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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Wed. Oct. 5 - 11:13 pm
Wed. 10/05/22
Update: Missing and Endangered Juvenile Located
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/05/22 9:03 PM

On Wednesday, October 5, 2022, after 7:00 pm, Fiona Jordan was located in Forrest Grove and brought home safely. The Washington County Sheriff’s Office would thank all those who assisted in her safe return. 


Deputies Ask For Help Locating Missing and Endangered Autistic Juvenile

On Wednesday, October 5, 2022, at about 3:30 pm, Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a missing juvenile call in Hillsboro. Deputies learned that 17-year-old Fiona Jordan had not made it to class at the Hillsboro Library in the morning. Her last known location is believed to be around the intersection of NE Cornell Road and NE Stucki Avenue in Hillsboro. She was last seen wearing a black short sleeve shirt, blue shorts, sandals, and a backpack with sparkles.

Jordan is autistic and has the mental capacity of a 6-year-old. She is familiar with the TriMet system and may be riding the bus in the Tanasbourne area. Anyone with information about Jordan is asked to call Washington County Sheriff’s Office at 503-629-0111 or their local law enforcement agency. 




Attached Media Files: Updated Media Release

Major Crash Team Investigating Fatal Motorcycle Accident In Southeast
Portland Police Bureau - 10/05/22 8:47 PM
On Wednesday, October 5, 2022, at 7:06 p.m., officers from the Central Precinct responded to a crash at the intersection of Southeast 6th Avenue and Southeast Morrison Street. When officers arrived, they found a crash involving a motorcycle and a minivan. The driver of the motorcycle was transported to an area hospital where he later died. The minivan driver and a passenger were evaluated at the scene by medical, but neither were transported. Investigators believe the speed of the motorcycle may have been a contributing factor.

The Portland Police Bureau Major Crash Team is currently on scene investigating. During the investigation Southeast 6th Avenue will be closed between Southeast Belmont Street and Southeast Alder Street. Additionally, Southeast Morrison Street will be closed between Southeast 7th Avenue and Southeast Grand Avenue.

If anyone has information about the incident, please contact crimetips@police.portlandoregon.gov, attention Traffic Investigations Unit, and reference case number 22-268103.

###PPB###

Coffee Shop Vandalized, Request for Information (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 10/05/22 5:30 PM
Vandalism
Vandalism
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/3056/158086/thumb_BisonVandalism4.jpg
A coffee shop that hosted a "Coffee with a Cop" event was vandalized this morning, and officers are asking for information from the public to locate the suspects involved.

On Wednesday, October 5, 2022 at 2:51a.m., North Precinct officers responded to a report of a vandalism at a coffee shop in the 3900 Block of Northeast Cully Boulevard. When they arrived, they found windows had been broken, property damaged, and white debris from a discharged fire extinguisher throughout the interior.

The suspects were no longer at the scene and officers did not immediately make arrests. An investigation began. Early information suggests that the business was targeted after it advertised that it would be hosting "Coffee with a Cop."

PPB is asking that anyone who has information about this crime or the suspects involved, please e-mail crimetips@police.portlandoregon.gov and reference case number 22-267489.

Some of the responding officers assisted with the cleanup efforts. The business owner stated that she wanted to proceed with the Coffee with a Cop event, and it went forward as planned this morning (photos). PPB is grateful to the business owner for hosting and giving officers and the community an opportunity to interact and discuss public safety issues.


###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Vandalism , Vandalism , Vandalism , Officers Assist Owner , Officer Assists with Cleanup , Coffee with a Cop Event , Coffee with a Cop sign

Sheriff's Office Responds to Alki Middle School for Possible Voyeurism Incident Involving School Employee
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/05/22 5:28 PM

On October 5, 2022, the Clark County Sheriff’s Office (CCSO) was notified by Vancouver Public Schools (VPS) staff of a possible voyeurism incident in which a VPS employee had allegedly videotaped female students in the Alki Middle School locker rooms.

VPS staff immediately reported the information to the Sheriff’s Office and closed and secured the locker rooms at the school. 

The suspected VPS employee had already left school grounds by the time the incident was reported to CCSO. CCSO located and contacted the suspected VPS employee this afternoon. They have declined to cooperate with investigators. 

Detectives from the CCSO Major Crimes Unit (MCU) have responded to the school and suspected employee’s residence. They are in the process of serving search warrants at the residence and are also searching the locker rooms and other areas at Alki Middle School.

The Sheriff’s Office has received full cooperation from Vancouver Public Schools and the Alki Middle School staff. VPS has made notifications to families that attend the school.

No arrest has been made at this time. The incident is being actively investigated. Due to the ongoing nature of this investigation, we are not able to share any additional information at this time. 


Albany, Lebanon, McMinnville Among Recipients of "Excellence on Main" Awards
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 10/05/22 5:00 PM

SALEM, Oregon – Oregon Main Street announced its 2022 “Excellence on Main” award winners during the annual Main Street conference on October 5th in Klamath Falls. Created in 2010, the annual Excellence on Main awards honor outstanding accomplishments, activities, and people making a difference in historic downtowns and traditional commercial neighborhoods across the state. A total of 12 projects, activities, and people were recognized – 4 of those based on nominations submitted by the Albany Downtown Association, the Lebanon Downtown Association, and the McMinnville Downtown Association. Videos of the award winners can be found here.

  • Bricks and Mortar Award: The Natty Dresser, Albany

This award is designed to recognize building owners or projects that positively impact preservation efforts. The Bricks and Mortar Award winner for 2022 is the Natty Dresser in Albany. The owners of The Natty Dresser, Oscar and Tamalynne Hult, renovated the façade and interior of the 1912 SE Young & Son Department Store Building into an amazing destination-worthy home for their men’s clothing business and the new Tipsy Toad event space. This grand building has a storied history housing many different retailers. The transformation of the corner is dramatic in every aspect - visual, practical, financial, and safety.

  • Volunteer of the Year: Hannah Darling, Albany

Main Streets are only as strong as their volunteers. No downtown can be successful without the dedication of those who give of themselves to help their community thrive. This year, Oregon Main Street recognized Hannah Darling from the Albany Downtown Association as Volunteer of the Year. Hannah began volunteering regularly over five years ago helping the Design Committee with hanging baskets. Soon she joined the Promotion Committee. Her dedication to Downtown Albany led to her to join the Albany Downtown Association's Board of Directors, originally serving as Secretary. Hannah currently leads the organization as the 2021-22 president.

  • Open Door Award: Family Pride Day, Lebanon

The inaugural Open Door Award goes to a Main Street that has demonstrated a commitment to creating an environment that is welcoming and inviting to all through programs, outreach, or other efforts.  The 2022 Open Door award winner is Lebanon’s Family Pride Day. A Family Pride Day committee was formed and worked tirelessly to develop a vision for the event and culminating in a celebration of the diversity of family. Held at a downtown park, the event created belonging for individuals and families of the LGBTQ+ community and allies, grew youth leadership and involvement, and featured local speakers who shared personal stories about what Pride means to them.

  • Board Member of the Year: Heather Miller, McMinnville

No Main Street program can succeed without the tireless work of dedicated Board Members. The 2022 Board Member of the Year is Heather Miller, president of the McMinnville Downtown Association. Prior to accepting her current position, she served on the MDA board as vice-president. She is a downtown business owner, serves on the board of multiple other organizations, and was named McMinnville’s Outstanding Junior Citizen in 2019. Heather assumed the MDA presidency position following a tumultuous year that saw the very foundation of the association challenged. Her leadership helped put MDA back on track through frugal fiscal management, community outreach, and response to membership concerns.

The wide range of Oregon Main Street’s Excellence on Main awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach™ to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network. 

“In 2021, we saw how our Oregon Main Streets stepped up and helped their communities navigate through the challenges brought on by two years of economic downturn,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “Through innovative projects, community centric programs, and renovations focused on historic preservation, main streets have improved their communities and enhanced their quality of life.”

Oregon Main Street strengthens community networks, bolsters local economies, generates tax revenues, and fosters social connections across the state. OMS leads a network of local Main Streets that oversee a wide range of programmatic efforts to build community, support local businesses, and create an attractive and vibrant environment for workers, visitors, and residents. The Oregon Main Street network generates significant value for local communities and for the State of Oregon overall. Learn more about the impact of the Oregon Main Street program by visiting www.oregonmainstreet.org


Estacada, Oregon City, and West Linn Among Recipients of "Excellence on Main" Awards
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 10/05/22 5:00 PM

SALEM, Oregon – Oregon Main Street announced its 2022 “Excellence on Main” award winners during the annual Main Street conference on October 5th in Klamath Falls. Created in 2010, the annual Excellence on Main awards honor outstanding accomplishments, activities, and people making a difference in historic downtowns and traditional commercial neighborhoods across the state. A total of 12 projects, activities and people were recognized – 5 of those based on nominations by Downtown Oregon City Association, Historic Willamette Main Street Association, and Downtown Estacada Commission. Videos of the award winners can be found here.

Oregon City

  • Business of the Year: LiveEdge Eco Salon, Oregon City

The Business of the Year Award is designed to recognize the innovation, dedication, and entrepreneurial spirit displayed by main street entrepreneurs and small businesses. The 2022, Business of the year is LiveEdge Eco Salon in Oregon City. LiveEdge Eco Salon, an LGBT and women-owned business, has been in Downtown Oregon City for 8 years. Sydnie Bray has been working to redefine her industry since the very start, but this year has been an especially big one for them. They received Green Circle Certification, recycling/reusing over 95% of their waste and were recently recognized as the only salon in Clackamas County as Leaders in Sustainability.

  • Outstanding Promotion, Virtual Oregon Trail Game Run, Oregon City

The Outstanding Promotion award is for creative and effective image campaigns, special events, or other promotional projects that attract people to downtown. This year’s winner is Downtown Oregon City’s Virtual Oregon Trail Game Run. During the pandemic, the Downtown Oregon City Association had to pivot their annual 5k run based on the Oregon Trail Game from the 1980s and 90s. They still wanted people to have fun with the theme but didn't want 500+ runners gathering together at the same time. Instead, they took the run virtual. Participants including runners, walkers, dancers, swimmers, and bikers, had to travel the 2,000 miles from Kansas City to Oregon City. They entered their exercise onto an online forum and as they hit milestones along the way, they would be sent an 8-bit graphic in the style of the Oregon Trail Game along with historic information about the milestone they had reached and links to downtown Oregon City businesses. 

Estacada

  • Best Mixed-Use Building: Heritage Properties, Estacada

The Best Mixed-Use Building award is awarded to a project that combines commercial and housing in an exemplary way. This year’s winner is Heritage Properties in Estacada. Heritage Properties built a new 2-story, 7700 sq. ft mixed use building on Main Street which included $1.3 million in private dollars and $250,000 of public investment. This building brings some much-needed residential space to downtown. As a result of this project coming before the Urban Renewal Board at the city, it spurred the development of a Vertical Housing Development Zone which allows for tax abatement for mixed use buildings in Estacada’s downtown. This project has inspired further improvements to the downtown including repairs to other buildings and more mixed-use development. 

  • Creative Placemaking Project: AntFarm and Harmony Gardens, Estacada

Placemaking capitalizes on a local community's assets, inspiration, and potential, with the intention of creating public spaces that promote people's health, happiness, and well-being. The award this year goes to the AntFarm and Harmony Learning Garden in Estacada. Jenny Beaudoin, owner of Harmony, a restaurant and bakery established in Estacada in 1984 by Jenny's aunt, and Chris Stanton, Director of Programs and Services with the nonprofit AntFarm, worked together to create a community garden in downtown Estacada after having multiple conversations about creating green spaces and gardens. Since opening the site behind Harmony, AntFarm has partnered with the Estacada High School and school district to offer an afterschool garden club program. AntFarm has begun to hire local youth to support this space and vision. The garden has not only contributed to downtown Estacada's beautification, but it has also provided space and resources for people to come together to support each other, and that is what makes a healthy community.

West Linn

  • Main Street Executive Director of the Year: Rebecca Hollenbeck, West Linn

The Main Street Executive Director of the Year is given to an executive director who has had an outstanding overall impact on their main street organization. The 2022 Main Street Executive Director of the year award goes to Rebecca Hollenbeck from Historic Willamette Main Street Association. Rebecca has helped Historic Willamette become a highly functioning main street organization and a respected partner of local government. During the pandemic, Rebecca spent many long hours building rapport with local business owners, explaining the options that were available to them, and helping them with grant application processes. The Historic Willamette board appreciates that Rebecca sees everyone as a partner and genuinely puts Historic Willamette Main Street at the center of all she does every day.

The wide range of Oregon Main Street’s Excellence on Main awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach™ to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network.

“In 2021, we saw how our Oregon Main Streets stepped up and helped their communities navigate through the challenges brought on by two years of economic downturn,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “Through innovative projects, community centric programs, and renovations focused on historic preservation, main streets have improved their communities and enhanced their quality of life

Oregon Main Street strengthens community networks, bolsters local economies, generates tax revenues, and fosters social connections across the state. OMS leads a network of local Main Streets that oversee a wide range of programmatic efforts to build community, support local businesses, and create an attractive and vibrant environment for workers, visitors, and residents. The Oregon Main Street network generates significant value for local communities and for the State of Oregon overall. Learn more about the impact of the Oregon Main Street program by visiting oregonmainstreet.org.


Oregon Main Street Announces Business of the Year, Among Other Recipients of the Prestigious Excellence on Main Awards
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 10/05/22 5:00 PM

SALEM, Oregon – Oregon Main Street, which is part of Oregon Heritage, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, announced its 2022 “Excellence on Main” award winners during the annual Main Street conference on October 5th in Klamath Falls. Created in 2010, the annual Excellence on Main awards honor outstanding accomplishments, activities, and people making a difference in historic downtowns and traditional commercial neighborhoods across the state. A total of 12 projects, activities and people were recognized with an Excellence on Main Award and two certificates were given in recognition of volunteer service. Videos of the award winners can be found here

The twelve partners, projects, activities, and businesses honored are:

  • Bricks and Mortar Award: The Natty Dresser, Albany
  • Leadership on Main Award: Mary Ann Miesner, La Grande
  • Business of the Year: LiveEdge Eco Salon, Oregon City
  • Best Mixed-Use Building: Heritage Properties, Estacada
  • Best Adaptive Reuse: The Local, La Grande
  • Volunteer of the Year: Hannah Darling, Albany
  • Board Member of the Year: Heather Miller, McMinnville
  • Creative Placemaking Project: AntFarm and Harmony Gardens, Estacada
  • Open Door Award: Family Pride Day, Lebanon
  • Outstanding Promotion, Virtual Oregon Trail Game Run, Oregon City
  • Outstanding Special Project: Brickyard Lanes, La Grande
  • Main Street Executive Director of the Year: Rebecca Hollenbeck, West Linn

In addition, two individuals were acknowledged with a Volunteers on Main certificate for their above and beyond contributions to their communities. These individuals are:

  • Connie Redmond, Estacada
  • Peggy Udolf, Albany

The wide range of Oregon Main Street’s Excellence on Main awards is reflective of the comprehensive Main Street Approach™ to downtown revitalization developed by the National Main Street Center. This model is used by the communities participating in the three-tier Main Street Track of Oregon Main Street Network.

“In 2021, we saw how our Oregon Main Streets stepped up and helped their communities navigate through the challenges brought on by two years of economic downturn,” said Sheri Stuart, state coordinator, Oregon Main Street. “Through innovative projects, community centric programs, and renovations focused on historic preservation, main streets have improved their communities and enhanced their quality of life

Oregon Main Street strengthens community networks, bolsters local economies, generates tax revenues, and fosters social connections across the state. OMS leads a network of local Main Streets that oversee a wide range of programmatic efforts to build community, support local businesses, and create an attractive and vibrant environment for workers, visitors, and residents. The Oregon Main Street network generates significant value for local communities and for the State of Oregon overall. Learn more about the impact of the Oregon Main Street program by visiting www.oregonmainstreet.org


City Council permanently bans large, new fossil fuel developments
City of Vancouver - 10/05/22 4:55 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – On Oct. 3, Vancouver City Council voted unanimously to approve changes to the City’s fossil fuel code. The ordinance—which supports two of the City’s policy priorities, addressing climate change and equity—seeks to protect and enhance public health and safety, environment, and foster a transition to cleaner fuels in alignment with the City's Climate Action goals. 

We’re concerned fossil fuel facilities pose a risk to the area’s health and safety,” said Chad Eiken, City community development director. “There are currently six bulk facilities that are susceptible to liquefaction and hazardous materials could potentially flow into the Columbia River, wetlands and other wildlife habitats in the case of a seismic event. These code changes are intended to reduce this risk and also minimize greenhouse gas emissions.”

Changes under the approved ordinance include:

  • New bulk fossil fuel facilities, coal energy-generating facilities and solid fuel yards will be prohibited in all zoning districts
  • Existing bulk fossil fuel facilities could be upgraded and maintained to ensure safe operations
  • Cleaner fuels will be specifically defined to include a number of types of liquid or gaseous fuels produced from renewable sources or that have low or no emissions
  • The capacity of existing bulk fossil fuel facilities could be expanded by 15% if switched to cleaner fuels, upgraded to seismic standards, and subject to approval of fire and spill response plans, among other requirements
  • New cleaner fuel facilities of up to one million gallons capacity may be allowed by conditional use permit in the IH District in order to support the City’s Climate Action Strategy and a transition away from fossil fuels

“The environmental health impacts of fossil fuel facilities add disparate burdens on some communities in Vancouver,” said Dan Serres, Columbia Riverkeeper conservation director. “The proposed ordinance avoids worsening environmental health disparities already present in Vancouver and demonstrates and awareness of the difficulties these communities face.”

Approval of the fossil fuel code change ordinance does not apply to storage or use of petroleum for commercial sales or industrial processes, or maintenance or repair of existing facilities.

The ordinance allows for existing fossil fuel facilities to be maintained and upgraded; an allowed modest increase in capacity is intended to incentivize a conversion to cleaner fuel and upgrade to seismic standards. The ordinance takes effect November 5.

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Private Security Entity Workgroup Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 10/05/22 3:46 PM

PRIVATE SECURITY ENTITY WORKGROUP

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting 

The Private Security Program of the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) will be holding a workgroup meeting on the implementation of House Bill 2527 on October 11, 2022, at 2:00 p.m. in Conference Room A234 at DPSST, located at 4190 Aumsville Highway SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information please contact Jeff Henderson at 503-378-2148.

The Private Security Entity Workgroup meeting will be live streamed on the DPSST Facebook page

https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon/

 

1. Minutes of September 27, 2022, Meeting

2. Review & Discussion on Section 1-3 from last meeting

    Presented by Jeff Henderson

3. Review & Discussion on Section 3 (3)-(4)

    Presented by Jeff Henderson

4. Tasks for Next Meeting

5. Next Scheduled Meeting: Tuesday, October 25, 2022, at 2:00 p.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by members of the workgroup. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Home Health and Hospice nurses at St. Charles file for union representation (Photo)
Oregon Nurses Assn. - 10/05/22 3:18 PM
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BEND, Ore. – Today, Home Health and Hospice nurses at St. Charles Health System in Bend filed for a union election to join the Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) Oct. 5, 2022. A supermajority of nurses submitted union authorization cards to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) after St. Charles administration declined voluntary recognition. The NLRB will set a date for the nurses’ union election in the next few weeks.

“We are disappointed that St. Charles refused to recognize our union but we are deeply committed to building a workplace where we can provide quality patient care with appropriate support and tools to ensure safety for everyone,” said Karin Arthur, RN. “Unfortunately, we have witnessed St. Charles going against its stated values many, many times. To better serve our patients and protect ourselves, we are forming a union.” 

Frontline nurses want input in decision-making because they know what their patients need. By forming a union, they will ensure home health and hospice nurses receive fair treatment, access to due process and adequate compensation and local patients receive high-quality, accessible health care. 

“St. Charles has experienced a lot of management instability and changes in priorities have meant many highly qualified staff have left the system. We don’t have the resources we need to adequately serve our patients, but we are expected to keep up the same high level of care. It’s not fair to our patients or health care providers,” said Cherie Iannucchi, RN. 

If the majority of home health and hospice nurses vote to join ONA in the union election, they will elect a local nurse leadership team, establish bylaws and begin contract negotiations with St. Charles Health System executives. 

ONA already represents hospital nurses at St. Charles facilities in Bend, Prineville and Redmond. The contract for nurses in Bend expires at the end of the year and they are already preparing for negotiations. In June, around 300 physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants also announced their intent to form a union.

The Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) is the state’s largest nursing organization. We are a professional association and labor union which represents more than 15,000 nurses and allied health workers throughout the state including nearly 1,200 frontline nurses working at multiple St. Charles Health facilities in Central Oregon. We are a proud state affiliate of AFT and the American Nurses Association. ONA’s mission is to advocate for nursing, quality health care and healthy communities. For more information visit: www.OregonRN.org.

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Attached Media Files: 2022-10/6931/158082/ONA-Voice-logo-300dpi.jpg

October 11 Northwest Power & Conservation Council meeting
Northwest Power and Conservation Council - 10/05/22 3:16 PM

This meeting will be held in Corvallis, Oregon, and also by webinar. See the agenda and how to attend.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 97-Klamath County
Oregon State Police - 10/05/22 3:10 PM

On Monday, October 3, 2022 at approximately 8:58 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Hwy 97 near milepost 259. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a northbound blue Subaru Legacy, operated by Philip Walter (57) of Chiloquin, crossed into the southbound lane and collided with a Volvo commercial truck, operated by Felix Deleon Jr. (58) of Albany. Both vehicles came to rest on the northbound shoulder. It is unknown why the Subaru left its lane of travel. 

Walter and his passenger, Cynthia Vanvleet (58) of Chiloquin, sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased. Deleon sustained minor injuries. 

OSP was assisted by the Klamath County Sheriff’s Office, Chiloquin Fire and Rescue and ODOT. 


UPDATE: Bicyclist Killed in Powell Blvd Crash Identified
Portland Police Bureau - 10/05/22 2:56 PM
The bicyclist killed in Tuesday's crash has been identified as Sarah N. Pliner, 50, of Portland. Her family has been notified of her death.

The case number in the original was incorrect. The reference case number is 22-266861. If anyone has information about this incident, and has not yet spoken with police, please contact crimetips@police.portlandoregon.gov , attention Traffic Investigations Unit or call (503)823-2103 and include the case number.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGES BELOW###

Due to the timing of the crash and its proximity to a high school, the community is expressing concerns that the deceased was a student. Although we cannot yet release the name of the victim, we feel it is in the public's interest to disclose that the victim was an adult female in her forties, and not a high school student.

The identity of the victim will be released after family is notified of her death.

###PPB###

Original Message Below

A bicyclist has been hit and killed near the intersection of Southeast 26th Avenue and Southeast Powell Boulevard.

On Tuesday, October 4, 2022, at 11:49 a.m., Central Precinct officers responded to the report of a crash on Southeast Powell Boulevard at Southeast 26th Avenue. When officers arrived, they located a bicyclist and determined the individual was deceased. The individual appeared to be a female in her mid to late twenties.

The driver of the involved vehicle remained at the scene and is cooperative.

The Portland Police Major Crash Team (MCT) responded to the scene. While MCT conducts their investigation, Southeast Powell Boulevard will be closed from Southeast 25th Avenue to Southeast 27th Avenue, and Southeast 26th Avenue will be closed at Powell.

If anyone has information about this incident, and has not yet spoken with police, please contact crimetips@police.portlandoregon.gov , attention Traffic Investigations Unit, and reference case number 22-266861, or call (503)823-2103.

###PPB###

Fire at 575 NE Olney Ave 10-4-22
Bend Fire & Rescue - 10/05/22 2:50 PM

Bend Fire Department responded to a fire in the house at NE Olney and NE 6th St early Tuesday morning. The first arriving crews found smoke coming from the roof and a fire inside the house. Olney was shut down whlie the fire was extinguished. No one was home at the time of the fire. The caused an estimated $200,000 in damages to the home and contents later identified as 575 NE Olney Ave. 

Police and fire investigators worked to determine the cause throughout the rest of the day Tuesday and into Wednesday afternoon. The fire has been determined to be intentionally caused. The case is on going and active. Bend Police, Bend Fire and Oregon State Police are continuing the investigation. If anyone has any information we ask them to call the Bend Police Department at 541-693-6911.  


UPDATE: Public Works reminds residents to properly dispose of leaves to prevent street flooding
Clark Co. WA Communications - 10/05/22 1:51 PM

UPDATE: The list of where coupons can be picked up has been updated. 

Vancouver, Wash. - Clark County Public Works reminds residents to rake and properly dispose of leaves to prevent roadway flooding. Leaves that aren’t properly disposed of can clog storm drains and create areas of standing water on roadways. Drivers can lose control of their vehicle when driving through standing water, or water can splash onto windshields and block other driver’s fields of vision.

Blowing, raking, sweeping or dumping leaves onto county roads is unlawful. Residents can clear clogged storm drains on neighborhood streets with low speed-limits and light traffic. On busy roads, storm drains should only be unclogged by Public Works staff. Residents can report clogged drains and street flooding at clark.wa.gov/public-works/report-park-road

Residents can dispose of their leaves for free with the Fall Leaf Coupon program, courtesy of the City of Vancouver and Clark County Public Works. From Oct. 1 to Dec. 31 residents can drop off up to five cubic yards of leaves at one of four designated sites at no charge. Residents can get their coupon by: 

The four sites for leaf disposal are H&H Wood Recyclers, McFarlane’s Bark, Triangle Resources and West Van Materials Recovery Center. Addresses, business hours and more information can be found on the coupon. The coupons are for residential use only and cannot be redeemed by businesses. Branches and other yard debris are not eligible for free disposal. Loads should be covered during transport, and all bags of leaves will need to be emptied at the disposal site by the resident. Residents can also dispose of leaves in their yard debris/organics cart.

To receive information about road and park projects, closures, opportunities for community input, and more, residents can follow Public Works on TwitterFacebook and Instagram and view information on Nextdoor. 


Crime Stoppers Featured Case #22-24 Reward Offered in Vancouver Police Shooting Investigation
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 10/05/22 12:57 PM
News Release from: Crime Stoppers of Oregon

Posted on FlashAlert

The Vancouver Police Department, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to locate the suspect or suspects in a shooting.

On August 8, 2022, at approximately 9:00 p.m., Vancouver Police responded to a shooting at the intersection of NE 62nd Avenue/NE Fourth Plain Blvd. When officers arrived, they located a male with multiple gunshots wounds. The victim remains hospitalized.

Detectives from the Vancouver Police Department Major Crimes Unit have continued the investigation and are asking anyone who may have information regarding this incident, or who may have witnessed the shooting, to contact Crime Stoppers of Oregon.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers of Oregon, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous. Secure and anonymous tips can be left at www.crimestoppersoforegon.com or visit the APP Store and download P3 Tips for smart phones or tablets

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers of Oregon with a donation, or to view other unsolved cases, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

CONTACT(S):
Media Contact: Kim Kapp, Public Information Coordinator, Vancouver Police Department, (360) 487-7490
Investigative Contact: Detective Corporal Neil Martin at (360) 487-7423

Missing child alert -- Onesty Jones and Marcus Jones are missing and are believed to be in danger (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/05/22 12:50 PM
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(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, asks the public to help find Onesty Jones, age 15, and her brother Marcus Jones, age 16, siblings who are in foster care who went missing from Portland. They are believed to be in danger.

Onesty and Marcus are believed to be together in the Portland area. 

ODHS asks the public for help in the effort to find them and to contact 911 or local law enforcement if they believe they see them.

Name: Onesty Jones
Pronouns: She/her
Date missing: Aug. 23, 2022
Date of birth: July 7, 2007
Height: 5-foot-2
Weight: 126 pounds
Hair: Brown
Eye color: Brown 
Other identifying information:
Portland Police Bureau Case #22-233534
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1459189

Name: Marcus Jones
Pronouns: He/him
Date missing: Sept. 26, 2022
Date of birth: May 5, 2006
Height: 5-foot-7
Weight: 140 pounds
Hair: Black
Eye color: Brown 
Other identifying information: Marcus has a tattoo of the numbers “503” on his forearm. 
Portland Police Bureau Case #22-265857
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1462248

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

###




Attached Media Files: 2022-10/973/158078/Onesty_Jones_Photo.jpg , Marcus Jones

Update: Missing and Endangered Person Located
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/05/22 12:45 PM

On Wednesday, October 5, after midnight, Jonas Patrick Briggs was located in downtown Portland and safely returned home. The Washington County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank all involved for their support and assistance in searching for Briggs.


Deputies Seek Help Locating Missing and Endangered Person 

On Tuesday, October 4, 2022, at 2:20 PM, Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a missing person call. Deputies learned that 37-year-old Jonas Patrick Briggs walked off from the area of the 8100 block of SW Barnes Road in Portland. Briggs was last seen wearing a dark grey jacket, white shorts, and a black Arizona Cardinals hat. 

Briggs is considered endangered and suffers from short-term memory loss. Briggs periodically wanders off and has been previously found in and around the Portland area. Anyone with information about Briggs is asked to please call the Washington County Sheriff's Office at 503-629-0111 or their local law enforcement agency.




Attached Media Files: Briggs Media Release , Briggs Update

Polygraph Licensing Advisory Committee Meeting Scheduled 10-10-22
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 10/05/22 12:44 PM

POLYGRAPH LICENSING ADVISORY COMMITTEE

 MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Polygraph Licensing Advisory Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on October 10, 2022, at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Shelby Wright at (503) 378-2191.

 

Agenda Items:

1. Introductions

2. Review of Advisory Committee Bylaws

3. Review of Required Examination

    (Due to the integrity of the exam, documents will be handed out at the meeting)

4. Roundtable

5. Next Polygraph Licensing Advisory Committee Meeting – TBD

 

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded.


OHA issues health advisory for lamprey in the Columbia River and its Oregon tributaries
Oregon Health Authority - 10/05/22 12:33 PM

October 5, 2022

Media contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA issues health advisory for lamprey in the Columbia River and its Oregon tributaries

Agency recommends limited meals due to levels of PCBs, mercury in lamprey tissue

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is issuing recommendations on the amount of lamprey from the Columbia River and its Oregon tributaries that people should eat.

Fish tissue data from the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) show polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at levels of concern in lamprey for the general population, and for PCBs and mercury for vulnerable populations (children under 6 years old, people who are or may become pregnant, nursing mothers). Meal recommendations are needed for lamprey harvested in advisory area, according to public health officials.

OHA issues advisories when fish or shellfish tissue data show that the levels of contaminants — in this case, PCBs and mercury — are high enough to potentially harm health. OHA calculates meal recommendations to help people better understand the number of fish meals they can safely eat in one month. These meal recommendations for lamprey are found in Table 1.

Table 1: Recommended meals for lamprey: Columbia River and its Oregon tributaries

Whole body1 meals per month

Recommended consumption rates2

All collection sites

Contaminant

General population

(People childbearing age)

Vulnerable population

(Children under 6, people who are or may become pregnant, nursing mothers)

Columbia River and its Oregon tributaries

PCBs + mercury

4

2

1 OHA did not convert whole body data to fillet-only data due to the physical characteristics of lamprey (high lipid content), and because a high percentage of their body weight is edible and eaten.

2 A meal is about the size and thickness of your or your child’s hand or one ounce of uncooked fish for every 20 pounds of body weight.

Eating too many fish contaminated with PCBs or mercury can cause negative health effects over time. These health effects include damage to organs, the nervous system and the brain, leading to potential learning and behavior problems. PCBs and mercury can also be passed along to babies during pregnancy or in breastmilk.

Because lamprey are consumed mainly by Tribal members in Oregon, Washington and Idaho, and these Tribes consume the whole fish as a cultural and spiritual First Food, this advisory is an important tool that can reduce exposure to PCBs and mercury, especially for the Tribes’ most vulnerable populations (especially those with thyroid and immune system problems).

Tribes, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and other organizations are working to restore Pacific lamprey numbers.

“Lamprey have been an important part of the cultures, diets, and ceremonies of Columbia Basin tribes since time immemorial,” said Aja DeCoteau, executive director of the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission. “The tribes have been successfully leading the effort to restore this threatened fish throughout the Columbia River Basin, not only to protect its role in the ecosystem, but also to preserve our access to this important First Food. As Oregon’s largest consumers of lamprey, this consumption advisory will impact tribal people most of all. We must all work together to make limiting consumption a temporary solution because the tribes believe that the long-term solution to this problem isn’t keeping people from eating contaminated fish—it’s keeping fish from being contaminated in the first place.”

Tribes that do not have reserved fishing and hunting rights and non-Tribal members need a permit to harvest lamprey at Willamette Falls from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and must harvest in accordance with State regulation in OAR 635-017-0090. This is the only location where Tribes without reserved rights and non-Tribal members can harvest, consistent with ODFW regulations.

While it is important for people to know about contaminants in lamprey, it is equally important to continue to eat at least two meals of a variety of fish from a variety of sources each week to gain important health benefits. Fish are high in protein and a rich source of nutrients like omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3s provide protection from heart disease and are an important brain food for adults, children and fetuses.

As future data becomes available for lamprey from the Columbia River and its Oregon tributaries, OHA will evaluate and update the advisory meal allowances as needed.

When fishing in the Columbia River and its Oregon tributaries, OHA advises fishers to visit the OHA fish advisory webpage at HealthOregon.org/fishadv for a list of other areas and water bodies with existing fish advisories and recommended meal allowances for other types of fish. Here is a direct link to a PDF of the advisory.


Alzheimer's Network "Make a Memory" Grant Now Available
VanNatta Public Relations - 10/05/22 12:26 PM

Families and caregivers can make a lasting memory with a loved one with Alzheimer’s with the “Make a Memory” grant. 

Alzheimer’s Network (AlzNet) will award two grants of up to $500 each to two individuals. The grants are open to Willamette Valley residents who are diagnosed with a dementia-related illness. Families/caregivers can apply for the grant to help cover the costs of a special experience. This could be a trip to the beach or a visit to a place meaningful to them.  

Alzheimer’s disease is a brain disorder that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills. Alzheimer’s and other dementias are heartbreaking to families and friends who long to connect with their loved ones.

Since 2003, The Alzheimer’s Network of Oregon (AlzNet) has assisted families and loved ones of those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease and other forms of dementia. The group hosts “Memory Café” on the 3rd Friday of every month in various locations. Each Memory Café has a different theme; everyone comes together to have fun with each other and their caregivers.

Applications can be filled out online at AlzNet.org or downloaded, printed, and mailed to PO Box 13725, Salem, OR 97309. Mailed applications must be postmarked by Oct. 20, 2022. 

For more information contact 971-720-1650 or k@gmail.com">alznetnetwork@gmail.com.

 

About Alzheimer's Network of Oregon: The Alzheimer's Network of Oregon is a nonprofit network of experienced volunteers offering support and resources to persons with memory loss, their families, and caregivers through the Memory Café. 


 


State Library Board Meeting October 21 2022
State Library of Oregon - 10/05/22 12:19 PM

Salem, Ore – The State Library Board will meet from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on Friday, October 21, 2022,
at the Oregon City Public Library, with a hybrid option. This is a public meeting; those who would like to
attend should contact Ashley Wilsey at ashley.wilsey@slo.oregon.gov.


Question or concerns can be addressed to Wendy Cornelisen, State Librarian at 503-378-4367 or
wendy.cornelisen@slo.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: 2022-10/1069/158073/Press_Release_-_Board_Meeting_10.21.22.pdf

Found Explosives (Photo)
Newport Police Dept. - 10/05/22 11:45 AM
2022-10/5016/158072/Grenade.PNG
2022-10/5016/158072/Grenade.PNG
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On October 4th, 2022 the Newport Police Department was dispatched to multiple reports of explosives washing up on the beach in the Newport area, between Yaquina Bay State Park and Agate beach. Newport police responded to three separate devices that appeared to have washed ashore. The Oregon State Police Bomb Squad responded and seized the devices. 

These devices are white in color and have a label attached to them that reads “Warning Explosive”. The label clearly states the item is a Simulator Hand Grenade M116A. If you encounter such a device, please do not handle or attempt to move it. Call the police to report the devices location.




Attached Media Files: 2022-10/5016/158072/Grenade.PNG

Update On Hillsboro Shooting
Hillsboro Police Dept. - 10/05/22 11:10 AM

This media release updates a release sent yesterday regarding a shooting that occurred on NE 106th Avenue in Hillsboro.

Three male juvenile suspects from Multnomah County, (ages 16, 15, 13) have been arrested for Attempted Murder, Robbery, and Unlawful Use of a Weapon. The suspects were lodged at Donald E. Long Juvenile facility. Based on their ages, their names will not be released at this time.

