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Portland/Vanc/Salem News Releases for Sat. Nov. 28 - 12:01 am
Fri. 11/27/20
Portland Police investigate shooting near NW Glisan & Broadway
Portland Police Bureau - 11/27/20 3:50 PM
On November 27, 2020, at about 2:30 p.m., Portland Police responded to the report of a shooting in the area of Northwest Glisan Street and Northwest Broadway.

Police arrived to find that a person had been shot. The shooting victim was transported to an area hospital.

Additional information will be released at the direction of investigators.
This investigation is ongoing.

Anyone with information about this shooting is asked to contact Detective Bryan Declercque Bryan.Declercque@portlandoregon.gov 503-823-2056 or Detective Michael Jones Michael.Jones@portlandoregon.gov.

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Noah Wilson sentenced to prison for attacking Portland Police officer
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 11/27/20 2:30 PM

November 27, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that 43-year-old Noah Wilson received a 60 month prison sentence after being convicted of attacking an officer assigned to the Portland Police Bureau’s Sex Offender Registration Detail.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office remained in regular contact with the officer and discussed the potential pretrial resolution with her.

She is supportive of this resolution and believes a prison sentence is warranted for this unprovoked attack.

By pleading guilty to one count of assault in the third degree and one count of assaulting a public safety officer, Wilson admitted that he recklessly, under circumstances manifesting indifference to the value of human life, caused serious physical injury to a person he knew to be a public safety officer while that person was working in their official capacity.

When this incident occurred on October 17, 2018, the victim was the primary officer in charge of running sex offender registration for the Portland Police Bureau. Wilson, a convicted sex offender, went to Southeast Precinct to register.

Wilson entered the room, immediately charged the officer, took her to the ground and started punching her repeatedly. In the course of the attack, the officer realized her pinkie finger was severely broken.

Police inside Southeast Precinct heard the officer yelling for help and ran the conference room and pulled Wilson from her.

“This appeared to be a targeted and completely unprovoked attack that resulted in significant injuries to the victim officer, which have prevented her from returning to regular police duties,” said Multnomah County Deputy District Attorney Todd Jackson, who prosecuted this case.

During the pendency of this case, the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office learned in the days leading up to and including the day of the attack, Wilson was experiencing paranoid delusions about law enforcement.

Wilson spent the vast majority of 2019 at the Oregon State Hospital receiving treatment after being found unable to aid and assist for trial.

Although he did not make any statements in court, shortly after being discharged from the Oregon State Hospital Wilson previously made comments and wrote that he wanted to take responsibility for his actions.

 

#MCDA#


Media Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/5769/140377/PR-20-196-Noah_Wilson.pdf

Union Gospel Mission Portland Reports Covid-19 Cases
Union Gospel Mission, Portland - 11/27/20 1:50 PM

For Immediate Release                                                                    Contact: Courtney Dodds  

November 27, 2020                                                                         971-275-2334 (cell)                      

Union Gospel Mission Portland Reports Covid-19 Cases

 

Portland, Ore., - On Thursday, November 26th (Thanksgiving Day) UGM learned that a few of their staff and residents in the men’s LifeChange recovery program in old town tested positive for COVID-19 or are experiencing symptoms. LifeChange is a long-term residential community for homeless, addicted and vulnerable men. They also serve over 250,000 meals a year to the homeless and hungry at this old town center. 

“Our greatest concern is preventing further spread and keeping our residents, staff, volunteers, and those we serve safe and healthy. We have practiced strict COVID-19 protocols and will continue to do so. We are working with the Multnomah County Health Department and are following their recommendations. All staff and residents who have been exposed will be quarantined and tested,” said Bill Russell UGM’s Executive Director  

Out of extreme caution, they are temporarily altering meal services out of the downtown location and closing the Thrift Store in Tigard to help prevent any further spread and to care for residents and staff.

UGM serves the homeless and hungry throughout the community and will safely continue services to the LifeChange residents and to the hungry and homeless in camps throughout the city and their overnight shelter in SE Portland.

About Union Gospel Mission: Union Gospel Mission’s purpose is “Feeding the hungry, restoring the addict and loving our neighbor.” Union Gospel Mission has been serving Portland since 1927. Union Gospel Mission provides meals and care for the homeless and operates LifeChange -- a transformative recovery program for men, women and children. Contact Union Gospel Mission at 503-274-4483 or ugmportland.org and @ugmpdx. 

# # # 


Oregon reports 826 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 11/27/20 12:18 PM

Nov. 27, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 826 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 885, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 826 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 70,832.

Note: The number of new cases reported today is lower than expected because several of the local health public departments that report daily numbers to OHA were off for the Thanksgiving holiday. OHA anticipates tomorrow’s daily case count will be unusually high.

Also: A technical reporting issue is impacting the number of negative test results reported today. The number of negative test results reported today are lower than usual due to the delay in reporting.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (9), Clackamas (14), Columbia (13), Crook (6), Deschutes (90), Douglas (12), Gilliam (1), Grant (1), Harney (3), Hood River (1), Jackson (1), Jefferson (4), Josephine (2), Lane (64), Lincoln (4), Linn (27), Malheur (10), Marion (168), Morrow (8), Multnomah (14), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (45), Union (22), Wasco (7), Washington (297), Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 883rd COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Union County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died on Nov. 24 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 884th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Linn County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Nov. 20 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 885th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old woman in Linn County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Nov. 19 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.


COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to rise

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon increased to 521, 32 more than reported on Wednesday, Nov. 25.

There are 115 COVID-19 patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds, up two from Wednesday.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


The Bureau of Land Management releases final plan to conserve and restore sagebrush communities in the Great Basin
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 11/27/20 10:19 AM

BOISE, Idaho – Today, the Bureau of Land Management released the final programmatic environmental impact statement for fuels reduction and rangeland restoration in the Great Basin. This programmatic environmental impact statement is intended to further efforts to conserve and restore sagebrush communities within a 223 million-acre area that includes portions of Idaho, Oregon, Washington, California, Nevada and Utah.

“The Department has led the way in advancing critical treatments, including creating fuel breaks, which stop or slow fires,” said Casey Hammond, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Lands and Minerals. “This effort focused on reducing fuels and restoring natural vegetation will reduce the intensity of wildfires, which in turn will reduce the threats from large and severe wildfires to sagebrush-steppe ecosystem and rangeland resources. As we get projects done, these two approaches will work together.”

The Trump Administration has prioritized active management of the nation’s public lands as provided in Executive Order 13855 and Secretary's Order 3372, which establish a meaningful and coordinated framework for ensuring the protection of people, communities, and natural resources. Implementation of both orders is a priority for reducing the risks of deadly and destructive wildfires.

Sagebrush communities in the Great Basin are a vital part of Western working landscapes and are home to over 350 species of plants and wildlife. Intact sagebrush communities are disappearing within the Great Basin due to increased large and severe wildfires, the spread of invasive annual grasses, and the encroachment of pinyon-juniper. The Great Basin region is losing sagebrush communities faster than they can reestablish naturally. Approximately 45 percent of the historical range of sagebrush has been lost. Fuels reduction and rangeland restoration treatments can reduce fire severity, increase sagebrush communities’ resistance to invasive annual grasses and improve their ability to recover after wildfires.

This effort complements a decision to construct up to 11,000 miles of fuel breaks in the Great Basin that was issued last spring. That decision is already being used to expedite construction of approximately 190 miles of fuel breaks in Idaho, Oregon, California, and Nevada.

“Restoring sagebrush communities improves the sustainability of working rangelands and can reduce the expansion of invasive annual grasses,” said Deputy Director for Policy and Programs William Perry Pendley. “People in the Great Basin depend on these landscapes for their livelihoods and recreation and wildlife rely on them for habitat.”  

Under the leadership of President Trump and Secretary Bernhardt, the BLM significantly reduced hazardous fuel loads in fire-prone areas by treating more than 782,000 acres in fiscal year 2020 using a variety of active management vegetation treatments including mechanical, biological, and chemical tools as well as prescribed fire.

The preferred alternative outlined in the final fuels reduction and rangeland restoration programmatic environmental impact statement analyzes a full suite of manual, chemical and mechanical treatments, including prescribed fire, seeding, and targeted grazing to reduce fuels and conserve and restore sagebrush communities. When completed, the programmatic environmental impact statement will not authorize any specific fuels reduction or rangeland restoration projects. Instead, it will analyze common elements of fuels reduction and rangeland restoration projects. Local offices can use this information to comply with National Environmental Policy Act requirements when planning and analyzing specific projects, potentially allowing for more rapid implementation.

An electronic copy of the Final PEIS and associated documents is available for public review for 30 days on the BLM Land Use Planning and NEPA register: https://go.usa.gov/x79bp . The BLM will issue a record of decision after the end of the public review period.

 

-BLM-

 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in the 11 Western states and Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals. 


Disturbance call results in shooting
Vancouver Police Dept. - 11/27/20 9:42 AM

Vancouver, Wash. –On November 26, 2020 at approximately 7:04 p.m., Vancouver Police responded to a disturbance call at a residence in the 2300 block of SE 177th Avenue. A family member texted 9-1-1 to report that their 23-year-old relative was out of control and they were afraid he was going to hurt them. Several family members were inside the house, including an elderly female. When officers arrived, the male was outside the house. He then went inside and was seen moving to various areas inside of the house. At one point he was observed to have armed himself with a bat.

The Mobile Crisis Team responded and was unable to de-escalate the individual. Police also deployed a less lethal 40 mm device, which was ineffective. The male refused multiple police commands to drop the bat. He advanced toward officers outside the residence from a recently opened garage door in an apparent attempt to assault them. A Vancouver Police Officer fired his weapon, hitting the male who was transported to an area hospital.

The involved Vancouver Police Officer is on critical incident leave, per standard protocol.

The investigation into the officer involved shooting will be conducted by the SW Washington Independent Investigative Response Team, led by the Clark County Sheriff’s Office. All follow-up related to this investigation should be directed to the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, (564) 397-6150.

 

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Thu. 11/26/20
Firefighters and Residents Thankful for Fire Sprinklers That Quickly Extinguished an Apartment Fire in Woodland (Photo)
Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue - 11/26/20 5:48 PM
The apartment building was protected by fire sprinklers and shows no visible signs of damage from the fire that occurred early Thanksgiving Morning in Woodland, WA
The apartment building was protected by fire sprinklers and shows no visible signs of damage from the fire that occurred early Thanksgiving Morning in Woodland, WA
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/6623/140372/thumb_Woodland_Apartment_Fire_2020.11.jpg

The team at Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue, along with some Woodland residents, we were very thankful for fire sprinklers early this morning.   Just after midnight on Thanksgiving morning, a fire broke out in this occupied apartment building in the 1300 Block of Glenwood Street in Woodland, WA.   The fire started when an appliance was accidentally left on and overheated, causing a fire that spread to the cabinets below.   Fire crews were notified of the fire by an automatic fire alarm tied to the fire sprinkler system.  A single fire sprinkler, ensuring minimal damage and no injuries or loss of life, quickly and automatically controlled the fire.  This fire sprinklers, kept the two occupants of the apartment where the fire occurred safe along with all of their neighbors in other units throughout the building.  There was very minor fire damage to a cabinet along with some minimal water damage that was limited to the first floor.   Division Chief Mike Jackson of Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue said, "This situation would have been much worse had the building not been protected with Fire Sprinklers.  There likely would have been significantly more damage along with a greater risk of injury to the building occupants."   Jackson further stated that, "We are also reminded in times like this of how thankful we are for our crews that respond quickly 24 hours-a-day, 7 days-a-week, and 365 days-a-year, especially on holidays like today when they are at work, serving the community away from their families.  Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue encourages home owners and building owners to consider protecting their property and family members with Fire Sprinklers.  Fire sprinklers offer the most effective way to protect structures and people from building fires.  Visit Clark Cowlitz Fire Rescue at www.clarkfr.org for more information about Fire Sprinklers.

###

Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue (CCFR) serves over 45,000 people in a 125 square mile area, including the cities of La Center, Ridgefield, and Woodland, as well as the Cowlitz Indian Reservation. Our combination department includes full-time and volunteer firefighters responding to more than 4,200 fire and emergency medical calls a year.  CCFR also provides comprehensive risk reduction and fire marshal services in the cities of our District.  CCFR operates under a balanced budget, and has a history of passing independent financial audits by the state. Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue, formerly known as Clark County Fire & Rescue, changed its name in 2020 to better reflect the communities it serves.




Attached Media Files: The apartment building was protected by fire sprinklers and shows no visible signs of damage from the fire that occurred early Thanksgiving Morning in Woodland, WA

Deputies Arrest Thanksgiving Morning Burglar (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/26/20 1:02 PM
Antonio Bernal booking photo 112620
Antonio Bernal booking photo 112620
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/1128/140371/thumb_Antonio_Bernal_booking_photo_112620.png

On November 26, 2020, at 6:41 a.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a call of a male breaking into a car in the 12800 block of NW Creekview Drive in the community of Cedar Mill. A resident heard his car alarm go off and saw a male inside his vehicle. While he confronted the male suspect, another family member called 911. The resident kept the suspect on scene until deputies arrived.

The investigation revealed that the male suspect had not only entered several vehicles, but had also been inside the residence and the garage. While inside the home, the male used the restroom and helped himself to food that the family was going to prepare for their Thanksgiving breakfast.The suspect also loaded his pockets with various items he stole from the vehicles and the home.

Detectives from the Property Crimes Unit responded to the scene to assist with the investigation. Investigators have already linked the suspect to at least one additional case.

Deputies arrested 22-year-old Antonio R. Bernal of Battle Ground, Washington. Mr. Bernal has been booked into the Washington County Jail on the following charges:

  • Burglary I
  • Unlawful Entry into a Motor Vehicle (two counts)
  • Theft II

Additional charges may be forthcoming as the investigation continues.

Anyone with information on this investigation is asked to call deputies at 503-629-0111.




Attached Media Files: Media Release in PDF format , Antonio Bernal booking photo 112620

Oregon reports 1,514 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 15 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 11/26/20 12:00 PM

Nov. 26, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,514 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 15 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed 15 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 882, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,514 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 70,006. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (14), Clackamas (152), Clatsop (6), Columbia (9), Coos (13), Crook (4), Curry (9), Deschutes (67), Douglas (20), Grant (3), Harney (3), Hood River (19), Jackson (64), Jefferson (6), Josephine (26), Klamath (15), Lake (4), Lane (91), Lincoln (10), Linn (45), Malheur (20), Marion (206), Morrow (7), Multnomah (289), Polk (26), Tillamook (6), Umatilla (45), Union (3), Wallowa (1), Wasco (15), Washington (283), Yamhill (31).

Oregon’s 867th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Coos County who tested positive on Nov. 6 and died on Nov. 25 at Bay Area Hospital. He had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 868th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 3 and died on Nov. 17 at his residence. He had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 869th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 12 and died on Nov. 22 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 870th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 6 and died on Nov. 22 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 871st COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Nov. 17 at her residence. She had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 872nd COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old woman in Lincoln County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died on Nov. 16 at her residence. She had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 873rd COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Nov. 11 and died on Nov. 25 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 874th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 23 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 875th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 23 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 876th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 3 and died on Nov. 17 at Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 877th COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old man in Multnomah County who died on Nov. 23 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease, or SARS-CoV-2, as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death.

Oregon’s 878th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Polk County who tested positive on Oct. 28 and died on Nov. 21 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 879th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Nov. 22 at Good Shepherd Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 880th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 3 and died on Nov. 20 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 881st COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 8 and died on Nov. 24 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 882nd COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Union County who tested positive on Nov. 4 and died on Nov. 24 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Note: On Nov. 18, OHA reported Oregon’s 785th COVID-19 death as an 85-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov 9. The woman is not dead, and the number of COVID-19 deaths in Oregon has been adjusted today to correct the error. OHA regrets the mistake.

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

272

3

2802

Benton

757

7

22306

Clackamas

5840

77

91914

Clatsop

351

0

8173

Columbia

466

3

10261

Coos

418

2

10921

Crook

211

6

3970

Curry

129

2

2731

Deschutes

2138

14

47509

Douglas

900

17

18425

Gilliam

21

0

431

Grant

133

1

1427

Harney

93

1

1176

Hood River

393

1

6799

Jackson

3643

28

49905

Jefferson

804

11

6655

Josephine

507

4

17585

Klamath

760

4

13708

Lake

117

1

1264

Lane

4139

41

95068

Lincoln

610

15

11673

Linn

1357

20

24478

Malheur

2369

42

7299

Marion

8849

137

73818

Morrow

642

7

2453

Multnomah

15860

232

213490

Polk

1168

16

15050

Sherman

23

0

453

Tillamook

121

0

4213

Umatilla

4256

49

17859

Union

749

4

6117

Wallowa

71

3

1448

Wasco

512

19

6983

Washington

9678

99

135900

Wheeler

3

0

253

Yamhill

1646

16

26140

Total

70006

882

960657

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Group causes thousands of dollars of damage along Southeast Hawthorne - Police make arrests (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/26/20 8:13 AM
Smashed windows
Smashed windows
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/3056/140367/thumb_112620_New_Seasons_doors.jpg
On November 26, 2020, at about 1:22 a.m., Portland Police responded to reports of people breaking windows and spraying graffiti on the New Seasons Market in the 4000 block of Southeast Hawthorne Boulevard. Multiple callers reported seeing a group of people, dressed in black clothing, moving west along Southeast Hawthorne breaking out windows as they went.

