area” is a designation for protecting outstanding or important portions of Oregon’s ecosystems. For more information about Sitka Sedge State Natural Area, visit oregonstateparks.org.

Editors: Images and video of Sitka Sedge State Natural Area and the tide gate are located here.


HRSA Awards Virginia Garcia $100,000 Grant to Increase Mental Health Access in Schools
Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Center - 02/14/19 10:24 AM

Earlier this month the  US Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources Administration (HRSA) awarded the Virginia Garcia School-Based Health Center in Forest Grove with $100,000 aimed at increasting mental health access at the school as well as making much needed improvements to the facility.

"School-based health centers provide access to essential health care services that improve student wellbeing and their ability and
readiness to learn," said HRSA Administrator George Sigounas, MS, Ph.D.

The application was a joint effort between Virginia Garcia, Forest Grove High School and the City of Forest Grove. Working together they developed and wrote the grant to ensure that the funds would be maximized without duplicating efforts.

"Everyone deserves to access healthcare in a beautiful, up to date healthcare facility. This is a showing of Virginia Garcia's commitment to serve and support the students of Forest Grove, Banks, and Gaston without the use of taxpayer dollars. We see this as investing in the success and outcomes of the students and families we serve," said Lacey Beaty Virginia Garcia School-Based Health Center Director.

The grant will ensure there is confidential access for those seeking mental health services as well as staff trained to support them. Virginia Garcia was only one of three organizations in the state to receive the funds. Improvements at the clinic are expected to begin in June of this year.

###




Attached Media Files: HRSA Release

Measles outbreak numbers unchanged: 53 confirmed, two suspect cases
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/14/19 10:12 AM

Measles outbreak numbers unchanged: 53 confirmed, two suspect cases

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health is continuing its measles outbreak investigation and has no updates to report today. Since Jan. 1, we have identified 53 confirmed cases and two suspect cases. Public Health has not identified any new locations where people may have been exposed to measles.

Here are the details of the confirmed cases:

  • Age
    • 1 to 10 years: 38 cases
    • 11 to 18 years: 13 cases
    • 19 to 29 years: one case
    • 30 to 39 years: one case
  • Immunization status
    • Unimmunized: 47 cases
    • Unverified: five cases
    • 1 MMR vaccine: one case

Hospitalization: one case (none currently)

Public Health is not providing any additional information about the one case with one dose of MMR in order to protect the patient’s privacy.

For a complete list of exposure sites, visit the Public Health measles investigation webpage.

Clark County Public Health is urging anyone who has been exposed at an identified location and believes they have symptoms of measles to call their health care provider prior to visiting the medical office to make a plan that avoids exposing others in the waiting room. People who believe they have symptoms of measles should not go directly to medical offices, urgent care centers or emergency departments (unless experiencing a medical emergency) without calling in advance.

Additional resources

For information about additional exposure sites in Oregon, linked to the confirmed case in Multnomah County, visit the Oregon Health Authority measles webpage. For information about other measles cases in Washington, visit the Washington State Department of Health measles webpage.

Public Health has established a call center for questions related to the investigation. Anyone who has questions about public exposures should call 360.397.8021. The call center is open daily.

Anyone with questions about their measles immunity or the measles vaccine should contact their primary care provider. Clark County Public Health does not provide immunizations or testing for immunity.

If you are unsure of your family's immunization status, you can view, download and print your family's immunization information online at MyIR or request a copy of your immunization record from the Washington State Department of Health.


Friends of Fort Vancouver Announces Five New Spring Felting Workshops
Fort Vancouver National Historic Site - 02/14/19 10:07 AM

The Friends of Fort Vancouver, a nonprofit organization that supports the educational mission of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, has announced five upcoming spring felting workshops, taught by artist Juneko Martinson.

Juneko Martinson is a featured artist in the Friends' Bookstore and Gallery in the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center (located at 1501 E Evergreen Blvd, Vancouver, WA 98661). The shop carries a generous selection of her handmade "critters." Martinson is a recognized master artist in fiber art and she offers these wonderful workshops with kits included to develop or enhance personal skills with felting. Each workshop is a new adventure for participants ages 12 and up.

Martinson raises alpaca and sheep on a small farm in Brush Prairie, Washington, where she observes first hand the habits and expressions of domestic and wild animals. This is often reflected in her artwork. The animals and birds Juneko creates for the Friends' Bookstore reflect the myriad of native wildlife, livestock, and pets that lived at Fort Vancouver and Vancouver Barracks over hundreds of years.

Martinson processes wool and fibers on her small farm, carding and coloring them with natural dyes. The kits used in each class are designed and assembled by the artist.

Registration is $35 per workshop. All workshops are held at the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center from 10 am to 1 pm. The registration fee includes instruction and the fiber art kit for the selected project for the registered date. Registration is non-refundable and each registrant will receive a kit for that workshop. All of this spring's workshops are suitable for beginning felters, or more experienced felters.

Register in the Friends' Bookstore at the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center or by calling (360) 816-6216. Payment is expected at the time of registration. Space is limited to 14 people per workshop.

Schedule

  • February 23, 2019: Lop-Eared Bunny
  • March 9, 2019: Busy Beaver
  • March 23, 2019: Stylish Bear
  • April 6, 2019: Scottish Blacknose Sheep
  • April 13, 2019: Pansy Brooch

Apartment Fire
Newport Police Dept. - 02/14/19 9:46 AM

At 1:32 PM on Wednesday, February 13, 2019, Newport Fire Department was dispatched to a report of smoke coming from a third floor apartment at the 700 block of NW Beach Drive. Upon arrival observed light smoke coming from the third story near the rear of the building. The business located on the first floor was closed.

Fire crews made access and extinguished a small fire in a third story apartment. The adjacent occupancy was opened and checked for damage, however none was found. Fire damage did not extend to any additional businesses or residences. Fire damage was contained to a dryer; however, the rest of the apartment did suffer some smoke damage.
Newport Fire Department received mutual aid assistance from Depoe Bay Fire District, Seal Rock Fire District, and Toledo Fire Dept. Newport Police Dept. and Newport Public Works provided assistance with traffic control.

Newport Fire Department responded with 2 fire engines, 1 ladder truck, 1 heavy rescue, 2 chief officers and 11 firefighters.

The cause of the fire was determined to be a build of lint in the dryer. Newport Fire Department reminds you to clean your dryer lint trap after every use.


All Parkrose Hardware locations now accept used, leftover paint for free
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/14/19 9:42 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County residents now can take used or leftover paint to any of the three Parkrose Hardware locations in the county. The Parkrose Hardware Hazel Dell location has joined the county’s Paint Take-Back program and now accepts latex- and oil-based paints for recycling for free.

Twelve local paint stores now accept used or leftover paint during business hours. Participating businesses are:

  • Ace Hardware, 13009 NE Hwy 99
  • Ace Hardware, 1605 W Main St., Battle Ground
  • Filbin’s Ace Hardware, 809 NE Minnehaha St.
  • Habitat for Humanity ReStore, 10811 SE Mill Plain Blvd.
  • Miller Paint, 14300 NE 20th Ave.
  • Miller Paint, 11717 NE 78th Way, Suite 101
  • Miller Paint, 2607 NE Andresen Road
  • Miller Paint, 111 NE 164th Ave.
  • Parkrose Hardware, 16509 SE First St.
  • Parkrose Hardware, 8000 E Mill Plain Blvd.
  • Parkrose Hardware, 8002 NE 6th Ave.
  • Rodda Paint & Décor, 7723 NE Fourth Plain Blvd.

Paint also can be dropped off at transfer stations for free most weekends during the following days and times:

  • Central Transfer and Recycling Center, 11034 NE 117th Ave., 8 am to 4 pm Friday to Sunday.
  • West Van Materials Recovery Center, 6601 NW Old Lower River Road, 8 am to 4 pm Friday and Saturday.
  • Washougal Transfer Station, 4020 S Grant St., 8 am to 4 pm first and third Saturday of the month.

Latex-based paint dropped off at participating locations is recycled into new paint. Oil-based paint is repurposed as an alternative fuel.

For more information about disposing of paint and other household hazardous waste, visit www.clark.wa.gov/hhw and RecyclingA-Z.com.


A comforting Win for Life win (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 02/14/19 9:37 AM
2019-02/4939/122032/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
2019-02/4939/122032/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/4939/122032/thumb_OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg

February 13, 2019 - Salem, Ore. – A recently-retired Fairview man won the top prize of the Win for Life game and will take home $1,000 per week for life.
Robert East of Fairview will now receive $1,000 per week for life, thanks to his Oregon Lottery win. He matched all four numbers for the Monday, Feb. 11 drawing. He purchased the ticket at CJ’s Pub on Sandy Boulevard in Portland. East said he is a regular player of Lottery jackpot games and was very surprised when he realized he won.
“I was at home and Googled the results from my phone,” he said. “I looked at the ticket again, checked the date and double checked it. Then I immediately called my best friend.”
East said he stopped by the store and scanned the ticket to be sure, and confirmed it was the winning ticket.
“I recently retired so this is going to help me relax in retirement,” he said. “I have limited income so this will make me more comfortable.”
CJ’s Pub will receive a retailer sales bonus of $13,000 for selling the winning ticket.
Chris Taylor, owner of CJ’s Pub said that the bonus money would be going back into the business.
“We need some (heating and air conditioning) work and will get new chairs,” Taylor said. “It’s all going back into the business.”
Taylor said he has a number of regular customers who will love the fact he sold the winning ticket.
“I think my wife might have sold the ticket,” he said. “It’s just tremendous. It boosts you and makes you want to work harder and continue to grow our business.”
During the 2015-17 biennium, more than $109 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education and watershed enhancement in Multnomah County, where East lives and purchased the ticket. Since 1985, Oregon Lottery players have won more than $38 billion in prizes.
The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 are advised to contact the Lottery office and schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org
 




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/4939/122032/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg , 2019-02/4939/122032/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg , Robert East winning ticket

County provides clarification on elections for charter review commission
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/14/19 9:35 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County’s charter contains a provision that, 5 years after its adoption, it is to be reviewed by a charter review commission consisting of 15 persons elected on a non-partisan basis.  The election of the commission members will occur in the 2020 General Election.

“There has been some confusion in the community that the 5-year review meant the election of freeholders would take place in November of this year,” said Council Chair Eileen Quiring. “The date that starts the clock on the 5 years is when the charter was officially certified, and therefore adopted, which took place in late November 2014 after being approved by voters earlier that month. That means November 2020 is the next general election to occur after the 5-year mark.”

The charter review commission is made up of three residents from each of the four county council districts and three people elected countywide. The commission reviews the charter to determine adequacy and may propose amendments. Potential amendments would be submitted to county voters during the general election that follows the review process.

The in-person candidate filing period for the 2020 general election will begin Monday, May 11, 2020, and close Friday, May 15, 2020.

For information on the county charter, go to www.clark.wa.gov/councilors/clark-county-home-rule-charter.


Historic Preservation Commission March meeting location change
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/14/19 9:31 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County’s Historic Preservation Commission’s March 6, 2019, meeting has been moved to the Aspen Room, Vancouver City Hall, 415 Sixth St.  

The meeting begins at 6 pm and is open to the public.

The meeting agenda and related materials will be posted on the county’s web page a week before the meeting at https://www.clark.wa.gov/community-planning/historic-preservation-commission.