The male victim, age 26, of Hillsboro, is recovering from a shoulder injury. 

The motive of this crime is robbery as the victim was accosted while he was walking on NE 106th Ave.

 

 

#     #     #


Deputies Investigating Monday Evening Traffic Fatality (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/05/22 11:05 AM
2022-10/1294/158069/Golf_Club_Rd.jpg
2022-10/1294/158069/Golf_Club_Rd.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/1294/158069/thumb_Golf_Club_Rd.jpg

On Monday, October 3, 2022, at approximately 7:15 p.m., deputies and emergency personnel were dispatched to a serious motor vehicle crash on Golf Club Road SE near Mill Creek Road SE, just outside the city of Stayton. Deputies arrived on scene to discover two vehicles were involved in the head-on crash.

The Marion County multi-agency CRASH team was called out to investigate the crash. Initial information at the scene indicates a red Kia Rio was traveling north on Golf Club Road before crossing over the centerline while negotiating a curve, striking an oncoming black Kia Optima. Investigators do not believe speed or alcohol were contributing factors to the crash.

Bridget Turner (57) of Stayton was identified as the driver of the red Kia Rio. She was transported from the scene by Life Flight to an area hospital where she died from injuries sustained in the crash. The 21 year-old male driving the black Kia Optima sustained minor injuries. There were no passengers in either vehicle.

The Marion County Sheriff’s Office was assisted by the Keizer Police Department, Life Flight, Marion County Public Works, METCOM 911, Oregon State Police, Stayton Fire District, Stayton Police Department, and Willamette Valley Communications Center during this response.




Attached Media Files: 2022-10/1294/158069/Golf_Club_Rd.jpg

Beaverton Sex Abuse Suspect Likely Has More Victims (Photo)
Beaverton Police Dept. - 10/05/22 10:45 AM
2022-10/1412/158068/Damien_Karp_Booking_Photo.png
2022-10/1412/158068/Damien_Karp_Booking_Photo.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/1412/158068/thumb_Damien_Karp_Booking_Photo.png

On July 16, 2022, the Beaverton Police Department was contacted by employees of VillaSport located at 13900 SW Meridian St. in Beaverton. VillaSport staff told responding officers a gym member, identified as 47-year-old Damien Karp of Beaverton, had just been caught engaging in an inappropriate interaction with a child in the outdoor hot tub.

Beaverton Police Department officers began their investigation into the report. During the initial investigation, officers learned Karp was a registered sex offender and was on probation for related crimes. Part of the stipulations of his probation was he was not allowed to have any contact with minor children. As a result, Karp was arrested for violating the terms of his probation and lodged in the Washington County Jail.

With the assistance of VillaSport staff and management, Beaverton detectives began an in-depth investigation into Karp’s behavior. Over the next few weeks, detectives determined Karp had inappropriately touched multiple under aged victims at the Beaverton VillaSport in June and July of 2022. Detectives determined Karp would use a waterproof camera to film his crimes against minors while they were swimming.

The investigation led to Karp being indicted by a Washington County Grand Jury on August 30, 2022, for 10 counts of Sex Abuse in the First Degree, and two counts of Invasion of Personal Privacy in the Second Degree. Karp, who has been in custody since July 16th on the initial probation violation arrest, is still in custody at the Washington County Jail at the time of this release.

Detectives learned at the time of Karp’s arrest that he was also a member at Tualatin Hills Park and Recreation District (THPRD). Detectives believe he may have attended the swimming pool at THPRD’s main complex at 15707 SW Walker Rd. sometime during April of 2021.

Based on the nature of Karp’s crimes, he likely has more victims, according to Beaverton Detective Chad Opitz. If you or someone you know has, or may have had, an inappropriate interaction with Damien Karp, know something about his behavior, or involvement in these crimes, please contact Detective Chad Opitz at 503.526.2674 and/or copitz@beavertonoregon.gov

The Beaverton Police Department worked closely with VillaSport and THPRD management and staff during the investigation and dissemination of this case. The Beaverton Police Department values community partners like VillaSport and THPRD who are so willing to assist law enforcement with investigating crimes against children. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-10/1412/158068/Damien_Karp_Booking_Photo.png

Salem City Club Hosts New Representation for House District 19: Tom Andersen(D) and T.J. Sullivan(R) are Off and Running (Photo)
VanNatta Public Relations - 10/05/22 10:40 AM
Salem City Club
Salem City Club
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/1853/158067/thumb_SCC_youtube_banner.jpg

Salem, OR,  (Oct. 5, 2022) - On Fri., Oct. 7 at 12:00 p.m., PST at the Willamette Heritage Center, the Salem City Club hosts New Representation for House District 19: Tom Andersen(D) and T.J. Sullivan(R) are Off and Running

Candidates Tom Andersen(D) and TJ Sullivan(R) will tell us why they are running for this office and give us their take on important issues of the day. After answering a few selected questions, limited time will be available for audience members to ask questions of the candidates. We expect this to be a cordial, informative and lively debate for the hour.

Both candidates are well known in the community from their past service on Salem City Council and on-going work with organizations throughout the community.

To register, go to https://salemcityclub.com/, click the tab that says “Events,” click “Register,” and once registered, a spot will be reserved for the event. Meetings are free for members and $10 for nonmembers.


 




Attached Media Files: Salem City Club , TJ Sullivan , Tom Andersen

Give the Gift of Sight and Food Security Today! (Photo)
Oregon Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation - 10/05/22 10:37 AM
Lift UP Lions OLSHF Food Drive
Lift UP Lions OLSHF Food Drive
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Portland, OR - From October 16 to the 30th, you can make a difference for the neighbors in your community! The Lions Clubs in the Portland area, Oregon Sight & Hearing Foundation (OLSHF) and Lift UP are launching an eyeglass and diabetic food drive. Lift UP’s mission is to reduce hunger and improve the lives of low-income residents in Northwest and Downtown Portland. OLSHF's mission is to screen, treat, save, and restore sight and hearing, in partnership with Lions Clubs.

For the food drive, here are the most needed food items for diabetic clients:


1. Whole Grain Pasta
2. Brown Rice
3. Any low Sodium Items such as broths, veggies, sauces, etc.
4. Canned Tuna, Canned Chicken, Canned Salmon, or any other Canned Meats
5. Nutbutters
6. Shelf Stable Milks

For those who can’t make it to the barrel locations (to be announced), Lift UP has set up a virtual giving page for our food drive.

For Ana, community support is crucial. A nice big mixed green salad with bell peppers, onions, and apples is what Ana enjoys for lunch from the food provided to her from Lift UP. Ana was in a near life-ending car accident that damaged her kidneys and credits healthy food for her ongoing healing journey. She receives a Delivered Food Box and accesses Preston’s Pantry, a shopping-style pantry, once a month. 

“In order to maintain equilibrium in my health, I have to eat a certain way, lots of fruits and veggies” Ana says. “Because of my tight budget, if I didn’t get what I get from Lift UP, I wouldn’t have much to eat at all.” People like Ana on are counting on us. Every $5 equals 15 meals for someone like Ana!

Whether $5, $10, $25 or $50. It all matters in the fight against alleviating hunger in your community. Lions Community, let’s do our part!

Please visit our website to learn more or make a donation.




Attached Media Files: Lift UP Lions OLSHF Food Drive

Columbia Hills Retirement Center Fire - St. Helens
Columbia River Fire & Rescue - 10/05/22 10:11 AM

PRESS RELEASE

Contacts: 
Jennifer Motherway, Public Information Officer

Date: October 5, 2022

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Columbia Hills Retirement Center Fire – St. Helens 

On Wednesday, October 5, 2022, at 12:36 am crews were dispatched to the Columbia Hills Retirement Center on Pittsburg Road in St. Helens for a 3-alarm fire. Approximately six units of a thirty one unit complex suffered heavy fire damage and multiple apartment units had heavy smoke damage. A total of thirty one apartment units were evacuated, which ultimately displaced all the residents in each of the units. Firefighters had the fire under control within two hours of the time of the call.   

First arriving units found six heavily involved units on fire, shortly after an explosion occurred within the structure throwing fire and debris across a large area of the complex. Crews attempted to suppress the fire while conducting search and rescue. Firefighters then pulled six people out of the building; unfortunately, one of those residents succumbed to their injuries, resulting in a fatality. Several occupants were then transported to Portland area hospitals for further evaluation. One police officer and one firefighter sustained non-life- threatening injuries and were also evaluated at Portland hospitals and have since been released. 

Local and state fire investigators are on scene conducting the fire investigation. We extend thanks to the staff at Spring Meadows who managed the situation with calm efficiency, making sure the vulnerable residents were transported safely and housed for the foreseeable future. Residents are also being supported by the Red Cross.  

Crews remained on scene throughout the evening and will continue monitoring to prevent any additional fire spread as well as conducting salvage and overhaul.  

We were assisted by Scappoose Fire, Clatskanie Fire, Vernonia Fire, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, Portland Fire & Rescue, AMR, Oregon Department of Forestry, Columbia County Sheriff’s Office, Scappoose Police Department, St. Helens Police Department, Columbia River PUD, NW Natural, Columbia County Emergency Management and Columbia County Rider bus service. Several private citizens responded and offered assistance as well. 

The district is incredibly busy with the fire investigation and will not be conducting any press conferences. We will post additional press releases as we have further updates. 


HUD approves state's Action Plan to spend $422 million federal grant on recovery from 2020 Labor Day Fires
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 10/05/22 9:48 AM

October 5, 2022 

Media Contact: Delia Hernández                               
equests@hcs.oregon.gov">HCS.mediarequests@hcs.oregon.gov  

SALEM, Ore. - The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has approved Oregon’s Action Plan to spend $422 million in Community Development Block Grant-Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR) funds to assist communities and survivors who continue to recover from the 2020 Labor Day Fires. Although recovery of the more than 4,300 homes in Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, and Marion counties has taken far longer than anyone hoped, HUD approval of the Action Plan is an important step.  

“Recovery has been tough for families and individuals who have struggled during the past two years to find safe and permanent housing,” said Alex Campbell, chief external affairs officer of the Disaster Resilience and Recovery Division at Oregon Housing and Community Services. With the approval of the Action Plan, we are on step closer to bringing much needed funding to these communities. The next step will be completing a grant agreement with HUD. We are asking survivors to get ready to apply by collecting documents and talking to a disaster case manager.” 

Administered by OHCS, the federal money will be used to set up several new programs to help individuals — regardless of residency or citizenship status — households, and communities to recover. This effort, which is called ReOregon, will begin to provide new permanent housing in the areas most impacted by the fires in 2023. In addition, a number of new affordable housing projects for fire survivors are under construction or will be built soon.   

Help with navigating housing recovery for 2020 fire survivors is already available thanks to funding put into place by the Oregon Legislature called Wildfire Recovery and Resilience Accounts, or WRRA. Survivors can access WRRA support through a local community action agency or similar organization. WRRA can help with both rent and move-in costs and, in some cases, financial assistance for replacing lost homes. Find a local contact for WRRA at Re.Oregon.gov by clicking “Assistance available now.” 

ReOregon assistance  

ReOregon includes several programs to assist fire survivors. First is the Homeowner Assistance and Reconstruction Program (HARP), which will launch early next year. The first phase of HARP will be open to fire survivors who are low or moderate income and have not yet completed their recovery, i.e., do not yet have a permanent, safe home. Low or moderate income will be defined as an annual household income, adjusted for household size.  

For example, a two-person household earning $58,150 or less would qualify for phase one. 

Fiscal Year 2022 Low and Moderate Income Limit 

1 Person  

2 Person  

3 Person  

4 Person  

5 Person  

6 Person  

7 Person  

8 Person  

$50,850  

$58,150  

$65,400  

$72,650  

$78,500  

$84,300  

$90,100  

$95,950  

For eligible survivors who have not started rebuilding, OHCS will provide new manufactured or modular homes to replace lost homes. The size of the replacement home will be based on the size of the home that was destroyed and, in some cases, by need based on number of individuals in the household. For homeowners who have already started to rebuild, or have already made a substantial down payment toward the purchase of a new manufactured home, the HARP program can help fund remaining costs.  Survivors will contribute any previous benefits, such as an insurance payment or FEMA structural damage award, toward the project. 

Survivors should take several steps this fall to make sure they are ready to apply for ReOregon benefits: 

  • Connect with a disaster case manager (DCM). A DCM provides a case management approach with a defined plan and recovery goals that identify unmet needs. They work toward those recovery goals with the survivor and provide services such as referrals for housing navigation, employment training and procurement, family stabilization resources and mental/behavioral health connections. If survivors aren’t currently connected to a DCM, they should call the DCM hotline at 833-669-0554.  
  • Housing navigators are the best point of contact for housing recovery issues, including help with finding a new rental or accessing financial assistance to help rebuild or replace the home. Find a local housing navigator at Re.Oregon.gov by clicking at “Assistance available now.  
  • Collect the documents that survivors will need to apply:  
    • Evidence of fire impact (type of home, proof of loss, household size)  
    • Income and bank statements (survivors will need their most recent documents at the time of application)  
    • Record of any other benefits or recovery supports received, including insurance payments.  
    • Photo ID for all household members over the age of 18.  
  • Sign up for (bilingual) email updates at Re.Oregon.gov.  

New housing projects for fire survivors 

Multiple affordable housing options, including rental and homeownership opportunities, are in various stages of development and will be accepting applications in the coming year. Projects with OHCS funding will provide hundreds of new homes that will be built for low- and moderate-income households with a preference for survivors in the counties hardest hit by the 2020 Labor Day Fires.  

For more information, visit Re.Oregon.gov.   

Spanish version:

5 de octubre, 2022 

Contacto para medios de comunicación: Delia Hernández,
equests@hcs.oregon.gov">HCS.mediarequests@hcs.oregon.gov  

HUD aprueba el Plan de Acción del estado para utilizar $422 millones en fondos federales para la recuperación de los incendios del Dia del Trabajo de 2020  

SALEM, Ore. – El Departamento de Vivienda y Desarrollo Urbano de Estados Unidos (HUD, por sus siglas en inglés) aprobó el Plan de Acción de Oregón para utilizar $422 millones en fondos de la Subvención en Bloque para el Desarrollo Comunitario-Recuperación de Desastres (CDBG-DR). Estos fondos ayudaran a comunidades y sobrevivientes que continúan recuperándose de los incendios del Dia de Trabajo de 2020. A pesar de que se ha tomado más tiempo de lo esperado la recuperación de más de 4,300 viviendas en los condados Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, y Marion, la aprobación del Plan de Acción por parte de HUD es un paso importante.  

“La recuperación ha sido difícil para las familias e individuos que se les ha dificultado en los últimos dos años encontrar una vivienda segura y permanente. Con la aprobación del Plan de Acción, estamos a un paso más cerca de traer fondos muy necesarios a estas comunidades. El próximo paso será completar un acuerdo de subvención con HUD. Estamos pidiendo a los sobrevivientes que se preparen para solicitar ayuda al reunir los documentos necesarios y hablar con un administrador de casos de desastres,” dijo Alex Campbell, director de asuntos externos de la División de Recuperación y Resiliencia de Desastres del Departamento de Vivienda y Servicios Comunitarios de Oregón (OHCS).  

Los fondos serán administrados por OHCS y la agencia utilizará el dinero para establecer varios programas nuevos para ayudar a las personas, independientemente de su estatus migratorio, y comunidades a recuperarse. La asistencia, conocida como ReOregon, se comenzará a repartir a partir de 2023 para proveer nuevas viviendas permanentes en las zonas más afectadas por los incendios. Además, se están construyendo o se construirán una serie de nuevos proyectos de viviendas asequibles para sobrevivientes de incendios. 

Actualmente hay ayuda disponible para las personas que perdieron sus viviendas en los incendios de 2020. Estos son fondos otorgados por la Legislatura de Oregon llamados Cuentas de Recuperación y Resiliencia de Incendios Forestales, o WRRA. Las personas pueden acceder el apoyo de WRRA por medio de una agencia de acción comunitaria u organización parecida. WRRA puede ayudar a pagar el alquilar y los costos de mudanza, y en algunos casos, otorgar asistencia financiera para reemplazar la vivienda. Encuentre a un contacto para WRRA en Re.Oregon.gov al hacer clic en “Asistencia disponible ahora para la recuperación de incendios forestales.” 

Asistencia ReOregon 

ReOregon incluye varios programas para ayudar a personas que sobrevivieron los incendios. Primero está el Programa de Asistencia y Reconstrucción para Propietarios (HARP), que estará disponible a principios del próximo año. La primera fase de HARP estará abierta a los sobrevivientes de incendios que tienen ingresos bajos o moderados y aún no tienen un hogar seguro y permanente. Los ingresos bajos o moderados se definirán como un ingreso familiar anual, ajustado por el tamaño del hogar. 

Por ejemplo, un hogar de dos personas con ingresos de $58,150 o menos calificaría para la primera fase de HARP. 

Año Fiscal 2022 Límite de ingresos bajos y moderados 

1 Persona  

2 Personas  

3 Personas 

4 Personas  

5 Personas  

6 Personas  

7 Personas  

8 Personas  

$50,850  

$58,150  

$65,400  

$72,650  

$78,500  

$84,300  

$90,100  

$95,950  

Para solicitantes elegibles que no han comenzado la reconstrucción de sus viviendas, OHCS proporcionará nuevas viviendas prefabricadas o modulares para reemplazar las viviendas perdidas. El tamaño de la casa de reemplazo se basará en el tamaño de la casa que fue destruida y, en algunos casos, según la necesidad basada en la cantidad de personas en el hogar.  

Para los propietarios de viviendas que ya se han comenzado a reconstruir o que ya han realizado un pago inicial sustancial para la compra de una nueva casa prefabricada, el programa HARP puede ayudar a financiar los costos restantes. Los sobrevivientes contribuirán cualquier beneficio que recibieron anteriormente para la reconstrucción de su hogar, como un pago de seguro o una indemnización por daños estructurales de FEMA. 

Sobrevivientes deben tomar varios pasos este otoño para asegurarse de que estén preparados para solicitar beneficios de ReOregon: 

  • Contacte a un administrador de casos de desastres conocidos por las siglas en inglés como DCM. Estos administradores ayudarán a definir e identificar las necesidades insatisfechas. Trabajan hacia esos objetivos de recuperación con el sobreviviente y brindan servicios tales como referencias para navegación de vivienda, capacitación y adquisición de empleo, recursos de estabilización familiar y conexiones de salud mental/conductual. Si los sobrevivientes no están actualmente conectados a un administrador de casos, deben llamar a la línea directa de DCM al 833-669-0554. 
  • Los navegadores de vivienda ofrecen ayuda para los problemas de recuperación de vivienda, incluida la ayuda para encontrar un nuevo alquiler o acceder a asistencia financiera para ayudar a reconstruir o reemplazar la casa. Encuentre un navegador de vivienda local en Re.Oregon.gov haciendo clic en “Asistencia disponible ahora para la recuperación de incendios forestales.” 
  • Reúna los documentos necesarios para presentar una solicitud: 
    • Evidencia del impacto del fuego (tipo de hogar, prueba de pérdida, tamaño del hogar) 
    • Estado de cuenta bancaria y de ingresos (los sobrevivientes necesitarán sus documentos más recientes al momento de la solicitud)  
    • Registro de cualquier otro beneficio o apoyo de recuperación recibido, incluidos los pagos del seguro. 
    • Identificación con foto de todos los miembros del hogar mayores de 18 años. 
  • Regístrese para recibir notificaciones por correo electrónico (bilingües) en Re.Oregon.gov. 

Nuevos desarrollos de vivienda para sobrevivientes de incendios 

Varias opciones de vivienda asequible, incluyendo oportunidades de alquiler y compra de vivienda, se encuentran en diversas etapas de desarrollo y aceptarán solicitudes el próximo año. Los proyectos con financiamiento de OHCS proporcionarán cientos de viviendas nuevas que se construirán para hogares con ingresos bajos y moderados. Preferencia se dará a sobrevivientes en los condados más afectados por los incendios del Día del Trabajo de 2020. 

Para más información, visite Re.Oregon.gov.   


Unitus Community Credit Union Launches "Barbara Leonard Day of Service" Volunteer Event (Photo)
Unitus Community Credit Union - 10/05/22 9:09 AM
Barbara Leonard
Barbara Leonard
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/6960/158062/thumb_Barbara_Leonard_Image.png

Unitus employees and family members to serve community partners at 15 locations from SW Washington to Salem

Portland, Ore., October 5, 2022 – Unitus Community Credit Union employees and their families will blanket the metro area on October 10, 2022, for the “Barbara Leonard Day of Service.” The day of volunteerism is dedicated to Barbara Leonard who served as Unitus’ first female board chair. In honor of the 10th anniversary of her passing, Unitus volunteers will serve community partners at 15 locations, while the credit union is closed for Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

Ms. Leonard was known for her service to the community. Born and raised in Portland, she graduated from Girls Polytechnic in 1964 and later earned a bachelor’s in business administration from the University of Oregon. Ms. Leonard joined Unitus when the credit union had select employee group membership and she worked in the telecommunications industry, serving on Unitus’ board of directors for more than 20 years. She was a passionate supporter and leader at the Portland chapter of The Links, Incorporated—an international women’s civic organization for which she raised more than $500,000 for educational scholarships. Ms. Leonard was also an active member of Maranatha Church in Northeast Portland and a mentor to local high school students.

“This is the perfect way to honor her, is to have families working together to give in service to the community,” explained Dr. Kimberly Matier, whom Barbara mentored. “And the best way to do it, is to serve with joy in your heart.”

On the “Barbara Leonard Day of Service,” 66% of Unitus employees and their families will volunteer with the following community partners: Blanchet House, Children’s Book Bank, City of Salem Parks, Clackamas Service Center, Clark County Food Bank, Family Promise, Hoyt Arboretum, Impact NW, Oregon Humane Society, Project Never Again, Ronald McDonald House, Rose Haven, Snowcap Community Charities, SOLVE, and the Tualatin River Wildlife Refuge. 

“Bringing 270 people together for a coordinated volunteer event in more than a dozen locations is quite an undertaking, but Barbara inspired us to serve,” said Steven Stapp, President and CEO of Unitus Community Credit Union. “I’m incredibly proud of our team and their commitment to supporting our community partners, and I’m honored we can celebrate Barbara’s life and service in this meaningful way.”

“We’re excited to join forces with Unitus volunteers to create hundreds of courage cards for kids in foster care, and advocate for the youngest citizens of our communities through #dignitythruduffels,” noted Seema Steffany, Founder and President of Project Never Again.

"We're grateful to have Unitus employees volunteer to get warm clothes to our guests experiencing homelessness in Portland,” expressed Julie Showers of Blanchet House. “The free clothing pop-up will be held in Blanchet House's parking lot where guests can shop different booths for needed items. All clothing was donated by the community. It's our mission to alleviate suffering in the community and we're only able to do that with the help of volunteers." 

Members of the media interested in attending this event must pre-register due to capacity restrictions at several locations. Onsite interviews will be available. Please contact Autumn Foster, Marketing Communications Specialist, to confirm availability.

“There are people in need. They need your time. And I think that our community, our city, our state, our country, the world would be a better place if all of us bind together and say, ‘I’m going to do my part to make a difference,’” said Serena Ashley, Barbara’s daughter.

About Unitus Community Credit Union

At Unitus, we’re dedicated to improving lives in the communities we serve. As a member-owned local credit union, we invest in people by doing the right thing. Through partnerships with nonprofit organizations, we provide support for community groups through volunteerism and financial donations. Our 108,000 members count on us to serve them and their communities; our 300+ employees share that passion for service. Learn about the local impact Unitus makes by visiting unitusccu.com.




Attached Media Files: Barbara Leonard

Taxpayer Advocate highlights Oregon's Taxpayer Bill of Rights
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 10/05/22 8:49 AM

Salem, OR—In anticipation of the 2023 tax season early next year, Oregon’s Taxpayer Advocate and the Department of Revenue have launched a new effort to remind Oregon taxpayers of their rights under the law.

The Oregon Legislature created the Taxpayer Bill of Rights in state law more than 30 years ago, but many taxpayers just don’t know what their rights are, said Codi Trudell, who was appointed the state’s first Taxpayer Advocate in January.

“Taxpayer rights are a key foundation to a successful voluntary compliant tax system,” Trudell said. “If taxpayers don’t know their rights, how can they claim them?”

While the rights themselves have not changed, taxpayers can now visit a webpage dedicated to providing an easy-to-understand summary of taxpayer rights. The agency has also posted a new, easier to understand version of the document Your Rights as an Oregon Taxpayer, 150-800-406.

“At the Department of Revenue, we are working to create an environment that builds trust and assures taxpayers they are treated fairly and well,” she said. “If taxpayers understand and know they have rights when working with the department, they can avail themselves of those rights when they need them and feel like they are being respected for voluntarily complying with the tax laws.”

The new webpage has been translated into five languages: Spanish, Cantonese, Mandarin, Vietnamese, and Russian. Visitors to the site will find they can access these translated materials by clicking on links. This is in addition to the Google translate features available for all DOR webpages.
Taxpayers will also find resources on how to appeal and how to contact the agency for assistance should they have questions on any of these rights.

In addition to the website, the agency has begun a social media campaign highlighting the Taxpayer Bill of Rights.

Helping taxpayers understand their rights and put those rights into practice navigating the tax system is part of the purpose of the Office of the Taxpayer Advocate, which was created by the Legislature in 2021.

The taxpayer advocate is an independent office that enhances the department’s services to taxpayers. It provides both a voice and resource for taxpayers.

“As Oregon’s Taxpayer Advocate, my hope is that with this new approach both department staff and Oregon taxpayers will grow more familiar with and better understand taxpayer rights and agency responsibilities through this new approach,”
Trudell said.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.


Media inquiries
To schedule an interview, in either English or Spanish, with the Taxpayer Advocate Office to discuss the department’s effort to highlight the Taxpayer Bill of Rights, contact Public Information Officer Robin Maxey via email at obin.maxey@oregon.gov?subject=RE:%20">robin.maxey@oregon.gov or call 971-718-4483.


County council appoints Ken Lader as county engineer
Clark Co. WA Communications - 10/05/22 8:48 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Council this week approved a resolution appointing Ken Lader as the county engineer. Lader had been serving as interim county engineer for the last couple of months. His appointment takes effect immediately.

Lader has worked for Clark County Public Works more than 20 years and served the last eight years as manager of the Engineering and Design section. Previously, he held positions as engineer and engineering technician. 

Lader is a licensed civil engineer in the state of Washington. He earned a bachelor’s in civil engineering from Oregon State University. 

“Ken’s passion for the employees of Public Works and the design of the roads in our beautiful county has been present throughout his distinguished career,” said Deputy County Manager Amber Emery. “His leadership for the office of the county engineer has been steadfast through a time of change, and I am pleased that Ken has stepped into this role permanently.”  

“I’m excited to take on the role as county engineer,” said Lader. “The last few months have shown me how passionate and invested Public Works employees are to ensure the safety of our roads and bridges. I’m honored to work with such dedicated public servants.”

State law requires counties to designate a county engineer who is a registered and professional civil engineer in the state of Washington. Functions typically performed by the county engineer include construction oversight, modifying, planning, and maintaining all county roads and bridges, and other engineering related tasks as necessary.

More information on Public Works is available on the county’s website at https://clark.wa.gov/public-works


ESD 112 Board Selects Nancy Miller for District 5 Seat (Photo)
ESD 112 - 10/05/22 8:32 AM
Nancy Miller Photo
Nancy Miller Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/487/158058/thumb_NancyMiller_Photo.JPG

The Educational Service District (ESD) 112 Board of Directors has selected Nancy Miller as its newest board member. Miller, a retired attorney who previously served as general counsel for Vancouver School District, will represent District 5, which encompasses parts of Vancouver and Evergreen School Districts. 

Miller’s distinguished legal career spanned 28 years and included working for Vancouver School District from 1993 to 1997. She later transitioned to practicing law in the area of trust and guardianship administration. She retired in 2017 and owns a private vocational school in Vancouver, the International Air and Hospitality Academy. 

“After an extensive interview process, the board selected Nancy to serve in the District 5 Director position,” said ESD 112 Superintendent Tim Merlino. “Her esteemed career, legal expertise, and dedication to the community will serve ESD 112 well.”

Current Board President Darlene Stickel said, “Nancy is a longstanding community leader and will be a great addition to the ESD 112 Board. I look forward to working alongside Nancy as we equalize educational opportunity for students across our region.”

Nancy Miller earned her undergraduate degree from Whitman College and completed her law degree at Lewis and Clark Law School. She and her late husband Arch Miller have two adult daughters, both of whom live in Vancouver. In her free time, Miller enjoys reading, watching sports, and traveling.      

ESD board members are volunteers who attend monthly meetings held at the ESD headquarters in Vancouver. 

Miller will be sworn in at the next ESD 112 board meeting on October 25, 2022, at 3 p.m.




Attached Media Files: ESD 112 Board Selects Nancy Miller for District 5 Seat , Nancy Miller Photo

Gresham Is Excited To Announce Scott Lewis As the Permanent Chief for Gresham Fire Department
City of Gresham - 10/05/22 8:00 AM

GRESHAM, Ore. – The City of Gresham is excited to announce Scott Lewis as the permanent Chief of the Gresham Fire Department. Chief Lewis joined the Gresham Fire Department in January 2003, and he has been serving as the Gresham Fire Department Interim Chief for the past six months.  

“Scott Lewis has been an integral part of the Gresham Fire Department for nearly 20 years,” said Deputy City Manager Corey Falls. “We are grateful for the thoughtful leadership, integrity, and selfless commitment Chief Lewis brings to this community.”  

Chief Lewis began his career in his hometown of Fairborn, Ohio. He served the Fairborn Fire Department for 20 years, in time rising to the role of Operations Deputy Chief. The pursuit of career growth and the opportunities a larger department can offer initially drew him to the City of Gresham. Since joining the Gresham Fire Department, Chief Lewis has held a variety of roles including Operations Deputy Chief, Administrative Division Chief, and Assistant Chief.  

I am humbled to have the opportunity to be the Fire Chief for the Gresham Fire Department,” said Fire Chief Scott Lewis. “We have assembled one of the finest groups of firefighters, fire officers, deputy fire marshals, and staff members in the State of Oregon. Every day they serve with courage and compassion, and it is a privilege to work alongside them.”  

Though it is not a requirement of the position, it is important to Chief Lewis to live in the community he serves. Chief Lewis and his wife, Linda, and their Lhasa Apso Lucy have happily called Gresham their home for 20 years now and we are pleased that they will continue to do so.  

About Gresham: 

Gresham is a welcoming community of hard-working people where tradition meets opportunity in Oregon's fourth largest city. Gresham’s residents care deeply about our roots and are committed to building a vibrant future. Today, Gresham is a dynamic, innovative, and rapidly growing city with a desire to thrive. To learn more, visit www.GreshamOregon.gov or visit us on Twitter at @CityofGresham. 

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Tue. 10/04/22
Crime Stoppers Featured Case #22-23 Reward Offered in Portland Police Bureau Homicide (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 10/04/22 9:29 PM
KELLEY, Janae
KELLEY, Janae
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/5183/158054/thumb_Kelley_Janae.jpg
News Release from: Crime Stoppers of Oregon

Posted on FlashAlert

Downloadable file: (Suspect’s Picture)

The Portland Police Bureau, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to locate the suspect in a homicide.

On 7/15/22 at approximately 1952 hours, officers responded to the area of SE 124 Avenue and SE Powell Boulevard. Officers located the victim, Aaron Follstad-Martin (MB DOB: 11/26/77) deceased at the scene from an apparent gunshot wound.

The subsequent investigation identified the suspect to be Janae Tanell KELLEY (FB DOB: 10/19/79 6’2” /200 blk, brn).

An arrest warrant was issued for KELLEY’S arrest and her whereabouts are unknown.

The investigation of the murder is still active and investigators are following up on any active leads. PPB Case #22-189873

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers of Oregon, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous. Secure and anonymous tips can be left at www.crimestoppersoforegon.com or visit the APP Store and download P3 Tips for smart phones or tablets

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers of Oregon with a donation, or to view other unsolved cases, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/



Attached Media Files: KELLEY, Janae

Crime Stoppers Featured Case #22-22 Reward Offered in Portland Police Bureau Homicide
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 10/04/22 9:21 PM
News Release from: Crime Stoppers of Oregon

Posted on FlashAlert

The Portland Police Bureau, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to identify the suspect, or suspects, in a homicide.

On 9/19/22 at approximately 1931 hours, shots were reported at Northgate Park, 9347 N. Geneva Avenue. Officers responded to the scene and found evidence of a shooting, but no victim. A short time later a private vehicle arrived at Emanuel Hospital with the victim identified to be Essadin Hassan (MB DOB: 3/1/99), who had a gunshot wound, Hassan succumbed to his injury.

The investigation of the murder is still active and investigators are following up on any active leads. PPB Case # 22-253142

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers of Oregon, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous. Secure and anonymous tips can be left at www.crimestoppersoforegon.com or visit the APP Store and download P3 Tips for smart phones or tablets

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers of Oregon with a donation, or to view other unsolved cases, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

Auto vs. Bicycle
Milwaukie Police Dept. - 10/04/22 8:19 PM

Date: 10/4/2022

CASE: 22-007307

 

 

Auto vs. Bicycle

 

On 10/4/2022 at 5:52 am, Milwaukie Police responded to a vehicle vs. bicycle crash on SE Lake Road at the Highway 224 exit in the City of Milwaukie. When police arrived, they found both the bicyclist and driver of a Toyota Sienna still on scene.

 

During the investigation police learned that the 43-year-old male driver of the Toyota had turned west, off the offramp onto SE Lake Road, after stopping at the stop sign when the crash occurred. The driver stated he did not see the bicyclist and stopped as soon as the two collided.

 

The 25-year-old male bicyclist explained he was travelling east on SE Lake Road and that his lighting had stopped working as he neared the intersection. The bicyclist explained he saw the Toyota stop at the stop sign so he continued, assuming the driver saw him. The bicyclist stated when the Toyota began turning west onto SE Lake Road he veered left to try and avoid the slow speed collision.

 

The bicyclist was transported to a local hospital with complaints of pain on his right side and minor injury to his right hand. The bicyclist is expected to survive and fully recover. 

 

No citations have been issued at this time.

 

The Milwaukie Police Department would like to remind drivers, bicyclists, skaters and pedestrians to use caution when approaching and entering intersections. Check the intersection in both directions multiple times, use appropriate safety equipment, anticipate potential hazards, and only proceed through when safe to do so.  


Garage fire on NW Delaware Ave 10-4-22 (Photo)
Bend Fire & Rescue - 10/04/22 8:15 PM
Credit Bend Fire
Credit Bend Fire
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/6802/158051/thumb_1006_NW_DELAWARE_AVE_FIRE_PHOTO_10-4-22.jpg

Bend Fire Department responded to a call for assistance this evening when a passerby noticed a smoke alarm sounding in a home on NW Delaware Ave. No one was home at the time. When the engine arrived they began to search the area for the source of the alarm. It was determined that the alarm was coming from the detached garage and ADU behind the home. The crews attempted to enter the garage and found the building full of smoke and a small fire in the garage. More crews were quickly dispatched to what was now a structure fire. 

Ultimately the fire crews found a small fire in the garage that had been partially extinguished when the adjacent water heater failed and sprayed water on the fire. The building was cleared of smoke and fire fully extingsuiehd. The fire was caused when an older electric bike was plugged in for charging. The lithium battery appears to have failed and caught fire. Lithium batteries are susceptible to fire when they get damaged, wet, over charged or as they age and start to malfunction. 

Be sure to follow all manufactures guidelines on charging lithium batteries and devices with those batteries. If the battery gets damaged or wet, do not charge again and replace the battery. Be sure not to over charge your batteries by taking them off the charger once they are fully charged. As soon as you start to notice the battery to not operate like normal; discontinuing charging and using it immediately. If the batteries do catch fire, call 911 immediately. These fires can be hard to extinguish due to the metals burning. 

Deschutes County Solid Waste, operators of Knott Landfill, remind everyone to not dispose lithium batteries in the regular trash. These batteries are best recycled to prevent them from catching fire in the process of being disposed or placed in the landfill. Lithium batteries are recyclable at most retailers that sell them (home improvement stores, electronics stores, etc) and at the Recycling Centers at Knott Landfill and transfer centers. 