Police arrived and found a group near Southeast 37th Avenue and Southeast Harrison Street matching the description and carrying evidence connecting them to the vandalism.

Officers canvassed the neighborhood, spoke to witnesses, and found damage to at least ten businesses between Southeast 41st Avenue and Southeast 33rd Avenue along Southeast Hawthorne Street, in both the Sunnyside and Richmond neighborhoods. Some of the damage was sufficient to provide access to the interior of retail stores so officers contacted responsible parties and stood by while contractors or employees boarded up windows. Grocery stores, banks, an auto service center, a package distribution and mailing center, and local business storefronts were damaged.

Officers arrested three adults who were booked into the Multnomah County jail:
24-year-old Chester Hester, ten counts of Criminal Mischief I.
38-year-old Nicole Noriega, ten counts of Criminal Mischief I.
23-year-old Bailey Willack, ten counts of Criminal Mischief I.

Officers found one adult in possession of a semi-automatic pistol. That person was referred out of custody to the district attorney's office for potential weapons charges. One juvenile was detained and referred to the court for crimes related to property damage.

Based on witness statements, it is likely that more people were involved in these crimes and police will try to determine their identity through further investigation.


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Attached Media Files: Smashed windows , Smashed window , Smashed door window , Vandalism to bank

Wed. 11/25/20
Reducción de Beneficios Extendidos, en base al descenso de la tasa de desempleo en Oregon
Oregon Employment Department - 11/25/20 5:29 PM

Noviembre 25 de 2020 (Salem, OR) - Hoy, el Departamento de Empleo de Oregón anunció una reducción en los beneficios extendidos como resultado del descenso de la tasa de desempleo en Oregón. Siguiendo una determinación federal, los Beneficios Extendidos (EB) se reducirán de 20 a 13 semanas de beneficios a partir del 13 de diciembre de 2020.

“Nosotros sabemos que la extensión de los beneficios ha sido un soporte crítico de seguridad para muchos residentes de Oregon, y esta reducción en los beneficios disponibles será dolorosa”, dijo David Gerstenfeld, Director Interino del Departamento de Empleo de Oregon. “Hacemos un llamado a nuestros líderes federales electos para que ayuden a los habitantes de Oregón y aprueben leyes que nos permitan brindar rápidamente beneficios a quienes aún enfrentan dificultades. Estamos listos para implementar cualquier programa de beneficios nuevo o continuo lo más rápido posible para que los habitantes de Oregón puedan satisfacer sus necesidades mientras la pandemia continúa propagándose”.

Los Beneficios Extendidos (EB) es un programa que extiende los beneficios regulares del seguro de desempleo (UI) cuando un estado tiene un alto nivel de desempleo. La tasa de desempleo promedio se revisa a nivel federal durante un período de tres meses para determinar si el estado entra en esta extensión. Si la tasa de desempleo promedio está por debajo del 8% pero por encima del 6.5%, entonces están disponibles hasta 13 semanas de beneficios adicionales bajo EB. Si la tasa de desempleo promedio es superior al 8%, la cantidad de semanas adicionales de beneficios aumenta a 20 a través de la Máxima Extension de Beneficios (HEB).

Debido a la alta tasa de desempleo de Oregón durante la pandemia, el Departamento comenzó a pagar hasta 20 semanas de HEB (Máxima extensión de beneficios) en la semana que finalizó el 11 de julio de 2020. Los reclamantes que reciben beneficios de HEB seguirán recibiendo esos beneficios hasta la semana que finalice el 12 de diciembre. Comenzando el 13 de Diciembre, los reclamantes verán un cambio en la cantidad de beneficios extendidos que les quedan.

Algunos ejemplos de lo que sucederá después del 12 de diciembre:

  • Si la semana que finaliza el 12 de diciembre es su décima semana en EB (Beneficios Extendidos), recibirá beneficios para esa semana y le quedarán 3 semanas de EB. A partir del 13 de diciembre, puede seguir reclamando y recibiendo EB, por un total de 13 semanas.
  • Si la semana que finaliza el 12 de diciembre es su decimotercera semana de EB (Beneficios Extendidos), recibirá beneficios para esa semana, pero no le quedarán semanas de EB. A partir del 13 de diciembre, no recibirá más semanas de EB.
  • Si la semana que termina el 12 de diciembre es su decimoquinta semana de EB (Beneficios Extendidos), recibirá beneficios para esa semana, pero no le quedarán semanas de EB. A partir del 13 de diciembre, no recibirá más semanas de EB.
  • Si la semana que termina el 12 de diciembre es su primera semana de EB (Beneficios Extendidos), recibirá beneficios para esa semana y le quedarán 12 semanas de EB. A partir del 13 de diciembre, puede seguir reclamando y recibiendo EB, por un total de 13 semanas.

Algunos habitantes de Oregon que ya han recibido 13 semanas de EB (Beneficios Extendidos) pueden recibir beneficios de Asistencia por desempleo pandémico (PUA) durante las pocas semanas que quedan antes de que el programa expire el 26 de diciembre de 2020. Para calificar para PUA, el desempleo de los solicitantes debe ajustarse a uno de los criterios enumerados en la Ley CARES para ser afectado por COVID-19. Los residentes de Oregon pueden solicitar PUA a través del Sistema de Reclamos en Línea del Departamento de Empleo. Online Claims System. 

El Departamento enviará a los reclamantes una carta y un correo electrónico informándoles que se ha reducido el monto de su beneficio de EB (Beneficios Extendidos). Los reclamantes también pueden comprobar cuántas semanas de EB se les ha pagado al ver el estado de su reclamación en el Sistema de reclamaciones en línea.

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Programa de igualdad de oportunidades: a solicitud, ayudas y servicios auxiliares disponibles para personas con discapacidades. Contacto: (503) 947-1794. Para las personas sordas o con problemas de audición, llame al 711 Servicios de retransmisión de telecomunicaciones.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/930/140366/Reducción_de_Beneficios_Extendidos.pdf

Media Advisory: Union Gospel Mission to Provide Thanksgiving Meal for the Homeless 
Union Gospel Mission, Portland - 11/25/20 4:00 PM

For Immediate Release                                                                               Contact: Courtney Dodds 

November 25, 2020                                                                                               971-275-2334 (cell)

Media Advisory: Union Gospel Mission to Provide Thanksgiving Meals for the Homeless 

Portland, Ore., -?Union Gospel Mission will provide a to-go Thanksgiving meal for those experiencing homelessness and in need?on Thursday, November 26 at 10:00 a.m. at Union Gospel Mission at 15 NW Third Avenue.

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Oregon Health Policy Board meets December 1 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 11/25/20 3:57 PM

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Tara Chetock, 971-304-9917, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon Health Policy Board meets December 1 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board.

When: December 1, 8:30 a.m. to noon.

Where: Virtual meeting only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line. To join via Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1619985877?pwd=c1prNWROQWV6YjdERFZIN29PaGxXdz09 To call in to the meeting on a mobile device, use the following number: +16692545252,,1619985877#,,,,0#,,413393#

Agenda:

  1. Welcome, OHPB Roll Call and Minutes Approval;
  2. Director’s Update;
  3. OHA 2021 Legislative Agenda;
  4. COVID-19 Community Group Presentations;
  5. Public Comment; and
  6. Closing Remarks and Reminders

For more information and meeting materials, please visit the OHPB meeting webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/index.aspx.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • CART (live captions)
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Tara Chetock at 971-304-9917, 711 TTY, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


PF&R Reports Full Staffing Levels Despite 8 Firefighters Testing Positive
Portland Fire & Rescue - 11/25/20 3:37 PM

All 31 PF&R stations are open and responding to emergency calls despite a recent up-tick in positive COVID 19 tests among eight firefighters in the past week.

From November 17, 2020 to November 25, 2020, eight employees tested positive for COVID 19. By comparison, PF&R had experienced a total of only 10 cases from February 28, 2020 (the date of the first case in Oregon) to November 17, 2020.  Of those, 9 have since recovered and returned to duty. During this same time period, PF&R responded to over 59,830 total calls.

No hospitalizations have been reported and measures have been taken to quarantine firefighters who may have come in contact with these eight recent cases; currently 57 firefighters are quarantined.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, PF&R’s top priority has been safeguarding the health and safety of the general public and all employees. Fire Chief Sara Boone said, “Firefighters are an essential workforce and must provide mission critical services 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Our station living and working conditions present extra challenges that fire departments across the nation are wrestling with. To keep employees and the public safe, we have adopted stringent policies and best practices.”

PF&R has met and, in some cases, exceeded the health guidelines and state workplace directives issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Oregon Health Authority, Multnomah County Health Department, the City of Portland and the state of Oregon.  COVID-19 safety protocols include, among others, completing mandatory health assessments and temperature checks before reporting to work; wearing face coverings inside fire station common areas and work facilities as well as outside; and adhering to 6 feet of physical distancing in non-emergency situations when possible.

City of Portland Commissioner in charge of PF&R, Jo Anne Hardesty, had the following to say regarding the recent developments: “I take the health and well-being of our firefighters seriously. The daily risk that first responders take has been compounded by this pandemic and I want to express my deepest appreciation to our firefighters serving during this time. I also want to thank Chief Boone for her proactive efforts to protect our firefighters and minimize exposure when COVID-19 first hit our communities.”

PF&R is committed to keeping the public well informed of any issues that could affect emergency response and will continue to monitor its workforce carefully, particularly considering the recent spikes in COVID-19 cases across Oregon and the nation.


Weekly cases, hospitalizations set new pandemic highs
Oregon Health Authority - 11/25/20 3:36 PM

Nov. 25, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Weekly cases, hospitalizations set new pandemic highs

OHA’s COVID-19 weekly report released today, set new pandemic highs for daily cases and hospitalizations.

OHA reported 8,687 new daily cases during the week of Monday, Nov. 16 through Sunday, Nov. 22, a 34 percent increase over the previous record-high week.

Weekly hospitalizations from COVID-19 rose to 366, a 26 percent increase and the highest weekly yet reported in the pandemic.

There were 61 reported COVID-19 reported deaths, nearly doubling the previous week’s total of 31.

People aged 20 to 49 have accounted for 55 percent of the cases, while people 70 and older have accounted for 74 percent of the deaths.

During the week of Nov. 15 to Nov. 21, 129,564 COVID-19 tests were administered. The percentage of positive tests was 7.2 percent.

Previously, OHA used a “person-based” method. OHA is now using a “test-based” method, whereby all electronic lab reports received by OHA will be used to calculate percent positivity. This change was prompted by changes in testing patterns.


Sheriff's Office Responds to Several Deadly Crashes in November (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/25/20 3:27 PM
North Plains Photo
North Plains Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/1128/140360/thumb_North_Plains_Auto_Ped.jpg

November 2020 has been a particularly dangerous month for drivers in Washington County. Since the beginning of the month, deputies have responded to six fatal crashes.

The latest incident happened this morning around 8:20 a.m. near NW Main Street & NW Cottage Street in the City of North Plains. The driver, a 22-year-old man, hit an elderly woman while she was trying to cross the street. The driver of the 2004 Dodge Caravan was stopped at the four-way intersection before the crash. The van’s windshield may not have been fully defrosted at the time, obscuring the driver’s view.

The victim, identified as 79-year-old Carol Goeden, was taken to a local hospital where she later died from her injuries.

The driver stayed on the scene and cooperated with investigators. He was cited for several violations, including careless driving and driving without a license.

The Washington County Crash Analysis Reconstruction Team (CART) is assisting in this investigation.

The Sheriff’s Office asks everyone to take it slow on the roads. Drive sober, wear your seatbelt, and watch out for pedestrians and bikers.


Deadly Crashes so far this month:

Nov. 6 – SW Hall Blvd & SW Schools Ferry Rd, Tigard (Auto vs. Ped)

Nov. 10 – Sunset Hwy, MP 32 (Auto vs. Auto)

Nov. 17 – SE Tualatin Valley Hwy & SE River Rd, Hillsboro (Auto vs. Auto)

Nov. 20 – SW Hwy 219 & SW Morilon Ln, Hillsboro (Car vs. Cement Truck)

Nov. 21 – NE Brookwood Pkwy & NE Cornell Rd, Hillsboro (Vehicle vs. tree)

Nov. 25 – NW Main St & NW Cottage St, North Plains (Auto vs. Ped)


BY THE NUMBERS

NOVEMBER FATAL CRASHES IN WASHINGTON COUNTY

2020 – 6

2019 – 5

2018 – 2

2017 – 3

 

 




Attached Media Files: PDF Version , North Plains Photo , Map of Deadly Crashes

DOGAMI Governing Board to meet December 4
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 11/25/20 3:19 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. - The Governing Board of the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) will meet on Friday, December 4 at 8:30 a.m. to 12:35 p.m. To adhere to the state’s social distancing requirements and to slow the spread of COVID-19, this public meeting will be conducted as a virtual meeting.

The meeting agenda is available at https://www.oregongeology.org.

The DOGAMI Governing Board sets policy and oversees general operations, and adopts a strategic plan every six years. The Board meets at least quarterly. As active members of their communities, Board members provide an important connection between Oregonians and DOGAMI's mission of providing earth science information and regulation to make Oregon safe and prosperous.

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Ridgefield High School Producing "It's a Wonderful Life" Radio Play (Photo)
Ridgefield Sch. Dist. - 11/25/20 2:58 PM
Ridgefield High School theatre students rehearse on Zoom for their live-streaming production of "It's A Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play" in December.
Ridgefield High School theatre students rehearse on Zoom for their live-streaming production of "It's A Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play" in December.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/889/140358/thumb_Its_a_Wonderful_Life_1.jpg

Wednesday, November 25, 2020 – Ridgefield, WA  “The show must go on!” has been a saying in theater for many years, and drama students at Ridgefield High School are proving the statement is true.  They’re taking their next theater production completely online with a plan to livestream It’s A Wonderful Life:  A Live Radio Play in December.

The radio play is an adaptation of the classic movie It’s A Wonderful Life.  When idealistic George Bailey wishes he had never been born, his guardian angel helps him realize how many lives he has impacted.  Author Joe Landry restages the Christmas story with the excitement of a live 1940’s radio broadcast.  Kaitlyn Etter, drama teacher at Ridgefield High School, is excited about the production.  “The story is so wonderful and hopeful—something we can all use right about now.” 

Switching gears from stage production to online production has created a lot of changes for Etter and her students, from Zoom rehearsals to the technical hurdles of livestreaming.  “The students are excited about overcoming the challenges and getting creative!  The production is taking a lot of inventiveness, initiative, and enthusiasm on the part of our students and department.  One step at a time, but one of my favorite things about theatre is how it teaches us to adapt and think creatively.”   

It’s a full-scale production, with a large cast and crew.  There are 21 students in the cast of actors, including lead actors Peter Schafer, Cameron McGravey, Sophia Miller, Avari Harrison, Anna Vande Krol, Dallin Casper, and Elle Lutz.  Many of them will be playing multiple characters in the show. 

There are 22 students serving on the technical crew, including lead crew members Kaitlyn St. John, Jay Stengele, Ani Gallman, Donnie St. John, LeeAnne Krause, and Caige Sothern. Art and history teacher Aziza Mansuri is also assisting with the show.  The crew will help solve the challenges involved in taking the production online and creating a radio-style atmosphere.  Part of the fun will be creating original, live Foley effects (the sound effects that bring a production to life, like footsteps and doors closing) in real time with the production. 

Etter and her students are looking forward to the streaming event.  “We are excited to bring joy, hope, and some fun 1940’s style Americana right into people’s homes!”

It’s A Wonderful Life:  A Live Radio Play will be streaming December 12th and 13th.  Information on the production will be on Ridgefield High School social media accounts and website.  On Instagram, follow @ridgefield.theatre and on Facebook, follow Ridgefield PAC.  There will also be online updates for the play and other events at  http://spudderactivities.weebly.com/theatre.html

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Attached Media Files: Ridgefield High School theatre students rehearse on Zoom for their live-streaming production of "It's A Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play" in December. , The play's original poster was designed by Ridgefield High School art student, Patricia Catacutan.

News Release: Clackamas County embraces new data-driven framework to fight COVID-19
Clackamas County - 11/25/20 2:51 PM

County remains open to serve residents

 

OREGON CITY, Ore. – Nov. 25, 2020 – Clackamas County will comply with Governor Kate Brown’s announcement today of a more risk-driven approach to reduce the spread of the deadly disease across Oregon. The Governor’s announced metrics now directly tie allowed activities to clear measures of risk —based on COVID-19 case data—helping businesses and the county plan ahead for reopening.