U.S. Attorney Statement on the Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/14/19 9:26 AM

The decision to withdraw the Portland Police Bureau from the Joint Terrorism Task Force is a mistake that defies logic. It’s disappointing that in spite of the overwhelming evidence presented of JTTF successes in Oregon and across the nation, a majority of the city council chose a politically-expedient broadside against the federal government over the safety and well-being of their constituents. The law enforcement community’s duty and commitment to ensuring public safety and protecting civil rights will not be deterred by the politics of the moment.

-- Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon


Cowlitz Sheriff releases photo of driver of Hit and Run at railroad crossing in Kalama (Photo)
Cowlitz Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/14/19 9:06 AM
2019-02/1503/122027/temnco_driver_3.jpg
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Cowlityz County Sheriff:  On February 4th at 11:50 PM TEMCO employees reported that a vehicle had gone through one of their railway fences off of Hendrickson Dr completely destroying it. This is just south of Kalama Washington near I-5.   The incident was captured on TEMCO security video.  The vehicle appears to be a dark maroon Jeep Grand Cherokee with a large cargo rack on the roof.  The suspect vehicle left the scene southbound on Hendrickson Dr. 

Attached are photos of the driver and the vehuicle.   Case A19-318

If anyone has any information about this event, please call and leave a message for Deputy Derek Baker.  360-577-3092 

Callers who wish to remain anonymous can use their smartphone by using the APP "Tip411" if they make the tip attention to the Cowlitz County Sheriff's Office. 

Charlie Rosenzweig, Chief Criminal Depurty, 




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/1503/122027/temnco_driver_3.jpg , Hit and Run Suspect , Hit and Run Suspect

3 heartfelt ways to make a co-worker's day
SAIF - 02/14/19 8:46 AM

Summary: Reach out to your co-workers in need.

-----

Instead of focusing on romance this Valentine’s Day, consider reaching out with kindness.

According to research by Mental Health America, Oregon has one of the worst rates of mental health issues in the country.

“Mental health is a taboo subject in general, but especially at work,” said Liz Hill, Total Worker Health® advisor at SAIF. “Reduce that stigma by reaching out to your co-workers.”

Hill points out several factors that impact mental health this time of year. Cold, dark days can be tough for Oregonians, especially those dealing with seasonal affective disorder. Bills from the holiday season are due. And Valentine’s Day can underscore loneliness or loss for some.

Small gestures can make a big difference, according to Hill. Here are some ways you can reach out to a co-worker in need:

  • Grab a cup of coffee or tea
  • Go for a walk
  • Ask how they’re doing, and just listen

You can also direct co-workers to your employee assistance program or the many community-based resources that are available. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline offers free and confidential emotional support to people in suicidal crisis or emotional distress through local crisis centers 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  

More information and 60-second stress break videos can be found at saif.com/relax.  

About SAIF

SAIF is Oregon's not-for-profit workers' compensation insurance company. Since 1914, we've been taking care of injured workers, helping people get back to work, and striving to make Oregon the safest and healthiest place to work. For more information, visit the About SAIF page on saif.com.

 


Oregon's Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Advisory Council to meet March 6
State Library of Oregon - 02/14/19 8:46 AM

Salem, Ore - Oregon’s Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Advisory Council will meet at the State Library of Oregon, Wednesday, March 6, 2019. Mark Peterson will chair the meeting, which will begin at 9 a.m. in Room 103.

The Council will review the FY2019 LSTA Competitive Grant applications and make recommendations to the State Library Board concerning the state’s LSTA program. The Council will also hear other updates and proposals from the Library Support & Development Services manager and staff.

An open forum will be held Wednesday, March 6 at noon. Any member of the public may address the Council on any topic during the open forum.

LSTA Advisory Council Meeting

State Library of Oregon - Conference room 103

March 6, 2019 – 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

9:00 a.m.         Welcome and introductions

9:15                 Housekeeping, review agenda, approve minutes from Sept. 10, 2018, meeting

9:20                 Report of Susan Westin, Program Manager

  • FY2018 budget update
  • FY2019 budget draft

9:30                 Report of Ross Fuqua, Data & Federal Programs Consultant

  • Grants management software and process updates
  • Competitive Grants program – future directions

9:35                 New business

  • Bylaws update recommendation from SDLAC
  • State Library staff recommendation:

Oregon digital collections project/Washington State Library partnership in FY2019

9:50                 Discussion and recommendations: LSTA Competitive Grants applications

  • Process review for LSTA Competitive Grants evaluation
  • Preliminary ranking based on initial scores

10:30               Break

10:45               Resume LSTA competitive grant discussions and recommendations

12:00 p.m.       Open forum

12:30               Working lunch

1:00                 Resume LSTA competitive grant discussions and recommendations

3:00                 Break

3:15                 Resume LSTA competitive grant discussions and recommendations

4:00                 Final scores tallied and applications ranked

Recommendations to State Library Board

4:15                 Meeting and action item review

                        Process check on application review

4:30                 Adjourn

 

Sign language interpretation will be provided for the public if requested 48 hours before the meeting; notice 72 hours before the meeting is preferred. Handouts of meeting materials may also be requested in alternate formats 72 hours before the meeting. Requests may be made to Ferol Weyand at 503-378-2525.

 


Tip of the Week for February 18 - Scammers Posing as the IRS
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/14/19 8:08 AM

Scammers posing as the IRS

As we get into tax season, the IRS is reminding taxpayers to be on the lookout for scam e-mails aimed at tricking you into disclosing personal and financial information that could be used to steal your identity and financial assets.  IRS does not send out unsolicited e-mails asking for personal information.

The IRS has seen a recent increase in these scams, many of which originate outside the United States.  To date, investigations have identified sites hosting hundreds of IRS-related phishing scams.  These scam websites have been found to originate in at least 20 different countries.

 Scammers claiming to be from the IRS, tell you that you are due a federal tax refund, and direct you to a website that appears to be a genuine IRS site.  The bogus sites contain forms or interactive web pages similar to IRS forms and web pages.

Don’t be fooled!  These sites and forms have been modified to request detailed personal and financial information from the e-mail recipients. E-mail addresses involving users in professional and educational communities seem to be heavily targeted.

The information obtained is then used to steal the taxpayer identity and financial assets.  Typically, identity thieves use someone’s personal data to empty the victim’s financial accounts, run up charges on the victim’s existing credit cards, apply for new loans, credit cards, services or benefits in the victim’s name and even file fraudulent tax returns.

The IRS does not send out unsolicited e-mails or ask for detailed personal information.  Additionally, the IRS never asks people for their PIN numbers, passwords or similar secret access information for their credit card, bank or other financial accounts. The IRS primarily uses the mail when they need to notify you regarding any tax-related matter. They do not phone you late at night, or text you.

 For more information on phishing (suspicious e-mails) and identity theft, visit the IRS Web site at www.irs.gov .

For information on preventing or handling the aftermath of identity theft, visit the Federal Trade Commission Web sites at www.consumer.gov/idtheft and www.OnGuardOnline.gov (and click on Topics).

Please report the fraudulent misuse of the IRS name, logo, forms or other IRS property by calling the Treasury inspector General for Tax Administration toll-free hotline at 1-800-366-4484.

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/5490/122024/Scammers_Posing_as_the_IRS.pdf

Lebanon Firefighters Respond to Structure Fire (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 02/14/19 7:26 AM
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The Lebanon Fire District responded to the report of a structure fire at 794 East Oak Street. The report came in at approximately 3:45 am. Upon arrival crews found a one story single family dwelling heavily involved in fire. Crews began a defensive fire attack and the fire was brought under control in approximately 30 minutes. The residence had been vacant since a fire in January of 2018. Neighbors advised fire crews that the home had been occupied by transients. Upon searching the structure no victims were found and no injuries were reported. The District responded with four engines, a medic unit, and command vehicle.




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/1191/122023/20190214_041156.jpg , 2019-02/1191/122023/20190214_035702.jpg

Brian Grant Foundation's Pints for Parkinson's Fundraiser Is Returning In April For Parkinson's Awareness Month (Photo)
Brian Grant Foundation - 02/14/19 7:00 AM
Brian Grant and Katrina Kahl at the Pints for Parkinson's Kick Off Party in 2018
Brian Grant and Katrina Kahl at the Pints for Parkinson's Kick Off Party in 2018
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/6054/122005/thumb_20180328-PintsForParkinsons-013.jpg

Program kicks off with parties in Portland and Bend to celebrate the local businesses that provide "Pints Passports" to support the Brian Grant Foundation's programs for people with Parkinson's

Portland, Ore. February 14, 2019 – The Brian Grant Foundation (BGF) is kicking off its annual Pints for Parkinson's fundraiser with parties in Portland and Bend to celebrate the 35 businesses that participate in the program. Throughout the month of April people can purchase $25 "Pints Passports" that are good for ten pints at any of the participating locations. Proceeds from the sales of "Pints Passports" support BGF's programs to improve the well being of people with Parkinson's. 

The Pints for Parkinson's kick off parties will be held on March 27, 2019 at Urban Studio in Portland and March 28, 2019 at Boneyard Pub in Bend. Attendees of these events will be able to purchase their "Pints Passports" in advance while enjoying food, drinks and games. Tickets for the Portland event are available at www.briangrant.org. Thanks to the sponsors of this event, 100% of ticket sales will support BGF's programs. The event in Bend is open to the public, with $1 of every pint purchased that evening benefitting BGF.

"The incredible number of establishments participating in Pints for Parkinson's shows the commitment of our business community to helping people with Parkinson's live fulfilling lives," says Katrina Kahl, executive director of BGF. "Brian was known for his tenacity on the court and that determination is matched by the thousands of Oregonians that come out year after year to support him in his new journey as a Parkinson's advocate."

"Pints Passports" can be purchased at any of the participating locations or online throughout the month of April. Passports can be used starting on April 1, 2019 and ending on on May 31, 2019. Each passport entitles the purchaser to ten pints of beer at any of the locations listed on the passport (one pint per location). For more information about the program and the kick off parties and to  purchase a passport online visit briangrant.org.

###

Founded in 2010, the Brian Grant Foundation provides tools to improve the well being of people with Parkinson's. BGF's programs focus on exercise and nutrition to help people with Parkinson's manage their symptoms, improve their overall health and prevent other serious illnesses. Learn more about BGF's programs at www.briangrant.org.

PINTS FOR PARKINSON'S LOCATIONS

Portland Locations

10 Barrel Brewing Co: www.10barrel.com

Altabira: www.altabira.com

Backwoods Brewery: www.backwoodsbrewingcompany.com

Baerlic Brewing: www.baerlicbrewing.com

Bar Maven: www.barmaven-pdx.com

Breakside Brewery: www.breakside.com

Brix Tavern: www.brixtavern.com

Carlita’s: www.carlitaspdx.com

Ecliptic Brewing: www.eclipticbrewing.com

Gigantic Brewing Company: www.giganticbrewing.com

Groundbreaker Brewing: www.groundbreakerbrewing.com

Lompoc Brewing 5th Quadrant: www.lompocbrewing.com

Market of Choice: www.marketofchoice.com

Migration Brewing: www.migrationbrewing.com

The Pope House Bourbon Lounge: www.popehouselounge.com

Quaintrelle: www.quaintrelle.com

Red Star Tavern: www.redstartavern.com

River Pig Saloon: www.riverpigsaloon.com

Stormbreaker Brewing: www.stormbreakerbrewing.com

Swank & Swine: www.swankandswine.com

Tanner Creek Tavern: www.tannercreektavern.com

The Rambler: www.ramblerbar.com

Von Ebert: www.vonebertbrewing.com

Bend Locations

10 Barrel Brewing Co: www.10barrel.com

Astro Lounge: www.astroloungebend.com

Avid Cider: www.avidcider.com

Boneyard Beer: www.boneyardbeer.com

Bridge 99 Brewery: www.bridge99brewery.com

Cascade Lakes: www.cascadelakes.com

Craft Kitchen & Brewery: www.craftkitchenandbrewery.com

Immersion Brewing: www.imbrewing.com

Market of Choice: www.marketofchoice.com

River Pig Saloon: www.riverpigsaloon.com

Silver Moon Brewing: www.silvermoonbrewing.com

The Growler Guys: www.thegrowlerguys.com

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: Brian Grant and Katrina Kahl at the Pints for Parkinson's Kick Off Party in 2018

Wed. 02/13/19
Learn to Row with Rose City Rowing Club
Woloshin Communications Inc. - 02/13/19 8:29 PM

 

                                                                       

Feb. 13, 2019                                                                        Photo Opportunities available!      
Media contact: Patti Atkins, APR
503-961-2535. patti@prpatti.com

 

Learn to Row with Rose City Rowing Club

Portland, Oregon – In recent years, rowing in the Pacific Northwest has expanded on a grand scale. The Rose City Rowing Club will teach teens (7th through 12th grade) how to row in a two week starter camp.