More information about lithium battery safety: https://www.nfpa.org/-/media/Files/Public-Education/Resources/Safety-tip-sheets/LithiumIonBatterySafety.ashx




Attached Media Files: Credit Bend Fire

Jail Disturbance Leads to Arson Charges
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/04/22 7:22 PM

On 10/04/2022, in the morning hours, inmates in one of the housing units at the Clark County Jail became upset with a disciplinary measure and began attempting to flood their unit.  The initial disturbance was quelled.  The inmates continued to act belligerent toward the staff and at approximately 1245 two inmates set fire to items within their unit.  The fire filled the unit with smoke and Corrections Deputies were able to put out the flames and safely clear the unit.  The fire resulted in minor property damage and no inmates or corrections deputies were injured.

Corrections Deputies requested assistance from Enforcement Deputies with the investigation.  Corrections Deputies identified several suspects and collected evidence.  The City of Vancouver Fire Marshal conducted the cause and origin investigation, and Enforcement Deputies interviewed several persons.

At the conclusion of the initial investigation, Michael C Dempsey and David N Trachuk were charged with one count each of Arson in the First Degree.  Dempsey and Trachuk are in the Clark County Jail on unrelated charges.  As such their arraignment on the new charges will be determined by the Clark County Prosecuting Attorney. 

This is an open investigation and charges for other inmates are potentially forthcoming. 

There will be no further comment on the investigation  

 


Salem Housing Authority is 'Moving to Work'
City of Salem - 10/04/22 5:30 PM

Salem is one of only two Oregon cities selected for the nationwide program.

Salem, Ore. – Moving to Work is a federal Housing and Urban Development (HUD) program that gives housing authorities flexibility around certain federal rules and regulations to implement local solutions. 

The Salem Housing Authority and the Housing Authority of Clackamas County were two of only 18 selected nationwide in late September 2022 for this special status.

“We are thrilled to welcome the Salem Housing Authority and Housing Authority of Clackamas County to the asset-building cohort,” said Northwest Regional Administrator Margaret Salazar. “Through this program, they will have increased flexibility with HUD resources to meet the needs of the community they serve. This will increase the self-sufficiency of their residents and strengthen the community overall.”

According to HUD, the Move to Work program “is a demonstration program for public housing authorities that provides them the opportunity to design and test innovative, locally designed strategies that use federal dollars more efficiently, help residents find employment and become self-sufficient, and increase housing choices for low-income families.”

Additional information regarding the Salem Housing Authority and HUD’s Moving to Work Program is available online.

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Hillsboro Police Investigate non-lethal Shooting (Photo)
Hillsboro Police Dept. - 10/04/22 5:26 PM
2022-10/1408/158047/09B0CA15-2855-4DE1-80D0-4F04DCEDD109.jpeg
2022-10/1408/158047/09B0CA15-2855-4DE1-80D0-4F04DCEDD109.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/1408/158047/thumb_09B0CA15-2855-4DE1-80D0-4F04DCEDD109.jpeg

On 10/04/22 at 330 pm hillsboro police responded to gun shots fired in the area of NE 106th Ave between Evergreen Parkway and Cornell Road. 

Upon arrival officers discovered a male victim who had sustained a non-life-threatening gunshot would to the shoulder. The victim was transported to Emmanuel hospital.

 officers detained three male suspects at the scene and also discovered a fourth male suspect in a vehicle near Northeast Stucki and Cornell Road. That suspect was also taken into custody.

 This case remains under investigation by Hillsboro police detectives and the Washington County CART team.

NE 106th ave is closed between Evergreen Pkwy and Cornell Rd for 3 hrs. 
 

details about motive and other factors of this crime are not yet known. The identities of the victim and suspects in this case have also not been established.

 

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Attached Media Files: 2022-10/1408/158047/09B0CA15-2855-4DE1-80D0-4F04DCEDD109.jpeg

Willamette River Water Coalition Board Meeting - October 11, 2022
Tualatin Valley Water Dist. - Willamette River Water Coalition - 10/04/22 5:18 PM

The Willamette River Water Coalition (WRWC) Board Meeting will be held Tuesday, October 11, 2022, at 5:15 pm.

This meeting is offered by phone and the web:

  • Physical location: Tigard Public Works Auditorium, 8777 SW Burnham Street, Tigard.  
  • Web: If you wish to attend this meeting virtually, please contact ine.desau@tvwd.org">katherine.desau@tvwd.org or call 503-848-3078 by 12:00 p.m. on October 11, 2022. 

If you wish to address the WRWC Board, please request the Public Comment Form and return it 48 hours prior to the day of the meeting.

The meeting is accessible to persons with disabilities and those who need qualified bilingual interpreters. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired, a bilingual interpreter, or for other accommodations should be made at least 72 hours before the meeting to the contact listed above.

The Board meeting agenda packet and additional information regarding the WRWC are available on the Willamette River Water Coalition website: https://www.willametteriver.org/wrwc/meetings.


Teen arrested in connection with shooting that injured one
Salem Police Department - 10/04/22 5:00 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DATE: October 4, 2022

Teen arrested in connection with shooting that injured one

 

Salem, Ore. — Yesterday, October 3, Salem Police detectives arrested a 16-year-old juvenile on several charges related to a shooting incident on September 27. 

At approximately 3:30 p.m. that Thursday afternoon, police officers responded to the area of Marion and 13th STS NE after multiple callers reported the sound of gunfire. 

Detectives from the Felony Crimes and Strategic Investigations Units assisted with canvassing the area and collecting evidence. Initially, no reports of injuries or damages were received; however, several hours after the shooting, officers contacted a juvenile victim at Salem Health. The adolescent sought medical treatment at the hospital for a non-life-threatening gunshot injury.

The investigation ultimately led to the arrest of a male teenager who was lodged at the Marion County Juvenile Detention Center on the following charges:

  • Assault in the second degree
  • Unlawful use of a weapon
  • Conspiracy, assault in the second degree
  • Conspiracy, unlawful use of a weapon

The Salem Police Department does not release the names of minors involved in criminal investigations.

All further inquiries concerning this case should be directed to the Marion County District Attorney’s Office.

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Oregon Psilocybin Fall Business Forum scheduled for October 19
Oregon Health Authority - 10/04/22 4:51 PM

October 4, 2022

Contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, 

PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Fall Business Forum scheduled for October 19

What: The Oregon Psilocybin Services Section at Oregon Health Authority in partnership with the Oregon Secretary of State’s Office of Small Business Assistance is holding a Psilocybin Fall Business Forum event on Oct.19, 2022 (9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Pacific Time).

The Psilocybin Fall Business Forum is a free one-day virtual event open to the public. The event will include a series of Zoom presentations offered by various state agency partners. Session topics throughout the day will cover important business considerations for those interested in licensure under M109, the Oregon Psilocybin Services Act. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions and learn about challenges and resources for new businesses in this emerging sector.

More details can be found in the Event Program, now available on the Psilocybin Fall Business Forum webpage.

Real-time captioning (CART), and simultaneous interpretation in Spanish and American Sign Language (ASL) will be provided in all sessions, except for the special session with the Office of Small Business Assistance at the end of the day which will be in a different format. If you would like to request interpretation services or other accommodations during the special session, please e-mail: business.sos@sos.oregon.gov by Oct. 16.

If you need any assistance with language or accessibility formats, please contact the Oregon Psilocybin Services team at: 971-341-1713, 711 TTY or OHA.Psilocybin@odhsoha.oregon.gov and every effort will be made to respond to requests received in advance. Submitting your request as early as possible is greatly appreciated.

When: Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2022 (9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Pacific Time)

Where: Virtual - Zoom Links can be found on the Psilocybin Fall Business Forum webpage.

Background:  Ballot Measure 109 (M109), also known as the Oregon Psilocybin Services Act, was voted into law by Oregonians in Nov. 2020. M109 directs OHA to license and regulate psilocybin products and the provision of psilocybin services. OHA is in a two-year development period extending from Jan. 1, 2021, to Dec. 31, 2022. During this time, OHA is building a new Oregon Psilocybin Services (OPS) Section and working with the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, Rules Advisory Committees (RACs), and the public to establish rules for the production of psilocybin and provision of psilocybin services in the state of Oregon.

For the latest updates, Sign Up Here.


Vancouver Fire HazMat team assists with chemical mixture (Photo)
Vancouver Fire Dept. - 10/04/22 4:43 PM
The entry team deconning after returning.
The entry team deconning after returning.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/5157/158041/thumb_Decon.jpg

The Vancouver Fire Department responded with three engines, a ladder truck and members of the Hazardous Materials team to 1701 W. 16th St, Northwest Packing, for the report of inhalation exposure to several employees. The potential exposure was caused by two acids being accidently combined in the same storage container. Twelve employees who were in the area of the vapor release evacuated outside where they were evaluated by American Medical Response paramedics. All employees refused transport. The VFD HazMat team donned Level A chemical suits and entered the structure to check for excessive heat of the combined chemicals, ensure the integrity of the container, and to shut down several plant operations that could not safely continue unmanned. A total of 17 fire department personnel were on scene to mitigate the situation.




Attached Media Files: The entry team deconning after returning. , Mosely and Kent get equipment before going inside. , FF/PM John Mosely (left) and Capt Travis Kent, both Hazardous Materials technicians prepare to go inside to mitigate the situation. , HazMat team members prepare to make entry into the structure. , HazMat team members being briefed by plant personnel.

Conference of Local Health Officials meets October 20 in Corvallis and via Zoom.
Oregon Health Authority - 10/04/22 4:36 PM

October 4, 2022

Media contact: Erica Heartquist 503-871-8843

PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Conference of Local Health Officials meets October 20 in Corvallis and via Zoom.

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO). 

Agenda: Officer elections; Annual committee reports; Health Space environmental health inspection platform updates; Maternal and child health home-visiting program updates; Alcohol and drug prevention program element (PE 36) changes; Fiscal year 2021 local investment data report; Public health accountability metrics update; Public health advisory board updates.

Agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/ prior to meeting.

There is no public comment period during this meeting.

When: Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022, 9:00-11:30 a.m. 

Where: Via Zoom meeting.  Members of the public seeking to attend must register for the meeting at  

https://www.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJItde2trDIuHi77O3JM8PRXSEpfLh2L6YY

In person option.  Oregon State University Memorial Student Union Room 104 (Journey Room), 2501 SW Jefferson Way, Corvallis OR, 97331

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340)

Program contact: Danna Drum, 503-957-8869,  um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 503-957-8869 711 TTY or um@dhsoha.state.or.us">danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


State Land Board to meet October 11
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 10/04/22 4:35 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The State Land Board will meet in Salem on Tuesday, October 11. 

The State Land Board Awards ceremony will take place at 10 a.m. Every year, the Land Board honors exceptional projects and partners for their contributions to enhancing Oregon’s natural resources. Award recipients are: 

  • Wetland Award: Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge Wetland Restoration.
  • Wetland Award: Klamath Lake Wetland Mitigation Project.
  • Stream Award: Three Rivers–Cedar Creek Hatchery Fish Passage Restoration Project.
  • Partnership Award – Catalyst Award: Lieutenant Doug Asboe.
  • Partnership Award – Team Award: The Elliott State Research Advisory Committee. This award will be presented at the Land Board meeting in December. 


The Land Board meeting will begin immediately after the awards ceremony. Agenda items the Land Board will consider include permanent restrictions on overnight use, camping, and campfires for 500 yards of riverbank on Hayden Island in Portland. The Board will also hear annual reports on the Common School Fund and the Department of State Lands’ Aquatic Resource Management Program; and updates on DSL’s 2022-2026 Strategic Plan, the transition of Oregon’s Unclaimed Property and Estates Programs to State Treasury, and selection of school lands still owed to Oregon by the federal government. 

The full meeting agenda and materials are available on the DSL website. The meeting will be livestreamed to the DSL YouTube channel

The public may submit written testimony or sign up to provide spoken testimony during the meeting. The deadline to sign up to testify is 10 a.m. on Monday, October 10. Testimony information is available here

If you need assistance to participate in this meeting due to a disability, please contact Arin Smith at 503-986-5224 or in.n.smith@dsl.oregon.gov">arin.n.smith@dsl.oregon.gov at least two working days prior to the meeting. 

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Shemia Fagan and State Treasurer Tobias Read. Established by the Oregon Constitution in 1859, the Land Board oversees the state’s Common School Fund. The Department of State Lands is the Land Board’s administrative agency, managing the lands and resources that help fund Oregon’s public schools and protecting the state’s waterways and wetlands for the many benefits they provide.


BPA reinforces financial strength through U.S. Treasury payment
Bonneville Power Administration - 10/04/22 3:09 PM

PR 09-22                                                                                               BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION
                                                                               FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2022
                                                                                                 CONTACT: Doug Johnson, 503-713-7658
                                                                                                                                                or 503-230-5131

Portland, Ore. – The Bonneville Power Administration completed its annual U.S. Treasury payment Oct. 4, on time and in full. The total payment was $950.6 million for fiscal year 2022.

This payment, along with actions taken as part of BPA’s 2022 Financial Plan, reinforces the agency’s financial strength and demonstrates the agency has met all of its financial commitments. This year’s payment to the U.S. Treasury includes $694.2 million in principal and $193.9 million in interest. The remaining $62.5 million covers a variety of other costs, including irrigation assistance that BPA provides to help irrigators repay their share of certain Bureau of Reclamation projects.

“I am pleased to announce our 39th consecutive annual treasury payment. Completing the annual U.S Treasury payment is a significant milestone that demonstrates BPA’s ability to meet all of its financial obligations on an ongoing basis,” said Marcus Harris, BPA’s chief financial officer. “Our recently released 2022 Financial Plan places BPA on stronger financial footing, which positions us to continue making treasury payments into the future in the face of an evolving market landscape.”

BPA is a self-financed power marketing administration that receives no annual appropriation funding from Congress. Instead, BPA recovers its costs primarily through the sale of electric power and transmission services.

Each year BPA pays back to the U.S. Treasury a portion of the taxpayers' investment in the Federal Columbia River Power System, which includes the federal hydropower dams that produce renewable electricity and the transmission system. BPA sets its rates to maintain an annual 97.5% probability of making this payment.

About BPA 

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale electricity from 31 federal dams and one nuclear plant to 143 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA delivers power via more than 15,000 circuit miles of lines and 261 substations to 546 transmission customers. In all, BPA markets about a third of the electricity generated in the Northwest. BPA also funds one of the largest fish and wildlife programs in the nation, and, with its partners, pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain affordable, reliable and clean electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov

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Breast Cancer Warning: Dr. Sheila Jhansale available for interviews (Photo)
Kaiser Permanente Northwest - 10/04/22 2:55 PM
October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and Kaiser Permanente physicians want to warn that missing regular breast cancer screenings can lead to worse health outcomes.
October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and Kaiser Permanente physicians want to warn that missing regular breast cancer screenings can lead to worse health outcomes.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/5557/158010/thumb_2013-JW-KA1814.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore. (Oct. 5, 2022): Breast cancer screening rates declined steeply during the pandemic, with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reporting a drop as much as 87%. Kaiser Permanente data shows those rates beginning to recover, but the number of people coming in for breast cancer screenings is still 30% below pre-pandemic rates.

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and Kaiser Permanente physicians want to warn that missing regular breast cancer screenings can lead to worse health outcomes. Every woman between ages 40 and 75 is encouraged to catch up on this important preventive care.

“The earlier breast cancer is found, the more easily and successfully it can be treated,” said Dr. Sheila Jhansale, primary care physician lead at Kaiser Permanente Northwest. “As a result of regular self-examinations and mammograms, breast cancer is being detected at an earlier state, but mammogram screening rates are not back to their pre-pandemic numbers.”

Breast cancer will affect one in eight women, according to the CDC, which says that breast cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women. Mammograms have worked wonders for early detection of this cancer, and treatments have made great strides. Death rates in women over age 50 have fallen, according to the American Cancer Society, although the CDC says that African American women are still more likely to die from it.

As a national leader in the percentage of members receiving breast cancer screening, Kaiser Permanente breast cancer patients have a lower mortality rate compared to national benchmarks and we encourage spreading the word this October that screenings can save lives.

Interviews available

Dr. Sheila Jhansale, primary care physician lead at Kaiser Permanente Northwest, is available for available for Zoom or phone interviews with media this Wednesday, Oct. 5 from 1-5 p.m. Contact en.a.vitt@kp.org">Karen Vitt to schedule.

 Dr. Jhansale is prepared to discuss:

  • Importance of regular breast cancer screenings (early detection)
     
  • Methods of breast cancer screenings (self-exams, mammograms, etc.)
     
  • Breast cancer risk factors and prevention
     
  • Breast cancer diagnosis and treatments

Breast Cancer Fast Facts:

  • One in eight women in the United States (about 13%) will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime.
     
  • Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women. In 2022, it's estimated that about 30% of newly diagnosed cancers in women will be breast cancers.
     
  • Death rates have been steady in women under 50 since 2007 but have continued to drop in women over 50.
     
  • In women under 45, breast cancer is more common in Black women than white women. Overall, Black women are more likely to die of breast cancer.

ABOUT KAISER PERMANENTE 

For 75 years, Kaiser Permanente has been committed to shaping the future of health and health care — and helping our members, patients, and communities experience more healthy years. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Since July 21, 1945, Kaiser Permanente’s mission has been to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve 12.4 million members in 8 states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists, and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery, and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education, and the support of community health.

For more information, please visit: about.kaiserpermanente.org




Attached Media Files: October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and Kaiser Permanente physicians want to warn that missing regular breast cancer screenings can lead to worse health outcomes. , Breast cancer screening rates declined steeply during the pandemic, with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reporting a drop as much as 87%. , Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women.

LCSO Case #22-5558 -- Lost Hunter Found in Woods by Search Crews (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/04/22 2:32 PM
2022-10/6111/158033/Wilderness.jpg
2022-10/6111/158033/Wilderness.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/6111/158033/thumb_Wilderness.jpg

A 72 year old hunter was found by Sheriff Search and Rescue crews Monday afternoon after spending nearly two and a half days lost in the wilderness. 

The 72 year old Eugene man left on foot to go hunting in the area south of Hill’s Creek Reservoir at about 8:00am on Saturday. He did not bring food, water, lighting or other survival supplies with him.  He was expected to return to camp before dark, however he never arrived. Authorities were not notified that he was missing until about 10:00am on Sunday.

Lane County Sheriff Search and Rescue Crews quickly mobilized and began searching the area.  Given the expansive wilderness area and its close proximity to two other counties, numerous additional resources were summoned to assist in the search. 

Search crews located the missing hunter on Monday afternoon shortly after 12:00pm.  He was alive, but in immediate need of medical attention.  A helicopter, dispatched by the Oregon Army National Guard responded and transported the man to a hospital in the Eugene/Springfield area. 

The Lane County Sheriff’s Office would like to remind you to be prepared whenever you will be recreating outdoors.  ALWAYS take proper supplies including but not limited to: water, food, proper clothing, lighting, shelter, navigation equipment, and the ability to provide yourself with warmth.  Formulate a travel plan highlighting locations and expected departure and arrival times.  Be sure to share this plan with people that are familiar with the area. 

We would like to thank the following agencies for their vital assistance in making this rescue mission a success:  Oregon State Police, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Linn County Sheriff’s Office, Benton County Sheriff’s Office, Marion County Sheriff’s Office, Polk County Sheriff’s Office, United States Coast Guard, and the Oregon Army National Guard.   




Attached Media Files: 2022-10/6111/158033/Wilderness.jpg

Oregon OSHA presentará la segunda conferencia en español, se ofrecerán temas presentados por expertos en derechos de seguridad del trabajador, protecciones contra peligros comunes y más (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/04/22 2:25 PM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/1073/158032/thumb_Oregon-OSHA-Spanish-logo-green.jpg

Salem – En Noviembre, Oregon OSHA presentará la segunda conferencia en español enfocada en la seguridad y salud en el lugar de trabajo, y los derechos de los trabajadores mientras trabajan. Los temas incluyen como hacer valer sus derechos en el lugar de trabajo, protección de su seguridad y salud en el trabajo y en el hogar, y cómo protegerse contra el robo de salarios.

La conferencia gratuita titulada “Seguridad y salud laboral y sus derechos en el trabajo” se llevará a cabo de 8:00 a.m. a 4:45 p.m. el martes 8 de noviembre, 2022, en las Instalaciones de la Feria del Estado de Oregon en Salem. Los presentadores incluirán profesionales de la salud y seguridad en el lugar de trabajo y otros expertos. Se ofrecerá almuerzo, exhibiciones de recursos y servicios.

"El ofrecer esta conferencia que presenta temas de seguridad y salud en el lugar de trabajo completamente en el idioma de muchos trabajadores refleja nuestra continua misión de mejorar el alcance hacia los trabajadores más vulnerables" dijo Renee Stapleton, administradora interina de Oregon OSHA.

Los interesados en asistir a esta conferencia gratuita deben preinscribirse antes del martes 1 de noviembre, 2022Regístrese ahora. Para más información visiteOregon OSHA conferences page, envíe un correo electrónico a egon.conferences@dcbs.oregon.gov">oregon.conferences@dcbs.oregon.gov o llame al 971-283-6415.

Los temas de la conferencia incluyen:

  • Cómo hacer valer sus derechos a un lugar de trabajo seguro
  • Protección de su seguridad y salud en el trabajo y en el hogar
  • Cómo identificar y abordar peligros comunes en el lugar de trabajo
  • Seguridad y salud en:
  • La agricultura
  • La construcción
  • El procesamiento de alimentos
  • Fabricación
  • Hospitalidad
  • Proveedores de cuidado a personas
  • El papel del supervisor en la seguridad laboral
  • Cómo protegerse contra el robo de salarios
  • Programa de Protección de Denunciantes 

La conferencia destaca el compromiso de Oregon OSHA de fortalecer sus esfuerzos de alcance, de romper las barreras del lenguaje, y de establecer más conexiones con trabajadores y empleadores acerca de recursos de salud y seguridad. 

Visite el sitio web de Oregon OSHA Cursos de entrenamiento en español, para información acerca del Programa PESO, programa bilingüe para ayudar a empleadores que no hablan español a entrenar a los trabajadores de habla hispana acerca de asuntos de seguridad y salud en el lugar de trabajo. 

Por medio de servicios técnicos, cumplimiento, consultación, educación pública y entrenamiento Oregon OSHA avanza la seguridad de todos los trabajadores de Oregon. Los trabajadores tienen derecho un lugar de trabajo seguro y saludable. Esto incluye el derecho a presentar inquietudes y quejas libre de represalias a Oregon OSHA. La Oficina del Ombudsman para los Trabajadores de Oregon (Ombuds Office for Oregon Workers), Tiene representantes independientes para ayudar a los trabajadores a comprender sus derechos de seguridad y salud en el lugar de trabajo y el sistema compensación para trabajadores. El número de teléfono gratuito de la oficina es 800-927-1271

El Programa de Comunicaciones Multiculturales del Departamento de Servicios para Consumidores y Negocios de Oregon (DCBS) brinda difusión acerca de seguridad y salud en el lugar de trabajo a las comunidades con dominio limitado del inglés. El número gratuito en español es 800-843-8086.

###

Oregon OSHA, es la división del Departamento de Servicios para Consumidores y Negocios que hace cumplir las reglas de seguridad y salud en el lugar de trabajo. Oregon OSHA trabaja para mejorar la seguridad y la salud en el lugar de trabajo para todos los trabajadores de Oregon. Para más información visite www.osha.oregon.gov.

El Departamento de Servicios para Consumidores y Negocios es la agencia reguladora de negocios y protección al consumidor más grande de Oregon. Para obtener más información, visitewww.dcbs.oregon.gov.

 




Attached Media Files: Conference flyer , Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

Oregon OSHA to present Spanish-language safety conference, offering expert presenters on worker safety rights, protections against common hazards and more (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/04/22 2:19 PM
Oregon OSHA logo
Oregon OSHA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/1073/158031/thumb_Oregon-OSHA-logo-green.jpg

Salem – In November, Oregon OSHA will present the second Spanish-language conference addressing workplace safety and health, and workers’ rights while on the job. Attendees will learn how to assert their rights to a safe workplace, protect their health and safety at work and at home, and to protect against wage theft.

Presenters at the free conference – titled “Occupational health and safety and your rights at work,” to be held from 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022, at the Oregon State Fairgrounds – will include workplace safety and health professionals, and other experts. The event will feature lunch and exhibits.

“This conference reflects our ongoing mission to improve outreach to the most vulnerable workers by offering a venue where important workplace health and safety information is provided entirely in the language of many such workers,” said Renee Stapleton, acting administrator for Oregon OSHA.

Those interested in attending this free conference must pre-register by Tuesday, Nov. 1Register now. For more information, visit the Oregon OSHA conferences page, send an email to egon.conferences@dcbs.oregon.gov">oregon.conferences@dcbs.oregon.gov or call 971-283-6415.

Topics include:

  • Asserting your right to a safe workplace
  • Protecting your health at work and at home
  • Identifying and addressing common workplace hazards 
  • Safety and health in:
    • Agriculture
    • Construction
    • Food processing
    • Manufacturing
    • Hospitality
    • Caregivers
  • Role of the supervisor in workplace safety
  • Protecting yourself from wage theft
  • Whistleblower Protection Program

The conference underscores Oregon OSHA’s commitment to bolstering its outreach efforts, breaking down language barriers, and connecting with more workers and employers about workplace health and safety resources. 

Visit Oregon OSHA’s Spanish-language online training courses, and learn about the division’s PESO program, a bilingual program that helps English-speaking employers train and talk about workplace safety and health issues with Spanish-speaking workers.

Workers have a right to a safe and healthy workplaceThat includes the right to raise concerns free from retaliation and to file a complaint with Oregon OSHA, which advances safety for all Oregon workers through enforcementconsultationtechnicaland public education and training services. The Ombuds Office for Oregon Workersan independent advocate, offers workers help in understanding their rights within workplace safety and health rules, and their rights within the workers’ compensation system. The office’s toll-free phone number is 800-927-1271.

Moreover, the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS) Multicultural Communications Program provides outreach to communities with limited English proficiency. That outreach includes information about on-the-job safety and health. The program includes a toll-free phone number for Spanish-speaking Oregonians: 800-843-8086.

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of DCBS, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to osha.oregon.gov.

DCBS is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.oregon.gov/dcbs/.


 

 




Attached Media Files: Conference flyer , Oregon OSHA logo , DCBS logo

Dedication of new VITA Elementary School will take place Oct. 12 (Photo)
Vancouver Sch. Dist. - 10/04/22 1:27 PM
Vancouver Innovation, Technology and Arts (VITA) Elementary School
Vancouver Innovation, Technology and Arts (VITA) Elementary School
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/393/158030/thumb_VITA_BuildingDSC_0093.jpg

The public is invited to the dedication ceremony for Vancouver Innovation, Technology and Arts Elementary School. The dedication is Oct. 12, 2022, at 6:30 p.m. The school is located at 1111 Fort Vancouver Way, Vancouver. Following the dedication ceremony, guests will have the opportunity to tour the school. 

Special guest American astronaut Dottie Metcalf-Lindenburger will speak at the dedication. Metcalf-Lindenburger was a science teacher at Hudson’s Bay High School in Vancouver Public Schools when she was selected by NASA in 2004 as an astronaut candidate. After qualifying as a NASA astronaut in 2006, she served as a mission specialist on a 2010 space shuttle mission to the International Space Station. Metcalf-Lindenburger retired from NASA in 2014 and lives with her husband and daughter in the Seattle area.  

VITA was built as part of a capital bond passed by voters in 2017. Based on community engagement and feedback prior to the bond election, the school was designed to support project-based learning encompassing STEAM–science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics. It opened this year as VITA Learning Lab for all district elementary students in second through fifth grade to experience the school through multi-day field trips.  

Next fall, VITA will open as an elementary school. The district will go through an elementary boundary review process in the spring to help determine enrollment for both VITA and Ruth Bader Ginsburg Elementary School that will also open in the fall of 2023. Watch for more Information about the boundary process and how you can share your input.

Curriculum and instruction at VITA Learning Lab is supported by community partners including the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site; City of Vancouver; Clark College; Washington State University Vancouver; Fort Vancouver Regional Libraries; and Vancouver Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services.  

General contractor is Robertson & Olson Construction. Architect is LSW Architects PC. Landscape Architect is Shapiro Didway.
 




Attached Media Files: Vancouver Innovation, Technology and Arts (VITA) Elementary School

**UPDATE** Home Invader Shot
Keizer Police Dept. - 10/04/22 12:42 PM

Update - 

Since September 4, 2022, Keizer Police detectives have continued investigating the Mayfield Place burglary, where the suspect, Aaron Gage, died on scene after being shot by the homeowner. During the investigation, detectives learned two unidentified coconspirators accompanied Gage. 

On October 4, 2022, detectives identified and arrested the other two suspects. They were identified as a 29-year-old male and a 25-year-old female who both reside in Salem, Oregon. The investigation revealed the burglars targeted the Mayfield Place residence believing it to be a vacant home. The two suspects were charged with Burglary in the First Degree and lodged at the Marion County Correctional Facility.

On September 4, 2022 at approximately 2:22am, Keizer Police officers were dispatched to 3222 Mayfield Place N on a report of a gunshot wound.  The home was occupied by a single owner who woke up to someone inside the residence.  The owner fired his weapon striking the home invader who was pronounced deceased on scene. 

The investigation is on-going and further inquiries should be directed to the Marion County District Attorney’s office.


350 Local High School Students to Celebrate Manufacturing Day in Clackamas County
Clackamas Workforce Partnership - 10/04/22 12:03 PM

350 LOCAL HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS TO CELEBRATE MANUFACTURING DAY IN CLACKAMAS COUNTY

Twenty-three local businesses open their doors to showcase the potential of modern 

manufacturing and ignite student interest in manufacturing careers.

October 4, 2022 | Oregon City, OR:  Clackamas Workforce Partnership is partnering with Clackamas Education Service District, Clackamas Community College (CCC), twenty-three area manufacturers and fourteen local high school and youth programs to celebrate Manufacturing Day in Clackamas County on October 7, 2022. 

Manufacturing Day, traditionally celebrated on the first Friday in October, is a national event designed to expand knowledge of manufacturing’s value in the U.S. economy and help foster interest in high-school aged students for manufacturing careers. “A recent report found that Clackamas County students who take two or more credits in a high school manufacturing program graduate at a rate of more than 98%.” Bill Blevins, Career Technical Education Regional Coordinator, Clackamas Education Service District. All the day’s activities are designed to increase student awareness about potential career pathways within the manufacturing industry.

What: Manufacturing Day in Clackamas County

Who: Local area high school/youth programs, manufacturers, and community partners 

When: Friday, October 7, 2022 | 9:30am – 1:30pm

Where: Clackamas Community College, Holden Industrial Technology Center | 19600 Molalla Ave, Oregon City, OR 97045 & additional business locations throughout our county

Business tours are scheduled at our Gold Sponsor locations - Vigor, Eaton, Cascade Engineering Technologies and Audix, along with 19 other Clackamas County manufacturers participating in events throughout the day either at their own facility and/or at Clackamas Community College. 

“Vigor is proud to support hundreds of family wage jobs in manufacturing and trades, across the Pacific Northwest, Alaska, and Hawaii. These jobs are the foundation of local economies and offer good-paying opportunities for people who may choose an alternate career path. Manufacturing Day offers a reminder of the importance of these jobs and our need to grow the future pipeline to ensure these opportunities continue well into the future.” Chris Palmer, Vice President of Fabrication, Vigor

As manufacturers seek to fill 4 million high-skill, high-tech and high-paying jobs over the next decade, MFG Day empowers manufacturers to come together to address their collective challenges so they can help their communities and future generations thrive.

“Eaton recognizes the importance of engaging our local students in the vital work that we do. Our participation is a testament to the support we provide in the communities in which we live and work. Manufacturing is at the heart of our presence in Wilsonville, and we are happy to provide a forum with our Team for this special day.” Jason Bush, Business Operations Manager of Eaton’s Portland Power Center

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The Clackamas Workforce Partnership is a nonprofit organization dedicated to building a strong workforce in Clackamas County. We are responsible for bringing public and private partners together, in the workforce system, to support the local workforce and meet the employment needs of businesses. Our mission is to address critical workforce, educational, and training challenges, and develop a skilled workforce that meets the needs of businesses and strengthens the local economy of Clackamas County. More information can be found on our website www.clackamasworkforce.org.

For more than 50 years, Clackamas Community College has offered high-quality education and training opportunities, lifetime learning and robust student life programming. Recognized for its committed, supportive faculty and staff, CCC offers programs and services in career technical, college transfer, literacy/basic skills, community education and business training to a diverse student body at three active campuses. 

Clackamas Workforce Partnership would like to thank all the generous business sponsors who helped make this event possible: 

Gold Level Sponsor

Vigor

Eaton

Audix

Cascade Engineering Technologies

Silver Level Sponsors

DW Fritz Precision Automation

CRB Manufacturing

Miles Fiberglass & Composites

Pacific Seafood

Willamette Falls Paper Company

Product Manufacturing

Shimadzu USA Manufacturing

Vision Plastics

Pape’

Boeing

Astronics-PECO

Benchmade Knives

Machine Sciences

Oregon Tool

Intel

Enoch Precision Machining

Warn Industries

Warn Automotive

General Sheet Metal

Additional Sponsors 

Frontier Screenprinting

Oregon Manufacturing Extension Partnership

Great Harvest Bread Company


Sandy Police Log 09-18-22 to 10-01-22
Sandy Police Dept. - 10/04/22 11:59 AM

Please be advised that the Bulletin does not include all calls for service to which officers respond.  Many calls do not require that a report be written; such as:

•Traffic Stops

•Advising/Referring a Person to the Proper Agency to handle their request

•Restoring the Peace

•Premise Checks

•Welfare Checks

•Flagged Down by Citizen




Attached Media Files: Bulletin

UPDATE: News Release: Woodburn Police Seek Help Locating Missing Endangered Person (Photo)
Woodburn Police - 10/04/22 9:58 AM
Brian Vera Santiago 2
Brian Vera Santiago 2
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UPDATE: Mr. Vera Santiago has been safely located and returned home. No further information available at this time. 

 

Monday, October 3, 2022 – Woodburn, OR - The Woodburn Police Department (WPD) is asking the public’s help in locating Brian Vera Santiago. Mr. Vera Santiago, described as a 20-year-old Hispanic male, 5’10”, 150 pounds, with brown eyes and black hair, walked away from his home in Woodburn after making concerning statements to family members, taking no property, money, phone or other belongings with him. 

He was last seen on Monday, October 3 at about 9:30 a.m., in the area of Aksenia St. and Luba St. in Woodburn, wearing black rimmed glasses, a brown t-shirt, black sweat pants, and flip-flop shoes.

Mr. Vera Santiago is considered endangered, as his absence is not consistent with his normal behavioral patterns.

Anyone with any information about Mr. Vera Santiago’s current whereabouts is asked to please contact their local police, or call Woodburn Police at 503-982-2345, and reference WPD Case #22-12135.




Attached Media Files: Brian Vera Santiago 2 , Brian Vera Santiago 1

Fatal Crash on Hwy 22E-Marion County
Oregon State Police - 10/04/22 9:58 AM

On October 3, 2022 at approximately 7:37 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 22E near milepost 35.

Preliminary investigation revealed a westbound Kenworth CMV left the roadway, went over an embankment and caught fire. The vehicle was fully engulfed and destroyed. 

The operator of the Kenworth sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. The name of the operator will be released upon identification and next of kin notification. 

Hwy 22E was affected for approximately 3.5 hours. 

OSP was assisted by Gates Fire Department, Lyons Fire Department and ODOT. 


Fatal Crash on Interstate 84-Union County
Oregon State Police - 10/04/22 9:55 AM

On Monday, October 3, 2022 at approximately 12:09 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single-vehicle crash on Interstate 84 near milepost 270, south of La Grande.

Preliminary investigation revealed westbound white Ford F350 pulling a 16-foot cargo trailer, operated by Craig J. Wickham (61) of Boise, ID, left the roadway and overturned. During the crash, the trailer became separated from the truck. 

Wickham sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Passengers, Timothy Yates (59) of Nampa, ID, and Leanne Huggins (54) of Challis, ID, were both transported to area hospitals with injuries. 

Interstate 84 westbound lanes were closed for approximately 1 hour while the OSP Collision Reconstruction Unit investigated the scene. Driver fatigue, vehicle overloading and seatbelt use are all being investigated as contributing factors to the crash. 

OSP was assisted by Union County Sheriff’s Office, La Grande Fire Department, Life Flight and ODOT. 


OSP Traffic Stop Leads to Arrests and Large Fentanyl Seizure- Jefferson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/04/22 9:39 AM
2022-10/1002/158024/Fentanyl.kilos.pic.09282022jpg.jpg
2022-10/1002/158024/Fentanyl.kilos.pic.09282022jpg.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/1002/158024/thumb_Fentanyl.kilos.pic.09282022jpg.jpg

On September 28, 2022, at about 10:11 P.M., an Oregon State Police Trooper stopped a vehicle for a traffic violation in Madras. During the course of the stop, reasonable suspicion was developed for drug trafficking. The drug dog alerted to the presence of narcotics. A search of the vehicle revealed six (6) bundles concealed within the vehicle, with a gross weight of approximately 14.48 pounds. A preliminary test of the narcotics showed it was fentanyl powder.