 

“It has been a long year for Clackamas County residents with COVID-19 and the recent wildfires. Thank you to everyone for your patience and continuing efforts to stay safe,” said Gary Schmidt, Clackamas County Administrator. “Most Clackamas County buildings will remain open to the public from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, as has been the case for the past several months.  Please check the county website to confirm office hours before visiting and consider setting up an appointment before visiting and using services through the telephone, email, webpages or other electronic means.”

 

Using state data available as of Wednesday, Nov. 25, a total of 5,574 Clackamas County residents have contracted COVID-19 this year; 77 county residents have died from the disease. County health officials warn the recent large weekly increases in new presumed cases is alarming.

 

“To give some perspective, this summer, Clackamas County averaged 100-150 positive COVID-19 tests per week. In October, it jumped to 200 per week. Last week – in just one week – we hit 811 cases,” said Philip Mason-Joyner, Clackamas County Public Health Director. “That means we have more than tripled our number of county residents infected with COVID-19 in just a few weeks.”

 

The data-driven framework take effect Thursday Dec. 3. The risk metrics mirror current school metrics by monitoring COVID-19 case rates (the number of cases per 100,000 population in large counties such as Clackamas) and percentage of test positivity. The Oregon Health Authority will use the latest data to update the metrics every week; since the metrics use the latest two weeks of data, counties can potentially move between risk categories—and change limitations on activities—every two weeks. The latest available data on these metrics shows Clackamas County would be in the “Extreme risk” category.

 

Clackamas County: Risk-driven metrics continue to worsen

                            Cases/100,000 population

                                       Percentage test positivity

11/8 through 11/21  339.9  7.4% (latest data)

11/1 through 11/14  284.8  6.4%

10/25 through 11/7  193.9  5.3%

(source: Oregon Health Authority school metrics data, https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/DISEASESAZ/Emerging%20Respitory%20Infections/Weekly-County-Metrics.pdf)

 

Visit https://govstatus.egov.com/or-covid-19/ to learn more.

 


CORRECTION: Extended Benefits Reduced Based on Oregon's Falling Unemployment Rate
Oregon Employment Department - 11/25/20 2:34 PM

A previous version of this release was sent with an incorrect attachment.

Nov. 25, 2020 (Salem, OR)--Today the Oregon Employment Department announced a reduction in extended benefits as a result of Oregon's falling unemployment rate. Following a federal determination, Extended Benefits (EB) will be reduced from up to 20 weeks of benefits to up to 13 weeks, beginning Dec. 13, 2020.

“We know the benefit extension has been a critical safety net for many Oregonians, and this reduction in available benefits will be painful,” said David Gerstenfeld, acting director of the Oregon Employment Department. “We are calling on our federal elected leaders to help Oregonians and pass legislation that will allow us to quickly provide benefits to those still facing hardships. We stand ready to implement any new or continued benefit programs as quickly as possible, so that Oregonians are able to make ends meet while the pandemic continues to spread.”

Extended Benefits (EB) is a program that extends regular Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefits when a state is at high unemployment. The average unemployment rate is reviewed at the federal level over a three-month period to determine if the state goes into this extension. If the average unemployment rate is below 8% but above 6.5%, then up to 13 weeks of additional benefits are available under EB. If the average unemployment rate is above 8%, the number of additional weeks of benefits increases to 20 through High Extended Benefits (HEB).

Because of Oregon’s high unemployment rate during the pandemic, the Department began paying up to 20 weeks of HEB on the week ending July 11, 2020. Claimants receiving benefits under HEB will continue receiving those benefits through the week ending Dec. 12. Beginning Dec. 13, claimants will see a change to the number of extended benefits they have remaining.

Some examples of what will happen after Dec. 12:

  • If the week ending Dec. 12 is your 10th week on EB, you will receive benefits for that week and will have 3 weeks of EB remaining. Starting Dec. 13, you can continue claiming and receiving EB, for a total of 13 weeks.
  • If the week ending Dec. 12 is your 13th week of EB, you will receive benefits for that week but will have zero weeks of EB remaining. Starting Dec. 13, you will not receive any more weeks of EB.
  • If the week ending Dec. 12 is your 15th week of EB, you will receive benefits for that week but will have zero weeks of EB remaining. Starting Dec. 13, you will not receive any more weeks of EB.
  • If the week ending Dec. 12 is your 1st week of EB, you will receive benefits for that week and will have 12 weeks of EB remaining. Starting Dec. 13, you can continue claiming and receiving EB, for a total of 13 weeks.

Some Oregonians who have already received 13 weeks of EB may be able to receive Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits for the few weeks remaining before that program expires on Dec. 26, 2020. To qualify for PUA, claimants’ unemployment must fit one of the CARES Act-listed criteria for being COVID-19 impacted. Oregonians can apply for PUA through the Employment Department’s Online Claims System.

The Department will send claimants a letter and an email informing them that their EB benefit amount has been reduced. Claimants can also check to see how many weeks of EB they have been paid by viewing their claim status in the Online Claims System.

More information about Extended Benefits and High Extended Benefits can be found on these FAQs.

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/930/140355/11_25_HEB_to_EB_PR_release_FINAL.pdf

Oregon reports 1,189 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 20 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 11/25/20 1:16 PM

Nov. 25, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,189 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 20 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed 20 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 867, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,189 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 68,503.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (4), Benton (10), Clackamas (112), Clatsop (3), Columbia (11), Coos (12), Crook (8), Curry (8), Deschutes (75), Douglas (42), Grant (3), Harney (1), Hood River (3), Jackson (89), Jefferson (12), Josephine (28), Klamath (44), Lake (4), Lane (101), Lincoln (12), Linn (17), Malheur (14), Marion (105), Morrow (5), Multnomah (177), Polk (35), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (25), Union (26), Wasco (9), Washington (180), and Yamhill (12).

Oregon’s 848th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 7 and died on Nov. 22 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 849th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 11 and died on Nov. 23 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 850th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 19 and died on Nov. 21 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 851st COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 20 and died on Nov. 23. Place of death and underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 852nd COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Nov. 11 and died on Nov. 21 in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 853rd COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old man in Lake County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died on Nov. 21 at Lake District Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 854th COVID-19 death is a 97-year-old woman in Malheur County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 11 at West Valley Medical Center in Caldwell, Idaho. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 855th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 1 and died on Nov. 23 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 856th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Oct. 31 and died on Nov. 8 at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, Idaho. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 857th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Wasco County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died on Nov. 23 in his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 858th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Multnomah County who died on Nov. 21 at Providence Portland Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death.

Oregon’s 859th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 8 and died on Nov. 13 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 860th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 28 and died on Nov. 13 in his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 861st COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 12 and died on Nov. 23 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 862nd COVID-19 death is a 47-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died on Nov. 22 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 863rd COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 18 and died on Nov. 23 at Portland VA Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 864th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Nov. 24 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 865th COVID-19 death is a 27-year-old man in Lincoln County who tested positive on Nov. 18 and died on Nov. 17 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 866th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Malheur County who died on Nov. 13 in her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 867th COVID-19 death is a 98-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 4 and died on Nov. 15 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.


COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to rise

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon increased to 489, 15 more than yesterday.

There are 113 COVID-19 patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds, no change from yesterday.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Clackamas Fire District # - Operation Santa
Clackamas Fire Dist. #1 - 11/25/20 1:14 PM

As we gear up for our 46th year of Operation Santa, things are going to look differently this year.

In the years past, during this month-long holiday toy and food drive, Clackamas Fire District #1 volunteers and employees lead Santa’s fire engine parade down neighborhood streets to collect non-perishable food items, which are used to fill hundreds of food baskets for needy families, and donated new toys for children. We are not able to accept donations of stuffed animals and clothing items for this year but only new toys that are packaged. Donated funds are used to purchase perishable items for food baskets.

Unfortunately due to the Coronavirus, we have to change the way Operation Santa looks this year. We are doing our very best to continue this time honored tradition and to help as many families in our community as possible, but we are subject to the restrictions and to keeping people healthy.

While the nightly parades will not be happening this year, we will have eight drive up and drop off events planned throughout the fire district. If you are interested in helping, please visit our website at www.clackamasfire.com to find the locations of the drop-off events. In addition with the new Operation Santa we are discouraging citizens from dropping off at our community fire stations this year. The contactless collection events begin Nov. 28 through Dec. 13, 2020.

If you would like to sign up to be a recipient of food and toys, we receive the names of those that are in need from Compassion in Action. Please refer to their website for further information and details www.ciacc.org.  We are not able to accept any applications in person this year.

Please check out our website at www.clackamasfire.com for further details.

From all of us at Clackamas Fire, have a healthy and safe holiday!


Oregon doctor travels to Texas to treat COVID-19 patients during Thanksgiving away from family [VIDEO] (Photo)
The Oregon Clinic - 11/25/20 1:02 PM
Dr. Jason Wells, Pulmonologist and Critical Care Physician at The Oregon Clinic
Dr. Jason Wells, Pulmonologist and Critical Care Physician at The Oregon Clinic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/5197/140352/thumb_Dr._Jason_Wells_The_Oregon_Clinic.jpg

This Thanksgiving, The Oregon Clinic’s Dr. Jason Wells won’t be with his wife and family. Instead, the Pulmonologist and Critical Care Provider will spend Thanksgiving day treating COVID-19 patients in Lubbock, Texas, where hospital staff have been inundated with patients and requested help.  [VIDEO BELOW]

Dr. Wells is one of several medical professionals from out of state helping out in the Texas hospital. 

“Without them, we would be in dire straits,” said Dr. Brian Schroeder, Chief Medical Officer at Covenant Health Hospital in Lubbock, Texas. 

Dr. Wells is working around the clock during his seven days in Texas. He will work 12 hour shifts at the hospital, followed by 12 hours on call. 

Dr. Wells has been treating COVID-19 patients in Oregon since the pandemic began. He will return home next week and continue to treat Oregonians at The Oregon Clinic and area hospitals.  

A link to a video interview of Dr. Jason Wells speaking about this experience is available: https://www.dropbox.com/s/vpvikd65zgqfd8i/Dr.%20Jason%20Wells.MP4?dl=0

 




Attached Media Files: Dr. Jason Wells, Pulmonologist and Critical Care Physician at The Oregon Clinic

Updated with more Photos: Union Gospel Mission to Provide More Than 1,000 Thanksgiving Meals All Over Portland (Photo)
Union Gospel Mission, Portland - 11/25/20 11:44 AM
Search + Rescue Thanksgiving
Search + Rescue Thanksgiving
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/706/140290/thumb_SR_Thanksgiving20_3011.jpg

For Immediate Release                                                                               Contact: Courtney Dodds

November 23, 2020                                                                                               Cell: 971-275-2334

                                       Union Gospel Mission to Provide More Than 1,000 Thanksgiving Meals All Over Portland

Portland, Ore., - Union Gospel Mission will provide more than 1,000 Thanksgiving meals to those in need downtown, living in camps all over Portland and on the East Side at their overnight shelter during Thanksgiving week. This is nearly a 20% increase in the number of Thanksgiving meals normally provided.

"For decades, we have put on a giant feast on Thanksgiving where we closed the street and served well over 800 meals. This year we can't gather even a couple dozen people, so we have innovated new ways to "feed the hungry" and celebrate the season,” says Bill Russell Executive Director.

The meals include traditional favorites like turkey, gravy, potatoes, cranberry sauce, and of course pumpkin pie. 

Guests at the downtown location will also receive a gift bag with a hat, gloves, socks, hand warmers, hygiene items and a snack sack.

If you would like to help the Mission provide meals to those in need visit www.ugmportland.org/donate, call 503-274-4483 or mail a check to 3 NW Third Avenue Portland, OR 97209.

There are opportunities for photos, video, and interviews, please contact Courtney Dodds at 971-275-2334.

Video B roll footage of S+R Thanksgiving 

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/zkw96ymvs2nick4/AABrVkftTrYL03KsonpVrkO1a?dl=0

About Union Gospel Mission: Union Gospel Mission’s purpose is “Feeding the hungry, restoring the addict and loving our neighbor.” Union Gospel Mission has been serving Portland since 1927. Union Gospel Mission provides meals and care for the homeless and operates LifeChange -- a transformative recovery program for men, women and children. Contact Union Gospel Mission at 503-274-4483, ugmportland.org or on social media @ugmpdx

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Attached Media Files: Search + Rescue Thanksgiving , Search + Rescue Thanksgiving , Search + Rescue Thanksgiving , Search + Rescue Thanksgiving , Thanksgiving Home Visit , Thanksgiving Home Visit , Meal , Food Prep , Gift Bag , Food Prep

Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update - Nov. 25, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 11/25/20 11:44 AM
2020-11/3986/140350/2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_4811.jpg
2020-11/3986/140350/2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_4811.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/3986/140350/thumb_2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_4811.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Nov. 25, 2020, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

The next update will be distributed on Monday, Nov. 30, 2020. 

PHOTO CAPTION:

Lincoln County, Ore. - Sept. 21, 2020 - Cory Royer, Division A Supervisor from FEMA, inspects utility system equipment damaged by the Echo Mountain Complex fire near Lincoln City Oregon. Photo by Jeff Markham/FEMA
File: 2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_4811.jpg

Marion County, Ore. - Sept. 17, 2020- Crews work to clear the road and restore power along Highway 22. Photo by Dominick Del Vecchio/FEMA
File: A7R00986.jpg

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/3986/140350/2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_4811.jpg , 2020-11/3986/140350/A7R00986.jpg

Drive by shooting arrests
Clark Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/25/20 9:13 AM

On 11.24.2020 at 2:23 PM Clark County Deputies were dispatched to the area of the Pebble Creek Garden Apartments located at 5313 NE 66th Av for a report of a suspicious vehicle occupied by several subjects, wearing masks and armed with "sawed off" weapons. A second 9.1.1 caller reported hearing gunshots in the area about the same time. A Deputy, in the area for an unrelated call, observed the vehicle leaving the area at a high rate of speed and in a reckless manner.  A traffic stop was attempted but the vehicle fled.  A short pursuit ensued before the vehicle crashed into a telephone pole in the area of NE 66th Av and NE 42nd St.  5 subjects in the vehicle fled from the vehicle.

Additional units from the Clark County Sheriffs Office, Vancouver Police, Washington State Patrol and Washington Fish and Wildlife arrived to assist. With the combined efforts of all agencies all 5 subjects were captured in the area within a few minutes.

The vehicle used had been reported stolen and 2 firearms were recovered.  Investigation is on-going. 

This incident is believed to be in retaliation for an assault the previous night involving the subject(s) in this event.

Three adults and 2 juveniles were arrested and booked into the CCLEC and JDH for charges related to this incident.

Adults are identified as:  Liijah Andrews - 19 years of age

                                      Clyde Hunt - 18 years of age

                                      Dale Grendahl - 18 years of age

The 2 juveniles will not be named at this time.

Charges for all involved range from Drive-by shooting, Unlawful possession of firearms, Eluding, Possession of a stolen vehicle.  Other charges may be forwarded at a later time.

The collision resulted in a major power outage in the area.  The Sheriff's office appreciates the communities cooperation during this event and subsequent power outage.  We also want to thank Clark Public Utilities for their quick response and efforts to return power to those impacted.

 


October 29, 2020 Officer-Involved Shooting -- Kevin E. Peterson Jr
City of Battle Ground - 11/25/20 9:00 AM

PRESS RELEASE #4 – NOVEMBER 25, 2020

The independent investigation team is completing its investigation of the October 29th, 2020 officer-involved shooting in Clark County.

The investigative team has prepared a video summary of the incident, which can be viewed at https://youtu.be/0bP6kf5CbTk

This video was compiled by using surveillance video from businesses in the area, drone video, dispatch audio recordings, and information obtained from interviews with the involved deputies and numerous witnesses.  The video also identifies the locations of evidence and points where certain actions occurred, based on the scene processing and witness interviews.  The involved deputies do not have body worn cameras or vehicle based cameras.

This incident began as a drug investigation where deputies intended to take Peterson Jr into custody for an attempted delivery of controlled substances.  In their briefing before the operation, detectives shared a social media post by Peterson Jr that indicated violence toward law enforcement.  When Peterson Jr was first contacted he fled on foot.  Deputies told investigators that as Peterson Jr ran away he dropped a handgun.  Pursuing deputies ordered Peterson Jr to not pick up the handgun.  He ignored the commands and picked up the handgun anyway and continued fleeing on foot. 

When Peterson Jr went through the U.S. Bank parking lot, one of the involved deputies contacted him at a distance of approximately 10 yards.  The deputies stated they again gave Peterson Jr commands to stop and to drop his gun, which witnesses in the area reported hearing.  Peterson Jr ignored these commands and ran back toward where other officers were on containment.   Deputies told investigators that as he ran, Peterson Jr pointed his gun at them.