“We do this program every year to expose teens to rowing,” said Nick Haley, head coach for Rose City Rowing Club. “It’s the first time many of them have engaged in the sport. We do this to recruit more students to rowing. It’s a great sport with many scholarship opportunities.”

 

What:             Learn to Row camp for 7th and 8th graders (non-competitive)

Where:            Portland Boathouse
                                    1515 SE Water Ave. (North of OMSI), Portland

When:           4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Tuesday and Thursdays, from Feb. 19 – March 1, 2019

 

What:             Learn to Row camp for 8th through 12th grade (competitive team)
            Where:            Portland Boathouse
                                    1515 SE Water Ave. (North of OMSI), Portland

When:             4:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Daily, from Feb. 19 - March 1, 2019

 

 

About Rose City Rowing Club
Rose City offers several rowing programs that serve various youth populations in the Portland area. With a centralized location in downtown Portland and easy access to public transportation, rowing is more accessible to more of Portland's youth than ever before.

Rowing is an extremely teamwork-oriented sport that requires consistent dedication from each team member. The kids learn how to set goals and work every day toward achieving them. They can grow into strong, fit, well-balanced athletes, with minimal risk of injury. We offer classes for middle and high school students and are progressive in our creation and operation of alternative programs and events.

The athletes learn positive life lessons about teambuilding and cooperation. Rowing is a life sport and participants are able to use what they learn both on and off the water for the rest of their lives. In fact, many former junior rowers have returned to Portland and are now teaching and coaching the next generation of student-athletes.

Rowing is an alternative sport for many kids who have not found their niche in traditional sports in school. Rose City helps augment the sports options available to kids in high school, providing an outlet for people who otherwise might not have participated in high school athletics. In addition, rowers are exposed to significant college recruiting opportunities.

For more information on Rose City Rowing Club, please visit www.rosecityrowing.org.


Hit and Run Suspect Arrested
Salem Police Dept. - 02/13/19 6:40 PM

On Monday, February 11, 2019, Stephen Murphy, who is blind, and his guide dog, Amilia, were struck by a car while crossing Hrubetz Rd SE near Liberty Rd S. The collision knocked both Murphy and Amilia onto Liberty Rd S, where passersby stopped to render aid and call police. The driver of the vehicle that struck Murphy and Amilia fled the scene and did not contact police.

Murphy was transported to Salem Health with serious injuries. Amilia was transported by a family friend to a veterinarian clinic. At this time police believe that both are recovering from their injuries.

Today, Salem Police officers were called by the owner of the vehicle that struck Murphy. The owner stated they had loaned the vehicle to an acquaintance, Donald Crume age 49 of Salem, who had returned the car with new damage. Crume gave the owner a different reason for the damage, so the owner contacted a repairperson to fix it. When the repairperson saw the damage they told the owner they believed the vehicle had possibly struck a person. This convicned the owner to do the right thing and call the police to report the suspicious damage. 

Based on the damage to the vehicle and evidence that was found at the crash scene, officers were able to determine this was the vehicle used in the hit and run of Murphy and Amilia. Officers located Crume and arrested him for Hit and Run Felony, Hit and Run of an Animal, Assault III and unrelated warrants.

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FBI Special Agent in Charge Renn Cannon Statement on Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF)
FBI - Oregon - 02/13/19 6:10 PM

The FBI's mission is to protect the American people and uphold the Constitution. With the withdrawal of the city of Portland from the Joint Terrorism Task Force, that mission doesn't change.

The agents, analysts, language specialists, legal experts and other professional staff of the FBI who work every day to keep our community safe will continue to do so, addressing threats of violence and criminal activity that impact our neighborhoods. To this end, the FBI will continue to partner formally with other members of the JTTF as well as informally with cities and counties across the state to share information and address threats as appropriate.

Robust discussions about law enforcement's role in our society are valuable. Recognizing the fears that exist in the community, we will continue to visit with community leaders and work together to keep Oregon safe while addressing those factors that can drive a wedge between us.

I want the people of Oregon to know that the men and women of the FBI do their work with the utmost respect for and adherence to our shared Constitutional protections that allow us to speak, gather and worship freely no matter who we are or where we come from. I thank them for the work they do every day, and I thank the Portland Police officers who have joined us the past few years for their work in keeping our shared community safe.

-- Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon


Portland City Council voted 3 to 2 to withdraw from the City's relationship with the Joint Terrorism Task Force
Portland Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty - 02/13/19 5:21 PM

Today, Portland City Council voted 3 to 2 to withdraw from the City’s relationship with the Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF).

Pursuing a withdraw from the JTTF was one of the prominent campaign promises offered by City Council Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty.

Commissioner Hardesty addressed a rally outside of City Hall prior to the City Council session. In front of the crowd, she spoke of her desire to fulfill her agenda of “One Portland.” One Portland means that everyone’s needs, especially those who have been traditionally marginalized, get equal treatment. Commissioner Hardesty believes that withdraw from the JTTF is an important part of making sure those who feel voiceless and unprotected are re-centered in our policy creation.

One-by-one, community members testified in front of City Council about their strong desire to withdraw from the JTTF.

When Commissioner Hardesty voted, she said “I reject the notion that this vote is rushed…since we rejoined in 2015, we have been working non-stop since then. This is not a new issue for communities.”

Commissioner Hardesty added: “We are here today because I am about keeping promises. When I said that I would bring this up as early as possible, this is why we are here today.”

And finally:

“This is a thoughtful process that centers all members of our community. When we talk about One Portland, a Portland where everyone is respected, we cannot in good conscious continue our engagement with the Joint Terrorism Task Force. I am proud to vote yes for this resolution and I thank you for being here.”


Jury Convicts San Diego Man of Traveling to Portland for Sex with Minor
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/13/19 4:54 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—A federal jury found David George Hopkins, 60, of San Diego, California, guilty today for traveling with the intent to engage in sex with a minor and other related charges.

“This case is another example of the extraordinary lengths some will go in an attempt to victimize children,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “It is also an example of the dogged determination of federal law enforcement to intercept individuals who seek to victimize children. I hope this conviction will serve as a warning to would-be child predators who believe they can pursue minors online without consequences.”

“Today’s conviction started with one person who was so concerned that she reported her disturbing interactions with Mr. Hopkins to law enforcement. Her willingness to step forward was critical to our ability to protect children from this predator. I would ask anyone with such information in the future to contact the nearest FBI office or submit tips online at https://tips.fbi.gov,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon.

According to court documents and information shared at trial, on June 9, 2017, Hopkins traveled from San Diego to Portland, Oregon believing he would be able to have sex with a 13-year-old girl named Paula along with her mother, Norma, and her mother’s friend, Ana, with whom he had been chatting online. Unbeknownst to Hopkins, he had been chatting with an FBI Special Agent acting as both Norma and Paula, and with a person using the alias Ana.

Hopkins and Ana began chatting online in 2012, and during one of the conversations, Hopkins raised the topic of having sex with a minor female in Peru and sent Ana a photo of what was purportedly him receiving oral sex from a minor.

In February 2017, Hopkins again contacted Ana and they began communicating using Skype and Facebook. In their first few conversations after reconnecting, Hopkins disclosed more details about his sexual relations with a minor in Peru. He also claimed to have had similar illicit contact with a minor in Panama. Hopkins later wrote, “did it bother u i [sic] had sex with young girls?” Hopkins did not present his conduct as a fantasy and Ana did not believe it was.

Concerned by the information shared with her, Ana reported Hopkins to the Eugene Police Department who referred the matter to the FBI. In March 2017, Ana met with an FBI Special Agent and agreed to cooperate with an investigation of Hopkins.

Ana continued chatting with Hopkins and their conversations grew increasingly more detailed and graphic as Hopkins shared information about his claimed past sexual experiences with minors and his desire to continue such behavior. In one conversation, Ana mentioned her fictitious Peruvian friend Norma. Hopkins asked if they could all have sex together. Ana also mentioned that Norma had a daughter named Paula. Hopkins also expressed an interest in having sex with Paula.

Ana told Hopkins that Norma had agreed to let him have sex with Paula. Shortly thereafter, Hopkins began communicating directly with Norma, the FBI Special Agent. The conversation quickly turned sexual and they discussed Hopkins flying to Oregon. In subsequent conversations, Hopkins began asking Norma about having sex with Paula, and, later, began communicating online directly with Paula. Hopkins chatted with Paula about having sex with her, describing in detail what he wanted to do.

In June 2017, Hopkins flew from San Diego to Portland with intent to engage in sexual conduct with Paula. He was met and arrested by the FBI at Portland International Airport upon his arrival. Hopkins claims of abusing children have not been corroborated.

In an indictment returned on June 20, 2018, a federal grand jury in Eugene charged Hopkins with one count each of attempting to use a minor to produce a visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct, attempting to coerce or entice a minor, traveling with the intent to engage in illicit sexual conduct and transferring of obscene material to a minor.

Hopkins will be sentenced on May 23, 2019, by U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane.

This case was investigated by the FBI with assistance from the Eugene Police Department. It was prosecuted by Amy Potter and Jeff Sweet, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

Anyone who has information about the physical or online exploitation of children are encouraged to call the FBI at (503) 224-4181 or submit a tip online at https://tips.fbi.gov.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/6325/122017/VERDICT-Hopkins-Final.pdf

Man Sentenced to 240 Months in Prison for Sexual Abuse of a Minor (Photo)
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 02/13/19 4:19 PM
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HILLSBORO, Ore.- On February 13, 2019, Judge Beth L. Roberts sentenced 67-year-old Stephen William Breaux to 240 months in prison. Breaux pleaded guilty to four counts of Sexual Abuse in the First Degree on February 1, 2019. The case was prosecuted by Deputy District Attorney Allison Brown.

Hillsboro Police first began investigating Breaux in January of 2018 after the 9-year-old victim made a disclosure of abuse to her father. Her father then alerted authorities. The victim was also taken to CARES Northwest, where she told counselors that Breaux had been abusing her for the last two years.

Breaux initially denied the allegations and refused to take a polygraph examination, but eventually admitted his guilt in court. The victim’s family was in court for Breaux’s sentencing, and indicated the victim will be relieved now that this case is concluded.

The Washington County District Attorney’s Office would like to acknowledge the Hillsboro Police Department, Detective Michelle Gay, and CARES Northwest for their assistance in this case.