The driver Jesus Villalpando Rubio (31) from Phoenix, Arizona, and the passenger Oscar Urias Haro (31) from Tucson, Arizona, were lodged in the Jefferson County Jail for various drug crimes.

This is an ongoing investigation with no further information being released.

According to the Drug Enforcement Administration (https://www.dea.gov/resources/facts-about-fentanyl), one kilogram of fentanyl has the potential to kill about 500,000 people.

OSP Troopers were assisted during the investigation by Detectives from the OSP-Criminal Investigations Division-Drug Enforcement Section (Domestic Highway Enforcement Initiative) and the Drug Enforcement Administration.

The Oregon State Police-Domestic Highway Enforcement Initiative is supported by the Oregon-Idaho High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA).

The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA program is an Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) sponsored counterdrug grant program that coordinates with and provides funding resources to multi-agency drug enforcement initiatives, including the OSP-DHE Initiative.




Attached Media Files: 2022-10/1002/158024/Fentanyl.kilos.pic.09282022jpg.jpg , 2022-10/1002/158024/K9_Marley-Fentanyl_Seizure_09282022-2.jpg

Mon. 10/03/22
Recreational use advisory issued for Willow Creek Reservoir Oct. 3
Oregon Health Authority - 10/03/22 5:19 PM

October 3, 2022

 

Media contacts:

Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843,

ica.J.Heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us">Erica.J.Heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us

Recreational use advisory issued for Willow Creek Reservoir Oct. 3

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a recreational use health advisory today for Willow Creek Reservoir due to the presence of a cyanobacteria bloom and indication of concerning levels of cyanotoxins. The reservoir is in Morrow County.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the reservoir where blooms are, as the major route of exposure is ingestion of water. Toxins are not absorbed through the skin. However, if you have skin sensitivities you may get a puffy red rash.

You are encouraged to visit Willow Creek Reservoir and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, bird watching, canoeing, and kayaking. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray. Sprays could lead to the risk of inhaling cyanotoxins.

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas of the lake affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact campground management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby campgrounds or day use areas.

Not all private treatment systems are effective at removing cyanotoxins. If you do not use a well or public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area you are advised to use an alternative water source.

Children and pets

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. Dogs can get extremely ill and even die within minutes to hours of exposure to cyanotoxins by drinking the water, licking their fur, or eating the toxins from floating mats or dried crust along the shore. This is regardless of a recreational use health advisory in place.

Be aware that dogs can become ill and die from water intoxication after drinking excessive amounts of water while swimming or fetching objects for long periods of time. Intoxication is a potentially fatal disturbance in brain function resulting from an imbalance of electrolytes in the body. Water intoxication and heat stroke can cause similar symptoms as exposure to cyanotoxins.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and cause a range of symptoms. Symptoms may be similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. Symptoms may also be more serious, such as numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath. These symptoms may require medical attention. Dogs can experience weakness, difficulty walking, seizures, lethargy, loss of appetite and more. If your dog exhibits symptoms veterinary treatment should be sought as quickly as possible.

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacteria blooms are present may pose unknown health risks, so OHA recommends you do not eat fish. If you do decide to eat the fish, you should remove fat, skin and organs before cooking or freezing. Toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0482.

Learn more here.


Re-Imagined Radio explores stories that may have shaped "The War of the Worlds" (Photo)
WSU Vancouver - 10/03/22 4:53 PM
Re-Imagined Radio brings back the popular “War of the Worlds” for October.
Re-Imagined Radio brings back the popular “War of the Worlds” for October.
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VANCOUVER, Wash. – Re-Imagined Radio brings back the popular “War of the Worlds” for October. But instead of retelling the most famous radio story ever, the episode will focus on the many stories that may have led to its creation. 

“The War of the Worlds: Possible Influences” premiers at 1 p.m. Oct. 17 on KXRW-FM, Vancouver, and KXRY-FM, Portland. Subsequent broadcasts and streams will be provided by local, regional and international broadcast partners.

This year marks the 84th anniversary of Orson Welles’s radio adaptation of H. G. Wells’s classic “The War of the Worlds.” Published in 1898, the book was one of the earliest literary works to examine conflict between human and extraterrestrials. Orson Welles’s broadcast is alleged to have caused mass confusion among its listeners through its use of realistic-sounding news bulletins and other narrative techniques.

The episode explores five earlier experiments with radio storytelling. The stories are “The Fall of the City” and “Air Raid,” both written by Pulitzer Prize–winning poet and Librarian of Congress Archibald MacLeish; “The Crimson Wizard,” originally broadcast by WGN, Chicago; “The Minister Is Murdered,” by Erich Ebermeyer; and “Broadcasting the Barricades,” by Father Ronald Arbuthnott Knox, broadcast over the BBC. 

“In addition, interviews with Welles provide further insight for this episode,” said John Barber, faculty member of the Creative Media and Digital Culture Program at WSU Vancouver and founder of Re-Imagined Radio. The interviews include one given the day after the first broadcast of “The War of the Worlds,” several over time with film director Peter Bogdonovitch, and several television programs many years after the initial broadcast.

Re-imagined Radio premieres episodes on the third Monday of the month on KXRW-FM and KXRY-FM. In addition, every Sunday, an episode of Re-Imagined Radio is broadcast on KXRW only, drawing from previously broadcast episodes. Episodes can be streamed on demand from the Re-Imagined Radio website, www.reimaginedradio.net.

Community Partners

Re-Imagined Radio draws on community voice actors, Foley artists, musicians, sound artists and engineers. Partners include KXRW-FM, Marc Rose, Martin John Gallagher, Kathy Klaus and Regina Carol Social Media Management. 

About Re-Imagined Radio

Re-Imagined Radio was begun by Barber in 2013 to celebrate radio storytelling. ”We select, produce and perform classic and contemporary stories across a spectrum of radio genres, from dramas to comedies, from oral to aural histories, from documentaries to fictions, from soundscapes to sonic journeys, from radio to sound art,” Barber said. 

About WSU Vancouver

WSU Vancouver is in the homeland of Chinookan and Taidnapam peoples and the Cowlitz Indian Tribe. As one of six campuses of the WSU system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

# # #




Attached Media Files: Re-Imagined Radio brings back the popular “War of the Worlds” for October.

County seeks diverse applicants for Clean Water Commission
Clark Co. WA Communications - 10/03/22 4:24 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The county manager is seeking to fill three open positions on the Clean Water Commission, an advisory group representing the community’s needs and interests in stormwater management decisions. Terms begin January 2023 and end December 2025.

Applicants must be residents of Clark County, either unincorporated areas of the county or a city/town. Professional experience in stormwater management is not required. Applicants with an interest in water quality, data and program analysis, education and outreach, or experience advocating for the environment are encouraged to apply. 

In seeking to represent the community’s diversity, applicants are encouraged to request interpretation, translated materials, or assistance overcoming challenges to meeting participation, if needed, by emailing each@clark.wa.gov">pw.outreach@clark.wa.gov or calling 564.397.1679. Interpretation and translation are available, upon request, for all commission meetings, communications and materials. 

The nine-member group makes recommendations to the Clark County Council about services and policies protecting watershed health throughout the community, and collaborates with residents, agencies, businesses and nonprofit organizations. The commission meets 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on the first Wednesday of every other month, starting in January. Currently, meetings can be attended in-person or virtually via WebEx.

To apply, interested residents should submit a letter of interest and a resume to Clark County Public Works Clean Water Division c/o Brent Davis, PO Box 5000, Vancouver WA 98660-5000 or via email to cleanwater@clark.wa.gov. Applications must be submitted by noon Monday, Oct. 31. 

More information about the Clean Water Commission can be found at clark.wa.gov/public-works/clean-water-commission

To receive information about road and park projects, closures, opportunities for community input, and more, residents can follow Public Works on TwitterFacebook and Instagram and view information on Nextdoor. 


Local businesses and community members to be honored for their commitment to employment and services for individuals with developmental/intellectual disabilities
Clark Co. WA Communications - 10/03/22 4:20 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Businesses and individuals who are making a difference in the lives of people with developmental and/or intellectual disabilities will be honored Wednesday, Oct. 5,  at the Disability Employment Awareness Awards. 

Five Community Awards will be presented at the event which will take place bothin person at Clark Community College and virtually this year. The in person/virtual ceremony runs from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m, with in person networking taking place 4-4:30 p.m.

The event also celebrates October as National Disability Employment Awareness Month.

Register for the even by following this link: http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07ejby3wv6864fb43c&llr=6ajwdndab

Awards will go to a large employer, small employer and an employee with a developmental or intellectual disability as well as people being honored for their extraordinary service to those with developmental or intellectual disabilities.

The Clark County Community Awards honor the role people with developmental disabilities have in helping achieve a dynamic, productive workforce and recognize those in the business community who have demonstrated leadership in employing people with developmental or intellectual disabilities.


CCC hosts Intel Day hiring event
Clackamas Comm. College - 10/03/22 3:51 PM

OREGON CITY - Intel Day will be held at Clackamas Community College on Oct. 11, 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., at its Oregon City campus. This free event will provide students and the public the opportunity to meet with Intel representatives and listen to technical talks about the technology created at Intel. Lunch will be provided.

The following day, Oct. 12, Intel will conduct interviews for the following positions: automated industrial technology, manufacturing technician, engineering technician, facilities technician apprenticeship style and facilities technician intern. To be considered for an on-campus interview, participants must apply for the job online prior to Oct. 12. To apply, visit https://jobs.intel.com/.

Intel Day will be held in the Wacheno Welcome Center StartLab. The college is located at 19600 Molalla Ave., Oregon City. For more information, email thomasb@clackamas.edu

-30-


Forest Grove Police Seek Armed Robbery Suspect (Photo)
Forest Grove Police - 10/03/22 3:05 PM
FGPD Seeks Armed Robbery Suspect
FGPD Seeks Armed Robbery Suspect
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The Forest Grove Police Department is seeking any information to help identify a suspect in an armed robbery that occurred at Rainbow Lanes Bowling Alley in Forest Grove on the evening of Friday, September 30, 2022.

 

The suspect fled the scene with an undisclosed amount of money. No one was hurt during the incident.

 

He is described as a white, heavyset, adult male, approximately 5'10" - 6'2" tall with what appears to be darker facial hair. He was last seen leaving the area wearing a light colored long sleeve shirt, blue jeans, and a light colored cowboy hat. 


Anyone with information is asked to contact Washington County non-emergency dispatch at 503-629-0111.




Attached Media Files: FGPD Seeks Armed Robbery Suspect

Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee meets Oct. 12
Oregon Health Authority - 10/03/22 3:01 PM

October 3, 2022

Media contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843,

PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee meets Oct. 12

What: A public meeting of the Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee.

Agenda:  Program updates; legislative bill review; exemptions/rules update; emergency preparedness/response/incident overviews.

When: Wednesday, Oct. 12, 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Teams Meeting: Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 971-277-2343; Passcode: 401 511 857#

Background: Per Oregon Revised Statute, the Radiation Advisory Committee (RAC) is comprised of eight members representative of Radiation Protection Services (RPS) registrants and licensees who use radiation devices/sources. RAC members advise RPS staff on radiation use and safety, including budgetary and administrative rule matters.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Patty Thompson at 503-509-2622, or lee.lind@dhsoha.state.or.us  at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Rules Advisory Committee on transfers of local public health authority responsibilities meets remotely Oct. 11
Oregon Health Authority - 10/03/22 2:54 PM

October 3, 2022

Media contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843,

PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Rules Advisory Committee on transfers of local public health authority responsibilities meets remotely Oct. 11

What: A rules advisory committee will hold its third meeting to consider proposed changes to Oregon Administrative Rules (OAR) 333-014-0590.  The proposed changes are the result of passage of Senate Bill (SB) 253 during 2019 legislative session.

Agenda:  Review of revised proposed draft rules; review of draft fiscal impact statement and draft statement of need. The agenda will include time for public comment.

When: Tuesday, Oct. 11, 9:30 a.m.-11 a.m.

Where: Microsoft Teams meeting. Click here to join the meeting

Meeting ID: 225 754 782 881 Passcode: khARqT

Download Teams | Join on the web

Or call in (audio only)

+1 971-277-2343,,584941053#   United States, Portland

Phone Conference ID: 584 941 053#

Background: SB 253 revised ORS 431.382 to include provisions for a local public health authority that has previously transferred its responsibilities to Oregon Health Authority to request the responsibilities be transferred back to the local public health authority.

Program contact: Andrew Epstein, 503-969-5816, ew.d.epstein@dhsoha.state.or.us">andrew.d.epstein@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 503-969-5816, 711 TTY or ew.d.epstein@dhsoha.state.or.us">andrew.d.epstein@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


DA's Office Awarded $750,000 Grant for Veteran's Treatment Court
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 10/03/22 2:52 PM

The Washington County DA’s Office has been awarded a competitive grant for $750,000, the maximum award, by the U.S. Department of Justice – Bureau of Justice Assistance.  The DA’s Office will use these funds to enhance the VTC program by providing additional treatment services to justice-involved veterans and increase substance use testing capacities. 

The mission of the Washington County Veterans Treatment Court (VTC) program is to enhance public safety and reduce recidivism by offering eligible justice-involved veterans a sentencing alternative through a comprehensive, judicially-supervised treatment program to address underlying substance use and/or mental health disorders. The VTC program seeks to return healthy, law-abiding veterans to the community using best practices and evidence-based approaches. The Washington County VTC is a therapeutic treatment court designed for offenders whose honorable military service is somehow linked to their criminal conduct. 

“We are excited to receive this federal grant that allows us to continue the important work meeting the needs of our veterans.  We have seen incredible success with this program by prioritizing principles of accountability, rehabilitation and a second chance, and we hope it is a model for other communities,” said DA Kevin Barton.  The VTC program has seen firsthand the urgent need to support those who served our country and now need help in return. The program is designed to give each veteran the opportunity to improve their quality life, and this grant will help participants do just that. 

The Washington County VTC and its past and future successes would not be possible without the valued partnerships of the Washington County District Attorney’s Office, Oregon Judicial Department, Oregon Defense Attorney Consortium, Washington County Community Corrections, Washington County Sherriff’s Office, Washington County Department of Aging and Veterans Services, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, and our community treatment and veterans organizations and providers.  For more information regarding the VTC program, please visit: https://www.washingtoncountyda.org/vtc.




Attached Media Files: 2022-10/6208/158011/VTC.pdf

Corbett Fire Department Holds Open House Featuring Lessons of Fire Safety During National Fire National Fire Prevention Week (Photo)
Corbett Fire - 10/03/22 2:47 PM
photo of "wet down"
photo of "wet down"
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/5572/158009/thumb_003.JPG

Oct. 8, 2022 at the Corbett Station, 36930 East Historic Crown Point Highway from 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM




Attached Media Files: press release , photo of "wet down"

OSP Fish & Wildlife seeking public assistance identifying Elk poaching subject -- Deschutes County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/03/22 2:23 PM
2022-10/1002/158008/Moss_trespass.jpg
2022-10/1002/158008/Moss_trespass.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/1002/158008/thumb_Moss_trespass.jpg

Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife is seeking public assistance with identifying two subjects and/or a vehicle parked at the intersection of HWY 20W and Innes Market between 5:00 A.M. and 6:10 AM on September 26, 2022.

On September 26, 2022, at approximately 6:10 A.M., two subjects, a male and female, were observed leaving private property near the intersection of HWY 20 and Tweed Road near Tumalo in Deschutes County. The pair did not have permission to be on the property and were seen packing out the head and antlers of a bull elk to a vehicle parked at the intersection of HWY 20W and Innes Market Rd.  The witness believed it to be a red pickup.

An investigation by the Oregon State Police, with the assistance of the landowner, revealed that the subjects had processed an unknown size bull elk on private property. A second bull elk was located deceased within an agricultural pivot on the same property. Both animals appeared to be harvested with archery equipment. No hunters had permission to hunt the property. Archery elk season ended the day prior on September 25, 2022.   

OSP Fish & Wildlife Division is urging anyone with information about this case to call the Oregon State Police Tip-line at 1-800-452-7888, OSP (677), or email at TIP@osp.oregon.gov. Please reference case number SP2225969.

 

 Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators

The Turn In Poachers (TIP) program offers preference points or cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation, to a suspect, for the unlawful killing of wildlife, and or waste of big game. Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags, and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags. Learn more: https://www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/fw/Pages/tip.aspx

 PREFERENCE POINT REWARDS:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

 

 Oregon Hunters Association (OHA) Cash Rewards:

$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Mountain Goat, and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer, and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar, and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$200 - Illegally obtaining Oregon hunting or angling license or tags

$200 - Unlawful Lending/Borrowing Big Game Tag(s)

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Game Birds or Furbearers

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish

 

Oregon Wildlife Coalition (OWC) Cash Rewards:

Birds
$500 Hawk, Falcon, Eagle, Owl, Osprey
All other protected avian species: see category below for listed species 

Mammals
$500 Cougar, Bobcat, Beaver (public lands only), Black bears, Bighorn Sheep, Marten, Fisher, Sierra Nevada Red Fox

Species listed as “threatened" or “endangered" under state or federal Endangered Species Act (excludes fish) 

$1,000 (e.g. wolf, wolverine, kit fox, red tree vole, Canada lynx, sea otter, Columbian white-tailed deer, California brown pelican, western snowy plover, California least tern, northern spotted owl, marbled murrelet, short-tailed albatross, streaked horned lark, yellow-billed cuckoo, leatherback sea turtle, olive ridley sea turtle, Oregon spotted frog, green sea turtle, loggerhead sea turtle)




Attached Media Files: 2022-10/1002/158008/Moss_trespass.jpg

U.S. Attorney's Office Encourages Reporting of Environmental Crimes
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/03/22 1:59 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Today, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon joins its partners at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other federal regulatory agencies in encouraging Oregonians to report all known or suspected environmental crimes.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon enforces federal laws to protect environmental quality, human health, and wildlife throughout the State of Oregon. The office works with its partners throughout the Department of Justice to hold those who violate environmental law accountable, prioritizing cases that will reduce environmental harms to historically underserved, overburdened, and marginalized communities.

The district’s environmental crimes and justice coordinators lead efforts to enforce both criminal and civil environmental laws. Intentionally violating environmental laws—including, but not limited to, the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and hazardous waste laws—is a federal crime and can be punishable by incarceration or monetary fines.

Examples of criminal or civil environmental violations include:

  • A landlord who leases a home without disclosing known information about lead-based paint
  • A federal contractor who violates a contractual provision mandating the proper disposal of hazardous waste
  • Illegal asbestos removals that expose and create health risks for workers and the public
  • Illegal handling, transportation, and disposal of hazardous wastes or pesticides
  • Oil spills or other incidents that compromise the fishing rights or practices of indigenous or disadvantaged communities
  • Air emissions of toxic pollutants resulting from inadequate or nonexistent pollution control
  • False statements to the EPA or other regulatory agencies that threaten the integrity of environmental protection programs

If you are in danger, please call 911.

If you or someone you know believe you are the victim of an environmental crime or believe you have witnessed an environmental crime, please contact the Environmental Protection Agency’s National Response Center by calling 1-800-424-8802 or by submitting a tip online at https://echo.epa.gov/report-environmental-violations.

In May 2022, Attorney General Merrick B. Garland announced a series of actions to secure environmental justice for all Americans. In addition to launching a new Office of Environmental Justice within the Justice Department, Attorney General Garland also announced a new comprehensive environmental justice enforcement strategy to guide the Justice Department’s work and issued an Interim Final Rule that will restore the use of supplemental environmental projects in appropriate circumstances.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets via Zoom Oct. 11
Oregon Health Authority - 10/03/22 1:47 PM

October 3, 2022

Media contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843,

PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets via Zoom Oct. 11

What: A Zoom meeting for the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: The full agenda will be available at www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

When: Tuesday, Oct. 11, 1-4p.m.

Where: Zoom Meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 161 976 4473 Passcode: 742926

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission provides advice to Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission regarding Oregon Administrative Rules that govern medical cannabis as well as retail cannabis as it pertains to patients and caregivers.  Additionally, the commission is tasked with developing a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain a therapeutic and affordable option for patients and monitoring federal laws, regulations, and policies regarding cannabis.

Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or .lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us">megan.r.lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Plan, Practice, Be Prepared with a Home Fire Escape Plan (Photo)
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 10/03/22 1:19 PM
2022-10/1062/158004/OSFM_Fire_Prevention_Month_Proclamation.jpg
2022-10/1062/158004/OSFM_Fire_Prevention_Month_Proclamation.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/1062/158004/thumb_OSFM_Fire_Prevention_Month_Proclamation.jpg

SALEM, Ore. – You and your family may have less than two minutes to safely escape your home during a fire. Each year in Oregon, an average of 32 people die in home fires. These statistics are just a few reasons why the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal (OSFM) is urging Oregonians to create and practice a home fire escape plan as part of Fire Prevention Month this month.

The OSFM is kicking off a campaign called “Plan, Practice, and Be Prepared with a Home Fire Escape Plan” to educate and highlight the importance of having and practicing a plan.

To support the OSFM’s campaign, Oregon Governor Kate Brown proclaimed October as Fire Prevention Month.  

“Home fire escape plans save lives,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “This October, we ask everyone to create a plan and practice it with all household members to be prepared if there is a fire inside their home.”

There are some simple steps to plan and prepare your safe home fire escape:

  • Ensure your home has working smoke alarms and check alarms monthly.  
  • Make an escape map showing every window and door and share it with everyone in your home.  
  • Have two ways out of every room.  
  • Designate an outside meeting place a safe distance from the home where everyone should meet.
  • Plan for everyone: If you have children, elderly, or differently-abled people in your home, plan for their escape. Consider other challenges like second-story bedrooms.
  • Practice your home fire drill at least twice a year during the night and day.  
  • Get out and stay out if your smoke alarm sounds; never go back inside for others or pets.  
  • Call 9-1-1 when you’re safely outside.  

For more resources about home fire escape plans and a social media campaign to help educate and prepare Oregonians, visit our website.  




Attached Media Files: 2022-10/1062/158004/Fire_Prevention_Month_October_2022.pdf , 2022-10/1062/158004/OSFM_Fire_Prevention_Month_Proclamation.jpg

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees meet via Zoom Oct. 10
Oregon Health Authority - 10/03/22 1:14 PM

October 3, 2022

Media contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843,  PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees meet via Zoom Oct. 10

What: A combined Zoom meeting for the Oregon Cannabis Commission’s Patient Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees.

Agenda: The full agenda will be available at www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

When: Monday, Oct. 10, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: Zoom Meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 161 696 9297 Passcode: 538725

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission provides advice to Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission regarding Oregon Administrative Rules that govern medical cannabis as well as retail cannabis as it pertains to patients and caregivers. Additionally, the commission is tasked with developing a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain a therapeutic and affordable option for patients and monitoring federal laws, regulations, and policies regarding cannabis.

Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or .lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us">megan.r.lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Full Restitution Payment Obtained from Three Former Portland-Area Strip Club Operators Convicted of Fraud
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/03/22 12:59 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon announced today that full restitution of over $600,000 was obtained from the former operators of two Portland-area strip clubs who were convicted at trial in 2016 for conspiring to defraud the IRS and Oregon Department of Revenue out of hundreds of thousands of dollars in business taxes owed.

On Sept. 23, 2022, the Clerk of the Court for the District of Oregon received a payment of $608,217, which was full payment of the outstanding restitution balance of David, George, and Daniel Kiraz. The Kirazes previously had paid less than ten percent of their original $657,243 restitution order.

 “I am proud of our Financial Litigation Program for their hard work in securing this full restitution payment, and for their commitment to helping crime victims by diligently investigating these cases,” said Natalie Wight, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

“Today’s restitution payment is the culmination of many years of dogged effort made by our agency and by our partners at the U.S. Attorney’s Office. This is a success we can all share in, as the funds secured today will be used for the benefit of our communities,” said Special Agent in Charge Bret Kressin, IRS Criminal Investigation (IRS:CI), Seattle Field Office.

According to court documents, David Kiraz, 40, of Happy Valley, Oregon, along with his father and brother—George Kiraz, 62, and Daniel Kiraz, 37, both of Portland—operated two Portland-area strip clubs, the Cabaret Lounge on West Burnside Street in Portland and Cabaret Lounge II on Southeast Stark Street in Gresham, Oregon. From 2007 through 2010, these clubs collected more than $1.5 million in cash for cover charges and dancer stage fees.

To conceal their total business income from the IRS, the Kirazes maintained a set of books at their clubs that did not include their cash payments, while maintaining a second set of books at David Kiraz’s home that tracked their actual receipts in full. The Kirazes reported their business activity on David Kiraz’s personal income tax return and provided their tax return preparers with only a two-page business financial summary compiled from their manipulated records. Together, these actions resulted in David Kiraz intentionally underreporting more than $1.5 million in taxable income and causing a combined state and federal tax loss of more than $649,000.

On April 8, 2015, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a seven-count indictment charging the Kirazes with conspiring with one another to defraud the United States, filing false income tax returns, and aiding and assisting in the preparation of false income tax returns. On May 26, 2016, after a six-day trial, they were found guilty

On Tuesday, October 25, 2016, David and George Kiraz were sentenced to three years in federal prison and three years of supervised release. Daniel Kiraz was sentenced to one year and one day in federal prison.

This case was originally investigated by IRS:CI. It was prosecuted by Quinn Harrington and Seth Uram, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon, and Leslie Goemaat, Trial Attorney for the Justice Department’s Tax Division. 

Enforcement of the Kirazes’ restitution order was handled by Assistant U.S. Attorney Jessie D. Young and the staff and investigators of the U.S. Attorney’s Office’s Financial Litigation Program.

The District of Oregon’s Financial Litigation Program (FLP) is part of the U.S. Attorney’s Office’s Asset Recovery and Money Laundering Division. The mission and goal of FLP is to fairly achieve the maximum recovery of civil and criminal debts consistent with applicable laws, regulations, and Justice Department policies. FLP attorneys and support staff work with individuals subject to restitution orders to bring closure for crime victims and recoup losses incurred by United States taxpayers.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Fatal Crash on Hwy 101-Tillamook County
Oregon State Police - 10/03/22 12:29 PM

On September 29, 2022 at approximately 5:27 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Hwy 101 near milepost 70.

Preliminary investigation revealed a southbound black Toyota 4Runner, operated by Tysa Marie Judd (37) of Tillamook, turned onto South Prairie Road into the path of a northbound Harley Davidson FIS motorcycle, operated by Carl Anderson (73) of Tillamook. The Harley Davidson collided with the side of the Toyota and Anderson was thrown from the motorcycle. 

Anderson sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Judd was uninjured. 

Hwy 101 was affected for 4 hours while the OSP Collision Reconstruction Unit investigated the scene. 

OSP was assisted by Tillamook County Sheriff’s Office and ODOT. 


CCC hosts STEM Talk
Clackamas Comm. College - 10/03/22 12:06 PM

OREGON CITY - Clackamas Community College will be hosting a STEM Talk on Tuesday, Oct. 11, 5-6 p.m. The talk will be “Particle Formation in the Atmosphere: An Arctic Case Study” by Dr. Deanna Myers.

The largest uncertainty in the current understanding of climate change is due to particles in the atmosphere. Atmospheric particles, under the right conditions, can form clouds and thereby impact climate. The processes that lead to particle formation dictates their ability to form clouds. Researchers have studied particle formation in many locations around the globe to improve the understanding of what is important for this process in the atmosphere. 

Participants at this STEM Talk will learn about a case study of atmospheric particle formation from the Alaskan Arctic and what impacts particle formation might have on climate in this region. 

This event is free and open to the public. It will be held in Pauling Center C, room 165. Clackamas Community College is located at 19600 Molalla Ave., Oregon City. Participants may also join the STEM Talk via Zoom at https://clackamas.zoom.us/j/95375352024

The STEM Talk is sponsored by Build EXITO and the CCC STEM Educational Focus Area. For questions, contact Tory Blackwell at yb@clackamas.edu">toryb@clackamas.edu. For more information about STEM at CCC, visit www.clackamas.edu/STEM

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Fatal Crash on Hwy 101-Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 10/03/22 11:56 AM

On Thursday, September 29, 2022 at approximately 2:21 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Highway 101 near milepost 209. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a southbound Dodge Ram 1500, operated by Ryan Davidson (40) of Reedsport, struck a southbound cyclist, identified as Nathalie Friese (29) of Germany. 

Friese was transported to area hospitals with critical injuries and was pronounced deceased on September 30, 2022.

OSP was assisted by Reedsport Police Department, Gardiner Fire and Rescue, Lower Umpqua Ambulance and ODOT. 


Fatal Crash on Interstate 5-Marion County
Oregon State Police - 10/03/22 11:47 AM

On Friday, September 30, 2022 at approximately 12:51 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Interstate 5 near milepost 270.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Toyota 4Runner, operated by Katharine Deluca-Carroll (58) of Salem, was on the northbound shoulder and began to merge into northbound traffic when the vehicle went off the roadway, struck a guardrail and rolled. 

Deluca-Carroll sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. 

OSP was assisted by Woodburn Fire Department and ODOT. 


Oregon Man Charged with Sexually Exploiting Minor on Discord, Additional Victims Sought
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/03/22 10:57 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—An Oregon man has been charged with federal child exploitation crimes after he persuaded a child to engage in a sexually explicit video chat with him on Discord, a popular instant messaging social platform.

Jason Kroeskop, 40, of The Dalles, Oregon, has been charged by criminal complaint with enticing and sexually exploiting a child online.

According to court documents, in August 2022, special agents from Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) in Tulsa, Oklahoma were contacted by local law enforcement to request assistance with an investigation involving the online exploitation of a child under 12. Investigators discovered that Kroeskop pretended to be an Oregon teenager to convince the child to engage in sexually explicit acts during a video chat on Discord. He also recorded the video chat without the victim’s knowledge.

Investigators tracked Kroeskop’s Discord account, “Noctis Lucis #7347,” to an internet protocol address registered to his residence in The Dalles. On September 29, 2022, HSI special agents from Portland contacted Kroeskop at his place of employment. Kroeskop agreed to talk with the agents and admitted to having engaged in sexually explicit communications with multiple children online since at least 2021 using Discord, Snapchat, and Omegle. He was later arrested without incident.

On September 30, 2022, Kroeskop made his initial appearance in federal court before U.S. Magistrate Judge Jeffrey Armistead. He was detained pending further court proceedings.

This case was investigated by HSI Portland and The Dalles Police Department with assistance from HSI Tulsa. It is being prosecuted by Mira Chernick, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

A criminal complaint is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Anyone who has information about other crimes committed by Kroeskop, or the physical or online exploitation of any children, are encouraged to contact HSI at (866) 347-2423 or submit a tip online at report.cybertip.org.

Federal law defines child pornography as any visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct involving a minor. It is important to remember child sexual abuse material depicts actual crimes being committed against children. Not only do these images and videos document the victims’ exploitation and abuse, but when shared across the internet, re-victimize and re-traumatize the child victims each time their abuse is viewed. To learn more, please visit the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children at www.missingkids.org.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Marcus Paul convicted of kidnapping after stealing car with baby inside
Washington Co. District Attorney's Office - 10/03/22 10:48 AM

On September 30, 2022, a Washington County jury found Marcus Esa Paul, age 25, guilty of all charges following a four-day trial.  Mr. Paul was convicted of Kidnapping in the Second Degree, three counts of Criminal Mistreatment in the First Degree and Unauthorized Use of a Vehicle. 

The incident began at 6:30 AM on Wednesday, July 27, 2022, in the city of Tualatin.  The victim’s father was picking up a dog at Oregon Dog Rescue on SW Nyberg Rd.  As he stood near his minivan, Mr. Paul jumped inside the vehicle and drove away.  The victim’s 9-month-old son was in a car seat in the van.  Mr. Paul sped away, eventually onto Interstate 205.  He exited the freeway in Oregon City and looked for a place to leave the child.  He found a relatively remote section of a residential area and abandoned the baby on the ground behind a guardrail, near the edge of a steep slope.  He then continued northbound on I-205, as police tracked him using cell phone technology.  Mr. Paul left the minivan at a location off NE Prescott St. known by police for stolen car transactions and fled on foot across rush-hour traffic on the I-205 freeway.  He attempted to hide underneath several bags of another person’s belongings on the Parkrose MAX platform, but he was soon apprehended by pursuing Portland and Tualatin Police officers.

A citizen who had been walking her dog in Oregon City found the infant in the brush and called 911. The child was uninjured.

This investigation was a collaboration between the Tualatin Police, the Portland Police Bureau, and the Oregon City Police Department.  The DA’s office would like to acknowledge the excellent work by all agencies.

A sentencing hearing is scheduled for October 5, 2022 at 1:15 pm before Judge Oscar Garcia.


OnPoint Community Credit Union releases updated eBook to help guard against evolving tactics in cybercrime (Photo)
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 10/03/22 9:32 AM
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From ransomware-for-hire to smishing attacks, OnPoint provides guidance on protecting against the newest cybersecurity threats.

PORTLAND, Ore., October 3, 2022 — OnPoint Community Credit Union today released its 2022 “The OnPoint Guide to Personal Cybersecurity” eBook to help consumers and businesses protect themselves amidst a fast-evolving cybercrime landscape. In 2021, ransomware attacks doubled, and in the first half of 2022, malware scams jumped 11%. OnPoint updates the free eBook every October to coincide with National Cybersecurity Awareness Month and help keep the community informed of the latest online threats. From emerging cybercrime business models to a surge in smishing and attacks on small businesses, hackers are continually adapting their tactics to take advantage of vulnerabilities. 

“Financial security and personal data security go hand in hand, and both require a commitment to ongoing learning and education,” said Damian Laviolette, Chief Information Security Officer, OnPoint Community Credit Union. “With everything from phones, cars, drones and home systems connected on the web, cybercrime is only going to keep growing—it is not going away. As cybercriminals evolve their modes of attack, we’ll continue to share best practices and resources so people can stay on top of trends and understand how to protect their identities and their bank accounts.” 

The latest trends in online fraud include:

  • Ransomware as a Service (RaaS): A play on the Subscription as a Service or SaaS business model, RaaS providers market themselves on the dark web, offering their ransomware services and technology to clients in exchange for cryptocurrency. The scale of services ranges from advice and assistance to round-the-clock support that includes negotiating with the victim. While RaaS makes it easier for more bad actors to enter the market, the methods of attack remain the same. Cybercriminals access systems via malware infection or exploitation of a vulnerability. 
  • Smishing surge: This summer, the FCC issued a warning about a rise in smishing, a type of social engineering attack that uses SMS texting. Designed to read like a formal notification from a business, smishing texts operate under the same premise as email phishing scams with a link pointing you to an attacker-controlled server. The smisher may even use your name and location to address you directly and strengthen the validity of the message.
  • Small businesses beware: According to the FBI’s Internet Crime report, the cost of cybercrimes against the small business community reached $2.4 billion last year. And a U.S. Small Business Administration survey found 88% of small business owners felt their businesses were vulnerable to online attacks. While large enterprises have built robust security teams and protocols, small businesses tend to lack the security infrastructure needed in the era of cybercrime, making them an attractive target for hackers.

Top 5 Tips for Cybersecurity:

  • Forget the password. Remember the passphrase. A password typically contains about 10 characters, blending letters, numbers and symbols. However, passwords are relatively easy to crack by hackers. That’s why passphrases are becoming the new industry standard. A passphrase is longer than a password, can contain spaces between words, and should be easy for you to remember but hard for a computer to crack. Consider song lyrics, a quotation or anything memorable to you like “My favorite food is Hawaiian p1zz@,” mixing in symbols and numbers in place of some letters. Even the most proficient password cracking tools break down at about 10 characters, so remember the longer your passphrase is, the harder it will be for fraudsters to hack.
  • Back up your data. Backing up data is an absolute must for small business owners. A ransomware attack will seize up your system and lock you out until you pay the hackers. The average length of business downtime due to ransomware attacks is 20 days. That’s enough time to shut down a small business. In addition to security protocols and threat detection, make sure you have a consistent and reliable way to back up your files with encryption in a system separate from your day-to-day operations.
  • Verify sender before clicking any link. Double check the sender’s address and domain name, and don’t simply rely on the display name. You can hover over a link to see if the URL looks legitimate or has common tricks like a zero in place of the letter “o” or an “s” added to the end of a word like Onpoints.com. Be extra wary of any offer or notification that has poor grammar or typos, comes out of the blue or sounds too good to be true.
  • Stop and ask for help. So, you’ve clicked the link. What now? First, stop using the device and disconnect from the internet to stop the spread of malware. If your device is related to your job, reach out to your IT department by phone. If you’ve entered sensitive information, call your financial institution’s hotline (on the back of your credit or debit card) to report the incident, consider putting a lock on your credit records and set up a fraud alert. For breaches on your personal device, back up your data using an external device like a USB and then scan your device for malware. Lastly, change your passwords across all your accounts. When in doubt, seek out a professional IT expert for help.  
  • Teach your kids. You might be aware of smishing, but are your kids? Laviolette says smishing attacks can be successful when you let a kid borrow your phone to play a game. When the text comes through, they may start tapping the screen to remove the distraction and unknowingly compromise the system. If your kids are using electronic devices of any kind, even for limited periods of time, make sure you’ve educated them about the risks.