All three deputies stated that before firing their weapons, they believed that Peterson Jr posed a lethal threat to either themselves or other responding officers.  The deputies fired a total of 34 rounds, with four rounds striking Peterson Jr.  The deputies told investigators Peterson Jr had aimed his firearm at them while multiple gunshots were going off around them.  They believed Peterson Jr had fired or had already shot at them.

There were two volleys of gunfire in this incident – the first occurred when Peterson Jr reportedly ignored commands, pulled his handgun out of his sweatshirt pocket and then ran towards the containment officers.  Peterson Jr then reportedly pointed his handgun at the deputies.  The second volley occurred after Peterson fell, then sat up and reportedly pointed the firearm at deputies again.  Shortly after the shooting, one of the involved deputies advised via radio that he thought Peterson may have fired “a couple” shots in their direction. 

At this point in the investigation, the team will be forwarding the case file to the prosecuting attorney for review.  Additional reports, such as lab reports and the medical examiner’s report are still pending, and will be submitted to the prosecutor as supplemental reports when they are received.

At the request of Clark County Prosecutor Tony Golik, this case will be reviewed by the Pierce County Prosecutor’s Office.  This update will be the final press release from the independent investigation team.

 

Troy Brightbill
Chief Criminal Deputy, Cowlitz County Sheriff’s Office
Commander, Lower Columbia Major Crimes Team

 


Santa Fills the Plane, Flys In Gifts for Homebound Seniors
Meals on Wheels People - 11/25/20 8:50 AM

Corey Rust, owner of Envi Adventures, hopes to fill a plane with gifts for homebound elderly this holiday season. On Saturday, Dec. 5, Corey invites people to bring new, unwrapped gifts for older adults to help Fill the Plane at the Troutdale Airport, 1350 NW Perimeter Way in Troutdale, between 9 a.m. and noon. Then the airplane will fly between Troutdale and Pearson Airfield in Vancouver. Clark County residents are invited to bring gifts to Pearson at 1010 E Reserve Street in Vancouver, between 1 and 4 p.m. Corey will then return to Troutdale with his planeful of gifts for seniors. All gifts will be distributed to homebound seniors later in December.

Suggested gifts include pajamas, fleece blankets, socks, postage stamps, puzzle books and large-print books. For more information, visit www.mowp.org.

About Meals on Wheels People: Meals on Wheels People has been changing lives, one meal at a time, since 1970. We provide more than a meal to thousands of older adults in the greater Portland metro area. Our service not only alleviates hunger and social isolation, but allows seniors to live independently with dignity in their own homes. Aging in place reduces depression, falls and hospitalization as well as the high cost of institutional care. For more information, visit: mowp.org.

About Envi Adventures: The core of Envi Adventures is to promote outdoor activity and to experience new things — to be adventurous and to find that next journey that will take you places you never dreamt of. Envi Adventures offers daily, year-round group and private flights over Portland, the Columbia River Gorge and Mt. Hood. For more information, visit: enviadventures.com.


Tip of The Week for November 30, 2020 - Holiday Shopping Safety (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/25/20 7:12 AM
2020-11/5490/140342/Holiday_Safety.PNG
2020-11/5490/140342/Holiday_Safety.PNG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/5490/140342/thumb_Holiday_Safety.PNG

  TIP OF THE WEEK

 

Date:          11/25/20                FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Contact:     Sheriff Curtis Landers

                   541-265-0654

                   iff@co.lincoln.or.us">lcsheriff@co.lincoln.or.us

 

              HOLIDAY SHOPPING SAFETY

As we all know, holiday shopping this year will be quite a bit different compared to most years. Given our current circumstances if you happen to shop in person while following the latest COVID-19 health guidelines, your Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office offers the following shopping safety tips as the holiday season is fast approaching.  We have also included some tips for those who shop online:   

  • Be alert and aware.  Be attentive to your surroundings at all times.
  • Don’t carry more cash or valuables than is necessary.  Be discreet so that you don’t attract attention.
  • Take extra precautions with your wallet or purse.  Carry your purse with the opening flap next to your body and with the strap hung over your shoulder.
  • Allow for darkness.  It gets dark early this time of year, so be sure to factor this into shopping plans.
  • Instruct children on holiday safety measures.  Know where your children are at all times.  Before going shopping, decide where to meet if you and your children should become separated.
  • Always lock your car doors and remember where you park.
  • Be sure to place valuables out of sight (i.e. packages, purses, mobile phones, etc.).  Place them in the trunk or take them with you.  This includes portable GPS units.
  • Never hide spare keys in or on your car.  These hiding places are easily discovered.  If you need spare keys, keep them in your wallet or purse.
  • Be alert to suspicious persons or circumstances.  Avoid parking where you see someone sitting in their vehicle for no apparent reason.
  • Trust your instincts.  If you feel uncomfortable or unsafe in a situation, report it to security immediately.
  • When walking in any parking lot, grocery store, airport, shopping center, etc., walk confidently with your head up, make eye contact, and have your keys ready.
  • Do not drive across parking stalls.  Use appropriate marked driving lanes and obey all traffic signs.
  • Drive defensively and courteously.
  • Report all suspicious activity.
  • And remember, parking lots will be more crowded and checkout lanes will be busier, so please be patient and have a safe shopping experience.

If you shop online, here are some ways to avoid becoming a victim of Porch Pirates – those who steal unattended packages from people’s property. They are heavily active this time of year.

  • Schedule deliveries to arrive when you will be at home or have them delivered to your office.
  • Have a trusted neighbor or friend pick up your packages if you won’t be home.
  • Install a security camera on your property.
  • Have packages delivered to a shipping store or an Amazon locker. If you hold a post office box, use USPS for shipping and take advantage of their package lockers to receive your items. Some post offices even allow boxholders to use it’s street address, with the customer’s box number as the “unit” number for deliveries from other carriers.

Have a safe and Happy Holiday!

 

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/5490/140342/112520_Holiday_Shopping_Safety.pdf , 2020-11/5490/140342/Holiday_Safety.PNG

Law enforcement activity on Sauvie Island (Photo)
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/25/20 12:33 AM
2020-11/1276/140341/Sheriff_Line_1.jpg
2020-11/1276/140341/Sheriff_Line_1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/1276/140341/thumb_Sheriff_Line_1.jpg

On behalf of the Columbia County Sheriff's Office: On Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2020, at approximately 7:56 p.m., the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office (CCSO) responded to a report of a burglary in progress and shots fired at a home in the 31000 block of NW Reeder Rd. on Sauvie Island in Columbia County. Multiple law enforcement agencies, including the Multnomah County Sheriff's Office, Portland Police Bureau, Oregon State Police and Columbia City Police Department, are assisting CCSO with a possible barricaded subject.

Currently, a long stretch of NW Reeder Rd. is closed to all traffic, including access for local residents. NW Reeder Rd. is expected to remain closed for some time. Due to safety reasons, a media staging area has been established at the Sauvie Island Park & Ride on NW Gillihan Rd. A PIO is not responding at this time. More information will be released when it’s appropriate.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1276/140341/Sheriff_Line_1.jpg

Tue. 11/24/20
Fatal Crash on SE Stark St, Major Crash Team Responding
Portland Police Bureau - 11/24/20 11:18 PM
A fatal crash has closed Southeast Stark Street near Southeast 127th Avenue.

On Tuesday, November 24, 2020 at 10:41p.m., East Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a crash on Southeast Stark Street near Southeast 127th Avenue. When officers and paramedics arrived, they found occupants of two cars with severe injuries. Two patients were transported to an area hospital by ambulance with life-threatening injuries. One person was pronounced deceased at the scene.

The Portland Police Traffic Division Major Crash Team is responding to the scene and will be investigating. Southeast Stark Street will remain closed at Southeast 125th Avenue to 127th for several hours.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be released after investigators learn more.

###PPB###

One Man Arrested, One Man Wanted After Armed Robbery (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/24/20 5:39 PM
Wanted graphic
Wanted graphic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/1128/140339/thumb_Voorhies.png

On Saturday, November 7, 2020, just after 7:30 p.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to an armed robbery of the Autozone at 825 NW Murray Blvd. in the community of Cedar Mill. Deputies learned one man stole from the store and ran to a truck waiting outside. The driver of the truck pulled out a gun and confronted a store employee. Both men then fled in the truck.

Detectives from the Violent Crimes Unit investigated the case and identified 24-year-old Brian Hauth as the man who stole from the store. Mr. Hauth was arrested on November 15 and is currently being held in the Washington County Jail on $250,000 bail for the following charges:

  • Robbery in the first degree
  • Robbery in the second degree (two counts)
  • Theft in the second degree
  • Unlawful use of a weapon
  • Felon in possession of a firearm

Detectives identified 34-year-old Brenton Voorhies, of Hillsboro, as the man driving the truck. On November 23, a Washington County grand jury issued an indictment charging both Mr. Hauth and Mr. Voorhies with the above-listed crimes. However, Mr. Voorhies’ current location is unknown, and he has an active felony arrest warrant. He is 5’10” tall, weighs about 210 pounds, and has a distinctive scar across his left cheek. He also has a unique tattoo on the top of his left hand.

If you have information about this case or about the whereabouts of Mr. Voorhies, please call 503-629-0111. If you see Mr. Voorhies, please call 911 and do not approach him.




Attached Media Files: Media Release PDF , Wanted graphic , Mr. Voohries old booking photo

Subjects Vandalize Vehicle Without Provocation (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/24/20 5:07 PM
windshield
windshield
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/3056/140338/thumb_windshield.jpg
On November 23, 2020, at 7:11 p.m., an officer from Central Precinct responded to a vandalism call by telephone. The victim in the incident told the officer a group of unknown subjects shattered the windshield of their vehicle.

The victim stated he was dropping someone off downtown when he had to drive through the area of Pioneer Square. There was a candlelight vigil at Pioneer Square attended by about 60 people. An additional 20 people wearing all black with helmets also arrived. The victim said he was driving through the intersection of Southwest 6th Ave and Morrison St when he saw about seven adult males crossing the street. The victim said he had a green light but saw the group, so he slowed and then stopped to let the group pass.

The victim said once he stopped, a large adult male, wearing all black, began yelling at the victim through the closed window. The victim said the suspect then jumped on top of the car, smashing the windshield.

The victim said he was shocked by what happened and said the suspect walked off with his friends; laughing and joking. The victim had a seven year-old child in the backseat of the vehicle who was terrified by the incident.

No arrests have been made.

Anyone with information about this incident is asked to call Portland Police at 503 823-3333. Please reference case number 20-349849.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: windshield

Pacific University News Capsule
Pacific University - 11/24/20 4:19 PM

Greetings from Pacific University, where we are thankful for the blessings of great students and caring faculty and staff.

Here are some things we're up to:

Dr. Fraser Horn '00, OD '04 named dean of the College of Optometry

College of Health Professions awarded state grant to provide mental health services to the medically underserved

Psychology Professor Ruth Zúñiga Wins Grants to Support Outreach to Spanish-speaking Community

Pacific Journalism program turns the (digital) page

NHOH holiday giving tree deadline extended through Nov. 30

Nicole George '16 is Helping to Expand the Reach of her Lingít Language

Reminder: Remaining undergraduate classes are online and many undergraduate students are heading home for the extended winter break 

— pacificu.edu —

Pacific University is a diverse learning community, where students thrive in a personal academic environment. Students study in a unique combination of undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in the liberal arts and sciences, business, education, health professions and optometry. Located in Oregon, Pacific serves a diverse population of more than 3,900 students, with campuses in Forest Grove, Hillsboro, Eugene and Woodburn, as well as healthcare clinics throughout the Portland area. Pacific is ranked the No. 1 private research university in the Pacific Northwest and is also committed to civic engagement, sustainability and interprofessional education as part of its core teaching philosophy.


Sheriff's Office, Gladstone PD nab armed ATM robber; suspect linked to several local robberies (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/24/20 3:44 PM
2020-11/624/140335/bookingphoto-RyanAndreHansen-20-025093.jpg
2020-11/624/140335/bookingphoto-RyanAndreHansen-20-025093.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/624/140335/thumb_bookingphoto-RyanAndreHansen-20-025093.jpg

Please reference CCSO Case # 20-025093

Just after 3 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 23, Gladstone Police responded to a report of an armed robbery at the US Bank ATM located at 19900 SE McLoughlin Blvd. in Gladstone.

The victim reported that the suspect had approached him while the victim was withdrawing cash at the ATM.

The suspect brandished a knife and demanded money, then fled the location in a gold Ford Fusion.

The victim followed the suspect for a few blocks, providing information to a 911 dispatcher.

An alert Clackamas County Sheriff's Office deputy working in the Oak Grove area spotted the suspect vehicle on SE Theissen Road near SE Aldercrest Road.

The deputy followed the suspect to SE Robhil Drive at SE Rusk Road -- a dead-end street.

Deputies initiated a high-risk traffic stop and ordered the suspect out of the car. The suspect was detained without further incident.

Gladstone Police officers and a detective responded to the scene and took custody of the suspect and continued their investigation (reference GPD Case # 20-025091).

Photos from the arrest scene are attached. Oregon City PD assisted.

The suspect was identified as Ryan Andre Hansen, 33, of Gladstone.

Investigators from Gladstone PD and West Linn PD were able to link Hansen to several other robberies in the area, including a Nov. 21 robbery at the Baskin-Robbins located at 13735 SE McLoughlin Blvd. A CCSO detective is following up on that case (CCSO Case # 20-024913).

Hansen's booking photo is attached. His complete Clackamas County Jail booking info is here: https://web3.clackamas.us/roster/#inmates His bail was set at $500,000. He is currently being held on a long list of charges including multiple counts of Robbery and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.

Anyone with information on additional criminal activity by Ryan Hansen is urged to contact the Sheriff's Office Tip Line -- by phone at 503-723-4949 or by using the online email form at https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/tip . Please reference CCSO Case # 20-025093.

Gladstone PD's press release on the case is reproduced below.

[END]


GLADSTONE PD PRESS RELEASE:

Robbery Suspect Arrested after ATM hold up

Posted: 11/24/20

https://flashalert.net/id/GladstonePolice/140332

On November 23rd, 2020, at about 3:08 PM, Officers from the Gladstone Police Department responded to a report of an armed robbery at the US Bank in Gladstone.  The suspect threatened the victim with a knife while at the ATM fleeing with $300 of the victim’s money.  The suspect got into a gold sedan headed north on Hwy 99 with the victim following and notifying police.  Members of the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office and Oregon City Police Department assisted in searching for the suspect vehicle which was located at SE Robhil Dr and Rusk Rd. in Milwaukie, Oregon.  Officers on scene were able to detain and later take the suspect into custody.  The suspect was identified as Ryan Hansen and officers recovered the victims $300.

During the course of the investigation, Detectives from the Gladstone Police Department and the West Linn Police Department were able to identify and link Mr. Hansen to several other robberies that included the November 18th US Bank ATM Robbery in Gladstone, November 18th Chase Bank ATM Robbery in West Linn, November 20th Burglary at KB Teriyaki in Gladstone, November 20th Robbery at the Oak Grove Baskin Robbins and the November 21st Robbery at the Gladstone Baskin Robbins.  

Ryan Hansen was transported to the Clackamas County Jail where he was booked on charges that included Robbery I, Robbery II, Criminal Mischief I, Menacing and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.  Additional charges could be added later by the Clackamas County District Attorney’s Office.

The Gladstone Police Department is grateful for the partnership we have with the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon City Police Department and West Linn Police Department and thank them for assisting in capturing Mr. Hansen.  Our communities in Clackamas County are safer as a result.

On November 23rd, 2020, at about 3:08 PM, Officers from the Gladstone Police Department responded to a report of an armed robbery at the US Bank in Gladstone.  The suspect threatened the victim with a knife while at the ATM fleeing with $300 of the victim’s money.  The suspect got into a gold sedan headed north on Hwy 99 with the victim following and notifying police.  Members of the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office and Oregon City Police Department assisted in searching for the suspect vehicle which was located at SE Robhil Dr and Rusk Rd. in Milwaukie, Oregon.  Officers on scene were able to detain and later take the suspect into custody.  The suspect was identified as Ryan Hansen and officers recovered the victims $300.

During the course of the investigation, Detectives from the Gladstone Police Department and the West Linn Police Department were able to identify and link Mr. Hansen to several other robberies that included the November 18th US Bank ATM Robbery in Gladstone, November 18th Chase Bank ATM Robbery in West Linn, November 20th Burglary at KB Teriyaki in Gladstone, November 20th Robbery at the Oak Grove Baskin Robbins and the November 21st Robbery at the Gladstone Baskin Robbins.  

Ryan Hansen was transported to the Clackamas County Jail where he was booked on charges that included Robbery I, Robbery II, Criminal Mischief I, Menacing and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.  Additional charges could be added later by the Clackamas County District Attorney’s Office.

The Gladstone Police Department is grateful for the partnership we have with the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon City Police Department and West Linn Police Department and thank them for assisting in capturing Mr. Hansen.  Our communities in Clackamas County are safer as a result.