In addition to his prison sentence, Breaux must register as a sex offender. Breaux has been transferred to the Oregon Department of Corrections to begin serving his sentence.




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/6208/122016/Stephen_William_Breaux.pdf , 2019-02/6208/122016/BREAUXSTEPHEN_WILLIAM.png

Council hearings to be held in evening on first, third Tuesdays in March and April
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/13/19 4:15 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Council will change its hearing schedule for the months of March and April. Hearings will begin at 6 pm on the first and third Tuesdays during those two months.

Council hearings currently are held at 10 am most Tuesdays, except for the first Tuesday of the month, when they are held at 6 pm.

Hearings will continue to be held in the sixth-floor hearing room of the Public Service Center, 1300 Franklin St.

More frequent evening hearings will allow for greater public involvement since many people work during the day making it a challenge to attend hearings. Additionally, the council is updating the schedule to more fully embrace the change in the role of the councilors as called for in the county charter.

“This will be a trial period to see how the new schedule works,” said Council Chair Eileen Quiring. “At the end of April, the council will discuss the schedule and decide whether to make this change permanent.”

The council’s weekly meeting, known as council time, will remain at 12:30 pm Wednesdays. Most council work sessions also will continue to be scheduled on Wednesday mornings.

Information about council meeting schedules and documents are available on the county website, www.clark.wa.gov/council-meetings.


Battle Ground School Board seeks two directors
Battle Ground Sch. Dist. - 02/13/19 4:13 PM

Battle Ground Public Schools' Board of Directors is accepting applications to fill two board vacancies created by the resignations of long-time directors Mavis Nickels (Director District 4) and Ken Root (Director District 2). Applications are due by March 4. Applicants must be registered to vote and live in the district for which they are applying.

Both Nickels and Root announced their resignations at the district's board meeting on Monday, Feb. 11. Root’s resignation is effective Feb. 26, while Nickels is resigning effective March 15. The board is looking to appoint two new directors to serve through the end of their terms, which expire November 2019. At that time, both director positions will be up for election in the 2019 primary and general elections.

School directors are elected, unpaid positions that serve four-year terms. More information about serving as a school director and the application process is on the Battle Ground Public Schools website: https://www.battlegroundps.org/school-board-vacancy/

Nickels, who has served on the board for eight years, has championed public education throughout her term by serving as the board's legislative representative. She also served on the Board's Audit and Tours committees, the Human Resources Committee, and as the board’s vice president.

Root also is resigning his position after serving for eight years on the board. He has served as the board's president and vice president and on Audit and Tours committees, as well as a liaison between the board and the Battle Ground Education Foundation and a member of the Washington State School Directors' Association Nominating Committee. 

"Mavis and Ken have given a decade of their lives to supporting the students of our community," said Battle Ground schools Superintendent Mark Ross. "We are forever grateful for their service."

Interested persons should send a letter of interest, resume and list of three references with contact information (no later than March 4) to Sandy U'Ren, Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent and Board of Directors, Battle Ground Public Schools Board of Directors, P. O. Box 200, Battle Ground, WA  98604, or by e-mail to uren.sandy@battlegroundps.org. Applicants, please include your full name and physical address (including ZIP Code), and an email address and telephone number where you can be contacted during the day.

Should a board member rescind his or her letter of resignation before the designated resignation date, the search for a new director will be terminated.

Spanning 273 square miles, Battle Ground Public Schools is one of the largest and most diverse geographic districts in the state serving a population of approximately 71,900 residents. The district supports more than 13,000 students in 18 schools, including six primary schools, six middle schools, one K-8 school, one 3-12 academy, two comprehensive high schools, one alternative high school, and one home school support program.


Serious Injury Crash on US Hwy 97 Turns Fatal (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 02/13/19 3:53 PM
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On February 7, 2019 at approximately 11:45 AM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers responded to a serious injury crash on US Hwy 97 near milepost (MP) 133. OSP has learned the seriously injured driver succumbed to her injuries on February 09, 2019.

The preliminary investigation revealed a southbound Ford Edge, driven by Anita Johnson (age 75 from Redmond) was slowing for another vehicle when a 1994 Kenworth tractor- trailer with a semi-trailer, driven by Chelsea Rice (age 28 from Aumsville) loaded with gravel rear ended the Ford Edge. The Ford Edge went off the highway to the right and struck a tree.  The Kenwood came to rest partially blocking the slow lane and right shoulder.

Johnson sustained life threatening injuries and was transported, by ground ambulance, to St. Charles Hospital in Bend where she died from her injuries on February 9, 2019. Chelsea Rice sustained minor injuries.

The highway was diverted to a single lane of travel for both SB and NB traffic for approximately 4 hours.  The investigation of the crash is still on-going. OSP was assisted by Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office, Oregon Department of Transportation, and Deschutes County Fire and Rescue.

 

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Attached Media Files: 2019-02/1002/122013/hwy_97.2019.jpg

Health Share of Oregon Public Meeting Announcement: Joint Board of Directors and Community Advisory Council Meeting
Health Share of Oregon - 02/13/19 3:51 PM

Date: Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Time: 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Location: Asian Health & Service Center, 9035 SE Foster Rd.

Agenda: Available online prior to each meeting

(Portland, OR) – Health Share of Oregon’s Board of Directors and Community Advisory Council will host a joint meeting open to the public. The meeting will be held next Wednesday, February 20, 2019 from 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm at the Asian Health & Service Center.

Updates on Health Share’s Ride to Care program, 2018 accomplishments, and discussion on Health Share’s Community Health Improvement Plan top the agenda. There will also be an opportunity for public comment.

The meeting is open to the public and Oregon Health Plan members are encouraged to attend.

Reasonable accommodations will be provided as needed for persons with disabilities. Language translation services will also be provided as needed. Those needing accommodations should contact Maria Tafolla at ia@healthshareoregon.org">maria@healthshareoregon.org or (503) 416-3668 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

In case of inclement weather, please check HealthShareOregon.org for updates and cancellations.

About Health Share of Oregon
Health Share of Oregon is the state’s largest Medicaid coordinated care organization (CCO), serving OHP members in Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington counties. Our mission is to partner with communities to achieve ongoing transformation, health equity, and the best possible health for each individual.

Health Share was founded and continues to be governed by eleven health care organizations serving OHP members: Adventist Health, CareOregon, Central City Concern, Clackamas County, Kaiser Permanente, Legacy Health, Multnomah County, Oregon Health & Science University, Providence Health & Services, Tuality Health Alliance and Washington County.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Press Release_Health Share of Oregon Public Meeting Announcement - Joint Board of Directors and Community Advisory Council Meeting

Oregon Department of Human Services Hosts Stakeholder Meeting on February 22, 2019
Oregon Department of Human Services - 02/13/19 3:28 PM

SALEM, Oregon –  Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) will host its regular stakeholder meeting on February 22, 2019 in Salem. Join us in person, by phone or online.

 

DHS Director Fariborz Pakseresht, along with the agency’s Executive Leadership Team, will present brief updates followed by a question-and-answer period. Updates will be provided on each of the agency’s divisions: Aging and People with Disabilities, Child Welfare, the Office of Developmental Disabilities, Self-Sufficiency Programs, Vocational Rehabilitation, and Central and Shared Services.

 

Date:          Friday, February 22, 2019

Time:         1:30 to 3 p.m.

Participate:

  • In-Person: Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 137, 500 Summer Street NE, Salem
  • By phone: Take part by conference call. Dial-in number: (800) 260-0719. Participant Code: 464300
  • Online: Join from any PC or mobile device browser: Join the meeting.

 

Participate in the conversation on Twitter by using #ORDHSforum.

 

Learn more about the services DHS offers: www.oregon.gov/dhs


Detectives Arrest Suspect Relating to Animal Abuse Investigation (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 02/13/19 3:18 PM
Lopez
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On February 13, 2019 detectives from the Portland Police Bureau's Sex Crime Unit arrested and lodged 51-year-old Fidel Lopez into the Multnomah County Detention Center on charges of Sex Assault of an Animal and Aggravated Animal Abuse I.

Detectives began this investigation on December 4th, 2018 and collaborated with the following community partners: Dove Lewis Animal Hospital, Multnomah County Animal Services, Oregon State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State Police Forensic Services Division and the Multnomah County District Attorney's Office.

No further information will be released at this time due to the ongoing investigation. Anyone who has information pertaining to this case should contact Detective D. McCormick at 503-823-0862.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Lopez

Oregon Virtual Academy
Oregon Virtual Academy - 02/13/19 3:08 PM

NOTICE OF REGULAR MEETING OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

February 19, 2019 @ 6:30 p.m.

1-888-824-5783 Ext.90095991# and via Blackboard Collaborate at

 http://tinyurl.com/BoardORVA


Canby fire and OSFM partner for smoke alarm program (Photo)
Canby Fire Dist. - 02/13/19 2:58 PM
Test you alarm
Test you alarm
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Burnt food in the oven? Is your alarm going off?

If your smoke alarm goes off, never remove the battery, never remove the alarm.By pushing the test button you can hush the alarm for 10 minutes. 

As of February 13th 2019 Canby Fire has a supply of smoke alarms from the Oregon State Fire Marshal’s smoke alarm program.  If you are a resident in the Canby Fire District and you do not have smoke alarms or your smoke alarms are older than 10 years old they should be replaced. If you cannot afford a replacement, give us a call at 503-266-5851 we can help.

Act fast, Smoke alarms save lives.




Attached Media Files: Test you alarm

Celebrate Oregon's 160th Birthday and the Opening of the Oregon Historical Society's New Exhibit, Experience Oregon
Oregon Historical Society - 02/13/19 2:23 PM

For press images of Experience Oregon, visit http://bit.ly/eopresskit 

Portland, OR – Join us for one of the Oregon Historical Society’s most memorable days of the year — Oregon Statehood Day. This year will be even more special, as we celebrate Oregon’s 160th birthday and officially open our new permanent exhibit, Experience Oregon!

Festivities include birthday cake, music from the Oregon Oldtime Fiddlers, remarks from OHS leadership and special guests, and a blessing from the Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde. Finally, we will cut the ribbon, and all will be welcome to Experience Oregon!

In celebration of the grand opening of Experience Oregon, admission to the Oregon Historical Society will be free all weekend, February 14 – 18. A special Family Day program featuring performances from local arts and culture groups will take place on Saturday, February 16 from 12pm – 4pm.

Statehood Day Program

Thursday, February 14, 2019

Festivities from 11:30pm – 2:00pm, free admission all day

11:30pm – 12:00pm              

Listen to the Oregon Oldtime Fiddlers perform and grab a slice of Oregon’s birthday cake!

12:00pm – 12:40pm             

Program

Remarks

Kerry Tymchuk, OHS Executive Director

Bill Valach, President, OHS Board of Trustees

Helen B Louise, Museum Director

Gov. Barbara Roberts & Gov. Ted Kulongoski

Blessing of Experience Oregon

Members of the Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde

Official Ribbon Cutting for Experience Oregon

Gov. Roberts, Gov. Kulongoski, Chair Kafoury, & Theo Gelber (OHS youth museum volunteer)

12:40pm – 1:00pm               

Listen to the Oregon Oldtime Fiddlers perform and grab a slice of Oregon’s birthday cake until it is gone!

12:40pm – 2:00pm             

OHS volunteer docents (trained group tour guides) will be in Experience Oregon to answer visitor questions

The Oregon Historical Society’s museum is open seven days a week, Monday – Saturday from 10am – 5pm and Sunday from 12pm – 5pm. After February 18, general admission will be $10, and discounts are available for students, seniors, and youth. Admission is free every day for OHS members and Multnomah County residents.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.