Cybercrime comes in many forms and requires vigilance across all channels. To learn even more ways to protect yourself, your family or your business, download The OnPoint Guide to Cybersecurity eBook or talk with a representative at your nearest OnPoint branch. 

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving over 489,000 members and with assets of $9.3 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union's membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler, and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

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Attached Media Files: 2022-10/963/157992/OnP_Mobile-Login.jpg , 2022-10/963/157992/Example_of_smishing.png

Triple Fatal Crash on Hwy 99E-Marion County
Oregon State Police - 10/03/22 9:26 AM

On Sunday, October 2, 2022 at approximately 2:46 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Hwy 99E near milepost 36. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a southbound gray Toyota Corolla, operated by Epifanio Jose Ruiz (21) of Beaverton, crossed over into the northbound lane and collided head-on with a silver Honda Accord, operated by Gabriel Hernandez Ortiz (36) of Woodburn.

Epifanio Jose Ruiz was life-flighted to an area hospital where he was later pronounced deceased. A passenger in Ruiz’s car, Jorge Valencia Cortez (22) sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Gabriel Hernandez Ortiz also sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased and the passenger in his vehicle, Omar Jeu Pastor Martinez (26) of Woodburn, was transported to an area hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. 

Hwy 99E was affected for approximately 4 hours while the OSP Collision Reconstruction Unit investigated the scene. Alcohol is being investigated as the contributing factor to the crash as Ruiz’s BAC was determined .24% at the hospital. 

OSP was assisted by Woodburn Fire Department, Woodburn Ambulance, Marion County Sheriff’s Office and ODOT. 


Two-alarm house fire displaces couple (Photo)
Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue - 10/03/22 8:33 AM

Kelso, WA – Firefighters from multiple jurisdictions responded to a two-alarm house fire Sunday evening at 8:45 in the 100 block of Vision Dr.  Initial reports from the residents were that a fire started in an outside garbage can and then spread to the house.  Residents were able to evacuate; one man returned inside the house to retrieve his dog and suffered some smoke inhalation and mild burns to his feet.  Later in the incident, firefighters found the dog, removed it from the structure, and treated the dog with oxygen.  The male resident accepted medical treatment but did not seek hospital transport.  One cat perished from the fire.  

 

Upon arrival, fire crews could not safely attack the fire due to downed live power lines in the driveway of the house.  Cowlitz County Public Utility District (PUD) isolated and cut power to the area allowing fire crews to safely attack the fire.  Firefighters had the fire knocked down at 9:10.  Firefighters from Cowlitz 2 Fire & Rescue, City of Longview Fire, and Cowlitz County Fire District 5 responded to the fire.  Cowlitz County PUD also responded.  The cause of the fire is under investigation, no other injuries were reported.  

 




Attached Media Files: 2022-10/3738/157990/Vision_FIre.jfif , 2022-10/3738/157990/VisionFire2.jfif , 2022-10/3738/157990/VisionFire3.jfif

Heavy Equipment Operator Certification offered to Adults in Custody
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 10/03/22 7:51 AM
Who:    

Coffee Creek Correctional Facility in partnership with Baker Technical Institute 

 

What:

Observe and discuss certification opportunity for adults in custody (AICs)

 

When:  

October 12 and 19, 2022

9:00 – 10:00 AM

 

Where:

24499 SW Grahams Ferry Road
Wilsonville, OR 97070

 

RSVP:RSVP to Amber Knight via email no later than October 7, 2022
Contact Information:    

Amber Knight, 503-507-3567

er.N.Knight@doc.oregon.gov">Amber.N.Knight@doc.oregon.gov

 

Additional Information:

Members of the media are invited to observe the virtual training opportunity being offered to AICs for Heavy Equipment Operator Certification. Those attending must be on site by 8:30 AM for processing and directions. Further instructions will be given at check in. 

 

Background:

The Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) received a three-year grant totaling $900,000 through the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) Second Chance Act. This grant allows DOC to offer a virtual heavy equipment operation, industry recognized certification program through Baker Technical Institute (BTI) to several DOC facilities, including Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF). BTI placed a trailer on-site at CCCF with virtual reality technology to train AICs on heavy equipment as well as offering First Aid and CPR, Flagger Certification, and Forklift Certification. Wraparound services will also be offered such as resume writing, job search assistance, and connections to WorkSource Oregon. Programs started at CCCF on Sept 26 and will move to Powder River Correctional Facility in Baker City and Snake River Correctional Institution in Ontario in November.

 

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Quick thinking resident minimizes fire spread (Photo)
Hillsboro Fire and Rescue - 10/03/22 7:18 AM
Fire damage inside the garage
Fire damage inside the garage
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At 4:00 AM this morning, a resident at 141 NE 40th Ave smelled smoke from his home but couldn’t immediately locate the source. As he opened the garage door, black smoke billowed into the home. Acting quickly, he closed the door and evacuated himself and his family outside. The resident called 911 from safely outside. The call was dispatched as a first alarm residential fire.

The first arriving fire unit reported heavy black smoke pouring out from the garage and roof eaves. Firefighters made a quick entry into the garage area to locate and extinguish the fire. Firefighters searched the home and confirmed that both residents and their two dogs safely escaped the fire and no one else was found inside the structure. The two residents were assessed by paramedics and no injuries were reported.

A chaplain was dispatched to the incident to provide comfort and care to the residents and connect the residents with victim support services. 

A fire investigator is working to determine the cause of the fire. 

Hillsboro Fire & Rescue reminds you that working smoke alarms save lives. It’s recommended that one be placed in each bedroom and one on each floor of your home. Remember, once you are safely out of your home, stay out and call 911 from a safe place outside the home. 

Hillsboro Fire & Rescue was assisted at the fire by Hillsboro Police, MetroWest Ambulance, NW Natural, and Portland General Electric.  Thanks to Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue for providing coverage at our fire stations during the incident. 

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Attached Media Files: Fire damage inside the garage , Firefighters checking for fire extension

Sun. 10/02/22
Fatal Crash on Hwy 234-Jackson County
Oregon State Police - 10/02/22 4:47 PM

On Friday, September 30, 2022 at approximately 5:32 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a multiple vehicle accident on Hwy 234 near milepost 10.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Ford F150, operated by Richard Dionne (65) of Rogue River, pulled out onto Hwy 234 from Old Sam’s Valley Road and collided with two westbound motorcycles. Dustin Small (36) of Pendleton was operating a Harley Davidson and Matthew Small (32) of Gresham was operating a Honda. Intoxication is being investigated as a contributing factor to the crash.  

Dustin Small sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Matthew Small was transported to an area hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. Dionne was transported with non-life-threatening injuries to an area hospital also. 

Hwy 234 was affected for approximately 4 hours while OSP Collision Reconstruction Unit investigated the scene. 

OSP was assisted by Jackson County Sheriff’s Office, Mercy Flights and ODOT. 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 126E-Lane County
Oregon State Police - 10/02/22 4:36 PM

On Friday, September 30, 2022 at approximately 6:00 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Hwy 126E near milepost 50.

Preliminary investigation revealed an eastbound blue Nissan VRS, operated by Vanessa East (45) of Mckenzie Bridge, was stopped waiting to turn left into a residential driveway when an eastbound Freightliner, operated by Joseph Garcia (62) of Junction City, rear-ended the Nissan. 

East and a male juvenile passenger were transported with injuries to an area hospital. The front passenger in the Nissan, Shaney Howard (52) of McKenzie Bridge, sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Garcia was uninjured. 

Hwy 126E was affected for approximately 6 hours while the OSP Reconstruction Collision Unit investigated the scene. 

OSP was assisted by Mckenzie Fire Department, Lane County Sheriff’s Office, Coburg Police Department and ODOT. 


Snake River Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 10/02/22 1:30 PM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Richard Wayne Godwin, died the morning of October 2, 2022. Godwin was incarcerated at Snake River Correctional Institution (SRCI) in Ontario and passed away in the infirmary while on hospice care. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Godwin entered DOC custody on September 20, 1979, from Lane County with an earliest release date of March 11, 2026. Godwin was 77 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of approximately 12,000 individuals who are incarcerated in 12 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

SRCI is a multi-custody prison in Ontario that houses approximately 3,000 adults in custody. SRCI has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, intensive management, infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care, and an administrative segregation unit. SRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including a contact center, laundry, and sign shop. SRCI specializes in incentive housing, specialized housing, individuals with mental health/medical vulnerabilities, education and trades programs, cognitive and parenting programs, and institution work programs. SRCI opened in 1991 and is the largest correctional institution in the state.

 

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Attached Media Files: Richard W. Godwin

Serious Injury Collision - St. Johns Road (Photo)
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/02/22 1:56 AM
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On October 1, 2022 at approximately 2119 hours, Vancouver Fire, American Medical Response (AMR) and Clark County Sheriff’s Office personnel were dispatched to the area of NE 102nd Street and NE St. Johns Road on the report of an injury collision. 

Responding units found one of the involved vehicles, a 2002 Ford Escape, on its top at the 9900 block of NE St. Johns Road.  The driver had been partially ejected and was pinned under the vehicle.  Vancouver Fire extricated the driver, who was transported to a local hospital with life threatening injuries.

A second involved vehicle, a 2016 Chevrolet Corvette, was located at NE 102nd Street and NE St. Johns Road.  The driver of this vehicle was transported to a local hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

Speed and alcohol are believed to be contributing factors to the collision. 

The incident is being investigated by the Clark County Sheriff’s Office Traffic Unit.  No further information is being released at this time. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-10/1172/157982/DJI_0260.JPG , 2022-10/1172/157982/DJI_0117.JPG

Multiple Vehicle Collision (Photo)
Vancouver Fire Dept. - 10/02/22 1:04 AM
2022-10/5157/157981/3.jpg
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Vancouver Fire was dispatched to the report of a multiple vehicle collision near the intersection of St. Johns Road and 99th St at 21:21 on 10-01-2022.  The Vancouver Fire Department responded with two Battalion Chiefs, two engines, two trucks and two AMR ambulances.  We had sixteen personnel from Vancouver Fire and four from AMR.   The first patient required heavy extrication as his vehicle rolled several times and came to rest on its top. The patient was half out of the vehicle and pinned by the vehicle to the ground.  The second vehicle required some extrication as it collided with a brick wall.  Both patients were treated by Vancouver Fire and AMR paramedics and transported to local trauma hospitals.  CCSO was on scene as well to provide traffic control and to investigate. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-10/5157/157981/3.jpg , 2022-10/5157/157981/2.jpg , 2022-10/5157/157981/1.jpg

Sat. 10/01/22
Widespread Tire Slashings in the Roseway Neighborhood, Public Assistance Requested
Portland Police Bureau - 10/01/22 5:43 PM
The Portland Police Bureau is requesting help from the public to help solve a case of widespread vandalism in Northeast Portland, specifically centered in the Roseway Neighborhood.

On Saturday, October 1, 2022, at about 8:50a.m., a North Precinct officer responded to a vandalism call in the 2800 block of Northeast 72nd Avenue. The officer learned that the victim's car had two tires punctured overnight. The officer learned that additional cars were damaged in the area.

The officer found over 30 victims roughly within the area of Northeast 72nd Avenue to Northeast 77th Avenue, south of Northeast Sandy Boulevard to Northeast Alameda Street.

Later Saturday, a North Precinct Public Safety Support Specialist documented as many as 20 additional victims in a multiple block radius west of Roseway Heights Middle School, bringing the total known victims past 50.

Follow-up investigation is being done. Victims who have not made a report are asked to make a police report on the Portland Police Bureau website https://www.portlandoregon.gov/police/cor/ and reference case number 22-263990. To assist with the case, victims are asked to document their damage with photographs, and preserve any invoices and receipts that document damage costs. Within a few days, victims will get an e-mail from PPB that will contain their free police report and case number for insurance claims.

Additionally, those who have doorbell cameras or other surveillance equipment in that neighborhood are asked to check their footage for images of the suspect or suspects. If anyone has any such evidence, or witnessed the crimes, or has other information that might help investigators, they're asked to please e-mail crimetips@police.portlandoregon.gov attention North NRT and reference case number 22-263990.

It’s important that victims and witnesses take time to report what happened to PPB. Future prosecution may allow for the Multnomah County District Attorney's office to aggregate charges as appropriate. It takes a great deal of documentation and evidence to successfully prosecute vandalism cases with multiple victims, and the community participation can make a big difference.

###PPB###

UPDATE: Victim Deceased After Hazelwood Neighborhood Shooting, Suspect Arrested on Murder Charges
Portland Police Bureau - 10/01/22 1:56 PM
The victim of the Hazelwood Neighborhood shooting died at the hospital. Homicide Unit detectives pursued leads throughout the day. Due to the complexity of the case, additional detectives from multiple Portland Police investigative units, Special Emergency Reaction Team (SERT), Crisis Negotiation Team, Narcotics and Organized Crime, Focused Intervention Team, Air Support Unit, Forensic Evidence Division, Multnomah County District Attorney's Office, and Clackamas County Sheriff's office patrol division assisted on the case.

Friday evening, detectives and SERT arrested Stephen Matthew Toelle in Happy Valley. Toelle, 31, of Portland, was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on an arrest warrant for Murder in the Second Degree, Attempted Murder in the Second Degree, Unlawful Use of a Weapon, and Felon in Possession of a Firearm.

The victim will be identified after the medical examiner verifies his identity and family has been notified of his death.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

A man was critically injured in a shooting in the Hazelwood Neighborhood.

On Friday, September 30, 2022 at 2:14a.m., East Precinct officers were notified of shots heard in the 200 block of Southeast 148th Avenue. A short time later, they were notified that a shooting victim had been taken to a hospital by private vehicle. East Officers responded with the help from Central Precinct Officers and began an investigation. They determined that the incident was related to the shots call and they located a crime scene at the original call location. The victim, an adult male, was critically injured.

Portland Police Detectives are responding to the scene to investigate. During the investigation, Southeast 148th Avenue is closed between East Burnside Street and Southeast Stark Street.

If anyone has information about this incident, please contact Detective Mike Jones at Michael.Jones@police.portlandoregon.gov 503-823-1063 or Detective Jeff Sharp at Jeff.Sharp@police.portlandoregon.gov 503-823-9773.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be released when appropriate.

###PPB###

Man Deceased After Shooting in Wilkes Neighborhood
Portland Police Bureau - 10/01/22 1:53 PM
A man is deceased after a shooting in the Wilkes Neighborhood, and homicide detectives are investigating.

On Saturday, October 1, 2022 at 1:22a.m., North Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of shots fired in the area of Northeast Sandy Boulevard and Northeast 162nd Avenue. Officers located a shooting victim in that area. Paramedics arrived and determined that the victim was deceased at the scene.

The suspect or suspects left the scene and no immediate arrests were made.

The Portland Police Bureau Homicide Unit responded to the scene to investigate. If anyone has information about this case, please contact Detective Brad Clifton Brad.Clifton@police.portlandoregon.gov , 503-823-0696; or Detective Steve Gandy Stephen.Gandy@police.portlandoregon.gov . The case number is 22-263796.

The victim will be identified after the medical examiner verifies his identity and family has been notified of his death. Additional information will be released as appropriate.

###PPB###

EDIT: Pacific Power Offers a New Low-Income Discount Program to Help Manage Costs
Pacific Power - 10/01/22 9:42 AM

Eligible customers will see power bill discounts ranging from 20% to 40% 

 

PORTLAND, Ore. (Sept.30) – Pacific Power is helping customers manage costs with a new low-income discount program, set to debut in October.  

Starting October 1, customers receiving energy relief from the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) and the Oregon Energy Assistance Program (OEAP) will automatically receive a 20% discount on their Pacific Power bills. The program will also give these participants the opportunity to qualify for a 40% discount if they meet additional income requirements.  

 “Our customers count on us every day for the energy they need, and we’re working to keep that power affordable, especially for customers experiencing income restraints,” said vice president of customer and community solutions Cory Scott. “The Low-Income Discount program will provide relief to customers who qualify on their power bills.” 

Eligible customers will receive the following discounts: 

  • A 20% discount if their income is between 21% and 60% of state median income
  • A 40% discount if their income is between 0% to 20% of state median income

To learn more about the program and see if they qualify, customers can visit http://pacificpower.net/LID starting October 1. Customers can also reach out to our customer care team at 1-888-221-7070 in English or 1-888-225-2611 in Spanish. Translation services are available in several additional languages.  

 

About Pacific Power  

Pacific Power provides safe and reliable electric service to more than 764,000 customers in Oregon, Washington, and California. The company supplies customers with electricity from a diverse portfolio of generating plants including hydroelectric, thermal, wind, geothermal, and solar resources. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with 2 million customers in six western states. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net 

 

### 


Traffic Team asks for public's help locating hit-and-run driver - UPDATE 2 - (Photo)
Salem Police Department - 10/01/22 9:00 AM
2022-10/1095/157887/salem-police_smp22-2177_pickup-truck-rear-psgr-side.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-10/1095/157887/thumb_salem-police_smp22-2177_pickup-truck-rear-psgr-side.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DATE: October 1, 2022

 

Traffic Team asks for public’s help locating hit-and-run driver

Involved-vehicle identified

Update 10/01/2022 | 9:00 a.m.

The Salem Police Traffic Team has identified the involved vehicle in the Wednesday, September 28, fatal traffic collision.

Traffic investigators are now asking for the public’s help in locating the pickup which is described as follows:

  • 1998, Chevy 1500 pickup truck, extended cab, dark blue
  • Oregon license plate 604 FWD
  • Damage to the driver side headlight

The photographs provided with this press release were captured prior to the collision. 

Anyone with information on the truck’s whereabouts is asked to immediately call the Salem Police Department at 503-588-6123 (option 1) and refer to case number 22-2177.

Members of the public should not attempt to make contact with anyone with the vehicle. Please call police directly.

---

Attached:

salem-police_smp22-2177_pickup-truck.jpg

salem-police_smp22-2177_pickup-truck-rear.jpg

salem-police_smp22-2177_pickup-truck-rear-driver-side.jpg

salem-police_smp22-2177_pickup-truck-rear-psgr-side.jpg

salem-police_smp22-2177_pickup-truck-license-plate.jpg

# # #

 

Victim identified

 

Update 09/30/2022 | 9:00 a.m.

The victim is identified as Cynthia Lynn Perry Rizzo of Keizer. Rizzo, who sustained critical injuries in the collision, succumbed to those injuries on Thursday, September 29.

The Salem Police Traffic Team is still seeking assistance from the community to identify the driver who fled from this fatal traffic incident.

At the scene investigators collected pieces of a headlight assembly which point to the involved vehicle being a 1988 to 2000 full-size Chevrolet/GMC pick-up or sports utility vehicle.

Anyone with information about this collision is asked to call the Salem Police Traffic Team at 503-588-6171.

# # #

 

Originally published 9/28/2022 | 4:00 p.m.

Salem, Ore. — The Salem Police Traffic Team needs the public’s help in locating the driver involved in a hit-and-run collision today in the 4000 block of Sunnyview RD NE

Officers responded to the area just after 5:00 a.m. on the report of a pedestrian struck by a vehicle. The victim, a 66-year-old woman was found lying in the roadway with life-threatening injuries, and she was transported to Salem Health.

The unknown driver of the vehicle in the collision did not remain at the scene and likely fled eastbound on Sunnyview RD from Lancaster DR NE.

At the scene investigators collected pieces of a headlight assembly which point to the involved vehicle being a 1988 to 2000 full-size Chevrolet/GMC pick-up or sports utility vehicle.

Anyone with information concerning this traffic investigation is asked to call the Salem Police Traffic Team at 503-588-6171.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2022-10/1095/157887/salem-police_smp22-2177_pickup-truck-rear-psgr-side.jpg , 2022-10/1095/157887/salem-police_smp22-2177_pickup-truck-rear-driver-side.jpg , 2022-10/1095/157887/salem-police_smp22-2177_pickup-truck-license-plate.jpg , 2022-10/1095/157887/salem-police_smp22-2177_pickup-truck-rear.jpg , If you see this vehicle, please call the Salem Police Department at 503-588-6123.

UPDATE: Old Town Murder Suspect Booked Into Jail
Portland Police Bureau - 10/01/22 7:36 AM
The suspect in the Old Town stabbing homicide case Friday evening has been lodged at jail. Kalil C. Ford, 20, of Portland, was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on charges of Murder in the Second Degree and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.

The victim will be identified after the medical examiner verifies his identity and family has been notified of his death.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

A suspect has been detained for an investigation after a stabbing in Old Town Neighborhood that left one victim deceased. This is the second homicide investigation in Old Town in 9 hours.

On Friday, September 30, 2022 at 8:34p.m., Central Precinct officers responded to a report of a stabbing at Northwest Broadway and Northwest Couch Street. When officers arrived, they located an injured victim. Paramedics determined the victim was deceased.

Officers began an investigation and detained a suspect at the scene. As of now, there are no other suspects being sought related to this case.

The Portland Police Homicide Unit responded to the scene to investigate. If anyone has information about this case, please contact Detective Shaye Samora by e-mail at Shaye.Samora@police.portlandoregon.gov or call 503-823-0768, or Detective Erik Kammerer at Erik.Kammerer@police.portlandoregon.gov or 503-823-0762 and reference case number 22-263571.

During the investigation, Northwest Broadway is closed between West Burnside Street and Northwest Davis Street. Northwest Couch Street is closed between Northwest 6th Avenue and Northwest Park Avenue.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. Further information will be released as appropriate.

This is the 71st homicide case for Portland in 2022.

###PPB###

LCSO Case #22-5514 -- Fatal Traffic Crash
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/01/22 4:12 AM

On September 30, 2022 at approximately 23:11pm the Lane County Sheriff’s Office responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Parkway Road near Valley Road in Pleasant Hill.  A white Chevrolet S10 was traveling northbound when it left the roadway for an unknown reason and rolled.

The driver of the involved vehicle, a 41 year old male, did not survive the crash and was pronounced deceased on scene.  

The Lane County Sheriff's Office was assisted by Goshen-Pleasant Hill Fire.


Fall Back in Love with Downtown Portland: Artist Takeover exhibit is now open (Photo)
Portland Business Alliance - 10/01/22 4:00 AM
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/6148/157949/thumb_Artists_Take_over_GGG.JPG

 October 1, 2022  

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

 

September 29, 2022, Portland, Or. The Portland Business Alliance, in partnership with Gallery Go Go, is kicking off the month-long Fall Back in Love with Downtown Portland: Artists Takeover art show and the competition aiming to capture the beauty, essence, and spirit of Downtown Portland – for a cash prize. One hundred entries have been hand-selected for the exhibition, 50 have qualified for the judge's panel, and one will win the overall crowd favorite for a $500 cash prize.  

What: The Fall Back in Love with Downtown Portland: Artists Takeover kicks off this Saturday, October 1, at 10 am for viewing and judging of the entries selected.   

When: Saturday, October 1 – Monday, October 31; Kick-off is Saturday, October 1 @10am  

Where: Gallery Go Go is located at 700 SW 5th Avenue in Downtown Portland's Pioneer Place Mall.  

Who: Gallery Go Go + Downtown Portland  

Why: In celebration of the fall season, Gallery Go Go and Downtown Portland partnered to create a space for local artists to capture the beauty of Downtown for a cash prize.   

How: Art pieces are selected for exhibition, the public and judge’s panel will vote for their favorite, and the winner will receive a cash prize of $500.  

About the Downtown Portland Marketing Initiative: The Downtown Portland Marketing Initiative is a program of the Portland Business Alliance, Greater Portland's Chamber of Commerce, which promotes Downtown Portland to audiences across the Greater Portland metro region and the world. Marketing programs include: holiday promotional efforts, robust social media messaging, events and programming, seasonal cooperative retail and restaurant promotions, and public relations campaigns to promote Downtown businesses. Downtown businesses may participate in the program at no charge. Visit: DowntownPortland.org for more information.   

About Gallery Go Go: Gallery Go Go is a gallery, a museum gift shop, and an interactive art experience all rolled into one. Offering vibrant art events and featuring a diverse range of artists that push the boundaries of their creative mediums. Visit www.gallerygogo.com for more information.   

  

Media Contact(s):  

Sommer Martin, Director of Downtown Marketing   

Portland Business Alliance   

(503) 552-6772 (office)   

tin@portlandalliance.com">smartin@portlandalliance.com   

   

Azure Attoe, Owner  

Gallery Go Go  

eattoe@gmail.com">azureattoe@gmail.com  

503-544-0577 (text)  

  

   

# # #  

   

 

  




Attached Media Files: 2022-09/6148/157949/Artists_Take_over_GGG.JPG , 2022-09/6148/157949/Artists-Take_-Over-IG[14].png

Fri. 09/30/22
60th Anniversary of Columbus Day Storm! Correction on Dates!!!!! (Photo)
North Clark Historical Museum - 09/30/22 9:56 PM
Courtesy of PUD 1962 Annual Report
Courtesy of PUD 1962 Annual Report
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/6334/157974/thumb_Picture_from_PUD_Annual_Report.jpeg

AMBOY, WASHINGTON – North Clark Historical Museum is in upper Amboy at 21416 NE 399th St. in the renovated 1910 United Brethren Church. The Museum incorporated in 1988 and opened to the public in June of 2000. 

The Columbus Day Storm happened on October 12, 1962.  It originated in the Pacific Ocean and created havoc from northern California to southern British Columbia in Canada.  It was the largest, most violent windstorm in the recorded history of the West Coast, at that time.  Wind gusts were recorded at over 100 miles per hour in many areas. The storm demolished homes, barns, trees, vehicles, and many lives were lost.

The exhibit will be available for viewing October 8th and 22nd.  A program will be held on October 22nd at 2:00 pm.  The Board of Directors is looking for stories about that stormy day. If you were around during the storm, please attend the program on the 22nd and share your story. You may also contact the Museum and provide your story and/or pictures at any time. 

The museum is wheelchair accessible and has air conditioning. Admission is free.  Donations are welcome.

Quilt raffle tickets will be available for “Wild Flowers”, a beautiful quilt made by the Chelatchie Quilters. The quilt is currently at the Battle Ground Library.  It will be on display at the Museum on October 22nd. Tickets are $1.00 each. This is the annual fundraiser and proceeds go to the Capital Improvement Fund.

For more information, please contact 360-247-5800 and leave a message or email museumnch88@gmail.com

###

The North Clark Historical Museum was founded in 1988 and is a 501(C)3 non-profit organization governed by a Board of Directors. The doors were opened in June of 2000. Mission Statement:   To preserve North Clark County’s natural and cultural history through collections and exhibits, and to sponsor educational programs and research opportunities for the enrichment of the public. 

 




Attached Media Files: Courtesy of PUD 1962 Annual Report , 2022-09/6334/157974/NCHM_building_barn__and__windmill_cropped.jpg

Crash Involving Pedestrian Fatality in the Cully Neighborhood, Traffic Team Investigating
Portland Police Bureau - 09/30/22 9:39 PM
The Portland Police Bureau Major Crash Team (MCT) is investigating a crash involving the driver of a vehicle and a pedestrian.

On Friday, September 30, 2022 at 8:41p.m., North Precinct officers responded to a report of a crash on Northeast Lombard Street and Northeast 55th Avenue. When officers arrived they located a pedestrian, believed to be an adult female. Paramedics evaluated the pedestrian and determined she was deceased.

The driver of the involved vehicle, an adult male, remained at the scene and is talking to officers.

The Portland Police MCT responded to the scene. During the investigation, Northeast Lombard Street is closed between Northeast 52nd Avenue and Northeast 55th Avenue.

If anyone has information about the incident, please contact crimetips@police.portlandoregon.gov , attention Traffic Investigations Unit, and reference case number 22-263577, or call (503)823-2103.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be released when appropriate. This is the 46th traffic fatality of the year in Portland, and the second in the last 24 hours.

###PPB###

VIDEO: OSFM interview with IMT member in Florida
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 09/30/22 8:25 PM

The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal (OSFM) Incident Management Team (IMT) sent to help with the response to Hurricane Ian in Florida arrived in Hardee County on Friday. The team met with emergency managers and went straight to work. They have been challenged with limited cell service, connectivity, and damaged infrastructure. The OSFM was able to get a brief interview this evening with OSFM IMT PIO Brett Deedon with Eugene Springfield Fire. The interview is linked below for our media partners to use. Because of the limited service the team has, at this point we can’t facilitate interview requests on the ground. We are working to make sure you all are able to share their story.

OSFM Interview: Brett Deedon 9-30-2022

As the team gets settled in over the coming days, we anticipate more pictures and videos. We’ll keep you posted on their work in Florida.


UPDATE: Old Town Stabbing Suspect Charged with Murder (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 09/30/22 6:43 PM
Homicide Investigation
Homicide Investigation
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/3056/157956/thumb_Homicide_Investigation_22263163.jpg
The suspect who was detained has been interviewed by detectives. Dorian A. Cannon, 50, was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on a charge of Murder in the Second Degree and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.

The victim’s name will be released after the medical examiner confirms his identity and family is notified.

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

A stabbing in Old Town Neighborhood has left one victim deceased, and a suspect has been detained.

On Friday, September 30, 2022 at 11:28a.m., Central Precinct officers responded to a report of a stabbing at West Burnside Street and Northwest 3rd Avenue. When officers arrived, they located an injured victim. Paramedics determined the victim was deceased.

Officers developed information about a suspect and located him nearby. He was detained pending further investigation. As of now, there are no other suspects being sought related to this case.

The Portland Police Homicide Unit responded to the scene to investigate. If anyone has information about this case, please contact Detective Erik Kammerer at Erik.Kammerer@police.portlandoregon.gov or by phone at 503-823-0762, or Detective Michael Schmerber at Michael.Schmerber@police.portlandoregon.gov or 503-823-0991.

During the investigation, Northwest 3rd Avenue is closed between West Burnside Street and Northwest Couch Street. The right lane of westbound Burnside Street is also closed at Northwest 3rd Avenue, but traffic is open in the left westbound lane.

The PIO is at the scene. Further information will be released as appropriate.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Homicide Investigation

Former Army Depot officially renamed in honor of retired general Raymond F. Rees (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 09/30/22 6:33 PM
2022-09/962/157948/220929-Z-CM403-202.JPG
2022-09/962/157948/220929-Z-CM403-202.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/962/157948/thumb_220929-Z-CM403-202.JPG

SALEM, Ore. - The Umatilla Chemical Depot located in Umatilla, Oregon, was officially renamed the Raymond F. Rees Training Center, in honor of Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Raymond F. Rees, during a ceremony on September 29, 2022, highlighting the current transformation and development of the historic installation. 

Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Raymond F. Rees is a retired Oregon Guardsman and served as The Adjutant General, Oregon for more than 16 years, providing the state of Oregon and the United States with a ready force of Citizen-Soldiers and Airmen. Rees also held various high-level leadership positions in the National Guard Bureau. After he retired from military service in 2013, he served at the Deputy Secretary of the Army as a civilian. 

Several distinguished guest and local elected officials were in attendance for this ceremony, which will also impact the economy of Eastern Oregon for the foreseeable future. 

In 2017 a license was signed by the Oregon Military Department (OMD) to secure 7,500 of the depot’s former 17,055 acres as a training site for the Oregon National Guard. The Raymond F. Rees Training Center will be the home of the 249th Regional Training Institute, providing a premiere joint and inter-agency training facility. 

Since OMD received the property, over $60,000,000 has been invested in Construction, Modernization and Restoration. Projects have ranged from barracks, dining facilities, electrical and water infrastructure, waste water treatment facility, and a STARBASE Academy. Within the next three years, an additional $40,000,000 will be invested in modernized ranges, new ranges, and additional barracks.