No additional information is available at this time.

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/624/140335/bookingphoto-RyanAndreHansen-20-025093.jpg , 2020-11/624/140335/ArrestScene3.jpg , 2020-11/624/140335/ArrestScene2.jpg , 2020-11/624/140335/ArrestScene1.jpg

PeaceHealth asks for community cooperation at Thanksgiving (Photo)
PeaceHealth - 11/24/20 2:30 PM
Sean Gregory
Sean Gregory
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/5173/140333/thumb_sean-gregory.jpg

As southwest Washington residents make final preparations for the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday, COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to spike in our community. PeaceHealth Columbia Network Chief Executive Sean Gregory shares the following letter discussing important thoughts to carry us safely throught the holidays into the New Year:

Dear friends and neighbors,

On behalf of my colleagues that serve in the largest and longest standing provider of healthcare in our region, I want to share a few thoughts as we prepare to celebrate Thanksgiving.

Please be safe. There is nothing political about COVID-19 in our community. People have been harmed, and more people will be harmed. Please take measures to not harm yourself or others. Wearing a mask is an inconvenience, but the consequences of spreading the virus are worthy of being inconvenienced.

Everyone has a role. If there was ever an illustration of interdependence, it is what we are experiencing in this pandemic.  Your important role may be to help your family make a hard decision about where to have Thanksgiving dinner.  You may need to listen to a loved one frustrated by the consequences of the pandemic.  Whatever your role in helping our community navigate the pandemic, it matters, and your friends working in healthcare appreciate your efforts.

Please know your encouragement is noticed. Our PeaceHealth teams have received over 20,000 donated meals, thousands of letters of encouragement, and thousands more prayers. Your encouragement matters to us and is something WE are very thankful for.  It is a blessing to work in a community that has been so incredibly encouraging. Thank you. We are part of an incredible community.

Happy Thanksgiving Eve,

Sean Gregory
Chief Executive, PeaceHealth Columbia Network

The PeaceHealth Columbia Network includes both PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center in Vancouver, WA and PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center in Longview, WA. 




Attached Media Files: Sean Gregory

Third Youth from Early November Car Crash has Died
Gresham Police Dept - 11/24/20 2:10 PM

Gresham, Ore.— At 8:50 p.m. on Nov. 6., Gresham police officers and medical personnel responded to reports of a two-vehicle injury crash in the 600 block of SE Butler Rd.  Responders found that an eastbound Volkswagen Jetta with six Gresham-area teenagers had crossed the center line and crashed head-on into a westbound Ford F350 driven by a 40-year-old Gresham man. 

The male driver of the Jetta, 16-year-old Phoenix Forman, was pronounced dead at the scene.  A 16-year-old female passenger, Rita Grace “Gracie” Sukosd, died shortly after arriving at the hospital.  A second 16-year-old female passenger, Hailey Aguilar, recently died after being taken off life support.  The three other teenagers, one female and two males, and the driver of the pickup, all suffered various degrees of injury but are expected to survive.

The involved teenagers attended four different area high schools and the weight of this tragedy has been felt throughout the community.

The East Metro Vehicular Crimes Team is leading the investigation and working to determine what factors precipitated the crash.  No further information is available at this time.

 

###GPD###


Robbery Suspect Arrested after ATM hold up (Photo)
Gladstone Police - 11/24/20 2:02 PM
2020-11/1213/140332/Ryan_Hansen.PNG
2020-11/1213/140332/Ryan_Hansen.PNG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/1213/140332/thumb_Ryan_Hansen.PNG

On November 23rd, 2020, at about 3:08 PM, Officers from the Gladstone Police Department responded to a report of an armed robbery at the US Bank in Gladstone.  The suspect threatened the victim with a knife while at the ATM fleeing with $300 of the victim’s money.  The suspect got into a gold sedan headed north on Hwy 99 with the victim following and notifying police.  Members of the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office and Oregon City Police Department assisted in searching for the suspect vehicle which was located at SE Robhil Dr and Rusk Rd. in Milwaukie, Oregon.  Officers on scene were able to detain and later take the suspect into custody.  The suspect was identified as Ryan Hansen and officers recovered the victims $300. 

During the course of the investigation, Detectives from the Gladstone Police Department and the West Linn Police Department were able to identify and link Mr. Hansen to several other robberies that included the November 18th US Bank ATM Robbery in Gladstone, November 18th Chase Bank ATM Robbery in West Linn, November 20th Burglary at KB Teriyaki in Gladstone, November 20th Robbery at the Oak Grove Baskin Robbins and the November 21st Robbery at the Gladstone Baskin Robbins.   

Ryan Hansen was transported to the Clackamas County Jail where he was booked on charges that included Robbery I, Robbery II, Criminal Mischief I, Menacing and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.  Additional charges could be added later by the Clackamas County District Attorney’s Office.

The Gladstone Police Department is grateful for the partnership we have with the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon City Police Department and West Linn Police Department and thank them for assisting in capturing Mr. Hansen.  Our communities in Clackamas County are safer as a result.

On November 23rd, 2020, at about 3:08 PM, Officers from the Gladstone Police Department responded to a report of an armed robbery at the US Bank in Gladstone.  The suspect threatened the victim with a knife while at the ATM fleeing with $300 of the victim’s money.  The suspect got into a gold sedan headed north on Hwy 99 with the victim following and notifying police.  Members of the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office and Oregon City Police Department assisted in searching for the suspect vehicle which was located at SE Robhil Dr and Rusk Rd. in Milwaukie, Oregon.  Officers on scene were able to detain and later take the suspect into custody.  The suspect was identified as Ryan Hansen and officers recovered the victims $300. 

During the course of the investigation, Detectives from the Gladstone Police Department and the West Linn Police Department were able to identify and link Mr. Hansen to several other robberies that included the November 18th US Bank ATM Robbery in Gladstone, November 18th Chase Bank ATM Robbery in West Linn, November 20th Burglary at KB Teriyaki in Gladstone, November 20th Robbery at the Oak Grove Baskin Robbins and the November 21st Robbery at the Gladstone Baskin Robbins.   

Ryan Hansen was transported to the Clackamas County Jail where he was booked on charges that included Robbery I, Robbery II, Criminal Mischief I, Menacing and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.  Additional charges could be added later by the Clackamas County District Attorney’s Office.

The Gladstone Police Department is grateful for the partnership we have with the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon City Police Department and West Linn Police Department and thank them for assisting in capturing Mr. Hansen.  Our communities in Clackamas County are safer as a result.

No additional information is available at this time.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1213/140332/Ryan_Hansen.PNG

County seeks applicants for five Animal Control Advisory Board positions
Clark Co. WA Communications - 11/24/20 1:53 PM

Vancouver, Wash. ??' Interim County Manager Kathleen Otto is seeking applicants for several open positions on the volunteer Animal Protection and Control Advisory Board. All the openings are for terms that begin immediately.

The positions are for Clark County residents that represent:

  • Member at large, term expires Oct. 31, 2022
  • Livestock owner, term expires Oct. 31, 2022
  • Veterinarian or vet tech practicing in Clark County, term expires Oct. 31, 2023
  • Cat owner, term expires Oct. 31, 2023
  • Animal welfare group, term expires Oct. 31, 2024

Advisory board members meet quarterly at 6:30 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of the month. Meeting are usually held at the Clark County Public Safety Complex, 505 NW 179th St., Ridgefield. However, the Board is meeting virtually due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Functions of the 10-member board include:

    • Reporting to the County Councilors and Vancouver City Council at least once a year on general operations of the Animal Protection and Control Program
    • Recommending potential modifications to code
    • Acting as an appeals hearing board
    • Volunteering at outreach and fundraising events
    • Promoting the program and its licensing of all dogs and cats.

Applications and a résumé can be mailed to Animal Protection and Control, P.O. Box 9810, Vancouver, WA 98666-9810 or emailed to son@clark.wa.gov">susan.anderson@clark.wa.gov.

For more about the board or to download an application, please go to www.clark.wa.gov/community-development/animal-control-advisory-board.

Application deadline is 5 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 22, 2020.


Hockinson School District Board of Directors Regular Meeting
Hockinson Sch. Dist. - 11/24/20 1:52 PM

Date:

Monday, November 30, 2020

Time:

6:00 p.m.

Address:

See the HSD Website http://www.hocksd.org (top of the page) for a Zoom link to join the meeting.

Public Comment:

Public comment is welcome, and will be limited to 2 minutes per person so that the planned business of the board may proceed in a timely manner. Zoom software will be used to receive public comment.
Please review: Policy 1400 Meeting Conduct, Order of Business, and Quorum


Eviction Rental Assistance Program closes to referrals, new calls in Clark County
Clark Co. WA Communications - 11/24/20 1:50 PM

Remaining funds to be dedicated to waitlist

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County has expended its initial Eviction Rent Assistance Program (ERAP) funds, providing more than $3.4 million dollars in rental assistance to 1,042 households, for a total of 2,875 months of assistance. With a waitlist of more than 1,800 households still awaiting assistance, the program is closing to new referrals and calls. 

The success of the ERAP program in Clark County prompted the Washington Department of Commerce to award the county an additional $3.3 million dollars, which will be dedicated to provide assistance to the more than 1,800 households that have not received ERAP support to this point and are on the waitlist.

Rental assistance was provided through four organizations: Council For The Homeless, Share, Lifeline Connections and Impact Northwest.

Outreach and referral services for historically underserved communities was done by 10 organizations and advocacy groups that are within and specifically target and serve marginalized communities, which are often black, indigenous, and other people of color. The outreach and referral organizations include: Chris Bennett Enterprises Charities, Cascade AIDS Project, White Center Community Development Center working through COFA Alliance National Network Washington, League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), Odyssey World International Education Services in partnership with National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Vancouver chapter, Parents Empowered and Communities Enhanced (PEACE), The Noble Foundation, Washington Advocates of Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and the Hispanic Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce.

The close cooperation between the county, rental assistance providers, and the culturally specific organizations providing outreach and referral resulted in an impressive 74.1% of households receiving assistance having a woman as the head of household; and just over 54.2% of all households receiving assistance identified as black, indigenous, or other community of color. 


Battle Ground School Board sends lower tax rate to voters
Battle Ground Sch. Dist. - 11/24/20 1:46 PM

The Battle Ground Public Schools Board of Directors decided unanimously on Monday to dip into the district's reserve fund and put a replacement levy before voters that is less than the current schools levy rate. This educational programs and operations (EP & O) levy will be on the Feb. 9, 2021 special election ballot.

The levy is not a new tax, and if approved, will replace the levy that expires at the end of 2021. The local levy will allow the district to maintain educational programs and critical day-to-day school operations such as student technology, additional school staff beyond what the state provides, and building maintenance. 

It is estimated that property owners in the district will see a decrease in their local schools tax rate of 39 cents in 2022 compared to 2021. The local levy rate is projected to be $1.95 per $1,000 of assessed value in 2022.

The board has diligently contributed to the district's reserve fund over the last several years in case a need might arise. Seeing that the pandemic has had economic implications for many families in the community, the directors decided that providing relief to the Battle Ground schools community during the pandemic would be a good use of some of the reserve funds. "I don't like to have to use the reserve fund, but COVID is one of those things that makes it necessary," said Board President Troy McCoy.

Key points of the district's replacement levy are:

  • Replacement levy will decrease taxes by about 39 cents per $1,000 the first year (2022) to $1.95 per $1,000.
  • The district plans to dip into its rainy day reserve fund and drop the tax rate as low as it can the first year
  • Battle Ground Public Schools has the lowest property tax rate of all K-12 districts in Clark County
  • The levy will allow the district to maintain critical student programs and activities and maintain facilities
  • The levy will be for four years, 2022–2025

After the first year, the replacement levy rate will go to a projected rate of $2.20 per $1,000, but will still be less than the current levy rate by about 14 cents per $1,000. The replacement levy is for four years and will provide about 14 percent of the district's total operating budget. 

Battle Ground's levy pays for basic services that are key to providing a quality education and getting students the help they need both socially and academically. The levy enables the district to keep class sizes small, supply technology that has helped students learn remotely during the health crisis, and provide for learning experiences such as electives and Advanced Placement (AP) courses. Battle Ground's levy covers 25 percent of school and district support staff, teachers, and administrators over what the state funds.

"The levy covers the needs of the district," said Board Member Monty Anderson. "We tried to look at it in several ways for the community and give a good solid package that would be supported." 

Levy dollars also pay for high school and upcoming middle school sports, health services, music and art classes, drug prevention education, instructional technology, security, education for students with special needs, utilities, and insurance. The levy also funds textbooks and curricula, staff positions and salaries and professional development, transportation, and building maintenance.

This levy will help Battle Ground maintain the funding for essential student programs and services," McCoy said. "Local support is critical to providing a variety of programs that appeal to a wide range of students, to supporting special needs students, and to maintaining facilities. The state does not cover or fully cover many of these critical components of education."

Battle Ground Public Schools has the lowest property tax rate of all K-12 districts in Clark County. While other districts rely on multiple levies to fund technology, transportation, capital projects and educational programs, Battle Ground funds all these elements out of a single levy. Across Washington, nearly all of the 295 districts rely on levy money to provide important student programs and services. 

The levy funds, which will provide approximately $24.9 million in 2022, $29.2 million in 2023,  $30.4 million in 2024, and $31.6 million in 2025 (based on the predicted increase of assessed property values), bridge the gap between the basic education funding provided by the state and the current operating budget of the district. In addition, If voters approve the levy, the Battle Ground district will be eligible to receive about $2 million in levy equalization funds from the state over the four-year period. The tax rate for the replacement levy will be lower than the current rate.

"We appreciate the support that our community has given to our students over the years," said Superintendent Mark Ross. "We continue to need that support to provide the programs and opportunities that prepare our students for a successful future." 

Levy information will be available on the district's website and social media outlets, and through public presentations. In addition, questions can be emailed to communication@battlegroundps.org or called into (360) 885-5470.

Established in 1909, Battle Ground Public Schools (Battle Ground School District No. 119) is the 27th largest school district in the state of Washington. The district is home to 18 schools, serving the educational needs of 12,000 students. With 1,400 employees, Battle Ground Public Schools is the largest employer in Battle Ground.


Anti-Hunger Advocates Nationwide Urge Nomination of Rep. Marcia Fudge for U.S. Secretary of Agriculture (Photo)
Oregon Food Bank - 11/24/20 1:41 PM
Logos
Logos
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/620/140327/thumb_OFB-GCFB-Logos.png

More than 60 food banks and anti-poverty organizations hail the Congresswoman’s leadership on public nutrition programs, support for farmworkers and the root causes of hunger

CLEVELAND, OH — More than 60 of the nation’s leading anti-hunger advocates today came together to strongly recommend the nomination of Representative Marcia Fudge (OH-11) for the position of United States Agriculture Secretary. In a November 23 letter to President-Elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. and the Biden-Harris Transition Team, leaders from food banks, hunger relief and anti-poverty organizations throughout the country cited the Ohio Congresswoman’s leadership on initiatives that form the backbone of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s mission — including public nutrition programs, support for farmworkers and efforts to address the root causes of hunger. 

The full letter and list of signatories can be found at bit.ly/FudgeUSDA. 

“As an anti-hunger organization located in Ohio’s 11th Congressional district, we have experienced Congresswoman Fudge’s unwavering commitment to tackling food insecurity,” said Kristin Warzocha, President & CEO of the Greater Cleveland Food Bank. “She has always prioritized protecting and strengthening federal nutrition programs, while also understanding the critical role that these programs play in maintaining a sustainable food system. We have witnessed her leadership on the farm bill and know she has the interests of American farmers and families at the center of her work. We have called on the Congresswoman time and time again for guidance on local and federal policy issues, so we know firsthand that when constituents call, she always answers. Her track record of fighting on behalf of American farmers and families makes us confident that there is no one better to lead the U.S. Department of Agriculture.” 

From coast to coast, leaders point to Congresswoman Fudge’s compassionate leadership and steadfast dedication to ending hunger, systemic racism and poverty in America — most recently as Chair of the U.S. House Agriculture Subcommittee on Nutrition, Oversight and Department Affairs.

“With 1 in 6 Americans already facing food insecurity in the pandemic’s wake — and an even greater impact among people of color — our communities need a champion like Congresswoman Fudge at the helm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture if we hope to emerge stronger from this crisis,” said Susannah Morgan, CEO of Oregon Food Bank. “We’re proud to join anti-hunger advocates across the country in endorsing her leadership not only on efforts to ensure access to food and other vital resources today, but in advancing the kind of lasting change we need to end hunger for good.”