Oregon to Deliver First Crisis Intervention Training for 9-1-1 Operators
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/13/19 1:58 PM

Across the nation first responders (law enforcement, fire and EMS) are helping residents in crisis on a daily basis. To assist our state's first responders with training for these types of incidents, Oregon identified the Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) model as an effective and collaborative approach for law enforcement response to persons with a mental health crisis. One component of CIT is a 40-hour training class that includes information on mental health, de-escalation, consumer voices, resources, and other issues that are specific to a jurisdiction.

With staffing and funds provided by the Oregon Legislative Assembly and Oregon Health Authority, the Department of Public Safety and Standards Training (DPSST) in collaboration with Greater Oregon Behavioral Health, Inc. (GOBHI) created Oregon's CIT Center of Excellence (CITCOE). CITCOE serves as a training resource clearinghouse which works with law enforcement and behavioral health agencies across the state to develop, implement and support CIT’s. Currently there are 26 CIT’s in Oregon and several more are being developed.

The more than 900 women and men who work around our state as 9-1-1 communications professionals are an important part of the public safety family and in many ways are the first, first responder.  Their interaction with a person in crisis is different than with other first responders as they can only rely on the information they can gather by talking with a caller over the phone, or via Text to 9-1-1, as opposed to interacting with an individual in person.  This specialized contact does not make the 40-hour CIT training ideal for the public safety telecommunicator.

To help address this need, approximately 18 months ago an ad-hoc work group was formed that brought together interested parties from across Oregon.  This dedicated team spent countless hours to develop a Public Safety Telecommunicator CIT that will be relevant to 9-1-1 professionals in all areas of the state. The CIT training class will be a model that can be used by an individual agency or as a regional 9-1-1 CIT training opportunity in different parts of the state. The pilot Oregon Public Safety Telecommunicator CIT class will be held on February 20-21, 2019.  This class will be offered at DPSST's Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first statewide class of its type in the nation.

The 9-1-1 CIT work group was co-chaired by Melanie Payne with Portland Bureau of Emergency Communications (BOEC) and Erica Stolhand of Hood River County 9-1-1. Work group members included Sgt. Bill Wright of the Umatilla Police Department, Sgt. Jason Ritter of the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, Captain Jason Wade of the University of Oregon Police Department, 9-1-1 Supervisor Jennifer Reynolds of Central Lane 9-1-1 (Eugene), Telecommunicator Jeremy Hipes of Clackamas County 9-1-1, Communications Supervisor Karen Primmer of the Umatilla County Sheriff’s Office, 9-1-1 Training Coordinator Karma Fletchall of the Washington County Consolidated Communications Agency (WCCCA), 9-1-1 Training Supervisor Megan Craig  Deschutes County 9-1-1, Emergency Communications Supervisor Mickie Reed Portland BOEC, Officer Tom Hietala of the Bend Police Department, 9-1-1 Training Program Coordinator Tamara Atkinson of DPSST, Training Coordinator Eilene Florey of GOBHI/CITCOE, and Crisis Intervention Training Program Coordinator Linda Maddy of DPSST.

DPSST Director Eriks Gabliks said "public safety agencies around Oregon work in partnership with both public and non-profit organizations in communities around our state to help our residents in crisis.  The program this work group created to train our 9-1-1 professionals to assist people in crisis is greatly appreciated and will help make a difference in our emergency response system." 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 45,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


On Valentine's Day, Remember the Sweet Deals at Washington Credit Unions (Photo)
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 02/13/19 1:10 PM
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Chocolate offers instant gratification, but lower fees, great rates, and member perks last longer.

 

SEATTLE (Feb. 12, 2019) – With Valentine’s Day approaching, it’s a great time to remember all the sweet deals from your credit union. Members enjoy a variety of money-saving perks that are better than a box of chocolates, whether you’re treating yourself or someone special on the big day.

If your idea of a romantic dinner out is more steak-and-lobster than burger-and-fries, try a free financial education course, such as budgeting, to align your finances. Hoping to take a romantic sunset drive in a new car sometime soon? Credit union members save big on auto loan financing, an average of $91 per year. Want to start a long-term financial relationship with a low-interest credit card? You could be enjoying a credit card rate as much as 3.09 percent lower than those offered at other financial institutions. All of these benefits are available for the 4.3 million Washington credit union members and joining a credit union is easier than you think.

These perks and savings aren’t just candy-coated promises. They exist because of credit unions’ not-for-profit structure. Credit unions are owned by their members, so they do not pay Wall Street stockholders. Instead, they return profits to their members in the form of favorable loan rates, better returns on savings accounts, and lower fees.

Washington credit unions love their members and Valentine’s Day is a great time to remember all the sweet deals waiting for you at your credit union. Want to join a credit union? Find one that best suits your needs at www.asmarterchoice.org.


Washington Benefits of Membership Report, a, Credit Union National Association study based on Datatrac, NCUA, and CUNA comparison of bank and credit union rates, for 12 months ending in Sept 2018.

 

                                                                          <END>

The Northwest Credit Union Association is the not-for-profit trade association representing over 180 credit unions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, and their 7.3 million consumer members. Northwest Credit unions are not-for-profit cooperatives, owned by their members. Credit unions help members achieve their financial goals.  All earnings in excess of operating expenses and required reserves are returned to members in the form of lower loan rates, fewer fees and higher interest paid on savings. For information on how to join a credit union, please visit http://www.asmarterchoice.org.




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/4992/122003/Washington_Loves_Credit_Unions.docx , Graphic

On Valentine's Day, Remember the Sweet Deals at Oregon Credit Unions (Photo)
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 02/13/19 1:07 PM
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Chocolate offers instant gratification, but lower fees, great rates, and member perks last longer.

 

PORTLAND (Feb. 12, 2019) – With Valentine’s Day approaching, it’s a great time to remember all the sweet deals from your credit union. Members enjoy a variety of money-saving perks that are better than a box of chocolates, whether you’re treating yourself or someone special on the big day.

If your idea of a romantic dinner out is more steak-and-lobster than burger-and-fries, try a free financial education course, such as budgeting, to align your finances. Hoping to take a romantic sunset drive in a new car sometime soon? Credit union members save big on auto loan financing with an average of $116 per year. Want to start a long-term financial relationship with a low-interest credit card? You could be enjoying a credit card rate 2.93 percent lower than those offered at other financial institutions. All of these benefits are available for more than two million Oregon credit union members and joining a credit union is easier than you think.

These perks and savings aren’t just candy-coated promises. They exist because of credit unions’ not-for-profit structure. Credit unions are owned by their members so they do not pay Wall Street stockholders. Instead, they return profits to their members in the form of favorable loan rates, better returns on savings accounts, and lower fees.

Oregon credit unions love their members and Valentine’s Day is a great time to remember all the sweet deals waiting for you at your credit union. Want to join a credit union? Find one that best suits your needs at www.asmarterchoice.org.

Oregon Benefits of Membership Report, a Credit Union National Association study based on Datatrac, NCUA, and CUNA comparison of bank and credit union rates, for 12 months ending in Sept 2018.

 

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The Northwest Credit Union Association is the not-for-profit trade association representing over 180 credit unions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, and their 7.3 million consumer members. Northwest Credit unions are not-for-profit cooperatives, owned by their members. Credit unions help members achieve their financial goals.  All earnings in excess of operating expenses and required reserves are returned to members in the form of lower loan rates, fewer fees and higher interest paid on savings. For information on how to join a credit union, please visit http://www.asmarterchoice.org




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/4992/122002/Oregon_Loves_Credit_Unions.docx , 2019-02/4992/122002/Valentines-Day_(1).jpg

West Linn PD to add extra patrol cars to specifically search for DUII and Distracted Drivers in February
West Linn Police Dept. - 02/13/19 12:57 PM

The West Linn Police Department will be deploying extra patrol cars to search for Distracted and intoxicated drivers this month, thanks to funding through Oregon Impact. The West Linn Police Department arrested 21 Intoxicated drivers last month (January, 2019). Here are some sobering facts about DUII drivers (via MADD tracking data, 2018):
 

In 2017, 10,874 people died in drunk driving crashes-one every 48 minutes-and more than 300,000 were injured in drunk driving crashes.

In fatal crashes in 2017, the highest percentage of drunk drivers was for drivers ages 21 to 24 (27%), followed by 25 to 34 (26%) and 35 to 44 (23%).

Each day, people drive drunk more than 300,000 times, but only about 3,200 are arrested.

Drunk driving costs the United States an estimated 132 billion a year.

Almost 7% of drivers, mostly under age 35, who were involved in fatal traffic crashes tested positive for THC, the principle ingredient in marijuana.

An average drunk driver has driven drunk over 80 times before their first arrest.


Be safe, drive sober.


UPDATE: PPB Identifies Deceased Person in Hazelwood Neighborhood Suspicious Death (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 02/13/19 12:50 PM
JaquonaGoggans
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Detectives continue to investigate the circumstances of a suspicious death that began with the discovery of a body on February 7, 2019 in the 13500 Block of Southeast Division Street.

Detectives have determined that the deceased is an adult female. She has been identified as 43-year-old Jaquona Lakaya Goggans (photo).

Anyone with information should contact Detective William Winters at 503-823-0466.

###ORIGINAL RELEASE BELOW###

On Thursday, February 7, 2019, at 12:27 a.m., East Precinct officers responded to a parking lot in the 13500 Block of Southeast Division Street on the report that someone had found a body in a vehicle in the parking lot.

Officers and medical personnel arrived at the scene and confirmed that the person was deceased. The deceased appears to be an adult male.

Based on a preliminary investigation, officers requested Homicide detectives to respond to the scene to continue the investigation. The Oregon State Medical Examiner will conduct an autopsy to determine the cause and manner of death.

Officers have closed Southeast 135th Avenue from Mill Street to Division Street to conduct the investigation. It is expected to be closed for several hours.

No other details are available at this time.

Anyone with information about this incident should contact the Police Non-Emergency Line at 503-823-3333.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: JaquonaGoggans

March Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Benefits to be issued March 1.
Oregon Department of Human Services - 02/13/19 11:38 AM

The U.S Department of Agriculture has asked states to provide early issuance of March benefits for those who rely on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) for food security. This request is due to the partial federal government shutdown that occurred in January.

Oregonians who normally receives their SNAP benefits between the 1st or 9th of each month will get their March allocation on March 1, 2019.

This is the second month that SNAP benefits will be issued differently than the regular issuance schedule. The early March issuance date will help to ease the burden on affected households who have had a longer than usual gap between their usual SNAP issuances.

“We understand that this disruption in the schedule of how benefits are distributed can be difficult for SNAP participants,” stated Self-Sufficiency Programs Director Kim Fredlund. “Our goal, during this unprecedented time, is to ensure we provide vulnerable Oregonians with access to food benefits and help them find additional resources if needed.”

If people are concerned about running out of SNAP benefits, they can contact to 211Info, the Oregon Food Bank or the Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) to find resources in their local communities.

To find a local DHS office, go to www.oregon.gov/dhs and click on Office Locations.


Pacific University Professor Andrew Bzowyckyj to be Honored by American Pharmacists Association (Photo)
Pacific University - 02/13/19 11:25 AM
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HILLSBORO - Pacific University School of Pharmacy associate professor Andrew Bzowyckyj has been selected by the American Pharmacists Association to receive its 2019 Academy of Pharmacy Practice & Management Distinguished Achievement Award in Service.