Biography for Maj. Gen. (Ret) Raymond F. Rees: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raymond_F._Rees

Full length recording of the ceremony: https://youtu.be/VUDasDwq9QQ

-30-

Released images:

220929-Z-CM403-101: Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel, Adjutant General, addresses guests at the Raymond F. Rees Training Center, in Umatilla, Oregon, in honor of Maj. Gen. (Ret) Raymond F. Rees, during a renaming ceremony of the installation in his honor on Sept. 29, 2022. Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Rees is a retired Oregon Guardsman and served as The Adjutant General, Oregon for more than 16 years, retiring from military service in 2013, and later worked as a civilian as the Deputy Secretary of the Army. (Oregon National Guard photo by Aaron Perkins, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

220929-Z-CM403-141: Gen. Daniel Hokanson, Chief, National Guard Bureau, gives remarks to guests at the Raymond F. Rees Training Center, in Umatilla, Oregon, in honor of Maj. Gen. (Ret) Raymond F. Rees, during a renaming ceremony of the installation in his honor on Sept. 29, 2022. Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Rees is a retired Oregon Guardsman and served as The Adjutant General, Oregon for more than 16 years, retiring from military service in 2013, and later worked as a civilian as the Deputy Secretary of the Army. (Oregon National Guard photo by Aaron Perkins, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

220929-Z-CM403-157: State Senator, Bill Hansell, gives remarks to guests at the Raymond F. Rees Training Center, in Umatilla, Oregon, in honor of Maj. Gen. (Ret) Raymond F. Rees, during a renaming ceremony of the installation in his honor on Sept. 29, 2022. Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Rees is a retired Oregon Guardsman and served as The Adjutant General, Oregon for more than 16 years, retiring from military service in 2013, and later worked as a civilian as the Deputy Secretary of the Army.(Oregon National Guard photo by Aaron Perkins, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

220929-Z-CM403-161: State Representative, Greg Smith, gives remarks to guests at the Raymond F. Rees Training Center, in Umatilla, Oregon, in honor of Maj. Gen. (Ret) Raymond F. Rees, during a renaming ceremony of the installation in his honor on Sept. 29, 2022. Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Rees is a retired Oregon Guardsman and served as The Adjutant General, Oregon for more than 16 years, retiring from military service in 2013, and later worked as a civilian as the Deputy Secretary of the Army.  (Oregon National Guard photo by Aaron Perkins, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

220929-Z-CM403-202: (From L to R on stage) Gen. Daniel Hokanson, Chief, National Guard Bureau, Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel, Adjutant General and Maj. Gen. (Ret) Raymond F. Rees, watch as a Chinook helicopter flies over the new front gate at the Rees Training Center, in Umatilla, Oregon, in honor of Maj. Gen. (Ret) Rees, during a renaming ceremony of the installation on Sept. 29, 2022. Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Rees is a retired Oregon Guardsman and served as The Adjutant General, Oregon for more than 16 years, retiring from military service in 2013, and later worked as a civilian as the Deputy Secretary of the Army. (Oregon National Guard photo by Aaron Perkins, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

220929-Z-CH590-0033: Members of the Oregon Army National Gaud 234th Army Band participate in the ceremony for the official renaming service at the Raymond F. Rees Training Center, Umatilla, Oregon, on Sept. 29, 2022. Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Raymond F. Rees is a retired Oregon Guardsman and served as The Adjutant General, Oregon for more than 16 years, retiring from military service in 2013, and later worked as a civilian as the Deputy Secretary of the Army. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

220929-Z-CH590-0130: Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, chief of the National Guard Bureau (left), Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon (center) render a hand salute to Maj. Gen. (ret.) Raymond F. Rees (right), as Gen. Hokanson deferred 'Ruffles and Flourishes' to honor Rees to being the official renaming ceremony at the Raymond F. Rees Training Center, Umatilla, Oregon, on Sept. 29, 2022. Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Raymond F. Rees is a retired Oregon Guardsman and served as The Adjutant General, Oregon for more than 16 years, retiring from military service in 2013, and later worked as a civilian as the Deputy Secretary of the Army. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

220929-Z-CH590-0356: Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, chief of the National Guard Bureau, delivers remarks as the Keynote Speaker to guest and local officials during the official renaming ceremony at the Raymond F. Rees Training Center, Umatilla, Oregon, on Sept. 29, 2022. Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Raymond F. Rees is a retired Oregon Guardsman and served as The Adjutant General, Oregon for more than 16 years, retiring from military service in 2013, and later worked as a civilian as the Deputy Secretary of the Army. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

220929-Z-CH590-0227: Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, addresses guests and local officials as the host during the official renaming ceremony at the Raymond F. Rees Training Center, Umatilla, Oregon, on Sept. 29, 2022. Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Raymond F. Rees is a retired Oregon Guardsman and served as The Adjutant General, Oregon for more than 16 years, retiring from military service in 2013, and later worked as a civilian as the Deputy Secretary of the Army. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

220929-Z-CH590-0238: Maj. Gen. (ret.) Raymond F. Rees listens to remarks by Maj. Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, chief of the National Guard Bureau during the renaming ceremony at the Raymond F. Rees Training Center, Umatilla, Oregon, on Sept. 29, 2022. Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Raymond F. Rees is a retired Oregon Guardsman and served as The Adjutant General, Oregon for more than 16 years, retiring from military service in 2013, and later worked as a civilian as the Deputy Secretary of the Army. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

220929-Z-CH590-0639: Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, chief of the National Guard Bureau (right), Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon (center) and Maj. Gen. (ret.) Raymond F. Rees (left) share a private moment off-stage following the official renaming ceremony at the Raymond F. Rees Training Center, Umatilla, Oregon, on Sept. 29, 2022. Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Raymond F. Rees is a retired Oregon Guardsman and served as The Adjutant General, Oregon for more than 16 years, retiring from military service in 2013, and later worked as a civilian as the Deputy Secretary of the Army. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

220929-Z-CH590-0568: (From Left to Right) Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, friend of Mrs. Rees, Mrs. Mary Len Rees, Maj. Gen. (ret.) Raymond F. Rees, Oregon State Senator, Bill Hansell, Oregon State Rep. Greg Smith and Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson, chief of the National Guard Bureau pause for a group follow the Christening and Flyover for the renaming ceremony for Raymond F. Rees Training Center,, at the Raymond F. Rees Training Center, Umatilla, Oregon, on Sept. 29, 2022. Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Raymond F. Rees is a retired Oregon Guardsman and served as The Adjutant General, Oregon for more than 16 years, retiring from military service in 2013, and later worked as a civilian as the Deputy Secretary of the Army. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

220929-Z-CH590-0461: Maj. Gen. (ret.) Raymond F. Rees, Oregon, addresses guests and local officials during his formal remarks  for the official renaming ceremony at the Raymond F. Rees Training Center, Umatilla, Oregon, on Sept. 29, 2022. Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Raymond F. Rees is a retired Oregon Guardsman and served as The Adjutant General, Oregon for more than 16 years, retiring from military service in 2013, and later worked as a civilian as the Deputy Secretary of the Army. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

220929-Z-CH590-0060: Oregon Army National Guard Color Guard members render colors during the National Anthem to begin the renaming ceremony at the Raymond F. Rees Training Center, Umatilla, Oregon, on Sept. 29, 2022. Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Raymond F. Rees is a retired Oregon Guardsman and served as The Adjutant General, Oregon for more than 16 years, retiring from military service in 2013, and later worked as a civilian as the Deputy Secretary of the Army. (National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

 

Additional images: 

Group One:

https://www.dvidshub.net/image/7444432/former-army-depot-officially-renamed-honor-retired-general-raymond-f-rees

Group Two: 

https://www.dvidshub.net/image/7444130/former-army-depot-officially-renamed-honor-retired-general-raymond-f-rees




Attached Media Files: 2022-09/962/157948/220929-Z-CM403-202.JPG , 2022-09/962/157948/220929-Z-CM403-161.JPG , 2022-09/962/157948/220929-Z-CM403-157.JPG , 2022-09/962/157948/220929-Z-CM403-141.JPG , 2022-09/962/157948/220929-Z-CM403-101.JPG , 2022-09/962/157948/220929-Z-CH590-0461.jpg , 2022-09/962/157948/220929-Z-CH590-0033.jpg , 2022-09/962/157948/220929-Z-CH590-0568.jpg , 2022-09/962/157948/220929-Z-CH590-0639.jpg , 2022-09/962/157948/220929-Z-CH590-0238.jpg , 2022-09/962/157948/220929-Z-CH590-0227.jpg , 2022-09/962/157948/220929-Z-CH590-0356_60.jpg , 2022-09/962/157948/220929-Z-CH590-0130.jpg , 2022-09/962/157948/220929-Z-CH590-0060.jpg

60th Anniversary of Columbus Day Storm! (Photo)
North Clark Historical Museum - 09/30/22 4:18 PM
Courtesy of PUD 1962 Annual Report
Courtesy of PUD 1962 Annual Report
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/6334/157970/thumb_Picture_from_PUD_Annual_Report.jpeg

AMBOY, WASHINGTON – North Clark Historical Museum is in upper Amboy at 21416 NE 399th St. in the renovated 1910 United Brethren Church. The Museum incorporated in 1988 and opened to the public in June of 2000. 

The Columbus Day Storm happened on October 12, 1962.  It originated in the Pacific Ocean and created havoc from northern California to southern British Columbia in Canada.  It was the largest, most violent windstorm in the recorded history of the West Coast, at that time.  Wind gusts were recorded at over 100 miles per hour in many areas. The storm demolished homes, barns, trees, vehicles, and many lives were lost.

The exhibit will be available for viewing October 10th and 24th.  A program will be held on October 24th at 2:00 pm.  The Board of Directors is looking for stories about that stormy day. If you were around during the storm, please attend the program on the 24th and share your story.  You may also contact the Museum and provide your story and/or pictures at any time. 

The museum is wheelchair accessible and has air conditioning. Admission is free.  Donations are welcome.

Quilt raffle tickets will be available for “Wild Flowers”, a beautiful quilt made by the Chelatchie Quilters. The quilt is currently at the Battle Ground Library.  It will be on display at the Museum on October 24th. Tickets are $1.00 each.  This is the annual fundraiser and proceeds go to the Capital Improvement Fund.

For more information, please contact 360-247-5800 and leave a message or email museumnch88@gmail.com

###

The North Clark Historical Museum was founded in 1988 and is a 501(C)3 non-profit organization governed by a Board of Directors. The doors were opened in June of 2000. Mission Statement:   To preserve North Clark County’s natural and cultural history through collections and exhibits, and to sponsor educational programs and research opportunities for the enrichment of the public. 

 




Attached Media Files: Courtesy of PUD 1962 Annual Report , 2022-09/6334/157970/NCHM_building_barn__and__windmill_cropped.jpg

Fatal Crash on Interstate 5-Marion County
Oregon State Police - 09/30/22 3:41 PM

On Friday, September 30, 2022 at approximately 12:45 AM, Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Interstate 5 near milepost 279, south of Wilsonville. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a black Honda motorcycle, operated by Tyler Bratton (24) of Santa Rosa, California, was travelling southbound in the northbound fast lane and collided head-on with a black Jeep Cherokee, operated by Usach Sisach Nelson (22) of Corvallis. 

Prior to the collision a witness observed the motorcycle northbound, make a U-turn and proceed southbound on the Interstate. It is unknown why Bratton was traveling the wrong direction. Additionally, during the investigation it was determined Nelson showed signs of impairment and was subsequently arrested for DUII. His BAC was determined to be .10%. 

Bratton sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. 

Interstate 5 was affected for 4.5 hours while the OSP Collison Reconstruction Unit investigated the scene.

OSP was assisted by Aurora Fire Department, Woodburn Ambulance and ODOT. 


Housing Stability Council Meeting - October 7, 2022
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 09/30/22 3:31 PM

September 30, 2022

The next Housing Stability Council meeting will be from 9 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Friday, October 7, 2022. The meeting will be held electronically due to the current COVID-19 health crisis. You can find all updated meeting materials on our website.

 

Webinar Meeting Only

Register in advance for this webinar:

https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_0gaTLc20SYSFgConBPN2kw 

 

AGENDA:

9:00: Meeting Called to Order - Roll Call 

9:05: Public Comment

9:30: Report of the Chair

9:45: Report of the Director (pg. 04)

  • Modernize the HSC Administrative Structure: Caleb Yant Deputy Director

10:15: Legislative Planning Team (pg. 6)

          Nicole Stingh, Assistant Director of Government Relations

  • 2023-25 Agency Request Budget & Integrating Feedback: Nicole Stingh & Chelsea Bunch, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Officer

11:15: Disaster Recovery & Resilience (pg. 8)  

          Ryan Flynn, Assistant Director, Disaster Recovery & Resilience

  • Wildfire Recovery: State Funding Update and Sub-allocation to Counties:  Chelsea Catto Chief Policy Officer, Ryan Flynn, Assistant Director, Disaster Recovery & Resilience

11:45: 15 min break 

12:00: Affordable Rental Housing Division (pg. 12)  

          Natasha Detweiler-Daby, Interim Director, Affordable Rental Housing 

  • Transaction Approvals: Tai Dunson-Strane, Production Manager    
    • Sequoia Crossing
  • Preservation Pool Project Recommendations: Martin Jarvis, State Tax Credits Program Analyst; Amy Cole, State Development Resources Manager
  • PuSH Acquisition Pool Project Recommendation: Martin Jarvis, State Tax Credits Program Analyst; Amy Cole, State Development Resources Manager
  • Affordable Rental Housing Rural Investments; Verbal Update & Presentation:  Mitch Hannoosh, interim Senior Policy Analyst
  • HOME American Rescue Plan (ARP) Update: Andrea Matthiessen, HOME and Housing Trust Fund Program Manager; Roberto Franco, Assistant Director Development Resources and Production

1:00: Housing Stabilization Division (pg. 41) 

          Jill Smith, Director, Housing Stabilization

  • State Plan for the Department of Energy (DOE) Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (BIL) Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) Draft:  Tim Zimmer, Assistant Director of Energy Services, Dan Elliott, Senior Policy Analyst, Steve Divan, Weatherization Program Manager
  • HB2100 Interim Report: Mike Savara, Interim Chief Programs Officer, Mary Frances, Jennifer Parrish Chair of the TF

1:30: Homeownership Division (pg. 48)

          Emeses Perfecto, Director, Homeownership

  • Oregon Bond Loan Approvals: Cheryl Lyons, Loan Specialist Homeownership Programs

 2:00: Meeting Adjourned




Attached Media Files: Oct HSC Meeting Agenda

Oregon SHPO Resubmitts Proposed Eastmoreland Historic District to the National Park Service
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 09/30/22 3:00 PM

Oregon State Historic Preservation Office Resubmitted Proposed Eastmoreland Historic District to the Federal National Park Service

SALEM, Ore., Friday, September 30, 2022

The Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) resubmitted the nomination for the proposed Eastmoreland National Register Historic District to the federal National Park Service (NPS) with a recommendation to list it in the National Register of Historic Places. The SHPO determined that the majority of property owners support the proposed Eastmoreland Historic District.

The nomination document and all materials submitted to the National Park Service are online at https://bit.ly/eastmorelandhd.

The NPS will make the final decision about listing the district. The SHPO requested that the NPS provide a 45-calendar day public comment period, but the NPS may review and sign the document immediately upon receipt or may choose to allow additional time for further consideration.

The State Advisory Commission on Historic Preservation (SACHP), a governor-appointed volunteer commission of people with interest and skill in Oregon history, first reviewed and recommended approval of the nomination in February 2017. The SHPO submitted the nomination three times (May 2017, April 2018, May 2019) to the NPS, but the federal agency returned the nomination each time over issues related to counting owners and objections.

The public comment period remains open until the NPS makes a final decision, and until then, additional comments may be mailed to the SHPO at Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, Oregon State Historic Preservation Office, EASTMORELAND HISTORIC DISTRICT, 725 Summer Street N.E., Suite C, Salem, OR 97301 or provided by email at SHPO.NationalRegisterProgram@oprd.oregon.gov">ORSHPO.NationalRegisterProgram@oprd.oregon.gov.

The proposed Eastmoreland Historic District is located in Portland, Multnomah County. It encompasses approximately 475 acres and is generally bounded SE Woodstock Blvd on the north; SE Cesar E Chavez Blvd and SE 36th Ave on the east; Berkeley Park and SE Crystal Springs Blvd on south; and SE 27th and 28th Ave on the west. The Eastmoreland Historic District is considered significant for its relationship to community planning and development trends in Portland in the early-twentieth century, most notably for its reflection of City Beautiful planning principles, and for its eclectic yet cohesive mix of early twentieth century architectural

styles.

Properties listed in the National Register are:

  • Recognized as significant to the nation, state, or community;
  • Considered in the planning of federal or federally assisted projects;
  • Eligible for federal and state tax benefits;
  • Qualify for historic preservation grants when funds are available; and
  • Eligible for leniency in meeting certain building code requirements.

State law in Oregon requires local governments to offer a minimal level of protection for properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places; the decisions about how to accomplish that goal reside with local governments, which also have the authority to create and regulate local historic districts and landmarks. 

For questions about City of Portland Land-Use Regulations, please contact:

Brandon Spencer-Hartle, City Planner
Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability 
(503) 823-4641
randon.Spencer@portlandoregon.org">Brandon.Spencer@portlandoregon.org

 

# # #


Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council to offer Measure 110 grant extensions through June 2025
Oregon Health Authority - 09/30/22 2:33 PM

September 30, 2022

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@dhs.oregon.gov

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council to offer Measure 110 grant extensions through June 2025

The Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) on Wednesday approved several proposals intended to protect continuity of services for individuals seeking treatment under Measure 110 and to ensure operational and financial stability for Measure 110 service networks ramping up across Oregon.

The OAC approved a proposal to offer current Measure 110 Behavioral Health Resource Network (BHRN) grantees an option to receive an 18-month grant extension through June 2025. The current grants are due to expire in December 2023. The OAC also approved a process for how to handle Measure 110 service providers that may drop out of service networks.

Offering the potential extensions ensures individuals seeking treatment and services under Measure 110 won’t face a disruption in care in December 2023.

“It also allows providers the predictability and certainty they need to become fully operational,” said Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Behavioral Health Director Steve Allen. “Approving these extensions and the process for replacing service providers further demonstrates our commitment to serving individuals seeking treatment and to working with the OAC and our community partners to provide a stable source of funding needed to fully implement Measure 110,” he said.

Starting in November OHA will ask BHRN service providers whether they are interested in continuing to provide services through June of 2025, with a deadline of expressing an interest in an extension of December 15, 2022.  

Beginning in January, OHA will work on grant extension documents and work with service providers to adjust budgets. The deadline for finalizing grant extensions is June 2023.

The OAC has established and funded 44 Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRNs) under Measure 110. These networks now exist in every Oregon county.

Each one offers a comprehensive array of community-based and culturally specific services for people seeking treatment for drug use and substance use disorders, without regard to their ability to pay.

Replacing service providers

The OAC also approved a process for replacing network providers who wish to stop providing services, if the loss of the provider would leave a service gap. Grantees opting to leave a network must get approval from the OAC and before agreeing to the termination of a grant agreement OAC wants to ensure all required BHRN services are covered. If there is another network partner providing the same service or services as the provider that is dropping out, the OAC has authorized OHA to agree to terminate the grant, but no replacement provider will be sought.

If a BHRN partner’s departure would leave a gap in services for the BHRN, OHA will look to other BHRN partners in the county to provide the additional, service.  If a network partner in the county cannot provide the service, OHA will look to any BHRN provider, and only if no current Measure 110 grantee can provide the service, will OHA look to a new provider to fill the gap. OHA will not agree to the termination of a grant until all required services in a BHRN are provided.

More detailed information on the grant extensions and the process for replacing providers, along with implementation progress updates can be found on the Measure 110 web page. Notices for future OAC meetings can be found here.

OHA has developed a statewide map visualization that shows the BHRNs that have been established, along with a robust dashboard showing the funded services within each service network. OHA has also developed a Measure 110 resources page, which includes contact information for each of the BHRNs.

Read more about Measure 110

Background: In November 2020, Oregon voters passed Measure 110, the Drug Addiction Treatment and Recovery Act of 2020, which became effective Dec. 4, 2020, to better serve people actively using substances or diagnosed with a substance use disorder. In July 2021, the legislature passed SB 755, which amended the act and made it more feasible to implement.

People who provide drug treatment and recovery services and advocates for criminal justice reform wrote Measure 110 in response to the high rate of drug addiction and overdoses in Oregon, and the disproportionate impact of those outcomes on Oregon’s communities of color.

Their goal was to establish a more equitable and effective approach to substance use disorder. OHA is working with the OAC to develop a first-in-the-nation health-based approach to substance use and overdose prevention system, which is more helpful, caring and cost-effective than punishing and criminalizing people who need help.

###


Backyard Burning Delayed
Albany Fire Dept. - 09/30/22 2:01 PM

Linn County Fire Defense Board Chiefs have agreed to delay the start of backyard burning until such time that our geographic area receives enough rain to minimize the risk of fire spread.  The Chiefs will continue to evaluate opening backyard burn season.  Once the risk has diminished, updated information for Linn County residents can be found at:

https://www.linncountyfiredefense.com/ and @linncountyfiredefenseboard

Open burning was scheduled to open on October 1, 2022.  


Late night shooting incident leaves one injured
Salem Police Department - 09/30/22 2:00 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DATE: September 30, 2022

 

Late night shooting incident leaves one injured

 

Salem, Ore. — On Thursday, September 29, at 11:10 p.m., Salem Police patrol officers received the report of a person with a gunshot wound in the area of Bill Frey DR and Portland RD NE.

Arriving officers located a man with a gunshot wound at an encampment in the distance. The officers provided immediate medical aid and carried him out to a location where paramedics provided assistance. The man sustained a life-threatening injury, and paramedics transported him to Salem Health where he is currently receiving treatment.

Officers learned a dispute occurred between individuals at the encampment prior to the shooting incident. Detectives from the Violent Crimes Unit have assumed this active investigation, and at this time, no further information is being released. 

# # #


Oregon Cattlemen's Association Board Votes to Endorse Gubernatorial Candidate Christine Drazan
Oregon Cattlemen's Association - 09/30/22 1:43 PM

The Oregon Cattlemen’s Association Board of Directors has voted to endorse Christine Drazan for Governor. Like most Oregonians, our members see that the state is headed in the wrong direction and the only way to improve the environment for our ranching families and small businesses is to change the political dynamic in Salem. Christine Drazan has a strong voting record of standing up for our values and leading in Oregon. We believe she provides the best opportunity for putting Oregon back on track and supporting our rural and agricultural communities. 

 

Our board also acknowledges that this wasn’t an easy decision; this year’s ballot features more than one candidate who has been a strong advocate for ranching in Oregon. We want to recognize Betsy Johnson for her dedication to OCA and our members during her time in the legislature. 

 

We believe this is the type of election that calls for us to take a position as an organization; it is important to stand up for what we believe in, take ownership, and show leadership - the same qualities we expect in Oregon’s next Governor. The Board expresses its appreciation to the membership and urges every voter to participate in this year’s critical election.


Drug Dealer Targeting Portland High School Students Faces Federal Charges
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/30/22 1:01 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A 42-year-old Portland man is facing federal charges for targeting and selling drugs to local high school students.

Jonathon Ash Clark aka “Jonathan Ash Clark” has been charged by federal criminal complaint with possessing with intent to distribute a controlled substance, distributing a controlled substance to a person under the age of 21, and using a minor in drug operations.

According to court documents, on September 28, 2022, Portland Public Schools officials contacted the Portland Police Bureau (PPB) to request assistance locating a missing student. School officials received word that the student was last observed with Clark, a suspected supplier of drugs for students. To quickly locate the student, responding PPB officers requested the assistance of the bureau’s Narcotics and Organized Crime Unit (NOC), the Oregon-Idaho High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Interdiction Task Force (HIT), and Homeland Security Investigations (HSI).

Investigators soon located the missing student with Clark in Powell Park in southeast Portland. Officers contacted Clark and learned that he had an outstanding arrest warrant in Clackamas County for violating a protective order. During his arrest, officers searched Clark’s backpack and located small amounts of cocaine and MDMA, and a digital scale covered in white powder residue. Clark later admitted to selling drugs to minors.

Clark will make his initial appearance in federal court today before U.S. Magistrate Judge Jeffrey Armistead. The government will seek pre-trial detention.

This case was investigated by HIT, PPB NOC, and HSI. It is being prosecuted by Scott Kerin, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

A criminal complaint is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

###




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Red Cross Cascades is Seeking Additional Disaster Volunteers as More Deploy
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 09/30/22 1:00 PM

Informational events for the public to be held in Portland and Salem

 

Portland, Ore (September 30, 2022)Our hearts go out to everyone affected by Hurricane Ian’s catastrophic damage. We know this is a challenging time, and the American Red Cross is working around the clock with our partners to offer support and comfort to people in need. 

Wednesday night, more than 33,000 people sought refuge in approximately 260 evacuation shelters across Florida to escape Hurricane Ian. As conditions slowly improve over the coming days, response efforts will expand as evacuation centers transition to emergency shelters with more robust services requiring more volunteers.

Some 730 trained Red Cross disaster workers are supporting this relief effort and hundreds more are on the way. So far, Red Cross Cascades Region has sent 30 volunteers from Oregon and SW Washington to Florida, and we anticipate more to deploy in the coming days. In addition, we have volunteers in Puerto Rico to assist people affected by Hurricane Fiona. 

With back-to-back disasters resulting in lengthy recoveries, the Red Cross Cascades Region is looking to add new disaster volunteers. There will be five informational events in the coming week. These events will cover the deployment process and are open to the public. 

 

Volunteer Deployment Info Session – Virtual 

Monday, 10/3 6pm-7pm 

Tuesday, 10/4 10am-11am 

 

Volunteer Deployment Info Session – In Person 

American Red Cross Cascades Regional Office, 3331 N. Vancouver Ave., Portland, OR 97227

Saturday, 10/1 10am-11am 

Monday, 10/3  2pm - 3pm

 

Volunteer Deployment Info Session – In Person

American Red Cross Cascades Salem Office, 1860 Hawthorne NE, Salem, OR 97301

Monday, 10/3  11am - 12pm

 

In-person events have a capacity of 25 people so please RSVP here.

If you can’t attend one of the informational events but are still interested in becoming a Red Cross volunteer, apply at redcross.org/volunteer

 

Click here for b-roll of the Red Cross response in Florida.

 

Visit our Flickr page for pictures of our local volunteers in Florida.

 

Media opportunity this evening (9/30) as a husband & wife volunteer team depart PDX Airport for Florida. Please use media contact information for details.

 

How else can I help?

Donate Blood

To help patients in Florida, the Red Cross Cascades Region has sent around 300 units of blood products to ensure blood remains available for patients in areas impacted by the storm. The storm’s second landfall is currently threatening to cancel more than 130 Red Cross blood drives this weekend in Georgia and the Carolinas possibly causing more than 2,700 blood and platelet donations to go uncollected. We stand ready to send additional support as needed, but we can’t do it without our donors. Please make your appointment to give by using the Red Cross Blood Donor App, visiting redcrossblood.org or calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767).

Oregon and Washington still require face masks be worn at all blood drives and donation sites.

Make a Financial Donation

Our work is just beginning. We will be working side-by-side with our partners to help people in need for weeks and months to come. To help people affected by Hurricane Ian, visit redcross.org, call 1-800-RED CROSS, or text the word IAN to 90999 to make a $10 donation. 

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides comfort to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; distributes international humanitarian aid; and supports veterans, military members and their families. The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to deliver its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or CruzRojaAmericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

 

# # #


Convention Center Spires Will Turn Red in Honor of Fallen Firefighters (Photo)
Portland Fire & Rescue - 09/30/22 12:38 PM
OCC
OCC
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/549/157939/thumb_Light_the_night_2019.jpg

CORRECTION: The Oregon Convention Center spire illumination in honor of fallen firefighters will take place on Saturday, October 8 from dusk to the following dawn.  The original press release date was incorrect.

 

In honor of National Fallen Firefighters Memorial Weekend, the Oregon Convention Center spires will be set alight in red from dusk to dawn on Saturday, October 1st.

“This year’s Light the Night holds a very personal significance for PF&R due to the loss of one of our own, Lt. Jerry Richardson, and the loss of Captain Rick Ilg of Forest Grove, who was married to one of our employees,” says Fire Chief Sara Boone. “We honor the fallen firefighters across the state and around the nation who served with heroism, honor, and distinction, and are devoted to supporting the loved ones left behind.”

Every October, the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation (NFFF) sponsors the National Fallen Firefighters Memorial Weekend, the official national tribute to those firefighters who died in the line of duty during the previous year. Please see the attached flyer with details of this event.

Thank you to the Oregon Convention Center for lighting its spires to mark this occasion.

###




Attached Media Files: Light the Night , OCC

Fatal Crash on Hwy 97-Deschutes County
Oregon State Police - 09/30/22 11:33 AM

On Thursday, September 29, 2022 at approximately 7:39 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Hwy 97 near milepost 117, north of Redmond.

Preliminary investigation revealed a southbound gray Honda Accord, operated by Micah Borden (23) of Madras, crossed into the northbound lane and collided head-on with a red Ford F150, operated by Jon Moore (37) of Redmond. 

Borden sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Moore was injured and transported to an area hospital. 

OSP was assisted by Redmond Fire and Rescue, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office and ODOT.  


Up to $4.5 million in city community development, housing grants available
City of Vancouver - 09/30/22 11:28 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The City of Vancouver estimates there will be up to $4.5 million in Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME Investment Partnerships Program, HOME American Rescue Plan (HOME ARP) and Affordable Housing Fund (AHF) funding available for local projects in 2023. 

Detailed grant application guidelines and a link to the online application are available at www.cityofvancouver.us/cdbg. Pre-applications will open Monday, Oct. 3 and are due by 5 p.m., Monday, Oct. 31. Final applications are due by 5 p.m. Friday, Dec. 16.

This funding supports projects and programs benefitting people who are homeless and those with low to moderate income. Types of eligible activities include homeless supportive services, affordable housing, business assistance, public facilities and other public services. Local governments and nonprofit organizations and agencies may apply.

The City will host a virtual information session about the application process and funding requirements Monday, Oct. 10 from 9 to 10:30 a.m. using Microsoft Teams. Participants can access the meeting at this link or view additional details on the City’s CDBG website. This is an opportunity to ask questions and is particularly helpful for new applicants. The meeting will be recorded and made available online and staff is available to help throughout the process for those who can’t attend. 

Funding decisions will be made by Vancouver City Council in April 2023. Funding awarded through this process will be made available approximately July 1, 2023.

For more information, visit www.cityofvancouver.us/cdbg. To request the application guidelines in another format or language, please contact Samantha Whitley at (360) 487-7952, TTY: (360) 487-8602, WA Relay: 7-1-1 or by email at Samantha.Whitley@cityofvancouver.us.


New Show Opening at Chemeketa Community College Planetarium
Chemeketa Community College - 09/30/22 11:07 AM

Show dates will be Fridays at 7:30 PM. September 30, October 7, 14, 21, 28, November 4, 18, and December 2, 2022.

Salem, Ore., July 72022 — After more than two years, Chemeketa Community College's Planetarium will begin public shows again.  The fall schedule will feature NASA's 21st century Artemis program which is the next step in our mission to explore the universe and land the first woman and person of color on the surface of the Moon.  NASA’s 21st century Artemis program, named after the Greek moon goddess and twin of Apollo, is the next step in our mission to explore the universe. Kari Byron from Crash Test World and MythBusters narrates.

The Chemeketa Planetarium is located in Building 2, Room 171 on the Chemeketa campus off Lancaster Dr.  Use the blue parking lot.  Tickets are sold at the door about 15 minutes before show time.  Seating is limited to 60 and once the show begins no entry will be allowed.  Seat reservations are not taken at this time.  For more information, please call (503) 399-5246. 

Tickets are $5.00 for adults.  Children and Chemeketa students are $4.00.  The ticket booth accepts cash only, no credit cards, however, there is an ATM machine in building 2 on campus.

 

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4000 Lancaster Drive NE Sale

For more than 50 years, Chemeketa Community College has committed itself to transforming lives and our community through exceptional learning experiences in the Mid-Willamette Valley. As the second multi-campus district in Oregon, Chemeketa serves 30,000 students annually at its Salem and Yamhill Valley campuses, as well as Brooks, Eola, Winema, Dallas, Woodburn and Chemeketa Center for Business and Industry (CCBI).

Chemeketa Community College is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer and educational institution. For a disability related accommodation, please contact Accessibility Services at least two weeks prior to this event at 503.399.5192 (TTY/voice) or studentaccess@chemeketa.edu


 


Homicide victim identified (Photo)
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/30/22 10:48 AM
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Update on 9/30/22 at 10:45 a.m.:

The victim in Tuesday’s homicide is identified as 67-year-old Danny Dee Barber.

The investigation is ongoing. No further information will be released at this time.


Update on 9/28/22 at 1:15 p.m.:

The shooting suspect, 41-year-old Anthony Tibbits, will be booked into the Multnomah County jail on a charge of murder in the second degree.

The victim’s identity is being withheld until next of kin notifications and other investigative steps are completed.

The criminal investigation is ongoing. No further information will be released at this time.


Initial press release on 9/28/22 at 11:10 a.m.:

Multnomah County sheriff’s deputies arrested the suspect wanted in the shooting death of a man at a Fairview home on Wednesday, September 28.

Sheriff’s deputies were dispatched to the home in the 600 block of Lincoln Street at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, September 27th. Arriving deputies found the victim deceased in the home’s backyard. A perimeter was established around the property and information of the suspect’s identity and description were shared with law enforcement agencies across the region.

Deputies learned that a woman, who was described as having mobility issues, was still inside the home and needed help getting out. Deputies also learned that the suspect kept weapons inside the home. Based on this information, the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office (MCSO) requested members of the East Metro Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team to respond to the scene. The SWAT team is a group of highly trained Multnomah County Sheriff’s deputies and Gresham Police officers that specialize in high-risk tasks. SWAT members entered the home, and the Gresham Police Department (GPD) launched a drone to provide aerial support and external lighting.

Shortly after entering the home, SWAT members located the woman in the basement area. She was not hurt. SWAT members escorted her out safely.

After performing a methodical, room-by-room search, around 10 p.m., SWAT members announced the home was clear; no additional people nor the suspect were located inside. Subsequently, the perimeter was reduced in size. Neighbors who lived inside the perimeter were allowed to move freely again, after being told earlier in the evening to stay inside for their safety.

Around 5:30 a.m., Wednesday, while detectives were at the home investigating, the suspect, 41-year old Anthony Tibbits, attempted to re-enter the crime scene. Deputies arrested Tibbits without incident.

Tibbits will be booked in the Multnomah County jail. His charges will be released to the public when he is booked into jail.

The victim’s identity is being withheld until next of kin notifications and other investigative steps are completed.

The East County Major Crimes Team (MCT) is leading the investigation. MCT consists of members from the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, Gresham Police Department, Oregon State Police, Port of Portland Police Department and the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office.

We want to extend our appreciation to the residents of Fairview, for their patience during this lengthy event that impacted the Old Town neighborhood. The area is safe; there is no longer a public safety threat.

The investigation is ongoing. No further information will be released at this time.

Image description: Crime scene tape and patrol vehicles parked on the street




Attached Media Files: 2022-09/1276/157866/Homicide_Investigation.jpg

Bend Fire & Rescue Open House Event celebrating National Fire Prevention Week (Photo)
Bend Fire & Rescue - 09/30/22 10:25 AM
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Bend Fire and Rescue Open House

Bend Fire Station North

63377 Jamison Street

Bend, Oregon

 

Saturday, October 15, 2022

10am – 3pm

 

Join Bend Fire & Rescue in celebrating National Fire Prevention Week!

Meet your firefighters and emergency responders

Tour the fire station and climb aboard a fire engine

K9 Bite Demonstration from the Bend Police Department

Watch our Rescue team perform special operations

Learn about wildfire and home safety

Emergency Preparedness from the American Red Cross

Health and Wellness from Saint Charles Health System

See an Airlink Helicopter land and meet their flight medics

 Learn Hands Only CPR and how to stop bleeding emergencies

Plus, delicious Eberhards Ice Cream for everyone!

 

For more information call (541) 322-6300 or visit us at www.bendoregon.gov/fire

 

FREE FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY!




Attached Media Files: 2022-09/6802/157942/FPW22_socialcard1_300.jpg

Greater Vancouver Chamber Revealed The 2022 Business & Leadership Awards' Honorees (Photo)
Greater Vancouver Chamber - 09/30/22 10:16 AM
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PRESS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 30, 2022

 

GREATER VANCOUVER CHAMBER REVEALED THE 2022 BUSINESS & LEADERSHIP AWARDS' HONOREES

During the live streamed award ceremony, the 2022 First Citizen Ron Onslow was introduced.  

Vancouver, WA - The Greater Vancouver Chamber (GVC) announced the 2022 Business & Leadership Awards' recipients in a virtual ceremony, presented by the Port of Vancouver USA. Four outstanding business owners and leaders were recognized for their dedication and service to the community this past year. During the event, the 2022 First Citizen Ron Onslow was introduced.

This year’s winners were awarded for their accomplishments and contributions in four categories that included: Start-Up to Watch, Small Business, Large Business, and Statesperson.

The Start-Up to Watch Award went to POP- LOCAL. This honor looks at those businesses that are up to their first five years and recognizes one that is emblematic of tenacity, vision, and strong business practices. POP LOCAL started in 2020 as a pop-up store to support businesses during the pandemic, and their fast growth led them to open their Vancouver Waterfront location this year to offer a new-age Co-Op space to over 70 small business owners, creators, artists, florists, winemakers, bakers, and more.

The Small Business Award recipient was Evergreen Women’s Health, nominated this year in two categories. This award celebrates the achievements of companies with a team of fewer than 25 employees, that show demonstrable growth and strong business practices. Since opening in Vancouver in 2018, the owner of Evergreen Women’s Health, Dr. Cynthia McNally has offered women a sage, empathetic environment where comprehensive treatment is provided for women of all ages. Evergreen Women's Health goes above and beyond in their downtown Vancouver practice by reaching out to community partners and area businesses bringing workshops and education directly to women and their families.

This year’s Large Business Award was given to the Vancouver Mall. This honor recognizes an organization with over 25 employees that is growing in market share and sales, creates more jobs for the community, and gives back in a way that helps make the community thrive. For 45 years, Vancouver Mall has provided a sustainable and structured environment for businesses to thrive in southwest Washington. Not only is Vancouver Mall committed to its 140 tenants, the importance of community involvement as a top priority leads to partnerships with nonprofits from across the region, and programming that highlights their ability to adapt into a space that offers value and experience to the Greater Vancouver area.

Finally, Representative Paul Harris, from the 17th Legislative District, was awarded as the Statesperson of the Year. The Statesperson Award honors an elected official who works collaboratively with all levels of government to represent the interest of business along with their overall community priorities. Harris's recognition is based on his continual efforts in the state House of Representatives to work in a bi-partisan way to create policy that is beneficial for his district, the county, and the state. Paul has been committed to ensuring that people have jobs, allowing businesses to be productive without fighting excessive regulations, and providing a quality education for children. In the 2022 session Representative Harris successfully secured a $3.2 million appropriation for the Youth Tobacco and Vapor Products Prevention Account to assist with the treatment and prevention of tobacco use.

During the live-streamed event, the 2022 First Citizen Ron Onslow, former Mayor of the City of Ridgefield and retired local business owner was introduced. Onslow is not only a familiar face in Clark County, but a focused, determined and fully committed member of the community. His accomplishments, dedication and service to the southwest Washington region make him worthy of this award. He has been impacting lives in the community throughout his entire career and continues making an impact still.  

“I am very proud to be selected as First Citizen. Even after my retirement, I am still involved in the community, and I love it! I will continue to encourage people to get out there, make themselves available, shake hands, and listen to people”, expressed Onslow about this recognition.   

For the GVC President/CEO John McDonagh, “this was definitely an inspirational evening, learning about the courage of our startups, the tenacity of our large and small businesses and the commitment of our Statespeople”. “The Greater Vancouver Chamber wants to express our gratitude to all the businesses and community members who make this region what it is, and we are so proud to be a part of it! Congratulations to all our nominees, our winners and a special congratulations to our 2022 First Citizen Ron for his decades of commitment to Clark County,” added McDonagh.  

The live-streamed event, available on Facebook Live, was a courtesy made possible by our event sponsors, including: Presenting Sponsor, Port of Vancouver USA; Supporting Sponsors, PeaceHealthCalPortland and Vancouver Clinic; VIP Reception Sponsor, LS Networks; Media Sponsor, The Columbian; and Award Sponsors, Riverview BankNW NaturalHAPO Community Credit UnionPacificSource Health Plans, and Perkins & Co

For more information about the awards and sponsorship opportunities for next year, please contact the Chamber at Chamber@VancouverUSA.com">YourChamber@VancouverUSA.com or go to VancouverUSA.com/Business-Leadership-Awards/.  