ABOUT OREGON FOOD BANK

At Oregon Food Bank, we believe that food and health are basic human rights for all. We know that hunger is not just an individual experience; it is also a community-wide symptom of barriers to employment, education, housing and health care. That’s why we work on two fronts in our mission to end hunger in Oregon: we build community connections to help people access nutritious, affordable food today, and we build community power to eliminate the root causes of hunger for good. For more information, visit OregonFoodBank.org

ABOUT GREATER CLEVELAND FOOD BANK

The Greater Cleveland Food Bank is the largest hunger relief organization in Northeast Ohio, having provided more than 56 million meals in FY2020 to hungry people in Cuyahoga, Ashtabula, Geauga, Lake, Ashland and Richland counties. Our mission is working together to ensure that everyone in our communities has the nutritious food they need every day. We do this through both food distribution and SNAP outreach efforts. For more information go to GreaterClevelandFoodBank.org

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Attached Media Files: Support Letter , Logos

Tualatin Valley Water District Board of Commissioners Meeting Notice -- December 1, 2020
Tualatin Valley Water Dist. - 11/24/20 1:32 PM

The December Tualatin Valley Water District (TVWD) Board work session will be held Tuesday, December 1, 2020, at 6:00 p.m. 

This meeting is dial-in only; it will not be held in a physical location. If you would like to attend via phone, please utilize the contact information found below by 4:30 p.m. on December 1. 

The Board work session agenda and packet and additional information regarding TVWD are available here.  

About TVWD

TVWD serves about 215,500 customers in parts of Washington County, Oregon. Our service area covers more than 44 square miles including portions of Beaverton, Hillsboro, Tigard and unincorporated Washington County.

TVWD is the managing agency for the Willamette Water Supply System (WWSS), an additional water supply for the region which is being constructed in partnership with the City of Hillsboro and the City of Beaverton. The WWSS includes intake facilities, over 30 miles of pipes, a water treatment plant and two storage reservoirs. The system will deliver fresh, high-quality, treated water from the Willamette River to 400,000 Washington County residents and businesses, and is being built to the highest seismic safety standard to recover quickly after a major earthquake. The investments in the system will provide reliable, quality drinking water for generations to come.


Oregon Historical Society Shares Update on Afro-American Heritage Bicentennial Commemorative Quilt Conservation Efforts (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 11/24/20 1:27 PM
Afro-American Heritage Bicentennial Commemorative Quilt before damage, courtesy Portland Textile Month
Afro-American Heritage Bicentennial Commemorative Quilt before damage, courtesy Portland Textile Month
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/2861/140325/thumb_Quilt-white_background_(1).jpg

Portland, OR — The Oregon Historical Society has sent the Afro-American Heritage Bicentennial Commemorative Quilt for conservation following the vandalism to the Oregon Historical Society’s (OHS) downtown facility on the evening of Sunday, October 11, 2020. During that evening, the quilt was taken from its temporary display in the OHS pavilion, where it was on exhibit as part of a collaboration with Portland Textile Month in order to offer free public access for community members to view the quilt during the month of October. Thankfully, local police recovered the quilt early the next morning, returning it to the care of OHS collections staff.

Each square of the quilt, crafted from 1974 to 1976 in honor of the American Bicentennial, honors a Black individual or moment in history. Fifteen Black women from Portland sewed the quilt, who later donated it to OHS and entrusted it to the Society’s care.

Upon its return, museum collections staff quickly moved to stabilize the quilt, carefully but quickly drying it to prevent mold and microbial growth. Once dry, staff members carefully cleaned the quilt with a variable-speed, HEPA filter vacuum through a screen to prevent force or damage to the textile. Fortunately, the quilt did not sustain notable structural damage, but it did suffer from red pigment staining throughout. The quilt was condition reported and documented as is, and staff sent this information to several potential textile conservators.

Last week, OHS sent the quilt to the Textile Conservation Workshop (TCW), a non-profit organization focused on the preservation of textiles. Located in South Salem, New York, TCW is a highly respected leader in textile conservation with a focus on quilts. The founder and director, Patsy Orlofsky, is also the author of Quilts in America, which provides history and technical information about quilting.

“I am confident that Patsy and her team will do the very best to address the conservation issues with the Afro-American Heritage Bicentennial Commemorative Quilt,” said OHS Deputy Museum Director Nicole Yasuhara. “Speaking to Patsy, I have been impressed with her knowledge, realistic approach, and thoughtful recommendations. We will continue to communicate throughout the process, and hope to have the quilt back in our care in a few months.”

After consulting with Dr. Sylvia Gates Carlisle, the last living quilter from the original group, OHS has decided to attempt to restore the front of the quilt as much as possible, but will remove and replace the quilt backing, which is severely stained. The original backing will remain in the OHS collection as its own museum object, with the history of the vandalism captured and added to its story.

You can learn more about this important piece of local African American history through a recent blog post at ohs.org/blog and view a recorded virtual panel discussion on the quilt’s history on our website at ohs.org/events, which featured Dr. Sylvia Gates Carlisle, Dr. Carmen P. Thompson, Sheridan Collins, and Mary Bywater Cross.
 


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.




Attached Media Files: Afro-American Heritage Bicentennial Commemorative Quilt before damage, courtesy Portland Textile Month , Back of the Afro-American Heritage Bicentennial Commemorative Quilt Showing Damage , Detail of a square from the Afro-American Heritage Bicentennial Commemorative Quilt Showing Damage , Detail of a square from the Afro-American Heritage Bicentennial Commemorative Quilt Showing Damage , Detail of a square from the Afro-American Heritage Bicentennial Commemorative Quilt Showing Damage , Overview of the Afro-American Heritage Bicentennial Commemorative Quilt Showing Damage

Fall Boating -Plan, Prepare for the Perfect Voyage
Oregon Marine Board - 11/24/20 1:00 PM

Oregon is blessed with a plethora of boating opportunities year-round but fall and winter require more preparation and planning. This year is no exception and boaters are urged to take a few extra steps to ensure a safe voyage.

Oregon’s waterways are cold year-round and noticeably cold now, so dress for the water temperature and expect to get wet. For paddlers, SUPers, and rafters, the Marine Board recommends wearing a wet suit, dry suit, warm layers, and a life jacket designed for the activity. At a minimum, carry a cell phone in a dry bag/container or other communication device, and share a float plan with friends or family so they can call for help if you are overdue. 

Fall rains can also cause dramatic rises in river flows. Because of this year’s historic wildfires, these fluctuations may be quicker and larger, and more debris is entering the rivers and lakes. The water is staying muddy much longer as well. Boaters are encouraged to monitor NOAA weather for their region, check river gauges and reservoir levels, and to visit the agency’s interactive Boat Oregon Map with information to contact facility owners and learn if access is open. The Marine Board works closely with marine law enforcement to assess reported navigation obstructions as well, adding verified obstructions to the map with river sections to avoid or recommendations for safe passage, where possible. Conditions are dynamic, though, with new obstructions reported almost daily right now. Scout ahead in unknown waters.

Boating has become a great escape during this time of COVID but requires vigilance and skill. If you’re new to boating, take advantage of a free online paddling course or other boating safety education offerings for motorboat operators. Start out in locations that are calm and sheltered from rapidly changing conditions due to weather or water volume.

Learn more at www.boatoregon.com.

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Oregon reports 1,011 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 21 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 11/24/20 12:49 PM

Nov. 24, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,011 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 21 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed 21 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 847, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today. The total number of Oregonians hospitalized with COVID-19 also increased, along with the number of people with the virus who are in intensive cares.

The 21 deaths that health officials are reporting today sets a one-day record. OHA Director Patrick Allen said, “We feel pain and sorrow for our neighbors who’ve lost their lives to COVID-19 and the families they leave behind. And each death we record is a reminder that COVID-19 is a life-threatening virus that’s easy to catch, a warning that more Oregonians will die if we don’t contain it and a call to action to stop its spread.”

People can do their part to help reduce the spread of the virus: wear a mask, keep six feet between you and other people when you’re in public and wash hands often. In addition, all Oregon counties are currently subject to a two-week freeze, which recommends that you limit the size of your social gatherings to six people or fewer, and gather with no more than one other household at a time.

OHA reported 1,011 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 67,333.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (7), Benton (20), Clackamas (106), Clatsop (7), Columbia (7), Coos (4), Crook (3), Curry (7), Deschutes (44), Douglas (19), Grant (4), Harney (2), Hood River (6), Jackson (56), Jefferson (12), Josephine (11), Klamath (16), Lake (9), Lane (57), Lincoln (23), Linn (21), Malheur (17), Marion (113), Morrow (5), Multnomah (150), Polk (30), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (34), Union (4), Wasco (9), Washington (183), and Yamhill (24).

Oregon’s 827th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 15 and died on Nov. 19, at Tuality Community Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 828th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 22 and died on Nov. 1, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 829th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Nov. 18, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 830th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Multnomah County who died on Nov. 15, in his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 831st COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 15, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 832nd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 10, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 833rd COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Wallowa County who tested positive on Oct. 26 and died on Nov. 9, at Wallowa Memorial Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 834th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 6 and died on Nov. 22, at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 835th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 17. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 836th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 3 and died on Nov. 11, in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 837th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Nov. 20, at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 838th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Oct. 26 and died on Nov. 18, at Portland Veteran’s Administration Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 839th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 6 and died on Nov. 21, at Rogue Valley Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 840th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Oct. 26 and died on Nov. 21, at Rogue Valley Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 841st COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Union County who tested positive on Nov. 11 and died on Nov. 23. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 842nd COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Nov. 7, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 843rd COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on June 24 and died on Nov. 4, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 844th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 15 and died on Nov. 20, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 845th COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 4 and died on Nov. 14, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 846th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 24 and died on Oct. 25, at Portland Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 847th COVID-19 death is a 33-year-old man in Marion County who died on Nov. 12, at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.


COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to rise

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon increased to 474, 18 more than yesterday.

There are 113 COVID-19 patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds, 4 more than yesterday.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


EPA Oregon Wildfire Recovery Review and Update (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 11/24/20 12:23 PM
2020-11/3986/140321/ODOT.jpg
2020-11/3986/140321/ODOT.jpg
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As EPA’s work winds down, some response crews remain to handle final cleanups

(Salem, OR - November 24, 2020)   As EPA pauses to retool its wildfire household hazardous waste recovery operations for the Thanksgiving holiday, agency officials  are reflecting on the results achieved by cleanup teams over the past 90 days in Oregon. After the holiday, EPA will continue reducing their “footprint” in the state, with many crews already departing to return to their normal schedules, teams and families.

Since mobilizing on September 24 by FEMA “Mission Assignment,” 17 EPA field recovery teams, working 12-hour days, seven days a week, have retrieved and removed household hazardous waste from over 2300 fire-ravaged parcels in eight Oregon counties.  In addition, EPA teams stabilized and consolidated ash and debris from more than 230 parcels along Oregon waterways - including five miles of the Bear Creek riparian area in Jackson County - protecting water quality from toxic runoff.  In all, EPA mobilized over 250 responders, both virtually and in the field, from all over the country to support response operations.

According to EPA Incident Commander, Randy Nattis, the Agency has been proud to help Oregon recover from the devastating fall wildfires, crediting local support and guidance as critical to EPA’s success. 

“Make no mistake, I couldn’t be prouder of our work and what  our teams have accomplished,” said EPA’s Nattis. “But we are standing on the shoulders of the County Public Works directors, DEQ On-Scene Coordinators, FEMA disaster officials, our support contractors and countless Oregon responders. Projects of this size, scope and scale demand ultimate teamwork. And we couldn’t have asked for better, more resilient partners than Oregonians.”

With Step 2 of the Oregon state-managed cleanup getting underway, Step 2 cleanup crews are expected to begin clearing properties throughout wildfire impacted areas in mid-December, removing hazard trees, ash and debris.  EPA’s presence will remain at a more compact profile, with several smaller mobile crews remaining to respond to any additional properties that still need attention. EPA crews will also back up ODOT’s contractors as they start removing heavy debris, cars and appliances and find hidden household hazardous waste, cylinders, ammunition or other hazardous materials.

For more information about EPA’s Step 1 work, please visit our 2020 Fire Recovery Story Map . For more information about Oregon’s Step 2 work please visit the 2020 Oregon Wildfire Recovery website or call the Wildfire Debris Cleanup Hotline at 503-934-1700.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/3986/140321/ODOT.jpg , 2020-11/3986/140321/DEQ_logo.png , 2020-11/3986/140321/OEM_logo.jpg , 2020-11/3986/140321/EPA_logo.jpg

Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld to hold weekly media briefing
Oregon Employment Department - 11/24/20 12:00 PM

WHO:              David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, Oregon Employment Department

WHEN:            Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020, at 1 p.m. PT

WHAT:            Oregon Employment Department Acting Director David Gerstenfeld will hold a video conference media briefing to share updates on updates on unemployment claims processing, the waiting week and more on Wednesday, Nov. 25 at 1 p.m. PT.

WHERE:         Via Zoom video conference: Members of the media must RSVP for call information by emailing OED_Communications@oregon.gov by 12 p.m. PT on Wednesday, Nov. 25. Video conference information will be provided to all reporters who RSVP.

OTHER:          The Oregon Employment Department is updating a claims processing progress data dashboard daily. Visit this link for weekday updates. A recording of the video conference will be emailed to reporters attending the briefing after the briefing concludes.

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services


Fourth suspect arrested in ongoing human sex trafficking investigation
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 11/24/20 11:55 AM

November 24, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced for the first time limited details on an ongoing human sex traffic investigation, involving a minor victim, which has resulted in two of the four suspects pleading guilty.

Until today, no information about this case could be provided to the public because the fourth suspect remained in warrant status.

This investigation started in 2019 when the Portland Police Bureau’s Human Trafficking Unit developed information about a minor being sold for sex.

During the investigation, four suspects were identified and later indicted:

  • Malik Owens, 24;
  • Isaac Zapata, 51;
  • Jeffrey Nichols, 51;
  • Josiah Carmona, 19.

According to publicly available information:

  • Owens is charged with seven counts of compelling prostitution, 40 counts of promoting prostitution, one count of unlawful possession of a firearm and two counts of tampering with a witness.
  • Zapata is charged with three counts of purchasing sex with a minor, three counts of commercial sexual solicitation, and three counts of sexual abuse in the second degree.
  • Nicholas is on 36 months of supervised probation, as of August 2020, after pleading guilty to one count of purchasing sex with a minor, one count of attempted delivery of cocaine, and one count of commercial sexual solicitation.
  • Carmona received a 15 month prison sentence after pleading guilty to one count of tampering with a witness and then violating his previously imposed probation. He will be on five years of post-prison supervision.

The criminal conduct alleged in these four cases occurred in July 2019.

On November 23, 2020, members of the United States Marshals Service located and arrested Zapata in the area of Southeast 90th Avenue and Southeast Ellis Street in Portland, Oregon.

All other additional facts in this case, including the charging instruments and plea agreements, remain under court ordered seal.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time because Owens and Zapata are pending trial.

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime. Owens and Zapata are innocent unless and until proven guilty.

This case is being litigated by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Human Trafficking Team, which includes two attorneys, an investigator and a victim advocate. Additionally, an attorney assigned to the MCDA gang unit is available to help prosecute cases and support the team as trafficking routinely intersects with gang violence.

The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office’s Human Trafficking Team works to protect victims utilizing a three-prong approach: (1) aggressively prosecuting those who traffic victims to sex buyers; (2) reducing demand for exploitation in all forms to include a dedicated focus on a reduction of sex buyers; and (3) ensuring adequate protection and support for victims of human trafficking.

If you are involved in sex trafficking, or know of someone who is being trafficked, call the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-373-7888 or 9-1-1.

 

#MCDA#


Media Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/5769/140319/PR-20-195-Four_people_indicted_in_Portland_human_trafficking_investigation.pdf

Fatal Crash on Interstate 84 - Hood River County
Oregon State Police - 11/24/20 11:00 AM

On Tuesday, November 24, 2020, at approximately 2:33 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Interstate 84 near milepost 68.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Honda Accord, operated by Noel Hernandez (24) of Hood River, was eastbound when it left the roadway and rolled multiple times.

Two passengers, Rosalia Gonzalez-Ortiz (23) of Hood River and a juvenile male, sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased.

Hernandez was transported to the Providence Hood River Memorial Hospital where he was treated for injuries. Upon being released from the hospital, Hernandez was arrested and lodged at NORCOR on two counts of Manslaughter II and DUII.  

OSP was assisted by ODOT, the Wasco County Sheriff's Office, the Hood River County District Attorney, Wyeast Fire, Hood River Fire, Mosier Fire and Mid-Columbia Fire.


Oregon Century & Sesquicentennial Farm & Ranch Program seeks applicants
Oregon Farm Bureau - 11/24/20 10:40 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 24, 2020

Share Your Family’s Story; the Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program Seeks Applications for 2021 Century & Sesquicentennial Awards

Applications are now being accepted for the 2021 award year for the Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program. The application deadline is May 1, 2021. Families throughout Oregon who have continuously farmed portions of their family acreage for the past 100 or 150 years are invited to apply.

The Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program began in 1958 to honor farm and ranch families with century-long connections to the land. To qualify for a century or sesquicentennial award, interested families must follow a formal application process.  Members of the Application Review Committee review each application against the qualifications, which include continuous family operation of the farm or ranch; a gross income from farm use of not less than $1,000 per year for at least three years out of five prior to application; and family members must live on or actively manage the farm or ranch activities.  Application documentation may include photos, original deeds, personal stories, or other historic records. These records help support Oregon’s agricultural history by providing valuable information about settlement patterns and statistics on livestock and crop cycles. All documents are archived for public access.

The Oregon Century Farm & Ranch application and program guidelines are available at http://www.centuryfarm.oregonfb.org , or by contacting Andréa Kuenzi Program Coordinator, at 503-400-7884 or cfr@oregonfb.org.. 

Successful applicants receive a personalized certificate with acknowledgment by the Governor and the director of the Oregon Department of Agriculture, and a durable metal roadside sign to identify the family’s farm or ranch as having historic Century or Sesquicentennial status. Each family will be honored during a special ceremony and reception at the Oregon State Fair.

Every Oregon farm and ranch has a unique history and special family story. The Oregon Century Farm & Ranch program encourages agriculture families to share these stories of century-long connections with a broader audience. By promoting family stories, rich cultural heritage is passed down to future generations while educating Oregonians about the social and economic impact of Oregon agriculture.  

To date, 1,235 families have formally received the Century designation and 47 families have received the Sesquicentennial Award.

The Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program is administered by the Oregon Agricultural Education Foundation. It is supported by a partnership between the Oregon Farm Bureau, the State Historic Preservation Office, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, Oregon State University Libraries’ Special Collections & Archives Research Center, the Oregon Department of Agriculture, and by generous donations of Oregonians.  

For information about the Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program, contact Andréa Kuenzi Program Coordinator, at 503-400-7884 or cfr@oregonfb.org.

###


County council seeks applicants for volunteer Solid Waste Advisory Commission
Clark Co. WA Communications - 11/24/20 10:30 AM

Vancouver, Wash. – The Clark County Council is seeking applicants for two volunteer positions on the Solid Waste Advisory Commission.

One position represents north Clark County, and the other represents the county at-large. Applicants for the north Clark County position must live north of 179th Street or the extension thereof. The three-year terms begin Jan. 1, 2021. Upon expiration of a term, a member can apply again. There is no limit on how many terms a member can serve.

The commission advises the county council on solid waste issues, such as recycling, garbage collection, landfills, transfer stations and waste-reduction programs. Members of the commission represent a variety of interests, including the solid waste industry, the business community, agriculture, and city and county residents.

The commission meets quarterly at 6 pm on the first Thursday of the months of February, May, August and November. Meetings are currently held online. When in-person meetings resume they will be at the Center for Community Health, 1601 E Fourth Plain Blvd., Vancouver, which can be reached by C-TRAN’s routes 6, 25, and The Vine.

In 2021, the Clark County Solid Waste Management Plan will be updated. The 20-year plan is updated every five years. The planned 2020 update was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The advisory commission plays a crucial role in providing feedback to staff during the update process and will likely move to monthly meetings in 2021. The meetings will be at 6 pm on the first Thursday of each month.

Residents with a passion for waste reduction, education and outreach experience, or experience with multifamily housing are encouraged to apply. As Clark County is a growing and diverse community with many languages and backgrounds, the county is also looking for people who can bring ethnic, cultural, social, and geographic diversity to the group. The commission is committed to inclusiveness and outreach to all Clark County residents to ensure the Solid Waste Advisory Commission reflects the community we serve.

The commission encourages applications from candidates with knowledge, ability and experience working with a broad range of individuals and communities with diverse racial, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds. Although not required, we encourage candidates who can fluently speak a language in addition to English to include that information in their application.

Interested applicants should submit a brief letter of interest and résumé to Michelle Pfenning, County Manager’s Office, P.O. Box 5000, Vancouver, WA 98666-5000 or by email at michelle.pfenning@clark.wa.gov.

The letter of interest should include:

  • How you can represent the interests of Clark County at-large or north Clark County on the commission
  • Your personal or professional experience
  • Your vision for the future of solid waste management in Clark County

Application deadline is 5 pm Friday, Dec. 11.

Visit the Solid Waste Advisory Commission website for more information or email SWAC@clark.wa.gov.


Suspect Arrested for Robbery After Threatening Garbage Truck Driver with a Gun
Portland Police Bureau - 11/24/20 9:57 AM
On November 24, 2020, at 5:40 a.m., officers from East Precinct responded to a threats with a weapon call in the 3500 block of Southeast 122nd Avenue. The victim in this call told dispatch that an unknown suspect approached and pointed a gun at them. The victim, who is a garbage truck driver, ran off but could see that the suspect got into the garbage truck, which was left behind.

Upon arrival, officers contacted the suspect (who was still inside the garbage truck) and began to give him demands. The suspect ignored all commands, walked over to another vehicle, got in, and drove off. Officers did pursue the vehicle for a short distance before stopping the vehicle using a Pursuit Intervention Technique (PIT). After the PIT, the subject fled on foot and was taken into custody with the help of a police K9.

The suspect, 21 year-old Hunter Jay Wilson, was transported to an area hospital for treatment of minor injuries. Wilson will later be lodged at the Multnomah County Detention Center on charges of Robbery III, Menacing, Unlawful Entry into a Motor Vehicle, Unlawful Use of a Motor Vehicle, Reckless Driving, Attempt to Elude (by vehicle), Attempt to Elude (by foot), and Resisting Arrest.

###PPB###

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense When Using Photo Sharing Sites (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 11/24/20 9:51 AM
TT - photo sharing - GRAPHIC - November 24, 2020
TT - photo sharing - GRAPHIC - November 24, 2020
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/3585/140311/thumb_TT_-_photo_sharing_-_GRAPHIC_-_November_24_2020.png

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense when sharing photos online… a topic of particular interest as many of us host virtual Thanksgiving dinners in a few days.

Last week we talked about EXIF data that can be embedded in your photos. EXIF data can tell you (and others) exactly where you took the photo, with what kind of camera, what kinds of settings you used, and more. This week, we will talk about some other privacy concerns you should consider when posting your pics.

There are many photo sharing sites out there, including some big ones you have likely heard of such as Google Photos, Apple’s “Photos” app, and Flickr. Beyond those options, many of us also use social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter to post and share pictures. No matter which app or platform you are using, they all have an array of different security settings and sharing options.

Some features on these sites are purposeful and even helpful. Face recognition, for instance, helps the system sort your photos, making them easier to find. However, depending on which product you are using, some features might provide more access than you are comfortable giving. It’s up to you to decide what limits you want to set. Here are some options:

  • Limit visibility of the photos to only your account.
  • Set your account to private or “friends only.” Remember that even if you restrict your data from public view, the service may still have access to your data and may share it with third parties.
  • Avoid posting or tagging images that clearly show your face. Consider only posting pictures from a distance, at an angle, or with you wearing sunglasses or other coverings.
  • Finally, remember that no matter how good you are at setting privacy restrictions on your own account, you need to make sure family members and friends who post pictures of you are taking similar precautions.

As you sit down to Thanksgiving dinner this week, remember to stay safe, both in person and online.

If you have been victimized by a cyber fraud, be sure to file a report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.  

###




Attached Media Files: TT - photo sharing - AUDIO - November 24, 2020 , TT - photo sharing - GRAPHIC - November 24, 2020

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Advisory Committee to Hold Final Virtual Meeting of 2020
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 11/24/20 8:00 AM

The final 2020 meeting of the Advisory Committee to the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs will be held Wednesday, Dec. 2, via Zoom. The meeting begins at 9:30 a.m.

The committee is made up of veterans appointed by the governor to provide counsel on veteran issues and represent veteran concerns across Oregon. Its nine members serve in a vital advisory role to the director and staff of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

ODVA’s December 2020 Report to the Advisory Committee has been presented and is available to the public as an attachment to this press release. It is also available here: https://issuu.com/odva/docs/odva_december_report_to_the_advisory_committee

This meeting is being held virtually due to travel and gathering size restrictions related to the coronavirus pandemic. The public is invited to attend.

To attend:

Join by Zoom via Videoconference: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYpd-mtrjsuGNQenGY7aYVDDLnZ9knG-QAE. Pre-registration is required.

Join by Zoom via Telephone: Dial 1 (253) 215-8782. When prompted, enter the meeting ID: 824 0050 0420# and password/participant ID: 6959417#

You will be prompted to state your name. State your name (first and last), branch of service and organization(s) you are representing.

More information can be found online at www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/advisory.aspx or to contact the Advisory Committee, please email vaac@odva.state.or.us.




Attached Media Files: VAAC Staff Report December 2020

Grand jury indicts Jared Walter for invasion of personal privacy
Multnomah Co. District Attorney's Office - 11/24/20 7:52 AM

November 24, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. – Today, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that 33-year-old Jared Walter is charged with invasion of personal privacy after he allegedly took a photo or video of a person inside a Lloyd Center Mall restroom.

The Multnomah County grand jury charged Walter with one count of invasion of personal privacy in the first degree, one count of attempted invasion of personal privacy in the first degree, one count of invasion of personal privacy in the second degree and one count of disorderly conduct in the second degree.

According to court documents, on November 14, 2020, Walter, a convicted sex offender, used a cell phone for the purpose of sexual gratification, and took a photo or video of a person, while they were in a state of nudity, using a mall restroom.

After the victim confronted Walter upon seeing a camera phone coming over the bathroom stall, Walter fled but a bystander detained him until security and police arrived.

At the time of this alleged conduct, Walter was pending trial on charges of sexual abuse in the third degree and harassment, according to court documents.

Walter is scheduled to be arraigned on November 24, 2020.

No additional information can be released by the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office at this time.

A charging document is only an accusation of a crime. Walter is innocent unless and until proven guilty.

 

#MCDA#


Media Contact:

Brent Weisberg, Communications Director

Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office

Email: rent.Weisberg@mcda.us">Brent.Weisberg@mcda.us




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/5769/140310/PR-20-194-Jared_Walter.pdf

UPDATE - Fatal Crash on Interstate 5 - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 11/24/20 7:19 AM

The pedestrian is being identified as Octavious Calloway (28) of Salem.

On Sunday, November 22, 2020 at approximately 5:50 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle crash on Interstate 5 near milepost 256 (Market Street Interchange).

Preliminary investigation revealed a pedestrian was attempting to cross the freeway when he was struck by a Dodge Ram pickup, operated by Ana Gutierrez (39) of Salem, and a Toyota 4-Runner, operated by Josh Jolley (33) of Salem.

The pedestrian, whom will be identified when appropriate, sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Gutierrez and Jolley are cooperating with the investigation.

Two lanes of I-5 southbound were closed for approximately 3.5 hours. 

OSP was assisted by Salem Fire Department and ODOT.      


Early morning fire intentionally set (Photo)
Hillsboro Fire and Rescue - 11/24/20 4:53 AM
NE Lincoln Ave-Fire debris
NE Lincoln Ave-Fire debris
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/1821/140309/thumb_NE_Lincoln_Ave_Fire-3.png

Just past 1:30 am this morning, a worker inside the building at 209 NE Lincoln in Hillsboro called 911 to report fire from the storage units adjacent to the building. Moments later, explosions and tall flames were reported by additional calls into 911. The fire was upgraded to a first alarm.

Engine 1 arrived to find an exterior fire and quickly began extinguishment. Engine 5 then entered the building to check for extension of the fire inside while Truck 5 checked the remainder of the exterior. The fire was contained to the area where it was initially reported. No injuries were reported.

The fire investigator determined that the fire was intentionally set. The reported explosions were likely from metal restaurant beverage containers stored outside.

Hillsboro Fire & Rescue was assisted by Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, Cornelius Fire and Rescue, Hillsboro Police, and Metro West Ambulance.  

###




Attached Media Files: NE Lincoln Ave-Fire debris , NE Lincoln Ave-Engine 1 and C1 , NE Lincoln Ave-Fire area

Mon. 11/23/20
UPDATE: Shooting Results in Fatality, Death Investigation Underway
Portland Police Bureau - 11/23/20 8:20 PM
The shooting in the Hazelwood neighborhood has resulted in the death of the victim. A death investigation is underway by Portland Police detectives. Due to the active investigation, no other details are being released at this time.

The identity of the victim will be released after family have been notified.

If anyone has any information about this shooting, please contact Detective Jennifer Hertzler, 503-823-1040, Jennifer.Hertzler@portlandoregon.gov , or Detective Brad Clifton 503-823-0696, Brad.Clifton@portlandoregon.gov .

###PPB###

###ORIGINAL MESSAGE BELOW###

On Monday, November 23, 2020 at 1:29a.m., East Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a person down in the 200 block of Northeast 122nd Avenue. When officers arrived they located a victim with injuries consistent with a shooting. The severity of the injuries is not being released at this time.

Officers and detectives have closed off the area for the investigation, but no streets are impacted. If anyone has any information about this shooting, please contact Detective Jennifer Hertzler, 503-823-1040 Jennifer.Hertzler@portlandoregon.gov , or Detective Brad Clifton 503-823-0696 Brad.Clifton@portlandoregon.gov .

###PPB###

Two Victims Struck By Gunfire After Robbery
Portland Police Bureau - 11/23/20 8:18 PM
Two victims are in the hospital with gunshot wounds after a robbery attempt in Holladay Park.

On Monday, November 23, 2020 at 7:11p.m., North Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a shooting in Holladay Park in the Lloyd District. When officers arrived they located two adult victims, a male and a female, both shot in a leg. Both were conscious and talking to officers. Officers applied tourniquets to the victims' injured legs before paramedics arrived. They went to the hospital by ambulance.

Preliminary information is that the suspect may have attempted a robbery of two male juveniles and fired shots when they ran away. The two juveniles were not hurt.

The suspect left in a vehicle before officers arrived and has not yet been located. No suspect description is being released at this time.

Robbery Detectives are enroute to investigate. The area around Northeast 11th Avenue and Northeast Holladay Street is closed during the investigation.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be released when appropriate.

###PPB###

El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon comienza a emitir pagos por la semana de espera; 246,300 habitantes de Oregon recibirán un total combinado de $176 millones en beneficios en la ejecución de pagos iniciales
Oregon Employment Department - 11/23/20 6:34 PM

23 de noviembre, 2020 (Salem, OR)-- Hoy, el Departamento de Empleo de Oregon anunció que ha comenzado a pagar la "semana de espera" para los residentes de Oregon elegibles que recibieron beneficios regulares de desempleo desde el comienzo de la pandemia del COVID-19. El anuncio de hoy llega una semana antes de la meta del Departamento de Empleo para fines de noviembre de comenzar a pagar la semana de espera.

“Estamos muy contentos de anunciar que muchos habitantes de Oregón comenzarán a ver los beneficios de la semana de espera que estaban esperando”, dijo David Gerstenfeld, director interino del Departamento de Empleo de Oregón. “Nuestros equipos de seguros de desempleo y de informática han trabajado increíblemente duro para implementar cambios de programación que nos permitan emitir pagos a esta escala. Los residentes de Oregon han sido pacientes con nosotros y se los agradecemos.”

La semana de espera es la primera semana de un reclamo de desempleo regular cuando una persona cumple con todos los requisitos de elegibilidad. Tradicionalmente, los reclamantes no reciben beneficios esa semana. Se ha prescindido la semana de espera para los reclamos iniciales regulares de desempleo presentados comenzando el 8 de marzo de 2020 hasta el 2 de enero de 2021. Los reclamos iniciales elegibles para el desempleo regular presentados antes del 2 de enero de 2021 recibirán un pago por la semana de espera. Los residentes de Oregon que recibieron Asistencia de Desempleo por la Pandemia (PUA) o Asistencia de Desempleo por Desastre (DUA) no recibirán un pago de la semana de espera, ya que esos programas pagan la primera semana elegible de los reclamantes.

El Departamento estima que hoy se han emitido pagos a 246,300 residentes de Oregon por un total de $176 millones. La mayoría de los reclamantes pueden esperar recibir el beneficio de la semana de espera mediante su método de pago típico dentro de tres días hábiles.

"Sabemos que algunos reclamantes todavía tienen que esperar para recibir sus pagos y queremos que sepan que estamos trabajando arduamente para obtener sus fondos lo más rápido posible", dijo Gerstenfeld.

Los pagos para unas 170.000 personas se retrasarán porque deben procesarse manualmente. El Departamento estima que, si bien la mayoría de las personas recibirán el beneficio de la semana de espera para fines de diciembre, es posible que los solicitantes que reciban Compensación de Emergencia de Desempleo por la Pandemia (PEUC), beneficios extendidos (EB) o beneficios a través de Workshare demoren hasta fines de enero para recibir su pago de la semana de espera.

Los reclamantes elegibles recibirán la misma cantidad semanal que la cantidad de su beneficio de desempleo regular. Sin embargo, la ley estatal restringe que los reclamantes reciban más de la cantidad máxima de beneficios para su reclamo. Para la mayoría de los reclamos, la cantidad máxima de beneficios es 26 veces la cantidad de beneficios semanales o 26 semanas de beneficios. La semana de espera no agrega más beneficios al saldo de un reclamo o al monto máximo del beneficio.