The honor recognizes the achievements of an individual who has made significant or sustained contributions in the area of service to their community, their state, or the national level. Service activities include community service, service to the profession and service to APhA.

Bzowyckyj’s extensive service to the pharmacy profession ranges from publications to community outreach, practice advancement, presentations and leadership activities. He serves as a role model to other pharmacists, student pharmacists and health care professionals when providing patient care and advocating for patient’s health and well being.

Bzowyckyi will accept the award at the APhA meeting in Seattle next month.

As one of eight schools that comprise Pacific University’s College of Health Professions, the School of Pharmacy offers a fully accredited three-year doctoral degree program (PharmD) that promotes excellence in professional pharmacy education, scholarship and service.

                                                                                                                                                                         -pacificu.edu-

Pacific University is a small, but diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Tracing its roots to 1849, when it was chartered as a school for orphans of the Oregon Trail, Pacific has long been devoted to making a difference in the world. Today, students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn. At Pacific, students and faculty develop close, nurturing relationships that provide an extraordinary educational experience. Pacific is currently ranked the No. 1 private research university in the Pacific Northwest.




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/888/121996/Bzowyckyj.jpg

PPB Hosts Town Halls Regarding Body Worn Camera Pilot Program
Portland Police Bureau - 02/13/19 11:17 AM
The Portland Police Bureau is in the early stages of developing a pilot program for body worn cameras and is hosting the first of three open forum Town Halls this weekend, Saturday, February 16, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the East Portland Community Center. Scheduled future meetings are on the Bureau's website: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/78485 and will be updated if times and locations need to be changed. All meetings are open to the public and media.

These meetings are an opportunity for community members to help shape the policy regarding the body worn camera pilot project. Community members unable to attend any of the meetings, but wanting to provide feedback, are encouraged to do so via the online link on the website.

The Bureau is also preparing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for vendors. The RFP will ask the vendors to explain the capabilities of their systems. Once the responses are received and scored, the Bureau will receive demonstrations from the vendors and select the top two; officers from Central Precinct and the Traffic Division will test both system for six months.

At the end of this pilot, in January 2020, the Bureau will make a determination on the viability of the cameras as a useful and effective tool. If the decision is to move forward with full implementation, a final vendor will be selected and the policy will be finalized. Full implementation would then occur.

Chief Outlaw released a video regarding this project, which can be viewed at: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/78485

###PPB###

Measles outbreak numbers unchanged: 53 confirmed, two suspect cases
Clark Co. WA Communications - 02/13/19 11:15 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health is continuing its measles outbreak investigation and has no updates to report today. Since Jan. 1, we have identified 53 confirmed cases and two suspect cases. Public Health has not identified any new confirmed cases or locations where people may have been exposed to measles.

Here are the details of the confirmed cases:

  • Age
    • 1 to 10 years: 38 cases
    • 11 to 18 years: 13 cases
    • 19 to 29 years: one case
    • 30 to 39 years: one case
  • Immunization status
    • Unimmunized: 47 cases
    • Unverified: five cases
    • 1 MMR vaccine: one case
  • Hospitalization: one case (none currently)

Public Health is not providing any additional information about the one case with one dose of MMR in order to protect the patient’s privacy.

For a complete list of exposure sites, visit the Public Health measles investigation webpage.

Clark County Public Health is urging anyone who has been exposed at an identified location and believes they have symptoms of measles to call their health care provider prior to visiting the medical office to make a plan that avoids exposing others in the waiting room. People who believe they have symptoms of measles should not go directly to medical offices, urgent care centers or emergency departments (unless experiencing a medical emergency) without calling in advance.

Additional resources

For information about additional exposure sites in Oregon, linked to the confirmed case in Multnomah County, visit the Oregon Health Authority measles webpage. For information about other measles cases in Washington, visit the Washington State Department of Health measles webpage.

Public Health has established a call center for questions related to the investigation. Anyone who has questions about public exposures should call 360.397.8021. The call center is open daily.

Anyone with questions about their measles immunity or the measles vaccine should contact their primary care provider. Clark County Public Health does not provide immunizations or testing for immunity.

If you are unsure of your family's immunization status, you can view, download and print your family's immunization information online at MyIR or request a copy of your immunization record from the Washington State Department of Health.


HSD levies failing
Hockinson Sch. Dist. - 02/13/19 11:05 AM

Preliminary results from the Feb. 12, 2019, special election have been released, and it appears Hockinson is the only school district in the state not to pass its levies.

So far, 46.37% of votes are in favor of the Replacement School Programs & Operations Levy, and 45.06% are in favor of the Capital Levy for Technology & School Improvements. Ballots are still arriving by mail, and the election will not be certified until Feb. 22, so we will continue to monitor election results.

We thank everyone who voted – whether “yes” or “no.” This is what the democratic process is all about: raising our voices with our votes.

“Although this ‘no’ vote is disappointing for our school district and will require us to make some difficult decisions, this also is an opportunity for our community to engage in important conversations,” said Superintendent Sandra Yager.

HSD would be unable to do any of its work preparing students for promising futures without our community. In addition to helping bridge the gap financially between what the state contributes and what it actually costs to educate our students, our community's volunteerism and participation in school district events and activities help make Hockinson the special place it is today.


Pretrial TAPS Open House Feb. 25th
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/13/19 10:58 AM

Pretrial TAPS Open House          

TAPS = Transition and Programming Services

Your Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office would like you to attend an Open House to introduce the new Pretrial TAPS Facility. We are happy to report that we obtained use of this residential duplex and programming area. With funding assistance from our local Community Justice and general fund approval from our Board of Commissioners, as well as support from Health and Human Services and all departments of the county, this duplex was remodeled and furnished to accommodate up to nine individuals.

Housing is a very important component to our Pretrial Justice Program. We know that individuals who have adequate housing are more likely to show up for future court dates and not reoffend.  These individuals have a better chance of a successful transition out of jail.  This project would not have been possible without the excellent partnerships from all involved and is another example of working together to successfully address a community issue.       

 

 Monday February 25th at 35 NW Cottage Street in Newport

Noon to 3pm Remarks and program begin at 12:30             /     Refreshments will be served   /

 parking available @American Legion




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/5490/121993/Open_House.pub

Salem City Club Program -- Oregon Youth: Crisis in Mental Health (Photo)
VanNatta Public Relations - 02/13/19 10:14 AM
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Salem, OR (Feb. 13, 2019) - Salem City Club, a biweekly gathering of more than 100 members, will meet Feb. 22 at the Willamette Heritage Center to discuss youth mental health.

The annual youth suicide rate in Oregon has increased sharply over the last 10 years and remains well above the average in the United States. The Oregon Healthy Teens Survey shows that nearly half of the state’s lesbian, gay or bisexual eighth-graders have contemplated suicide and a quarter of those students have attempted suicide. At Sprague High School alone, over the last eight months, three teenagers have committed suicide.

The event will feature Liberty House CEO Alison Kelley, Liberty House’s Hope and Wellness Services program manager Neda Grant, and South Salem High School counselor Ryan Marshall. As experts in crisis response and grief and loss counseling, they will discuss how they assess the behavior of children and teens and how their programs help those populations and their families.

The meeting will take place Friday, Feb. 22, at 12 p.m. at the Willamette Heritage Center at 1313 Mill Street St. SE. Members are free. Non-members pay $10. All have the option to purchase lunch for $20. Lunch begins at 11:30 a.m. Register online at SalemCityClub.com.

 

###

 

Alison Kelley, JD became the current CEO of Liberty House in 2013 after serving five years as the director of the Marion County Children and Families Commission. From 1999-2008, Kelley was an attorney and mediator in private practice and provided mediation, facilitation, team building and strategic planning for public and private agencies.

Neda Grant, LPC, is the program manager of Liberty House’s Hope and Wellness Services. She believes children benefit most when their caregivers actively participate, when possible, in the counseling process. She holds a master’s degree in Counseling Psychology from Lewis and Clark College and became a Licensed Professional Counselor in 2001.

Ryan Marshall, a counselor at South Salem High School, has a degree in Speech Communications and Leadership studies in addition to a master’s in Education from Whitworth University. He has authored crisis response manuals and served on three different school districts’ Crisis Response Teams.




Attached Media Files: 2019-02/1853/121992/Clear_Bckgrd_Short_Color_SCC_Logo.jpg

Oregon's Office of Emergency Management says it's a good time to prepare for flooding and adhere to basic flood safety (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 02/13/19 9:54 AM
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With recent wet weather and more rain on its way, now is a good time to prepare for floods, check your emergency supplies, and adhere to basic flood safety. Some simple tips include clearing out leaves or remaining ice/snow from storm drains and culverts to prevent localized flooding, and having an emergency kit with necessary supplies. Oregon Office of Emergency Management recommends being 2 Weeks Ready http://bit.ly/2dxylmA. 

Many flood-related fatalities are caused by vehicles driven into hazardous waters.  Six inches of moving water can knock over an adult and 12 inches can carry away a small vehicle. Remember “Turn Around, Don't Drown.”

  • Heavy rains reduce drivers' visibility. When driving, turn on your lights, increase following distance, slow down, and watch for bicyclists and pedestrians. Follow the Oregon Department of Transportation tips for driving in the rain: https://www.oregon.gov/odot/pages/winter-driving.aspx
  • Give yourself more time for heavy traffic. Keep a safe distance between you and the driver in front of you. Make sure your windshield wipers in are good working condition.  Obey the speed limit and drive slower in the rain. Turn on headlights. 
  • If you are in your vehicle and floodwater is blocking your evacuation route, go to a building on high ground. If your vehicle is trapped in rapidly moving water, stay in the vehicle. If water is rising inside the vehicle, seek refuge on the roof. 

A flood does not have to be a catastrophic event, and you do not have to live in a high-risk flood area to suffer flood damage. Around twenty percent of flood insurance claims occur in moderate-to-low risk areas. Property owners should remember to: 

  • Buy Flood Insurance. Most standard homeowner’s policies do not cover flood damage. Flood insurance is affordable, and important to protecting your investment. An average flood policy costs around $890 a year, and rates start at less than $516 a year for homes in moderate- to low-risk areas. 
  • Prepare Now. Review your insurance coverages. No flood insurance? Remember: It typically takes 30 days for a new flood insurance policy to go into effect, so get your policy now.
  • Plan Ahead. Plan evacuation routes. Keep important papers in a safe, waterproof place. Conduct a home inventory; itemize and take pictures of possessions and the inside and outside of your home. For more information about flood insurance, please call your insurance agent or contact the National Flood Insurance Program Call Center (NFIP) at 1-800-621-3362 for information about the NFIP or questions about an existing policy.  Visit the National Flood Insurance Program at www.fema.gov/national-flood-insurance-program to learn more about flood risk and flood insurance.



Attached Media Files: 2019-02/3986/121990/5015865_OEM_Logo_Design_2014-COLOR.jpg

BLM seeks nominations for National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 02/13/19 9:35 AM

WASHINGTON – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is seeking nominations to fill three positions on its National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board.  Selected Board members advise the BLM and U.S. Forest Service (USFS) from the perspective of a particular interest in wild horse and burro management. The call for nominations released today is for the positions that represent humane advocacy, livestock management, and wildlife management interests.

The board plays an important role in the Department of the Interior’s efforts to be a good neighbor in states where the BLM and USFS oversee wild free-roaming horses and burros. The advisory board advises the BLM and USFS on the protection and management of wild free-roaming horses and burros on public lands administered by those agencies. The board typically meets twice annually, but the BLM may call additional meetings when necessary. Members serve a three-year term without salary. Members are reimbursed for approved travel and per diem expenses related to their activities on the board.