 

About the Business & Leadership Awards

Wanting to recognize those businesses who exemplified the motto of the Greater Vancouver Chamber, Moving Business Forward, was the inspiration for the Business & Leadership Awards in 2012. For ten years, the southwest Washington business community has nominated outstanding companies and individuals for recognition.    

About the First Citizen Award

Since 1939, the annual First Citizen Award has been presented to a Clark County resident who models the attributes of good citizenship through leadership, action, civic pride, and cultivates inclusive civic engagement practices. These are individuals who, through their business, volunteering, and philanthropic efforts, improve the lives of those in the community by serving first. For more information about the First Citizens through the years, visit: VancouverUSA.com/Business-Leadership-Awards-Winners/  

About the Greater Vancouver Chamber

SW Washington’s largest business organization, the Greater Vancouver Chamber (GVC), with nearly 1000 members, has been Moving Business Forward in southwest Washington for over 130 years through business advocacy, community building, education, and creating visibility for our members. The Chamber is a supportive alliance of diverse member businesses, individuals, and organizations, working together toward long-term business prosperity. The GVC is the heart of Clark County’s business community, advocating for sound, sensible and dynamic policies that ensure a vital economic climate and prosperity for all. For more information, please visit VancouverUSA.com. 

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Media Assets:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1I1T58OQhzFs49nSn80ZTEd-2jfnG9oqa?usp=sharing

Official Event Link:

2022 Business & Leadership Awards

Video:

https://fb.watch/fSSDeNxzC3/




Attached Media Files: 2022-09/3339/157941/2022_GVC_Business_Leadership_Awards.png

Overnight fire intentionally set by resident
Portland Fire & Rescue - 09/30/22 10:16 AM

Just after 3:45 am, crews were dispatched to reports of a person burning material outside their apartment door on the third. The caller reported that this resident did the same thing earlier in the day at this 5-story apartment building at 1410 SW Broadway. The caller and others began to evacuate the building. Another caller reported that smoke was coming from inside the apartment. 

When firefighters arrived, they went to the fire floor and found light smoke and some burned debris outside this apartment and began to evacuate that floor and the floors above. We requested Police Code 3 (lights and sirens emergency). Officers from Portland Police (PPB) Central Precinct responded. We informed them that the resident was throwing items out of a 3rd story window. Enhanced Crisis Intervention Team (ECIT) officers attempted to communicate with the resident but she was unresponsive. Officers ascended to the 3rd floor and coordinated with PF&R to breach the door and take the resident into custody. She was transported to the hospital by ambulance on a Police Officer Hold, allowing her to be held for mental health evaluation.

Once inside the apartment, crews were able to quickly mitigate the small fire and smoke and the fire was recalled at 4:19. Fire investigators were also on the scene and are waiting for the medical evaluation to be complete before considering arson charges for this fire. No additional injuries have been reported. 

Thanks to the coordinated efforts of PF&R, PPB, and AMR, this emergency concluded without serious harm to this resident or any others. PF&R would like to remind anyone experiencing, or who knows of someone who is experiencing mental health crisis to please call (503)988-4888 for assistance.


Rebuilding Salmon and Steelhead in the Columbia River Basin
NOAA Fisheries - 09/30/22 10:00 AM

https://www.noaa.gov/news-release/rebuilding-salmon-and-steelhead-in-columbia-river-basin

NOAA Fisheries, with input from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, has finalized the Rebuilding Interior Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead report. It identifies a comprehensive suite of actions with the greatest likelihood of making progress toward rebuilding Columbia Basin salmon and steelhead to healthy and harvestable levels. The final report follows the draft, which was released in July, and incorporates feedback from state and tribal fishery co-managers.

The recommended suite of actions to rebuild Columbia Basin stocks include: increasing habitat restoration, reintroducing salmon into blocked areas, breaching dams, managing predators, reforming fish hatcheries and harvest and reconnecting floodplain habitat.

“This is a crucial time for the Columbia Basin’s salmon and steelhead. They face increasing pressure from climate change and other longstanding stressors including water quality and fish blockages caused by dams,” said Janet Coit, assistant administrator for NOAA Fisheries and acting assistant secretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere at NOAA. “The report identifies goals for the recovery of salmon and steelhead that will require a sustained commitment over many decades.”

The actions reflected in the report convey the urgency behind the Columbia Basin Partnership’s 2020 recommendations that merely avoiding extinction of native salmon and steelhead is not enough. Instead, the Partnership called for healthy and harvestable numbers that contribute fully to the culture, environment and economy of the region. The report is not a regulatory document, but rather is intended to inform and contribute to regional conversations and funding decisions.

The Columbia Basin Partnership expressed the hope that in 20 years, the people of the Columbia Basin would view the Partnership's work and the resulting efforts as “a turning point for the return of healthy and abundant salmon and steelhead to the Columbia River.” The report represents one step toward that important goal. 

The final report will inform ongoing dialogues about salmon restoration and decisions regarding allocation of resources for recovery actions. The rebuilding actions can also help restore fish populations to meet long standing commitments to Columbia Basin tribes.

Resources: 

Final Report: Rebuilding Interior Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead 

A Vision for Salmon and Steelhead: Goals to Restore Thriving Salmon and Steelhead to the Columbia River Basin


 


Oregon Parks and Recreation Department accepting public comments on proposed changes to local government grant rules
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 09/30/22 9:09 AM

SALEM, Oregon – Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is accepting public comments on proposed changes to Oregon administrative rules for its Local Government Grant Program.

The deadline for comments is 5 p.m. Nov. 3 for proposed changes to rules on grants to local jurisdictions for acquiring or developing outdoor recreation facilities.

The proposed changes include increasing grant award amounts, updating definitions and updating administrative processes. A copy of the proposed amendments is available on the OPRD Rules web page.

A virtual public hearing will be held at 1 p.m. Nov. 1 for anyone who would like to provide comment or learn more about the proposed rule change. Registration is required to participate at https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_NcskSJx0TOWxc8faPgiYbQ.

Comments may also be submitted by 5 p.m. Nov. 3 via:

After reviewing public comments, agency staff will present a final amended rule for consideration by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission at a business meeting.

The Local Government Grant Program, created after the passage of Measure 76, has awarded over $90 million in grant funding to local governments in Oregon for parks, trails and other outdoor recreation facilities since the program began in 1999.  More information is on the local government grant program website.

Individuals who require special accommodations to view the meetings should contact Katie Gauthier, at least three days in advance of a meeting, by calling (503) 510-9678.

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Hospitals Concerned About Access As Record Financial Losses Mount
Oregon Assn. of Hosp. and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 09/30/22 9:00 AM

Q2 2022 was the worst financial quarter of the pandemic, exceeding record Q1 losses

Lake Oswego, Ore. – September 30, 2022 – Nearly two-thirds of Oregon’s hospitals lost money in the second quarter of 2022, with margins plunging to depths below the lockdown phase of 2020 when all but basic operations ceased, according to new analysis released by Apprise Health Insights. 

The full report is attached. 

Driven by sharply increasing labor and other costs combined with flat revenue, hospital losses from operations collectively reached $111 million in the second quarter. Through the first six months of 2022, hospitals have lost $215 million from operations.

“The wheels have come off the financial model that keeps hospital doors open to patients,” said Becky Hultberg, OAHHS President and CEO. “This dismal financial picture calls into question the ability of some hospitals to provide essential and life-saving care for patients in their communities now and in the future. This should be a wakeup call to all of us who rely on functioning hospitals to take care of our loved ones and neighbors. The system can break, and we are getting ever closer to that breaking point.”

Median Operating Margin continued to decline sharply in Q2, to -4.7%, following the Q1 margin of -2.5%. Both numbers are below where they were at the early stages of the pandemic. Once again, hospital revenue is not covering the cost of patient care. Net Patient Revenue (NPR) fell short of Total Operating Expenses in Q2 2022, and the gap continues to be considerable. Labor costs, hospitals’ largest expense, have risen 16% compared to last year. Labor accounts for at least half of a hospital’s cost, so even a small increase in labor cost has a big impact. 

Oregon’s system is breaking down across the care continuum, from ambulances to hospitals to post-acute, and creating a capacity crisis in hospitals.  The capacity crisis, which threatens patient access to care, is adding to the strain on hospital staff and finances. Around 500 patients per day are ready to be discharged from hospitals into a care setting that better meets their needs, but there is nowhere for them to go. Meanwhile, hundreds more wait in the ED, “boarding” and waiting for a staffed bed to open. Emergency departments are often full, which can mean long wait times for ambulance companies and our community members. 

“A local hospital with an open front door and a closed back door does not work even with the best efforts of our teams,” said Hultberg. “These numbers should create a sense of urgency in addressing the significant challenges in our health care system, like the inability of hospitals to discharge patients.” 

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About OAHHS: Founded in 1934, OAHHS is a statewide, nonprofit trade association that works closely with local and national government leaders, business and citizen coalitions, and other professional health care organizations to enhance and promote community health and to continue improving Oregon’s innovative health care delivery system.

Apprise Health Insights is the most reliable and complete source of hospital data in Oregon. As the data subsidiary of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS), Apprise staff have gathered and analyzed data about Oregon hospitals and health systems since 1985. We strive to provide data, tools, and expertise to help hospitals understand the healthcare landscape in the Pacific Northwest. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-09/1635/157933/Q2_2022_HUFA_Report.pdf

Man Arrested After Getting Into Woman's Car at Gas Station
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/30/22 8:43 AM

At just after 5:00 p.m. on September 28, 2022, call takers from the Willamette Valley Communication’s Center received a 911 call and could hear a woman in the background telling someone to “get out of my car” and “don’t touch me”. The call taker listened to the open line as the caller was saying street names in the background while driving to help the police find her. Dispatchers quickly relayed updates to deputies and officers from the Salem Police Department, helping them locate the woman at a Shari’s Restaurant on Lancaster Drive SE in Salem. The woman was with a man she didn’t know who had taken her car keys and cell phone before they arrived.

Deputies learned the 36-year-old Salem woman was leaving a gas station on Lancaster Drive SE near Macleay Road SE when a stranger got into her car and refused to get out. The woman quickly called 911 and put her phone in her purse, giving out directions to help guide law enforcement to her as she drove him to the restaurant several blocks away. Fortunately, she was not injured during the incident.

Patrol Sergeant Kevin Roberts commended the victim, “her quick thinking to call 911 and the great work by our dispatcher’s made it possible to find the victim quickly and to help get her to safety.” 

The man involved, Danniel Anderson (40), was safely taken into custody by deputies and was lodged at the Marion County Jail for Kidnapping in the First Degree and Harassment.


Board of Forestry hosts a planning retreat on Oct. 12 and 13
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/30/22 8:06 AM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet on Oct. 12 and 13 for a planning retreat. The annual retreat offers the board and department leadership the opportunity to connect and explore policy issues in an informal setting. No public comment or testimony will be accepted during the retreat. The public can attend in-person at Matt Dishman Community Center Auditorium, 77 NE Knott Street, Portland, OR 97212 or observe both days of the retreat via a livestream on the department’s YouTube page.

During this informal annual retreat, board members will reflect on the past year of work together and begin their work on creating the next generation Forestry Program for Oregon. They will focus on: 

  • Discussing the outcomes of the annual self-evaluation.
  • Exploring the Board business approach for the current biennium including work plans, organizational level governance, and public engagement.
  • Expanding upon the relationship between the Board and agency leadership.
  • Hearing from a local urban forestry community voice.
  • Setting the stage to begin substantive work on the Forestry Program for Oregon.

View the agenda and retreat details. 

On Oct. 12, as part of the planning retreat, the Department will host an evening Community Spotlight and Board social to focus on Urban Forestry as part of their planning effort of revisioning Oregon’s forests. This informal event is open to the public and can attend in-person at the McMenamins Kennedy School, 5736 NE 33rd Avenue, Portland, OR 97211. An RSVP is not required, but a courtesy as spacing and parking is limited. RSVP to oardofforestry@odf.oregon.gov">boardofforestry@odf.oregon.gov

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200 or by email at estryinformation@odf.oregon.gov">forestryinformation@odf.oregon.gov.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. Read more information about the board.


Pedestrian Killed by Hit and Run Driver in NE Portland
Portland Police Bureau - 09/30/22 2:09 AM
A pedestrian was killed by a hit and run driver in Northeast Portland.

On Thursday, September 29, 2022 at 11:48p.m., North Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a pedestrian-involved crash in the 4000 block of Northeast 122nd Avenue. When officers and paramedics arrived, they located the pedestrian, who appears to be an adult male. He was deceased at the scene. His identity will be confirmed later by the medical examiner.

The driver involved left the scene and was not immediately located. No suspect or suspect vehicle information is being released at this time.

The Portland Police Major Crash Team is on scene investigating. During the investigation, Northeast 122nd Avenue is closed both directions between Northeast Fremont Street and Northeast Skidmore Street.

If anyone has information about the incident, please contact crimetips@police.portlandoregon.gov, attention Traffic Investigations Unit, and reference case number 22-262805, or call (503)823-2103.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be released when appropriate. This is the 45th traffic fatality of the year in Portland and the 62nd activation of the Major Crash Team.

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Thu. 09/29/22
Drug Dealer Arrested Near School in the Hosford-Abernethy Neighborhood
Portland Police Bureau - 09/29/22 7:03 PM
A drug dealer has been arrested for delivery of controlled substances to minors near Cleveland High School in the Hosford-Abernethy neighborhood.

On Wednesday, September 28, 2022 at 11:13a.m., a Central Precinct officer responded to a report of a missing 16-year-old female, who is a student at Cleveland High School. The officer learned that the female might be with an adult male named Jonathan Ash Clark, 42, of Portland. Clark had an outstanding warrant for his arrest.

The officer requested additional resources, including the Narcotics and Organized Crime (NOC) Unit and Central Precinct Neighborhood Response Team (NRT). The investigation led officers to locate Clark near Southeast Powell Boulevard and Southeast 21st Avenue, where they arrested him. Further investigation revealed that Clark was selling drugs to other minors near Cleveland High.

The missing female was located safe.

Clark was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center on charges of Unlawful Delivery of MDMA to a person under 18, Unlawful Delivery of Cocaine, and an arrest warrant. He is also on a U.S. Marshal's Service hold related to this case pending federal drug charges from the U.S. Attorney's Office. The investigation is continuing and additional charges are possible.

If anyone has information about this case, please contact crimetips@police.portlandoregon.gov attn: NOC and reference case number 22-261262.

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Vancouver Police investigate strong-armed robbery
Vancouver Police Dept. - 09/29/22 5:36 PM

On 09/28/2022 at approximately 10:50 a.m., Vancouver Police responded to a strong-armed robbery that occurred at the Vancouver Mall located at 8700 Vancouver Mall Drive. 

The victim was walking through the parking lot on her way to work, when she noticed a maroon-colored vehicle (resembling a Kia Optima) drive past her and park. Shortly thereafter, a male exited the vehicle, attacked the victim from behind, grabbed her purse knocked her to the ground during the struggle and fled with her purse in the maroon vehicle.  

Video of the incident is posted on the VPD Twitter feed:@VancouverPDUSA

The suspect is described as a black male wearing black hoodie pulled tight around his face.  Witnesses state there were a total of three males inside the suspect vehicle. 

Anyone with information on the identity of this suspect is asked to contact the Vancouver Police Department Major Crimes Unit at (360) 487-7440.  

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OHA lifts health advisories for Short Sand, Rockaway beaches Sept. 29
Oregon Health Authority - 09/29/22 5:13 PM

September 29, 2022

Media contacts: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA lifts health advisories for Short Sand, Rockaway beaches Sept. 29

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today lifted public health advisories for contact with ocean water at Short Sand and Rockaway beaches, both located in Tillamook County.

The health authority issued the advisories on Sept. 27 for Short Sand Beach and Sept. 28 for Rockaway Beach, after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from follow-up tests taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels at these beaches. Contact with the ocean water in these areas no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. Officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

Since 2003, state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0440, or call OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

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Vancouver Police investigate shooting and attempt to identify suspect (Photo)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 09/29/22 4:52 PM
2022-09/385/157928/Shooting_2.jpeg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/385/157928/thumb_Shooting_2.jpeg

Vancouver, Wash. – On September 29, 2022, at approximately 2:21 a.m., a white colored sedan (possibly a BMW) with a black roof pulled up to the McDonald’s drive-through window at 2814 NE Andresen Rd. The driver attempted to order food through the window, however the McDonald’s was closed at the time. The suspect was advised by staff that the business was closed. He then pulled out a gun and fired a shot through the drive-through window (photo attached of bullet hole through window). No one was injured. 

Surveillance cameras captured images of the suspect (photos attached).

Anyone with information on the identity of the suspect is asked to contact the Vancouver Police Department Major Crimes Unit at (360) 487-7440.  

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Attached Media Files: 2022-09/385/157928/Shooting_2.jpeg , 2022-09/385/157928/Shooting_1.jpeg , 2022-09/385/157928/Shooting.PNG

Transit Police holds second public safety mission in September (Photo)
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/29/22 4:20 PM
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After receiving positive feedback from community members and TriMet riders and employees, the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office Transit Police Division (TPD) performed another public safety mission, the second of its kind in September.

In partnership with TriMet, the Milwaukie Police Department and the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, the Transit Police Division focused on the MAX Orange Line in Milwaukie, particularly between the SE Tacoma/Johnson Creek MAX Station and the SE Park Ave MAX Station, the terminus of the Orange Line.

The purpose of these public safety missions is to create a safe and secure environment for riders and TriMet employees, address behavioral issues on the transit system and the immediate, surrounding neighborhoods and prevent crime through deterrence and education.

During the mission, on September 28th, approximately 20 officers and deputies performed high-visibility foot patrols, rode MAX trains and made numerous positive contacts, such as helping riders access trains and fielding questions about the transit system.

Also on hand were members of TriMet’s Safety Response Team (SRT), which provides outreach by offering those on and near the transit system with community-based resources, such as housing referrals, access to substance abuse treatment, first aid and other services. Following the arrest of an individual for a warrant, deputies worked with SRT members to develop a resource plan for the individual once they were released from custody.

In total, during the four-hour event, 40 warnings were issued and three arrests were made, all for existing warrants.

Earlier in September, Transit Police held a mission in partnership with the Portland Police Bureau near the E 122nd Ave MAX Station. You can view that mission’s press release by clicking here.

The missions are part of a larger public safety strategy developed by the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, called the Enhanced Public Safety Initiative. Launched in April 2022, EPSI is a proactive, multi-layered strategy, developed to address the unprecedented levels of gun violence and traffic fatalities in our community, and to create community-engaged policing opportunities. The Sheriff's Office has collaborated with many partner agencies and community organizations, all united in the vision of creating a safe and thriving community for everyone.

Image description: A SRT member and MCSO deputy work together to build a resource plan
Image description: A MCSO deputy provides a physical presence at a MAX station
Image description: A Milwaukie Police officer converses with a community member




Attached Media Files: 2022-09/1276/157926/TPD_Milwaukie_Mission_92822-3.jpg , 2022-09/1276/157926/TPD_Milwaukie_Mission_92822-8.jpg , 2022-09/1276/157926/TPD_Milwaukie_Mission_92822-16.jpg

Oregon Health Policy Board Behavioral Health Committee to hold public meetings in October
Oregon Health Authority - 09/29/22 3:57 PM

September 29, 2022

Media contact: Tim Heider 971-599-0459 timothy.heider@oha.oregon.gov

Oregon Health Policy Board Behavioral Health Committee to hold public meetings in October

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board’s Behavioral Health Committee

When: October 10, and 24, 2022 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Where: Virtual:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1615920136?pwd=UnVjMGxIZzRucGtxN0U2ekl6UWhhQT09

Join by phone: 669-254-5252

Zoom Meeting ID: 161 592 0136

Zoom Passcode: 734636

Agenda: Committee members continue to develop metric concepts.

The meeting will include time for public comment. Comments may also be sent ahead of time to HC@dhsoha.state.or.us">BHC@dhsoha.state.or.us

Purpose: In 2021, the Oregon State Legislature passed House Bill (HB) 2086, which included multiple provisions and called for the establishment of the Behavioral Health Committee of the Oregon Health Policy Board. The committee’s purpose is to increase the quality of behavioral health services and transform Oregon’s behavioral health system through improved outcomes, metrics, and incentives. The committee will direct this work for the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and will be supported by staff from OHA’s Office of Behavioral Health Services

The Behavioral Health Committee will use a health equity lens. It will center the voices of those with lived experience, community members impacted by health inequities, and members of the community with behavioral healthcare knowledge.

Read more about the Behavioral Health Committee.

Questions? Email questions to:  HC@dhsoha.state.or.us">BHC@odhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please call 503-784-3737, 711 TTY, or HC@dhsoha.state.or.us">BHC@odhsoha.state.or.us or at least two business days before the meeting.

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NW Natural to Support Two Local Nonprofits with Multi-Year Environmental Stewardship Grants
NW Natural - 09/29/22 3:24 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. — NW Natural has selected two local organizations to receive its new Conservation Champion Award, totaling over $100,000 in grants.


Building on a long history of investment in local environmental stewardship, the 163-year-old, Portland-based utility launched the award program to support leading environmental nonprofits’ efforts to grow capacity, develop innovative programs or reach new audiences. The three-year award includes an annual cash grant, in-kind resources and multi-level organizational engagement and activation.


The 2023-2025 Conservation Champion Award recipients include the following:

  • Bonneville Environmental Foundation’s “CE - Clean Energy. Bright Futures.” program: Conservation Champion Signature Program Award ($25,000 per year)

    The Bonneville Environmental Foundation’s CE program supports educator leadership, illuminates energy career pathways, eliminates opportunity gaps and inequitable access to these careers, and brings energy education to life in classrooms.
     
  • Oregon Bee Atlas: Conservation Champion Catalyst Award ($10,000 per year)

    The Oregon Bee Atlas is a volunteer initiative based at Oregon State University that focuses on creating a comprehensive and publicly accessible inventory of the state’s 700+ species of wild bees. Volunteer melittologists (i.e., the fancy term for those who study bees) also meticulously document what flowers each bee visits, resulting in an immensely useful database of plants. Finally, volunteers are busy across Oregon communities providing top-notched education on the bees of the state.   

“Through this partnership with NW Natural, CE will work with local educators and utility experts to co-develop a new STEM education opportunity to help inspire the next generation of clean energy leaders,” said Chaun MacQueen, Senior Director of the CE Program at BEF. “Students in the area will be among the first in Oregon to learn to design and build hydrogen fuel cell electric cars as part of a new renewable energy engineering challenge activity.”


“The Oregon Bee Atlas is a one-of-a-kind program in the United States,” said Andony Melathopoulos, Oregon State University’s Pollinator Health Extension Specialist. “The Catalyst Award will help us leverage all the data being collected by our volunteers and turn it into a tool that will help anyone who wants to match the best plants in their region to the bees that live there.” 


“At NW Natural, environmental stewardship has always been an area of philanthropic focus,” said Mary Moerlins, Director of Environmental Policy and Corporate Responsibility at NW Natural. “We are thrilled to be able to make an even greater impact now with the Conservation Champion Award and support the incredibly important work of these two organizations.”


The company donates nearly $1 million to local nonprofits every year, made possible by NW Natural shareholders. The new Conservation Champion Award is intended to be an ongoing part of the company’s community partnership efforts. More information can be found at https://www.nwnatural.com/about-us/community/corporate-contributions.   
 

About NW Natural  
NW Natural is a local distribution company that currently provides natural gas service to approximately 2.5 million people in more than 140 communities through more than 790,000 meters in Oregon and Southwest Washington with one of the most modern pipeline systems in the nation. NW Natural consistently leads the industry with high J.D. Power & Associates customer satisfaction scores. NW Natural, a part of Northwest Natural Holding Company, (NYSE: NWN) (NW Natural Holdings), is headquartered in Portland, Oregon, and has been doing business for more than 160 years. NW Holdings owns NW Natural, NW Natural Renewables Holdings (NW Natural Renewables), NW Natural Water Company (NW Natural Water), and other business interests. We have a longstanding commitment to safety, environmental stewardship, and taking care of our employees and communities. Learn more in our latest ESG Report.
 


County seeks applicants for Community Action Advisory Board
Clark Co. WA Communications - 09/29/22 3:02 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The county manager is seeking applicants to fill several positions on the volunteer Community Action Advisory Board. 

The board is made up of an elected official, a community representative and a low-income representative from each of the five county council districts. There also is one member at large. 

Current open positions include: 

  • Elected officials from the county’s fourth and fifth districts 
  • Low-income representatives from the county’s third, fourth and fifth districts 
  • Community representatives from the county’s first, third and fourth districts. 

Term periods start Jan. 1, 2023, and are three years, ending Dec. 31, 2025. Incumbents have the opportunity for re-appointment to two additional three-year terms. 

The advisory board makes recommendations about local government funding for basic needs, self-sufficiency and housing programs. Members also advocate for services supporting low-income communities, families and persons at local, state and federal levels. 

Clark County is looking to diversify the board composition and encourages people with diverse backgrounds, experiences and perspectives to apply, especially people of color and from historically oppressed or under-resourced communities. 

Interested residents must submit an application and résumé to Rebecca Royce, Clark County Community Services, P.O. Box 5000, Vancouver, WA 98666-5000 or ebecca.royce@clark.wa.gov">rebecca.royce@clark.wa.gov

Application information can be found at https://clark.wa.gov/community-services/caab-community-action-advisory-board or by calling Rebecca Royce at 564.397.7863.

Deadline is Tuesday, Oct. 11.


Downtowns Vancouver and Portland Go Pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month
Pink Lemonade Project - 09/29/22 2:53 PM

Vancouver, WA and Portland, OR – Local, passionate breast cancer fighting organizations, in a show of solidarity, are turning the downtowns PINK in honor of October’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month. In Vancouver, the Allen Gabriel MD sign on 703 Broadway, and in Portland, the Morrison Bridge, the Oregon Convention Center, and Kaiser Permanente. On October 13, the Morrison Bridge and the Oregon Convention Center will change to pink and teal in special recognition of those living with metastatic breast cancer. 

Today, in the Pacific Northwest, 1 in 7 women are at risk for breast cancer, and 1 percent of men will be diagnosed in their lifetime. Breast Cancer Awareness Month is the nationally recognized day to raise awareness for women and men affected by breast cancer. This collaboration of breast cancer organizations offers support for those courageously battling this disease; recognizes the many survivors, their supporters and loved ones; and honors those lives lost to this disease. 

Many women delayed mammograms at the outset of the pandemic which is now resulting in a wave of more advanced diagnoses, more aggressive treatments, and likely more breast cancer related deaths. People of color have a greater risk of dying from breast cancer as well.

“The goal is for this large-scale, public visual display to remind the community about the importance of breast health, screening mammograms and support during and after treatment,” said Susan Stearns, CEO of Pink Lemonade Project. “We also want the pink and teal lights to represent a thank you to all the breast health healthcare workers who tirelessly serve our community of breast cancer patients.”

The local community and breast cancer stakeholders are committed to working together to help maintain services and to fill the gaps for patients’ services and care since the local Komen affiliate closed in spring of 2021. 

“This collaboration was a priority of mine when I joined Pink Lemonade Project in March 2020,” said Stearns. “Breast cancer patients everywhere will benefit when all the community breast cancer groups work well with each other, reach out to more communities, and coordinate better with the healthcare systems.” 

Collaborating organizations include: 

American Cancer Society

Asian Health and Service Center—Asian Cancer Resource and Support Services

Breast Friends

Catch-22

Fighting Pretty

Metavivor

Moore Fight Moore Strong

NAACP Portland

Native American Rehabilitation Association of the NW, Inc.

NW Family Services

Oregon Breasties

Oregon Health Authority--Screenwise

Oregon Women’s Sailing Association/Set Sail for the Cause

PeaceHealth—Breast and Cervical Cancer Program

Pink Lemonade Project 

Pink Phoenix 

Pink Sistas

Row for the Cure/Station L Rowing

Urban League Portland

 

To learn more about Breast Cancer Awareness Month and this collaboration, contact: 

Susan Stearns, CEO, Pink Lemonade Project at 503-706-3991 or susan@pinklemonadeproject.org 

About Pink Lemonade Project

Pink Lemonade Project (PLP), founded in 2010 by Drs. Allen and Cassie Gabriel, was created with the mission to educate, empower, and support people affected by breast cancer. In 2021, PLP helped improve the lives of nearly 1,754 people in SW Washington and Oregon who were impacted by breast cancer. PLP offers retreats, financial aid, a metastatic breast cancer dinner series, peer mentors, virtual/in-person education programs, fitness activities, a book bank for parents and their children, support groups and more. Learn more at pinklemondeproject.org.

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Northwest Association for Blind Athletes to Host Paralympic Experience for Children with Visual Impairments in Salem, OR
Northwest Assn. for Blind Athletes - 09/29/22 2:28 PM

Northwest Association for Blind Athletes (NWABA) will be hosting a 2022 Paralympic Experience in Salem, Oregon on Friday, September 30, 2022. Sixty students from across the state, who are blind and visually impaired, will participate in three paralympic sports including tandem biking, track and field, and goalball. Goalball is a team sport specifically designed for individuals who are blind and visually impaired.) This event will be held at Oregon School for the Deaf (999 Locust St NE, Salem, OR 97301) from 9:00 am – 2:00 pm. This event is open to all K-12 students who are blind or visually impaired in Oregon. Teachers of the visually impaired and parents of children are also welcome. 

We are especially excited this year to have several Paralympians leading the various sessions and inspiring our youth. Paralympians Brett Lewis (Spokane, Washington) will be leading the judo session; Asya Miller (Portland, Oregon) will be leading the track and field session; with Eliana Mason and Calahan Young (both from Portland, Oregon) leading our goalball session.

“We are extremely excited to, once again, deliver this Paralympic Experience to local youth who are blind or visually impaired across Oregon. This truly life-changing opportunity will introduce participants to accessible sports and physical activity, and support NWABA’s long-term vision of enhancing and expanding opportunities throughout the Northwest to ensure every person with a visual impairment is receiving services they need to reach their greatest potential in all areas of life,” said NWABA Founder, President & CEO, Billy Henry.

The event will give K-12 students with visual impairments an opportunity to learn the fundamental skills to participate in Goalball (a sport specifically designed for individuals who are blind and visually impaired), tandem bicycling, judo, and beep baseball. For more information on Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, please contact Stacey Gibbins at 1.360.718.2834, or visit www.nwaba.org.

About NWABA: 
The mission of Northwest Association for Blind Athletes (NWABA) is to provide life-changing opportunities through sports and physical activity to individuals who are blind and visually impaired. A group of students who were visually impaired formed the association in 2007 to ensure that people who are blind were participating in sports and physical activity. Today, NWABA is a rapidly expanding 501(c)(3) charitable organization that provides more than 1,900 children, youth, adults and military veterans with visual impairments tailored programming which improves self-confidence and self-esteem, promotes independence, creates an inclusive community of supporters, and builds the skills necessary to succeed in all areas of life including school and employment.


Tualatin Valley Water District Board of Commissioners Work Session Notice - October 4, 2022
Tualatin Valley Water Dist. - 09/29/22 1:40 PM

The October Tualatin Valley Water District (TVWD) Board work session will be held Tuesday, October 4, 2022, at 6:00 p.m. 

This meeting is only available via phone or the web. If you would like to attend, please use the contact information found below by 4:30 p.m. on October 4.

The Board work session agenda and packet and additional information regarding TVWD are available here.

About TVWD 

TVWD serves about 217,700 customers in parts of Washington County, Oregon. Our service area covers more than 41 square miles including portions of Beaverton, Hillsboro, Tigard and unincorporated Washington County.

TVWD is the managing agency for the Willamette Water Supply System (WWSS), an additional water supply for the region which is being constructed in partnership with the City of Hillsboro and the City of Beaverton. The WWSS includes intake facilities, over 30 miles of pipes, a water treatment plant and two storage reservoirs. The system will deliver fresh, high-quality, treated water from the Willamette River to 400,000 Washington County residents and businesses, and is being built to the highest seismic safety standard to recover quickly after a major earthquake. The investments in the system will provide reliable, quality drinking water for generations to come.


Man posing as teen arrested on multiple sex offense charges
Salem Police Department - 09/29/22 1:00 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DATE:  September 29, 2022

 

Man posing as teen arrested on multiple sex offense charges

 

Salem, Ore. — Twenty-three-year-old Tyler Justin Hausen was arrested yesterday, September 28, on multiple sex offense charges by detectives from the Salem Police Special Victims Unit.

Hausen became the focus of an investigation after detectives received a report he was posing as a 16-year-old adolescent on a social media platform and asked a 13-year-old girl for nude images or sexual favors in exchange for marijuana or liquid nicotine. Detectives also learned Hausen was transmitting sexually explicit images of himself to young girls via the social media platform.

Hausen was lodged at the Marion County Jail for the following crimes:

  • Sodomy, second degree
  • Online corruption of a child, first degree
  • Encouraging child sexual abuse, second degree
  • Possession of materials depicting sexually explicit conduct of a child, first degree
  • Luring a minor
  • Compelling prostitution

Arraignment for Hausen will be at 2:30 p.m. today at the Marion County Criminal Court Annex, and therefore, all inquiries into this investigation must be presented to the Marion County District Attorney’s Office.

The Salem Police Department works closely with Liberty House, an essential partner in law enforcement’s work to investigate and bring justice to the most vulnerable of our community. We invite the community to learn more about the organization’s iRespect&Protect program intended to help teens and parents work through the sometimes-difficult conversations concerning cell phones and social media. 

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Police looking for missing endangered person (Photo)
Milwaukie Police Dept. - 09/29/22 12:50 PM
2022-09/1406/157912/Kyle_Griffeth.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/1406/157912/thumb_Kyle_Griffeth.jpg

UPDATE - Mr. Gfiffeth has been located safe, thank you!

 

Milwaukie Police are looking for 33-year-old Kyle Griffeth who is listed as a missing-endangered person. Kyle was last seen in the morning hours of September 26th, when he stated he was on his way to work. Kyle never arrived at work and has not had contact with family, friends or co-workers. He is described as a white male, 6’2”, 190 pounds with brown hair and blue eyes. Kyle drives a 2004 dark blue Volkswagen Jetta, with Oregon plate #750NEE, which has also not been located. Any information on his whereabouts can be reported to the Milwaukie Police Department at (503) 786-7500 or by calling 9-1-1.  (Please reference case #22-7141.)




Attached Media Files: 2022-09/1406/157912/Kyle_Griffeth.jpg

LCSO Case #22-5455 -- Death Investigation
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/29/22 12:43 PM

UPDATE 09/29/22

36 year old David Roy Keefaver of Junction City has been identified as the victim in this case. While the exact series of events leading up to Keefaver’s death are still not entirely clear, investigators have not uncovered any evidence to indicate that his death was the result of a criminal act.  Investigators do not believe there is any ongoing threat to the public.   

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This morning at approximately 4:32am, the Lane County Sheriff’s Office received a call of suspicious circumstances at a residence in the 30300blk of Lassen Ln. north of Eugene. An area resident called 911 to report that an adult male was throwing himself against the caller’s door.  As deputies responded the caller advised that the male had laid down on the porch and lost consciousness.

Deputies arrived on scene to find the male to be injured and not breathing.  The deputies attempted to perform life-saving measures including CPR.  Medics additionally responded to assist but the male did not survive.  His identity is being withheld at this time.  He is believed to be a resident of another location on Lassen Ln.

Detectives are actively working to determine the circumstances surrounding the male’s death.  His death is being investigated as suspicious at this time.

Additional details will be released as they become available.     


Learn about bats and celebrate Green Neighbors' birthday at free, family-friendly event
Clark Co. WA Communications - 09/29/22 12:42 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Green Neighbors program is turning 10 and inviting the community to its batty birthday party!

Celebrate at the Green Neighbors “Beneficial Bats” birthday party 2-3:30 pm Saturday, Oct. 8 in the Vancouver Community Library Columbia Room, 901 C St. in Vancouver. Advance registration for the event is requested, but not required. Register on the Green Neighbors website

Guest speaker Brandon Burger with Backyard Bird Shop will talk about local bats, how bats support local ecosystems, and what people can do to support them. Bat specimens will be on display and partygoers can take fun photos with props. The event will also include raffle prizes and light refreshments. In honor of Green Neighbors’ waste-reduction mission, guests who bring their own reusable cup will receive a second raffle ticket. 