The advisory board is comprised of nine members who represent a range of interests. Individuals qualify to serve on the board because of their education, training, or experience that enables them to give informed and objective advice regarding the interest they represent. Successful nominees will demonstrate experience or knowledge of the area of their expertise and a commitment to collaborate in seeking solutions to resource management issues.

Any individual or organization may nominate one or more persons to serve on the Board; individuals may also nominate themselves. Federal and state government employees are not eligible to serve on the Board. 

Interested parties should submit an application packet that includes at a minimum a resume and nomination letter. Provide the following information as part of the application packet:

  • The nominee’s first, middle, and last name.
  • Position(s) for which the nominee wants to be considered.
  • Business and home addresses and phone numbers.
  • E-mail address.
  • Present occupation/title and employer.
  • Education (colleges, degrees, major field(s) of study).
  • Career highlights (significant related experience, civic and professional activities, elected offices, including prior advisory committee experience or career achievements related to the interest to be represented).
  • Relevant education, training, and experience.
  • Experience or knowledge of wild horse and burro management.
  • Experience or knowledge of horses or burros (equine health, training, and management).
  • Experience in working with disparate groups to achieve collaborative solutions.
  • Identification of any BLM permits, leases, or licenses held by nominee or employer.
  • Indication of whether the nominee is a federally registered lobbyist.
  • Explanation of interest in serving on the Board.
  • Reference letter(s) from special interests or organizations the nominee desires to represent.

References may include, but are not limited to, business associates, friends, co-workers, and local, state and/or federal government representatives or elected officials. All nominations must include at least one letter of reference.

Submit nominations by e-mail to Dorothea Boothe, acting Wild Horse and Burro Program Coordinator, at dboothe@blm.gov. To send by U.S. Postal Service, mail to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 1849 C Street, N.W., Room 2134 LM, Attn: Dorothea Boothe, WO-260, Washington, DC 20240.  To send by FedEx or UPS, please mail to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 20 M Street, S.E., Room 2134 LM, Attn: Dorothea Boothe, Washington, DC 20003.

Nominations must be received no later than 45 days after the notice has been published in the Federal Register, or postmarked by the same date. The BLM request for nominations appears in the February 13 edition of the Federal Register.  For more information on the National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board, visit the BLM website.
 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency's mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America's public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs.


Heppner Physician Pleads Guilty to Tax Evasion
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/13/19 8:49 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—On February 12, 2019, Kenneth Wenberg, 72, a medical doctor from Heppner, Oregon, pleaded guilty to a single count of tax evasion. The government demonstrated it could prove Dr. Wenberg failed to report income resulting in a tax loss of approximately $187,000.

According to court documents, Dr. Wenberg created nominee entities to hide assets and income he personally earned while serving as a physician at the Morrow County Health District (MCHD) and Urgent Health Care Center (UHCC) in Heppner. Dr. Wenberg instructed MDHD and UHCC to make payments for services he performed directly to sham entities to avoid income tax liabilities. Dr. Wenberg opened numerous bank accounts and purchased real property in the names of his nominee entities. He also paid for his and his family’s personal living expenses out of the nominee accounts. Dr. Wenberg failed to report his income to the IRS, despite knowing he owed taxes.

Wenberg faces a maximum sentence of five years in prison, a $250,000 fine and three years of supervised release. He will be sentenced on June 6, 2019 before U.S. District Court Judge Marco A. Hernandez.

As part of the plea agreement, Wenberg has agreed to pay restitution to the IRS in the full amount of the tax loss as determined by the court after sentencing.

This case was investigated by IRS-Criminal Investigation (IRS-CI) and is being prosecuted by Clemon D. Ashley and Seth D. Uram, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office and IRS-CI remind Oregonians that tax day is Monday, April 15, 2019. For tips to assist taxpayers in choosing a reputable tax professional or preparing their own taxes, visit the IRS website: https://www.irs.gov/help-resources.

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Attached Media Files: 2019-02/6325/121987/CHANGE_OF_PLEA-Wenberg-Final.pdf

Ridgefield School District Honors February Employee and Students of the Month (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 02/13/19 8:46 AM
Bobbi Wilson
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Wednesday, February 13, 2019 – Ridgefield, Washington – On February 12, Ridgefield School District officials recognized the February Employee and Students of the Month at the regular Board of Directors meeting.  

The Employee of the Month is Christine “Chris” Petersen, head secretary at Ridgefield High School.  Chris Petersen is one of the most dedicated and hardest working staff members at RHS.   She continuously goes above and beyond what is expected of her because she cares so much about the quality of work she produces. Chris is the backbone of our school and keeps us all in order. She is constantly working late or working on the weekends because she wants to be sure the teachers get their materials ordered, and the work gets done for our students and teachers. We tell Chris to go home and to stop working, but she can’t be stopped until the job is done. Furthermore, Chris is very intelligent and is a systems thinker. She can see where there is a breakdown in our processes or procedures and knows exactly how to fix them and make improvements. She has made many changes in our main office that have made a big difference in our daily operations, thus making us smarter and more efficient.  Chris truly makes our organization a better place and is helping us move forward. 

Additionally, Chris bleeds orange and blue and has such Spudder pride. Everywhere she goes, she has the Spudders on her mind and is always looking for good ideas and ways that can improve our culture and climate for our students, staff, and families. Lastly, Chris creates a fun work environment in the main office and takes time to laugh and have fun during the hard work. She truly enjoys her job and has fun with the students, staff, and parents. We are so lucky to have Chris Petersen as part of the Spudder family.

Students of the Month

Blakeley Gardner, a fourth grader, is February’s Student of the Month at South Ridge Elementary School.  The South Ridge teachers and staff are very proud of Blakeley.  They write, “Blakeley quietly looks for ways to help those around her and then sets about doing so in a gentle, caring manner.  She truly has a servant’s mentality.  Kindness radiates from her eyes.  Academically, Blakeley listens intently and diligently and works to make the most of every minute at school.  She is extremely responsible.  It is evident that she seeks to do the very best she can on every assignment.  Blakeley is respectful, polite, cheerful, generous, unselfish and humble.  She is extremely deserving of recognition for her efforts academically and her efforts to serve others.”

Leela Weeks, a third grader, was selected at Union Ridge Elementary.  The Union Ridge teachers and staff are very proud of Leela.  They write, “Leela is a hard worker and never gives up.  She always strives to do her very best.  She enthusiastically embraces all subjects and likes to challenge herself and go the extra mile.  Leela is very helpful and accepts and appreciates everyone for their uniqueness.  She is a pleasure to work with and a friend to all.  Leela is a great example of being respectful, responsible, and resilient.  Union Ridge Elementary School sure appreciates Leela.”

Sara Tabish, a sixth grader, is February’s Student of the Month at Sunset Ridge Intermediate School.  The Sunset Ridge teachers and staff are very proud of Sara.  They write, “Sara is responsible.  She always does her work, brings in her homework, and organizes her time well.  She is resilient and works diligently in class.  If she doesn’t understand something, she will ask questions and keep trying until she gets it.  She is respectful.  She treats everyone like a friend and never speaks an unkind word.  Sara’s sixth grade teachers know what she’s capable of and believe she will be successful at whatever she wants to be when she grows up.”

Stuart Swingruber, a seventh grader, was chosen at View Ridge Middle School.  The View Ridge teachers and staff are very proud of Stuart.  They describe him as a hardworking and polite student who strives for excellence.  He is dedicated, ambitious, honest and smart.  Stuart is easy to teach because he stays on task and is not afraid to ask questions.  You can count on him to make classroom discussions interesting.  He is a fearless participant in discussions and is willing to engage in debate and share his ideas.  His work is of the highest quality, and he works well with all his classmates.  Stuart helps everyone become better learners.

For the February Student of the Month, staff members at Ridgefield High School were asked to think of students who have demonstrated the Success Bound trait of Resilience.  Nineteen students were nominated by 17 different staff members, and senior Bobbi Wilson’s story was the most compelling.  One teacher said, “Her growth over the last three years has been tremendous.  She comes early every day and is always prepared.”  Said another teacher, “She faces all challenges head on and never gives up.”  Bobbi’s growth as a student is evident in that she has increased her GPA every semester and now has a GPA more than one full point higher than it was as a freshman.  Bobbi’s efforts have not gone unnoticed.  The RHS staff is proud to have her represent the more than 900 students at Ridgefield High School as February Student of the Month.

Ridgefield School District is grateful to its sponsors, James Schmeling of Allstate Insurance Company whose local office is providing funding to support the district’s recognition program during this school year and the Ridgefield Public Schools Foundation.

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Attached Media Files: Bobbi Wilson , Stuart Swingruber , Sara Tabish , Leela Weeks , Blakeley Gardner , Christine Petersen

VPS projects $14.3 million budget shortfall even with passage of levies
Vancouver Sch. Dist. - 02/13/19 8:18 AM

Vancouver Public Schools is anticipating a decline in student enrollment for the 2019-20 school year that will further compound a projected budget shortfall. The district’s enrollment analysis is consistent with projections independently gathered periodically by local demographer Eric Hovee of E.D. Hovee and Company. A decrease of 458 full-time equivalent students is expected to add another $2.3 million to a projected budget deficit of $12 million.  

Initially, the district’s projected shortfall was nearly $10.7 million for 2019-20 due to a capped local levy rate and fewer state levy equalization dollars, which are part of the state’s new funding formula for K-12 education.

Last month, VPS announced a projected budget deficit of nearly $12 million after contract settlements with Vancouver Education Association and Vancouver Association of Educational Support Professionals.

With the anticipated decline in student enrollment, the new projected budget deficit is $14.3 million dollars for 2019-20. Last night’s passage of the education/operations and technology levies will not mitigate this shortfall.

The district is responding to the deficit with initial budget cuts of $3.9 million in central administrative services. Another $3.8 million will come from the reserve fund balance.

Further reductions will be made in school-based services and staffing to cover the remaining $6.6 million shortfall. A district team that includes leaders from bargaining groups will review contractual obligations. Following that review, a proposal for school-based reductions will be brought to the board of directors at its Feb. 26 school board meeting.

“These are incredibly difficult choices, and I am deeply frustrated that the legislature’s response to the McCleary lawsuit has worsened our fiscal position. Our employees do amazing work with our students and families every day,” said Superintendent Steve Webb. “However, the district is obligated by law to maintain a balanced budget. We must be fiscally responsible with the money that has been allocated to us. We are not alone in this dilemma. School districts across the state are facing the same tough decisions.”

Overall, the projected $14.3 million budget shortfall for 2019-20 will be addressed in the following manner:

  • Approximately $3.8 million will be generated from the 2019-20 fund balance. Because this is one-time money, that part of the shortfall must be addressed again in the 2020-21 budget.  

  • An estimated $3.9 million will come from cost savings in central administrative services staffing and program reductions.

  • Approximately $6.6 million will be generated through SCHOOL-BASED reductions yet to be determined. Roughly half of the staffing cuts could be made through retirements and resignations.


Street Closures for March for Our Students Event
City of Salem - 02/13/19 8:00 AM

Salem, Ore. — On Monday, February 18, 2019, Presidents’ Day, several streets in downtown Salem and around the State Capitol area will be closed or partially closed for a March For Our Students event.