Green Neighbors is a Clark County Public Health program dedicated to promoting residential waste reduction, composting, and recycling. For more information about the program, visit the Green Neighbors website or email info@clarkgreenneighbors.org


Opioid overdoses increased in 2021, OHA report shows
Oregon Health Authority - 09/29/22 12:24 PM

September 29, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Opioid overdoses increased in 2021, OHA report shows

Fentanyl and methamphetamine help fuel rise in deaths and hospitalizations

PORTLAND, Ore.—Methamphetamines and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl helped drive an increase in opioid overdoses and related deaths in 2021, according to a new Oregon Health Authority (OHA) report.

The report, Opioids and the Ongoing Drug Overdose Crisis in Oregon, shows that overdoses involving multiple drugs – known as polysubstance overdoses – also rose during 2021 and now account for more than half of all fatal overdoses. In addition, hospitalizations increased in 2021 following decreases between 2018 and 2020. Charges for drug overdose-related hospitalizations reached $170 million and overdose-related emergency room charges reached $50 million.

“What this report tells us is that, even as prescription opioids were on the decline in Oregon over the last decade, misuse of synthetic and prescription opioids and other drugs continues to take a heavy toll on everyone in our state,” said Tom Jeanne, M.D., M.P.H., deputy health officer and deputy state epidemiologist at OHA’s Public Health Division, who served as an advisor on the report. “We need to continue our efforts focused on enhanced prevention across the continuum of drug use.”

The report also describes those at highest risk for unintentional drug overdose death in 2021, which were non-Hispanic American Indians and Alaska Natives, non-Hispanic Blacks, and males. At lowest risk were people of Hispanic ethnicity and non-Hispanic Asians and Pacific Islanders.

“These are populations that have been unfairly affected by systemic racism, socioeconomic and political injustices and bias, which through multiple pathways can worsen health outcomes and increase the risk of experiencing a drug overdose,” Jeanne said.

The report noted some trends that presented opportunities for intervention with those at risk of overdoses.

For one, emergency medical services (EMS) personnel administered naloxone, a drug that rapidly reverses an opioid overdose, during 5,556 encounters in 2021, which is up from 3,758 encounters in 2019. In most of these cases the patient was transferred to a medical care facility for treatment.

In addition, there were almost 73,000 emergency department visits and more than 17,000 hospitalizations related to substance use disorder or intoxication issues other than an overdose in 2021. Such health care interactions represent opportunities to connect patients to treatment, prescribe naloxone – a medicine that rapidly reverses an opioid overdose – and provide other supports to reduce their risk for experiencing future overdoses, the report explains.

Providing comprehensive, non-stigmatizing harm-reduction services for people who use drugs is among a number of response strategies the report points to. Others include education for people who have never used drugs; resilience building and support to strengthen protective factors among those at higher risk for drug use and for developing substance use disorder; ensuring universal access to culturally sensitive treatment; and maintaining strong support for people in recovery, including peer support workers.

“Each non-fatal overdose and medical or behavioral health care visit has the potential to be a touch point with prevention, treatment and recovery services to support recovery and reduce the risk of a future fatal overdose,” according to the report.

An overdose is always a medical emergency. Individuals should call 911 before administering naloxone. Oregon’s Good Samaritan Law protects the caller and the person who has overdosed against possession and paraphernalia charges.

OHA’s Naloxone Rescue for Opioid Overdose webpage contains naloxone frequently asked questions and a map showing Oregon pharmacies that distribute the medicine. In Oregon, naloxone is available without a prescription. Anyone actively using opioids, or other illicit substances, can get naloxone and other harm-reduction materials at no cost through syringe service programs. Syringe service programs are available to anyone who uses drugs, regardless of whether they inject them. Here is OHA’s list of syringe and needle exchange services available in Oregon.

OHA has developed the following guidance for people who use drugs:

  • Unless a pharmacist directly hands you a prescription pill, assume it is counterfeit and contains fentanyl.
  • Assume any pills obtained from social media, the internet or a friend are counterfeit and contain fentanyl.
  • If you are using pills, don’t use alone and always have naloxone on hand and visible.
  • Test your drugs with fentanyl test strips before you use them. Fentanyl test strips can often be accessed at local harm-reduction sites.

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OHA seeking applicants for peer run respite programs in Oregon. Deadline is Oct.6
Oregon Health Authority - 09/29/22 11:57 AM

September 28, 2022

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@oha.oregon.gov

OHA seeking applicants for peer run respite programs in Oregon. Deadline is Oct.6

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has issued a Request for Grant Applications (RFGA) seeking state-based organizations to operate peer-run respite programs for people who experience a mental health crisis or emotional distress that may lead to a higher-level of care.

The program, established under House Bill 2980, will distribute $6 million in grants to operate up to four peer-run centers in four geographic regions: The Portland-Metro area, central or eastern Oregon, southern Oregon and the Oregon coast. At least one of the centers must offer culturally specific services.

Peer-run respites are voluntary, non-clinical, short-term residential programs operated in home-like settings for people experiencing emotional distress. The respites are staffed by people with lived experience and run independently of other behavioral health support providers.

The program is being operated through OHA’s Office of Recovery and Resilience. More about the grants and the program can be found here.

Eligibility is limited to peer-run organizations currently operating in Oregon. Information on how to apply for the programs, including the RFGA can be found here. The deadline for RFGA applications is Thursday, Oct. 6.

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Oregon Resource Allocation Advisory Committee meets Sept. 30, via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 09/29/22 11:33 AM

Sept. 30, 2022

Contacts: Liz Gharst, 971-666-2476, eth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us">Elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Lisa Bui, esourceallocation@dhsoha.state.or.us">oha.resourceallocation@dhsoha.state.or.us or contact by phone at 503-576-9321 (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon Resource Allocation Advisory Committee meets Sept. 30, via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Resource Allocation Advisory Committee (ORAAC).

When: Sept. 30, 2022 noon to 2:00 p.m

Join meeting by computer or video link:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1604980686?pwd=RmVTVk5aTU0rNkpyWkhQM3JjYUZIdz09

Join meeting by phone:

Phone # 669-254-5252

Meeting ID: 160 498 0686

Passcode: 828115

Agenda: Welcome; Health Justice vs Health Equity, Community Systems and Health Justice, Healthcare Systems and Health Justice.

Oregon Resource Allocation Advisory Committee (ORAAC) meeting. Meeting materials are posted to the ORAAC website. https://www.oregon.gov/oha/Pages/Resource-Allocation-Advisory-Committee.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • CART (Communication Access Real-time Translation)
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

Everyone is welcome to the meetings. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please call 971-304-6236 or write esourceallocation@dhsoha.state.or.us">oha.resourceallocation@dhsoha.state.or.us


Battle Ground Public Schools Director of Career and Technical Education earns national recognition (Photo)
Battle Ground Public Schools - 09/29/22 11:32 AM
Battle Ground Public Schools Director of Career and Technical Education Cindy Arnold
Battle Ground Public Schools Director of Career and Technical Education Cindy Arnold
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/20/157858/thumb_Cindy_Arnold.jpg

Cindy Arnold, Battle Ground Public Schools’ director of career and technical education, has been named the Association for Career and Technical Education’s Region V Administrator of the Year. She is one of five finalists for the 2023 national title, which will be announced on Nov. 30, 2022. 

In her current role, Arnold launched middle-school CTE programs by creating design modeling and robotics classes that pair woodworking with science, technology, engineering and math. All six of the district’s middle schools now offer this successful program. 

Arnold also developed several new classes and programs at the high school level, including an HVAC, plumbing and electrical program; computer programming classes; and math for health care professionals, a unique offering in the state of Washington. In addition, Arnold created Battle Ground Public Schools’ STEM strategic plan, which has since been used as a model for other districts.

Prior to her current position, she was principal at Captain Strong Primary, where she implemented a leadership program to help students develop their skills. They acted as greeters as their peers entered the building in the morning, led assemblies, oversaw aspects of their classrooms, served as recess monitors and even participated in teacher interviews. The result: Captain Strong was named a School of Distinction by the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, and the school’s scores on standardized math and reading scores increased.

“We should be providing a wide range of learning experiences for all of our students, spanning many different career tracks, fields and industries,” said Arnold. “This type of learning should not be reserved for CTE and seventh through 12th grades alone.” 

Arnold also is a former assistant principal/athletic director at Prairie High School and taught business at Clark College and Columbia River High School in Vancouver Public Schools. Her private sector experience includes working as an office manager and biological laboratory technician. 

She holds a bachelor’s degree in business and biology education from Truman State University and a master’s degree in educational leadership from Washington State University.

The Administrator of the Year award recognizes administrative CTE professionals at the school, district, county, state or federal level who have demonstrated leadership in ensuring teacher and student success and have made significant contributions toward innovative, unique and effective career and technical education programs.

Region V includes Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, North Dakota, Nebraska, Nevada, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Guam.




Attached Media Files: Battle Ground Public Schools Director of Career and Technical Education Cindy Arnold

PPB and PSU Announce Conclusion of Community-Based Crime Reduction Grant
Portland Police Bureau - 09/29/22 11:12 AM
A United States Department of Justice grant between the Portland Police Bureau and Portland State University has demonstrated through data that trust between police and the community improves when there is follow-up contact to victims of crimes and when police provide non-enforcement walking beats.

Research has found that criminal victimization leads to the development of negative attitudes toward the police. This is particularly true among people who use online systems to report their crime. Most law enforcement agencies send a single automated email back to the victim with an incident number for use with insurance claims. North Precinct began addressing this through this grant by adding enhanced victim follow-up contacts. Officers try to contact each victim via phone or email two weeks after their initial report. Using a script based on the concepts of procedural justice, they communicated concern for the victim, gave the victim an opportunity to voice complaints about their experience, and they offer guidance on preventing re-victimization. The team’s data analysis showed satisfaction for the police rose from around 15% before the follow-up intervention to around 45% after the intervention, which is a significant achievement.

PPB has created the attached video highlighting the comprehensive work completed over the past few years: https://youtu.be/Hz2dx_zffX8

PPB's North Precinct and Portland State University (PSU) applied for and received the grant in 2018. With its team of Bureau members and researchers in PSU’s Criminology and Criminal Justice Department, this grant brought a strategic approach that leveraged the knowledge of neighborhood residents. The focus was to discover if police could improve community satisfaction and trust through different interventions in the Parkrose and Hollywood neighborhoods.

Unfortunately, the pandemic and the civil unrest in 2020 impacted the grant team’s ability to perform these proposed interventions as previously developed during the planning phase. Therefore the grant team pivoted its plan into the follow-up calls and walking beats. Even during the challenges of these times for the law enforcement profession, data collected during this project suggests police can improve community trust one conversation at a time during victim follow-up or when walking with community members in their neighborhoods.

“I am proud of our Bureau members who continued to work on this project under sometimes difficult and stressful circumstances,” said Deputy Chief Mike Frome. “I also appreciate the continued partnership with Portland State University and their researches. And of course, without community involvement from the two neighborhood associations, this grant would have never be able to produce this type of quality work.”

The grant team thanks the Parkrose and Hollywood neighborhood associations and their community members who engaged in this project and helped strengthen the bond between police and community over the lifespan of this project.

###PPB###

Marion County Bat Tests Positive for Rabies
Marion County - 09/29/22 10:36 AM

SALEM, Ore. — Public health officials are warning area residents to take precautions after a bat with rabies was found in a home located in the Salem area of Marion County, Oregon. The bat was tested on Monday, September 26, at the Oregon State University, Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory.

According to Oregon Health Authority, bats are the most common carriers of rabies in this state. About 8-10% of the bats tested for rabies are positive every year. So far, in 2022, seven bats have tested positive for rabies in Oregon.

Authorities emphasize the main protection for humans is to make sure pets are vaccinated and to avoid contact with stray animals and wildlife. Public health officials advise taking extreme precautions before attempting to handle a bat. If it is necessary to pick up a bat, it is best to wear heavy gloves, use a shovel or both. 

Do not approach bats, wildlife, or other mammals seen exhibiting odd behavior. Sick bats may be seen flopping around on the ground or otherwise acting unusual. If you find a sick bat or other sick wildlife on your property, take children and pets indoors.

If you do have an exposure (e.g., scratch or bite) from a bat, immediately clean the wound and seek medical attention. Report the incident to Marion County at 503-588-5346. If the bat has been captured, do not crush the bat or throw it away, as intact bats can be tested for rabies, which can help people avoid needing post-exposure rabies shots. 

If your pet has encountered a bat or been bitten by a wild animal, contact your veterinarian immediately or call the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife at 866-968-2600.

For more information about rabies, please visit the Oregon Health Authority, Public Health Division website at: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/DISEASESAZ/RABIES/Pages/rabies.aspx.

You can also visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention website at: https://www.cdc.gov/rabies/index.html.


Fire Defense Board lifts Burn Ban for Multnomah County, effective October 1st
Portland Fire & Rescue - 09/29/22 10:16 AM

September 29, 2022

Media Contact: 

Multnomah Fire Defense Board Chief, Scott Lewis 
Scott.Lewis@GreshamOregon.gov
503-618-2355

Multnomah County, Ore. - Fire Defense Board Chief Scott Lewis has lifted the outdoor burn ban in all areas of Multnomah County effective October 1, 2022. The burn ban has been lifted due to the cooler temperatures, increase in nighttime moisture, and the return of rainfall, which has improved the moisture content of the local ground cover.

Keeping in mind the recent wildfires throughout Oregon, however, please ensure any outdoor burning is conducted as safely as possible.

Recreational campfires, fire pits, and agricultural burning is now permitted on DEQ approved burn days. Yard debris and open burning is allowed only in permitted areas. Yard debris and open burning is never permitted in the City of Portland. 

Yard debris burning in Troutdale and Fire District 10 will begin on Saturday, October 1st with DEQ approval.

Yard debris burning in Gresham, Fairview, and Wood Village will begin on Saturday, October 15th with DEQ approval.

Check with your local Fire Department/District for more information. For updated information please call the burning information line at:

--503-618-3083 for Gresham, Troutdale, Wood Village, Fairview, Fire District 10
--503-695-2225 for Corbett Fire District 14 
--503-621-1242 for Sauvie Island District 30
--Portland Fire & Rescue's Fire Marshals Office, 503-823-3770

For additional information, contact Gresham Fire and Emergency Services at 503-618-2355.

To learn more, visit www.greshamoregon.gov or visit us on Twitter at @CityofGresham.

###


Division of Financial Regulation warns student loan borrowers about scams
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/29/22 10:14 AM

SALEM – The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation (DFR) is warning people about the uptick in student loan scams. With recent changes to federal student loan programs, scammers are bombarding borrowers with fraudulent offers for loan forgiveness and refinancing.

The division reminds people to ignore phone calls, emails, social media messages, and other unsolicited messages from people claiming they can help you get your student loans forgiven faster or telling you that you should refinance your loan. Do not accept these unexpected offers without first checking to see if the offer is legitimate. Chances are it is a scam. Scammers may use the phrases such as “pre-enrollment for all loan forgiveness” or “you must apply within the next 24 hours.”

“There are no fees associated with signing up for student loan forgiveness, so don’t fall for these scams,” said TK Keen, administrator for DFR. “Everyone will have the same opportunities and there are no ways to cut in line and get loans forgiven faster.” 

There are recent and upcoming changes to federal student loans and forgiveness of loans, as well as the Biden Administration’s one time cancellation. With those changes, unfortunately, there are people who will prey on those seeking help.

“There is not yet an application available for President Biden’s relief plan,” said Lane Thompson, Oregon student loan ombuds. “People can get alerted once the program is live by visiting the U.S. Department of Education website and check the box title ‘NEWII Federal Student Loan Borrower Updates.’”

One helpful reminder is that if it is not a .gov website, it is not an official site of the federal government. The key signs to watch out for are if they tell you there is an urgency, a guarantee, and any secrecy.

“Any time the Department of Education announces changes to the student loan program, scammers come out of the woodwork,” Thompson said. “The advice remains the same: if it seems too good to be true, it likely is.”

If you have questions regarding your student loan’s eligibility, it is best to go to studentaid.gov. If you believe you received incorrect information from your servicer, email .bankingproducthelp@dcbs.oregon.gov">dfr.bankingproducthelp@dcbs.oregon.gov or call our consumer hotline at 888-877-4894 (toll-free).

###

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and dfr.oregon.gov.​​


Union Gospel Collecting Winter Gear for the Homeless at Washington Square Mall
Union Gospel Mission, Portland - 09/29/22 10:13 AM

For Immediate Release                                                Contact: Courtney Dodds 

September 29, 2022                                                      971-275-2334

 

Union Gospel Collecting Winter Gear for the Homeless at Washington Square Mall

 

Portland, Ore., - On Saturday, October 1st between 12-2 pm Union Gospel Mission in partnership with 99.5 The Wolf will be at Washington Square Mall collecting winter essentials to help our low-income neighbors and those experiencing homelessness. Kristin from the WOLF’s morning show will also be there along with UGM’s team to accept donations. 

Bring your donations to Washington Square Mall across from Red Robin off of Washington Square Road9585 SW Washington Square Rd, Portland, OR 97223

Items Needed: pants, new undergarments, sleeping bags, boots, and coats.

Donations will be distributed during the months of October and November through Union Gospel Mission’s Operation Overcoat campaign.

"We really appreciate this, the clothes really make a difference to us." -2021 Operation Overcoat Recipient

If you would like to learn more about Operation Overcoat and Union Gospel Mission visit www.ugmportland.org

About Union Gospel Mission: Union Gospel Mission’s purpose is “Feeding the hungry, restoring the addict and loving our neighbor.” Union Gospel Mission has been serving Portland since 1927. Union Gospel Mission provides meals and care for the homeless and operates LifeChange -- a transformative recovery program for men, women and children. Contact Union Gospel Mission at 503-274-4483, ugmportland.org or on social media @ugmpdx 

 

# # #

 


Detectives arrest two in neighborhood shooting incident
Salem Police Department - 09/29/22 10:00 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DATE: September 29, 2022

 

Detectives arrest two in neighborhood shooting incident

 

Salem, Ore. — On Tuesday, September 28, detectives from the Salem Police Violent Crimes Unit arrested two individuals sought in an August 28 shooting incident in the 400 block of 24th ST NE.

Israel Fausto Anaya, age 27, and Aaron Max Anaya, age 19, were arrested in their Lebanon residence after the investigation led detectives to the pair who are brothers.

Anaya and Anaya were indicted by a Marion County Grand Jury on September 16. Israel Anaya was charged with the following:

  • Attempted murder in the second degree with a firearm
  • Assault in the first degree with a firearm
  • Unlawful use of a weapon, two counts
  • Felon in possession of a weapon

Anaya also had an outstanding warrant for a parole violation.

Aaron Anaya was charged by the Grand Jury on the following:

  • Attempted murder in the second degree with a firearm
  • Assault in the first degree with a firearm
  • Unlawful use of a weapon

The Salem Police detectives coordinated with the Linn-Benton Counties Sheriff’s Office SWAT Team and served a search warrant at the family home where the brothers were taken into custody. Detectives recovered eight firearms in the search.

The Anaya brothers are currently lodged in the Marion County Jail. All further inquiries into this investigation must be directed to the Marion County District Attorney’s Office.

# # #


Clackamas County Fire Agencies Delay Open Burning Season
Canby Fire Dist. - 09/29/22 9:46 AM

Please see the attached news release from the Clackamas County Fire Defense Board regarding the delay in the opening of burn season. 




Attached Media Files: News Release Attachment

Oregon City Mayor Denyse C. McGriff Begins Term and Applications Now Available for the Open Commission Seat
City of Oregon City - 09/29/22 9:42 AM

Oregon City Commissioners certified the election results from the recent Special Election confirming Denyse C. McGriff as Mayor of Oregon City. Mayor McGriff was sworn in on September 21, 2022, and her term will expire December 31, 2022. 

On August 23, Clackamas County Elections Division conducted a Special Election for the City of Oregon City to vote to fill the vacant Mayor position on the City Commission. Clackamas County returned the canvass of votes for City Commissioners who officially certified the election results and accepted the canvass of votes at their September 21, 2022 meeting.   

The City of Oregon City is now accepting applications for appointment of Commissioner on the City Commission to fill the seat vacated by Mayor McGriff.  Applications will be accepted until 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, October 12, 2022. The appointment will be valid through the first Commission meeting in January 2025. Options for applying include submitting an online application  (https://www.orcity.org/cityrecorder/application-city-commission-appointment), downloading the form and returning it via email, mail, dropping it off at the City Hall front desk or leaving it in the Utility Billing Drop-box.

Please submit the application to:

City of Oregon City
Jakob Wiley, City Recorder
625 Center Street
Oregon City, OR 97045

ecorderteam@orcity.org">recorderteam@orcity.org


Please note that interviews will be conducted at a Special Commission Meeting, scheduled between October 18 and 28, 2022.  You must be available for this interview to be considered for the Commissioner position.

September 29 – October 12, 2022                 Advertisement of Open Position

October 12, 2022 at 4:00 p.m.                      Deadline to receive applications

October 18 - 28, 2022                                     Conduct interviews at Special City Commission Meeting and vote to appoint

November 2, 2022 at 7:00 p.m.                     Oath of Office for New Commissioner


Background: The City Commission is comprised of five members elected in staggered general election years, with the Mayor elected independently of the four Commissioners. This appointment will be in effect until the first City Commission meeting in January 2025. This Commission position vacancy is filled through appointment by a majority vote of the City Commission. 

If you have any questions, please contact Jakob Wiley, City Recorder, at 503-496-1509 or ecorderteam@orcity.org">recorderteam@orcity.org

 


In-person Manufacturing Day returns to OMIC facilities (Photo)
PCC - 09/29/22 9:38 AM
2022-09/40/157899/Suzanne_Bonamici_watches_demo.jpg
2022-09/40/157899/Suzanne_Bonamici_watches_demo.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/40/157899/thumb_Suzanne_Bonamici_watches_demo.jpg

SCAPPOOSE, Ore. – For the first time since 2019, Portland Community College and the Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Center (OMIC) will be collaborating with regional industry, education and workforce development partners to host an in-person “Manufacturing Day” event in Columbia County. 

The annual event, which had shifted to a video format the past two years due to the pandemic, will be held at PCC’s Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Training Center (34001 NE Wagner Ct.) and the OMIC Research and Development Center (33701 Charles T. Parker Way), both in Scappoose.

Manufacturing Day will be free and open to the public from 2:30-3:15 p.m, on Friday, Oct. 7 with students visiting earlier in the day, from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Parking is available at both sites.

Part of the national MFG Day effort, the event is the largest of its kind in Oregon with more than 350 students from around the region participating in 2019. The event features live demonstrations of 3D printing, laser cutting and virtual welding, as well as engaging hands-on activities that provide regional students and community members an opportunity to learn about the world of advanced manufacturing. They also get an up-close look at the OMIC initiative, which includes PCC’s recently completed workforce training center.

PCC’s OMIC Training Center, built from the 2008 and 2017 PCC bond measures, is designed to inspire and prepare Oregon’s workforce for good-paying jobs and careers in advanced manufacturing. In the end, students benefit from industry-driven training and Oregon employers are able to hire workers who have the most current skill sets.

The training center offers a variety of manufacturing-related training programs, ranging from traditional career and technical education to apprenticeship models that combine on-the-job training with classroom and lab instruction. With an emphasis on craftsmanship, professionalism, and placing graduates into high-demand manufacturing jobs, students can complete an apprenticeship program and/or an associate degree or certificate leading to an advanced degree.

Learn more at www.pcc.edu/locations/columbia-county/
 

About OMIC Research and Development: OMIC R&D is a world-class collaborative environment bringing together industry, higher education and government in partnership to develop new tools, techniques and technologies to address near-term manufacturing challenges through applied research and advanced technical training. For more information, visit www.OMIC.us

 

About Portland Community College: Portland Community College is the largest post-secondary institution in Oregon and provides training, degree and certificate completion, and lifelong learning to more than 50,000 full- and part-time students in Multnomah, Washington, Yamhill, Clackamas, and Columbia counties. PCC has four comprehensive campuses, 10 education centers or areas served, and approximately 200 community locations in the Portland metropolitan area. The PCC district encompasses a 1,500-square-mile area in northwest Oregon and offers two-year degrees, one-year certificate programs, short-term training, alternative education, pre-college courses and life-long learning. 

Visit PCC news on the web at http://news.pcc.edu/




Attached Media Files: 2022-09/40/157899/Suzanne_Bonamici_watches_demo.jpg , 2022-09/40/157899/virtual_welding.jpg

Answerland Advisory Committee Meeting 10/7/22
State Library of Oregon - 09/29/22 9:03 AM

 

Contact:    Wendy Cornelisen

State Librarian

503-378-4367

 

October 4, 2022 9:00-10:15am 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Salem, Ore - The Answerland Advisory Committee (AAC) will meet on Tuesday, October 4, 2022 from 9:00am to 10:15am Pacific Time online. This is a public meeting; those who would like to attend should contact Jennifer Cox (971-600-4992 or jennifer.cox@slo.oregon.gov).

The AAC advises the State Library and the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Advisory Council on Answerland, and its membership is drawn from all areas of the state and representing the public, school, academic, and special libraries that use or provide service for Answerland. 

Questions or concerns can be addressed to Jennifer Cox (971-600-4992 or jennifer.cox@slo.oregon.gov).

Sign language interpretation will be provided for the public if requested 48 hours before the meeting; notice 72 hours before the meeting is preferred. Handouts of meeting materials may also be requested in alternate formats 72 hours before the meeting. Requests may be made to Jennifer Cox (971-600-4992 or jennifer.cox@slo.oregon.gov).

 

AGENDA 

9:00      Welcome

9:10      Review agenda, approve minutes, and review action items 

9:30      Open Forum

9:40      Updates from the Coordinator    

10:00    Quality Team updates

10:10    Wrap up and action item review

10:15    Adjourn

 

Any person may address the Answerland Advisory Committee at this meeting on any topic. 

NOTE: The times of all agenda items are approximate and subject to change.


 

 




Attached Media Files: 2022-09/1069/157896/AAC_meeting_press_release_-_October_2022.pdf

MESD Board Equity and Inclusion Committee meeting 10/6 at 1:00 p.m.
Multnomah ESD - 09/29/22 8:33 AM

The Multnomah Education Service District Board Equity and Inclusion Committee will meet at 1:00 p.m. on Thursday, October 6, 2022.
This meeting will be held virtually via Zoom.

https://multnomahesd-org.zoom.us/j/89139236401?pwd=T1p6cUp1STB6dEt2VGp6YlA1Szhwdz09

Meeting ID: 891 3923 6401
Passcode: 642745


Keep leaves out of storm drain with free leaf disposal coupons
City of Vancouver - 09/29/22 8:29 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – With the arrival of autumn and leaves falling and covering the ground, the annual Fall Leaf Coupon Program, courtesy of City of Vancouver and Clark County public works, can assist with proper disposal of leaves. The popular program allows residents to bring leaves to designated drop-off sites for free disposal. Keeping leaves out of streets helps prevent clogged stormwater drains and localized flooding.

From Oct. 1 to Dec. 31, Vancouver and Clark County residents can drop off up to five cubic yards of leaves at one of the four designated sites shown on the coupon, at no charge. Loads of leaves must be covered, and all bags of leaves must be emptied out at the disposal site. Branches and other yard debris, including loads with a mix of leaves, are not covered by the coupon and will be charged at the regular disposal price. Coupons are intended to be used by individuals, not businesses.

Coupons are required and must be filled out with the name of an individual on the coupon, not a business, to be valid. Some drop-off sites may have a few spare coupons on hand this year, but residents are strongly encouraged to print, clip or get coupons in advance, before making the trip to drop off leaves. Coupons in Spanish, Russian and Vietnamese are also available.

Here’s how to get your coupons for free leaf disposal:

- Print out a coupon from City of Vancouver Solid Waste webpage: www.cityofvancouver.us/leafcoupon

- Print out a coupon from Clark County Green Neighbors webpage: www.clarkgreenneighbors.org

- Clip a coupon from Waste Connections’ annual Recycling newsletter, which will be sent in October to all residences in Clark County. Coupons are also available on Waste Connections’ webpage: www.wcnorthwest.com/leaves

- Call Vancouver Solid Waste at 360-487-7160 or email solidwaste@cityofvancouver.us to have a coupon sent to you by mail

- Pick up a printed coupon from Vancouver City Hall, City of Vancouver Utility Services and other City and County offices

There are four participating designated leaf disposal sites this year, shown below and printed on the coupon. 

- H & H Wood Recyclers, 8401 N.E. 117th Ave. Phone: 360-892-2805. Hours: 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday in October, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in November/December, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.

- McFarlane’s Bark, 8806 N.E. 117th Ave. Phone: 360-892-6125. Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday in October/November; closed Sunday in December.

- Triangle Resources, 612 S.E. Union St, Camas. Phone: 360-834-7253. Hours: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday- Friday. Closed Saturday and Sunday.

- West Van Materials Recovery Center, 6601 N.W. Old Lower River Road. Phone: 360-737-1727. Hours: 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday, and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Closed Sunday. Check webcam for real-time lines before going: www.columbiaresourcecompany.com/west-vancouver-material-recovery.

In Vancouver, property owners are responsible for managing the leaves from their trees. Deliberately raking or blowing leaves into the street and leaving them there is unlawful. Street sweepers are generally no match for big, wet, heavy piles of leaves. The free leaf disposal program is intended to provide options for Vancouver residents with a lot of trees, while also protecting our stormwater system and streets from flooding.

Other resources for leaf disposal include on-site composting or subscribing to Waste Connections’ optional Organics service, available within the City of Vancouver and parts of Ridgefield, or optional yard debris service, available in portions of Clark County. Visit www.wcnorthwest.com to learn more.

View our video showing how the City of Vancouver and residents can work together to manage fall leaves: https://youtu.be/jr3ogvYlY6E.


The summer outdoor burn ban has been lifted in all areas of Multnomah County
City of Gresham - 09/29/22 8:23 AM

Multnomah County, Ore. - Fire Defense Board Chief Scott Lewis has lifted the outdoor burn ban in all areas of Multnomah County effective October 1. The burn ban has been lifted due to the cooler temperatures, increase in nighttime moisture, and the return of rainfall, which has improved the moisture content of the local ground cover.

Keeping in mind the recent wildfires throughout Oregon, however, please ensure any outdoor burning is conducted as safely as possible.

Recreational campfires, fire pits, and agricultural burning is now permitted on DEQ approved burn days. Yard debris and open burning is allowed only in permitted areas. Yard debris and open burning is never permitted in the City of Portland. 

Yard debris burning in Troutdale and Fire District 10 will begin on Saturday, October 1 with DEQ approval.

Yard debris burning in Gresham, Fairview, and Wood Village will begin on Saturday, October 15 with DEQ approval.

Check with your local Fire Department or District for more information. For updated information please call the burning information line at:

--503-618-3083 for Gresham, Troutdale, Wood Village, Fairview, Fire District 10
--503-695-2225 for Corbett Fire District 14 
--503-621-1242 for Sauvie Island District 30
--General Information for Portland Fire & Rescue, 503-823-3700

For additional information, contact Gresham Fire and Emergency Services at 503-618-2355.

To learn more, visit GreshamOregon.gov/Fire-and-Emergency-Services or follow us on Twitter at @CityofGresham.

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OSP Fish & Wildlife seeking public assistance with poached Elk - Columbia County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/29/22 7:00 AM
2022-09/1002/157882/Poached_Elk_Vernonia.jpg
2022-09/1002/157882/Poached_Elk_Vernonia.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/1002/157882/thumb_Poached_Elk_Vernonia.jpg

On September 23, 2022, at approximately 6:40 a.m., OSP Fish & Wildlife Troopers received information that a large bull elk was shot and killed with a rifle on private property off Stoney Point Road in Vernonia. 

OSP Fish & Wildlife Troopers are seeking public assistance identifying the person(s) who shot the bull elk and left it to waste. 

OSP Fish & Wildlife Division is urging anyone with information about this case to call the Oregon State Police Tip-line at 1-800-452-7888, OSP (677), or email at TIP@osp.oregon.gov. Please reference case number SP22256433.

 

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators

The Turn In Poachers (TIP) program offers preference points or cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation, to a suspect, for the unlawful killing of wildlife, and or waste of big game. Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags, and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags. Learn more: https://www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/fw/Pages/tip.aspx

 PREFERENCE POINT REWARDS:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

 

 Oregon Hunters Association (OHA) Cash Rewards:

$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Mountain Goat, and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer, and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar, and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$200 - Illegally obtaining Oregon hunting or angling license or tags

$200 - Unlawful Lending/Borrowing Big Game Tag(s)

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Game Birds or Furbearers

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish

 

Oregon Wildlife Coalition (OWC) Cash Rewards:

Birds
$500 Hawk, Falcon, Eagle, Owl, Osprey
All other protected avian species: see category below for listed species 

Mammals
$500 Cougar, Bobcat, Beaver (public lands only), Black bears, Bighorn Sheep, Marten, Fisher, Sierra Nevada Red Fox

Species listed as “threatened" or “endangered" under state or federal Endangered Species Act (excludes fish) 

$1,000 (e.g. wolf, wolverine, kit fox, red tree vole, Canada lynx, sea otter, Columbian white-tailed deer, California brown pelican, western snowy plover, California least tern, northern spotted owl, marbled murrelet, short-tailed albatross, streaked horned lark, yellow-billed cuckoo, leatherback sea turtle, olive ridley sea turtle, Oregon spotted frog, green sea turtle, loggerhead sea turtle)

 




Attached Media Files: 2022-09/1002/157882/Poached_Elk_Vernonia.jpg

Tip of The Week For October 3, 2022- Unlawful Lights on Motor Vehicles (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/29/22 6:46 AM
2022-09/5490/157892/Unlawful_Lights_on_Vehicles.PNG
2022-09/5490/157892/Unlawful_Lights_on_Vehicles.PNG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-09/5490/157892/thumb_Unlawful_Lights_on_Vehicles.PNG

TIP OF THE WEEK

 

Date:           September 29, 2022            FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:       Sheriff Curtis Landers

                   (541) 265-0652

                   lcsheriff@co.lincoln.or.us

 

                                                     UNLAWFUL LIGHTS ON MOTOR VEHICLES

There appears to be some confusion among some motorists about the color of lights that can be lawfully displayed on motor vehicles while travelling on Oregon’s public highways.  Your Sheriff’s Office receives calls from time to time inquiring if a variety of colored lamps can be lawfully displayed on motor vehicles. Some callers express concern over the use of some colored lights, especially those involving headlights.

There are a number of AFTER-MARKET bulbs and headlights appearing on some motor vehicles that emit a blueish or greenish color.  The argument that a person purchased the bulbs, headlights or “light bars” at the local car parts store is not the standard used to determine if they’re legal to use or not in Oregon.

Oregon Revised Statutes (ORS) 816.050 states that headlights shall show a white light described in Standard Number 108 of the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS).

ORS 816.360 addresses the use of prohibited lighting equipment for motor vehicles in this state as well.  It also identifies the penalty for not complying with this law should a motorist be cited by a police officer.  As a Class C infraction, the fine imposed by a court can range from $80 to $500.

The law states the following:

  • All headlamps must be WHITE in color as defined by Society of Automotive Engineers and Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) 108.  White lamps have been tested to meet all headlamp requirements.
  • Maximum wattage allowed in a headlight or accessory light is 70 watts.
  • FMVSS 108 disallows any color coating on headlights and/or headlight bulbs.
  • Blue and green lamps are designated for use on emergency vehicles only.
  • Red lamps to front are reserved for emergency vehicles and school bus warning lamps.
  • Colored bulbs give a distorted headlamp pattern, which may prevent the driver from seeing a person or object at the road edge or starting to cross the road.
  • Blue or other colored lights in the taillights of a motor vehicle are also prohibited, unless the vehicle was manufactured before 1959.

Markings on headlights and their packaging typically indicate if the product is Department of Transportation (DOT) approved.  If the bulb or headlight packaging doesn’t include this information, more research should be conducted with law enforcement before making your purchase.

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2022-09/5490/157892/092922_Unlawful_Lights_on_Motor_Vehicles.pdf , 2022-09/5490/157892/Unlawful_Lights_on_Vehicles.PNG

Wed. 09/28/22
VIDEO: Interview with OSFM IMT member headed to support Hurricane Ian
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 09/28/22 8:25 PM

The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal (OSFM) conducted a brief interview (linked below) for our media partners Wednesday evening before members of the incident management team (IMT) left for Florida. OSFM IMT member Brett Deedon with Eugene Springfield Fire talks about being mobilized to support the hurricane response efforts in Florida. Deedon and 12 others (13 total) from the OSFM’s three all-hazard incident management teams were mobilized Wednesday and are traveling to Tallahassee, Florida. After arrival, they will receive their mission in supporting those impacted by Hurricane Ian.

VIDEO INTERVIEW: Brett Deedon OSFM IMT PIO