At 7 a.m., the following street segments will close:

  • Court Street NE between 12th Street NE and Cottage Street NE
  • Waverly Street NE between Court Street NE and State Street
  • Winter Street NE between Court Street NE and Chemeketa Street NE
  • Capitol Street NE between Court Street NE and Chemeketa Street NE

At 11 a.m., the following additional street segments will close:

  • Cottage Street NE between Court Street NE and State Street
  • State Street between Church Street and 12th Street
  • Chemeketa Street NE between Capitol Street NE and Winter Street NE

The march begins at 11:00 a.m. and will move as follows:

  1. Begin on the steps of the Oregon State Capitol Building
  2. Move west on Court Street NE
  3. Turn south on Cottage Street NE
  4. Turn east on State Street
  5. Turn north on Waverly Street NE
  6. Turn west on Court Street NE
  7. Turn north on Capitol Street NE
  8. Turn west on Chemeketa Street NE
  9. Turn south on Winter Street NE
  10. Turn east on Court Street NE
  11. Proceed back to the front steps of the Oregon State Capitol Building.

Drivers should avoid these areas or anticipate delays due to congestion.  All streets are expected to reopen by 1 p.m.


Quality Measurement Council meets Feb. 21
Oregon Department of Human Services - 02/13/19 8:00 AM

(Wilsonville, Ore.) – The Quality Measurement Council will meet from 9 a.m. to noon on Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2019, in Training Rooms 1 and 2 at the Oregon Child Development Coalition, 9140 S.W. Pioneer Court, Wilsonville, Oregon, 97070.

The Quality Measurement Council was formed with the passage of House Bill 3359 in 2017. The council meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include will include a discussion on collecting and reporting metrics.

Sign language interpreters and live captioning will be provided. Those who are unable to attend in person, may join by calling toll-free phone number, 1-888-363-4735, and using Conference ID #3439085. 

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Rebecca Mapes at 1-541-735-0058 or Rebecca.Mapes@state.or.us  Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For questions about this meeting, please contact: Rebecca Mapes at 1-541-735-0058 or Rebecca.Mapes@state.or.us

About the Quality Measurement Council

The council was established to create and maintain a system through which community-based, long-term care facilities report reliable and meaningful data that will make possible a system for measuring a facility’s performance compared with other long-term care providers in the state.

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Thousands of Girl Scout Cookie Booths Open February 15 -- Girl Scout S'mores(TM) cookies back by popular demand! (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington - 02/13/19 7:00 AM
Girl Scouts Booth Sales Photo 5
Girl Scouts Booth Sales Photo 5
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-02/6250/121975/thumb_Sophia_B-8.jpg

For Immediate Release
Wednesday, February 13, 2019                                                                             

Media Contacts

Sarah Shipe, Director of Communications

(503) 977-6861 | After Hours (800) 626-6543 | sshipe@girlscoutsosw.org

Maureen A. Kenney, Public Relations and Advocacy Manager

(503) 977-6817 | mkenney@girlscoutsosw.org

 

Thousands of Girl Scout Cookie Booths Open February 15

Girl Scout S’mores™ cookies back by popular demand!
 

PORTLAND, OR. – February 13, 2019 – Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington (GSOSW) is about to launch the 2019 Girl Scout Cookie booth season. And, back by popular demand are Girl Scout S’mores™! Cookies can be purchased from more than 30,000 Girl Scout Cookie booths between Friday, February 15 and Sunday, March 10, 2019.

 

“I’m excited for girls to have this business experience, and put themselves out there,” says Chief Operations Officer, Paige Walker. “As they’re talking with community members at booths, they’re learning people skills. As they’re making decisions about their cookie business, they’re practicing skills that prepare them for a successful future.”

 

While the girls ask for the sale, Walker has an ask for customers, too: “When you meet a Girl Scout at a cookie booth, ask her why she is selling Cookies!”

 

COOKIE FINDER

Signature Girl Scout Cookies, including Thin Mints®, Samoas® and Trefoils® will be offered among the eight Girl Scout Cookie varieties at all booths throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington. Girl Scout S’mores™ cookies and gluten free Toffee-tastic™ specialty cookies are available at select cookie booths while supplies last. Customers can find a Girl Scout Cookie booth near their location with the Cookie Finder at girlscoutsosw.org/cookies or use the Girl Scout Cookie Finder app available for iPhone or Android.

 

THE POWER BEHIND THE GIRL SCOUT COOKIE PROGRAM

The Girl Scout Cookie Program teaches girls the skills they need to become effective leaders, manage finances and gain confidence in handling money—skills that will stay with them for a lifetime. Each box of Girl Scout Cookies sold powers real-life experiences for thousands of local girls.

 

“We are so grateful to the stores, businesses and organizations that host Girl Scouts at cookie booths,” says Walker. “The community partners that provide these spaces are making a valuable investment in girls’ entrepreneurial experience.”

 

KEEPING IT LOCAL

100 percent of the net revenue earned from cookie sales remains within the local region. Every purchase of Girl Scout Cookies helps provide for new and unique opportunities for local girls including valuable educational experiences that offer lifelong impact. Girl Scout campers in Oregon and Southwest Washington use cookie program proceeds to fund their own camp and travel adventures. And, nearly every Girl Scout troop uses some portion of their cookie proceeds to give back to their local communities.

 

COOKIE BOOTH SALES AND COOKIE FINDER

Girl Scouts will sell cookies at booths in front of local retailers throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington from February 15 through March 10, 2019. Customers can find a Girl Scout Cookie booth near their location with the Cookie Finder at girlscoutsosw.org or use the Girl Scout Cookie Finder app available for iPhone or Android.

 

ABOUT THE GIRL SCOUT COOKIE PROGRAM

A little more than a century ago, girls began participating in what would evolve into the largest entrepreneurial training program for girls in the world: the Girl Scout Cookie Program. To learn more about the history of the Girl Scout Cookie Program, please visit girlscoutcookies.org.

 

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON

In partnership with more than 8,000 adult members, Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington prepares 14,500 girls in grades K-12 for a lifetime of leadership, adventure and success. GSOSW’s programs in civic engagement, financial literacy, the outdoors and STEM serve girls in 37 counties in Oregon, and Clark, Klickitat and Skamania counties in Southwest Washington. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence and character, who make the world a better place. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.

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Attached Media Files: Girl Scouts Booth Sales Photo 5 , Girl Scouts Booth Sales Photo 4 , Girl Scouts Booth Sales Photo 3 , Girl Scouts Booth Sales Photo 2 , Girl Scouts Booth Sales Photo 1

Tue. 02/12/19
Milwaukie Police respond to Vehicle vs. Pedestrian crash at Hwy 224/SE Monroe St.
Milwaukie Police Dept. - 02/12/19 11:40 PM

On 2/12/2019 at approximately 9:00 pm, Milwaukie Police responded to the intersection of Highway 224 & SE Monroe Street in Milwaukie, Oregon regarding a vehicle vs. pedestrian crash. Police learned that 62-year-old Allen Caldwell was driving a Gold Buick Regal, west-bound on SE Monroe Street, and turning east-bound onto Highway 224 at the time of the crash. The pedestrian, 49-year-old Shauna Hatcher, was in the crosswalk, crossing Highway 224 east-bound when she was struck by Mr. Caldwell’s car.

   Mr. Caldwell reported he did not see Mrs. Hatcher due to the low light conditions and light rain. Mr. Caldwell estimated he was driving approximately 5 miles per hour when he struck Mrs. Hatcher. Mr. Caldwell stopped immediately, checked on Mrs. Hatcher and remained on scene.

   Mrs. Hatcher explained to police there was little to no traffic at the time of the crash. Mrs. Hatcher told the investigating officer she was not knocked off her feet and was able to remain standing when struck by Mr. Caldwell’s vehicle. Mrs. Hatcher was transported to Milwaukie Providence Hospital to have her leg checked due to complaints of “mild pain and tingling”. 

   The investigation revealed Mrs. Hatcher was crossing the crosswalk when signaled to do so by the traffic control device. Mr. Caldwell also had a green light, however, was required to stop and give the right of way to pedestrians in the crosswalk. Mr. Caldwell was cited for Failing to Stop and Remain Stopped for a Pedestrian.

 


Voters approve VPS levies
Vancouver Sch. Dist. - 02/12/19 10:39 PM

Vancouver Public Schools’ replacement levies for education and operations and technology passed on election night. The replacement levy for education and operations received 63.49 percent approval, and the technology levy received 61.78 percent approval. Both levies needed a 50 percent simple majority vote for passage. Historically, late-arriving ballots have caused the percentage of yes votes to rise after election day.

“I am extremely proud of our community,” said Board President Rosemary Fryer. “The passage of the levies shows the high regard our voters hold for our school district and the education of our children and youth.”

The four-year education and operations levy continues local funding through 2023. At the new state cap of $1.50 per $1,000 estimated property value, it makes up about 12 percent of the district’s general fund budget.

The replacement technology levy, first approved in 2013, continues local funding through 2025. It makes up about 2.2 percent of the district’s budget. The tech levy enables the district to replace and update digital devices, such as iPads and laptop computers, for all students in grades 3-12. It also provides funds for teacher training on the effective use of technology for teaching and learning.

“Vancouver voters have shown their support for our schools consistently for more than 50 years, and I am grateful for this vote of confidence,” said Superintendent Steve Webb. “Although we now must address budget challenges due to the state’s new funding system, the local levies will help meet the needs of our students and prepare them for college, careers and life.”

Levy results will be certified on Feb. 22.

For more information, go to the VPS website.


Medicaid long term quality council meets Feb. 13 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 02/12/19 8:37 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – The Medicaid Long Term Care Quality and Reimbursement Advisory Council meets from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 13, at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 285, 500 Summer St. N.E., Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include: public comment, Governor’s Recommended Budget document, bills of possible interest and council business.

For those who can’t attend in person, there is a toll-free phone number that can also be accessed through Skype for Business: (503) 934-1400, participant code 50479028.  

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Alex Pelusi at alex.j.pelusi@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For questions about this meeting, please contact: Max Brown, 503-945-6993 or max.brown@state.or.us.

About the Medicaid Long Term Care Quality & Reimbursement Advisory Council

The Medicaid Long Term Care Quality and Reimbursement Advisory Council (MLTCQRAC) was established by the 1995 Legislative Assembly to advise the Department of Human Services Aging and People with Disabilities program on changes or modifications to the Medicaid reimbursement system for long-term care and community based care services.

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Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services committees meet Feb. 15 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 02/12/19 8:16 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – The Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee will hold its full advisory and executive committee meetings on Feb. 15 in Salem.

The full advisory committee will meet from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in Room 160 of the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, 500 Summer St. N.E., Salem, Oregon, 97301. Agenda items for the meeting, which is open to the public, will include public comment, announcements, new staff introduction, new membership discussion, retreat priorities, other budget items, legislative updates, and bylaws committee scheduling.

The executive committee, which is also open to the public, will meet from 1 to 3 p.m. in Room 160 of the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, 500 Summer St. N.E., Salem, Oregon, 97301. Agenda items include will include public comment, announcements, 2019 meeting planning, brochure and website ideas, and new business.

Sign language interpreters, close vision interpreters, FM assistive listening devices and live captioning will be provided for each meeting. Those who are unable to attend in person, may join each meeting by calling toll-free phone number, (503) 934-1400, and using Conference ID 8113673#.   

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Request.ODHHSP@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.  For questions about these meetings, please contact: Max Brown at 503-945-6993 or max.brown@state.or.us

About the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee

The committee assists the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Service Program (ODHHSP) by providing information and expertise on issues affecting individuals who are deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing and those with additional disability.

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