Los reclamantes elegibles cuya semana de espera caiga entre el 29 de marzo de 2020 y el 25 de julio de 2020 también recibirán el pago de Compensación de Desempleo por la Pandemia federal de $600 además del monto de su beneficio semanal.

Los reclamantes elegibles cuya semana de espera caiga entre el 26 de julio de 2020 y el 5 de septiembre de 2020 y que hayan certificado que están afectados por COVID recibirán el pago de la LWA de $300 además del monto de su beneficio semanal.

La semana de espera está sujeta a impuestos según las leyes federales y estatales, al igual que otros beneficios por desempleo. Si un reclamante tiene impuestos retenidos de sus beneficios, también serán retenidos de la semana de espera. La manutención infantil se retendrá de la semana de espera y del pago de $600 del FPUC. No se retendrá de la LWA.

Para ver si han cumplido una semana de espera, los reclamantes pueden revisar las semanas que han reclamado y las que se han pagado en el Sistema de reclamaciones en línea. Los reclamantes pueden iniciar sesión en el Sistema de reclamos en línea y seleccionar "¿Dónde está mi cheque?". Los reclamantes, incluidos aquellos cuyo pago de la semana de espera se procesará manualmente, NO necesitan comunicarse con el Departamento de Empleo para recibir su pago.

Puede encontrar más información acerca de la semana de espera en las preguntas frecuentes.

###

 

Programa de igualdad de oportunidades: ayudas y servicios auxiliares disponibles a pedido para personas con discapacidades. Contacto: (503) 947-1794. Para las personas con sordera o problemas auditivos, llame al 711 Telecommunications Relay Services (Servicio de retransmisión de telecomunicaciones).




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/930/140306/11_23__Waiting_Week_PR_FINAL_SP.pdf

Sandy Police Log 11-01-20 to 11-14-20
Sandy Police Dept. - 11/23/20 5:21 PM

See Attached Bulletin

Please be advised that the Bulletin does not include all calls for service to which officers respond.  Many calls do not require that a report be written; such as:

•Traffic Stops

•Advising/Referring a Person to the Proper Agency to handle their request

•Restoring the Peace

•Premise Checks

•Welfare Checks

•Flagged Down by Citizen




Attached Media Files: Bulletin

Bull Trout Poacher Sentenced In Federal Court
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/23/20 4:57 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—Culver, Oregon resident Thomas R. Campbell, 29, was sentenced in federal court today for the flagrant and repeated poaching of protected and Tribally significant bull trout, announced U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams.

“One of the most solemn duties of the U.S. Attorney’s office is enforcing the laws for the protection of our threatened wildlife and upholding our special trust relationship with our tribal partners,” said United States Attorney Billy J. Williams. “This case demonstrates our priorities in exercising those duties and holding accountable those who would flagrantly disregard our nation’s laws that protect threatened species.”

“Bull trout are an iconic species of the Pacific Northwest whose populations are suffering from habitat degradation, and are protected by Tribal, State and Federal laws,” said James Ashburner, Special Agent in Charge, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “The defendants in this case caused great harm to the recovery efforts of all of the government and non-government groups who have invested in the recovery of this species. This joint case demonstrates the resolve of Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs, Oregon State Police, the U.S. Forest Service, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in preserving bull trout for future generations.  A special thank you goes out to the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Oregon for placing an emphasis on environmental crimes that impact the natural world we all enjoy.”

According to court documents, on multiple occasions in 2017 and 2018, Thomas R. Campbell poached bull trout from the Metolius River, fishing from both U.S. Forest Service lands and while trespassing on the “Eyerly Property,” which was held in trust by the United States for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs.  Campbell also encouraged others to do the same.

The Metolius River requires catch-and-release for all species of fish, including bull trout.  Although one can legally angle for bull trout on the Metolius River and in Lake Billy Chinook, bull trout are not legal to target elsewhere in Oregon.  This makes the Metolius River one of the Oregon’s crown gems of angling. 

Campbell targeted, kept, and grossly mishandled bull trout despite admittedly knowing the laws protecting the species and how to properly handle fish to immediately release unharmed.  He also committed these crimes despite numerous warnings from public viewers of his social media boasts about his poaching.  Campbell repeatedly posted photos of his bull trout poaching exploits to his social media platforms where he had more than 1,000 followers.

Bull trout are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.  The species has been depleted by a range of factors, including overfishing.  Today, bull trout inhabit less than half of their historic range.  Central Oregon’s Metolius River helps serve as a prized spawning ground, and it is used to help repopulate other waters where bull trout numbers have dwindled even lower.  These magnificent fish are revered by anglers and are a cherished Tribal resource.  Poaching represents a lethal threat to their recovery.

On August 13, 2020, Campbell pleaded guilty to three misdemeanor charges contained in the criminal information. These counts charge violations of the Lacey Act, 16 U.S.C. § 3372(a)(1) for knowingly acquiring and transporting bull trout from the Metolius River in the Deschutes National Forest and from Warm Springs’ Tribal land.

Robert “Bobby” Brunoe, the General Manager of Natural Resources and Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs addressed the sentencing judge on behalf of the Tribes.  He discussed the Tribes’ sovereignty over the Warm Springs Reservation, the severity of the trespasses by non-members like Campbell, and the cultural importance of bull trout to the Tribes.  Mr. Brunoe also discussed his own connection to these fish, recalling his grandmother’s subsistence fishing for bull trout when he was a child.  He stressed the importance of protecting and restoring bull trout.

U.S. District Court Judge Ann Aiken sentenced Campbell to five years of federal probation and banned him from angling or hunting anywhere in the United States as a condition of probation.  In addition, Judge Aiken ordered Campbell to pay a $6,000 criminal fine to the Lacey Act Reward Fund and $649.95 in restitution to the Oregon State Police for his destruction of a trail camera designed to catch poachers.  Campbell was also ordered to perform 300 hours of community service with a non-profit focused on conservation or with a collaborative relationship with the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs.

This case was investigated by the United States Fish and Wildlife Services, Office of Law Enforcement; Oregon State Police, Fish and Wildlife Division; Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Branch of Natural Resources; and the United States Forest Service, Law Enforcement and Investigations. It was prosecuted by Will McLaren and Pam Paaso, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Sentencing-Campbell

#myRCH event raises more than $250,000 for Randall Children's Hospital at Legacy Emanuel
Legacy Health - 11/23/20 4:52 PM

 

 

NEWS RELEASE

For Immediate Release

 

 

              Contact: Lesley Reid

November 23, 2020

 

 

                Phone: 503-413-6407

#myRCH event raises more than $250,000 for Randall Children’s Hospital at Legacy Emanuel

PORTLAND, ORE. – The fourth annual #myRCH event, held October 23, raised $250,000 for Randall Children’s Hospital.

The theme this year was a virtual pajama party, and featured the work of Randall Children’s providers, patient testimonials and a livestream raffle to celebrate the hospital’s courageous kids, while raising funds for its exceptional programs. The format was changed to follow COVID-19 guidelines for physical distancing.

Donors heard the story of Leah Lopez, who made national headlines this year as one of the nation’s first kids diagnosed with the COVID-19-related illness, Multi-inflammatory Syndrome in Children. The experts at Randall Children’s collaborated on her lifesaving treatment.

Gold sponsors this year included Gold + Arrow Salon, Ida P. Colver and Roger C. Ray, Violetta Office, Northwest Newborn Specialists/MEDNAX and PacificSource Health Plans.

Randall Children’s Hospital Foundation raises funds for the hospital, a regional leader in the care of babies, children and teens — blending the finest in medical services with family-friendly spaces.

Randall Children’s Hospital is part of Legacy Health – the area’s largest local, nonprofit health system.

To learn more about supporting Randall Children’s Hospital Foundation, contact Senior Associate Director of Development Heather McEvoy Eldon at 503.276.9495, heldon@lhs.org.

 

#  #  #

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/419/140302/myRCH_Pajama_Party_Raises_Quarter-Million_Dollars.pdf

City takes steps to ensure safe rides for Gresham residents
City of Gresham - 11/23/20 3:39 PM

GRESHAM, Ore. – On November 17, Gresham City Council implemented safety regulations and accessibility requirements for transportation network companies (like Uber and Lyft), which provide Gresham riders with additional protections.

Transportation network companies (TNCs) use a digital network or smartphone app to connect passengers to drivers that provide rides. Cities and states are increasingly regulating TNCs to ensure safety, assess traffic and impact on roads, and monitor emissions.

The regulations prevent unsafe drivers from operating in Gresham, ensure that vehicles are safe and enhance equity for riders, consistent with regulations in neighboring Portland.

“As technology evolves, it’s important that our services meet the needs of our residents,” said Mayor Karylinn Echols. “These new regulations ensure that Gresham residents using these ride apps can continue to enjoy that convenience with a greater assurance of safety.”

Gresham will receive criminal background checks and driving history reviews of Uber and Lyft drivers.  A driver will not be permitted to operate here if they have a violent felony conviction, a sex offense, or a recent traffic crime conviction including driving under the influence or leaving the scene of a traffic injury.  The regulation requires companies to have zero tolerance policies for drug and alcohol use for drivers on the job. 

The ordinance also requires vehicles to clearly display company logos, to have passed safety inspections, and to have properly functioning horns, lights and signals.

Finally, TNCs will be required to accept requests for service from any location within Gresham, including requests made by persons with disabilities and requests for wheelchair accessible service.  It also requires that the companies have zero tolerance policies for discrimination.

Gresham will enter an agreement with the City of Portland, who will administer portions of Gresham’s program, which is both cost-effective and efficient, as it is likely many TNC drivers operating in Gresham are already permitted to operate in Portland. Portland’s Bureau of Transportation is experienced in managing new driver data, issuing permits, reviewing background checks, and conducting audits of drivers and vehicles.

As part of this new program, transportation network companies will remit to the City a nominal fee—50 cents—for each trip that originates in Gresham. Fee revenue will fund administration and regulation of this program, as well as City services impacted by the operation of TNCs, like transportation planning, public safety and code enforcement.   

Currently, Gresham and Portland are working on an intergovernmental agreement. These new regulations will go into effect 30 days after enactment, which is scheduled for December 1. TNC drivers currently permitted to operate in Portland should expect no disruption in their ability to operate. Under the new regulations, any driver holding a current City of Portland permit will be entitled to operate in Gresham until a new joint Portland/Gresham permit is issued.  Qualifying drivers new to the system will be issued a joint Portland/Gresham permit.  TNC drivers seeking clarification on permitting can contact 503-823-7483.


PPB Responds to Stabbing in Goose Hollow Neighborhood
Portland Police Bureau - 11/23/20 3:36 PM
On November 23, 2020, at 2:57 p.m., Central Precinct officers responded to the 1400 block of Southwest 20th Avenue on reports of a stabbing. When officers arrived on scene they found an adult victim with a stab wound. The victim was transported to an area hospital by ambulance. The victim's injuries are non-life-threatening.

Prior to officers arrival, the suspect fled the scene. The suspect has not been located at this time.

The PIO is not responding to the scene.

If anyone has information about the stabbing and has not been contacted by investigators, they are asked to call the non-emergency line at 503-823-3333.

An update will be provided if appropriate for the investigation.

Anyone with information about this stabbing is asked to call Portland Police at 503 823-3333. Please reference case number 20-349624.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###PPB###

Vancouver Police investigation into shooting continuing
Vancouver Police Dept. - 11/23/20 3:17 PM

Vancouver, Wash. –On November 20, 2020, Vancouver Police responded to a disturbance with a weapon call in a parking lot at 18801 SE Mill Plain Blvd. in which a citizen had called 9-1-1 to report they shot someone.

Information from the investigation indicates Aaron Dreyer, 48, was in the parking lot getting ready to leave when he noticed a male, later identified as Kenneth Nigg, 22, running out of the east emergency door of Lowe’s carrying merchandise and heading toward a waiting vehicle, which had a female in the driver’s seat. Dreyer drove closer to the vehicle Nigg was associated with, in an attempt to get license plate information. Nigg approached Dreyer’s vehicle and began attacking it with an axe handle, breaking out windows. Dreyer excited his vehicle and as Nigg moved toward Dreyer, still armed with the axe handle, Dreyer pulled out a firearm he had in his possession and fired at Nigg, striking him. Dreyer called 9-1-1 after the shooting and rendered aid until emergency responders arrived. Nigg was transported to an area hospital for treatment and remains hospitalized.

The Vancouver Police Department Major Crimes Unit is continuing the investigation. Nothing further is releasable at this time.

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Two dead in multi-vehicle crash on NE Marine Drive, witnesses sought
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/23/20 3:05 PM

On Sunday, November 22, 2020, at approximately 5:35 p.m., Multnomah County Sheriff’s patrol deputies responded to reports of a multi-vehicle crash near the intersection of NE Marine Drive and NE Interlachen Ln. Because of the severity of the crash, responding deputies called for the East County Vehicular Crimes Team (ECVCT), a specially trained team of MCSO deputies and Gresham police officers trained in crash reconstruction, to investigate the deadly crash.

Investigators believe a 1999 Saab, traveling westbound on NE Marine Drive, crossed into oncoming traffic and collided a Chevrolet Suburban traveling eastbound. The driver and passenger in the Saab were ejected and pronounced dead at the scene. Three occupants in the Chevrolet were transported to a local hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

At the time of the crash, there was a steady flow of traffic and possibly additional witnesses who did not speak with police on scene. Investigators are asking for witnesses with any information to contact the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office at 503-988-0560. Refer to report #20-52114.

The occupants of the Saab will be identified at a later time once next of kin notifications are made. The investigation is ongoing, and no further comment can be made at this time.

The East County Vehicle Crimes Team is comprised of specially trained law enforcement members from the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, Gresham Police Department and Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office. ECVCT is responsible for investigating serious or fatal vehicle crashes and crimes in Gresham, Fairview, Maywood Park, Troutdale, Wood Village and unincorporated Multnomah County.

This is the 29th ECVCT activation and 23rd and 24th deaths on roadways in these areas this year.


Wildfire Recovery Update 11.23.2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 11/23/20 2:46 PM
2020-11/3986/140298/2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2407.jpg
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The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Nov. 23, 2020, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

PHOTO CAPTION:

Phoenix, Ore. - October 9, 2020 - Construction crews begin cleaning up the damage from the Almeda wildfire. Photo by David Yost/FEMA. 
File: 2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2407.jpg

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/3986/140298/2020-09-10_4562_Phoenix_DLY_2407.jpg

Diver in single vehicle fatal crash last week identified (Photo)
Multnomah Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/23/20 1:52 PM
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On Friday, November 20, 202, at approximately 12:15 a.m., Multnomah County Sheriff’s patrol deputies responded to a report of a single vehicle crash in the 28400 block of E. Historic Columbia River Highway. Arriving deputies found the Mercedes CLA250 wedged between large trees with significant damage. The driver, identified as 26-year-old Collin Johnson, did not survive his injuries. Deputies activated the East County Vehicular Crimes Team (ECVCT), a specially trained team of MCSO deputies and Gresham police officers, to investigate the deadly crash.

ECVCT investigators believe Johnson was traveling at a high rate of speed when he lost control. The Mercedes left the roadway and collided with several large trees. No other vehicles are believed to be involved.

No further comment can be made on this investigation.

The East County Vehicle Crimes Team is comprised of specially trained law enforcement members from the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, Gresham Police Department and Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office. ECVCT is responsible for investigating serious or fatal vehicle crashes and crimes in Gresham, Fairview, Maywood Park, Troutdale, Wood Village and unincorporated Multnomah County.

This was the 28th ECVCT activation and 22nd death on roadways in these areas this year.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1276/140295/Photo_1.jpg , 2020-11/1276/140295/Photo_2.jpg

Former Department of Corrections employee convicted of federal charges
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 11/23/20 1:23 PM

Today, former Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) employee Richard Alberts pleaded guilty to one count of Conspiracy to Distribute Controlled Substances. Alberts also plead guilty to Custodial Sexual Misconduct in the First Degree, for which he received probation. He will be sentenced on February 22, 2021 by the Honorable Michael H. Simon.           

DOC Director Colette S. Peters said, “The Oregon Department of Corrections is committed to preventing sexual misconduct involving employees and the people in our care and custody; and take decisive action when allegations are brought forward. When DOC’s Inspector General’s Office and the leadership at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility received a tip about Alberts’ criminal behavior, the agency immediately acted by launching an internal investigation and contacting state and federal law enforcement. Our goal was to ensure a thorough investigation, a fair process, and prosecution, if warranted.

We have thousands of employees who provide outstanding public service each and every day. I would like to thank our partners at the US Attorney General’s Office, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Oregon State Police, and the Washington County District Attorney’s office for their cooperation in handing down justice for Alberts’ illegal and dishonorable behavior.”

In 2019, the defendant was a correctional officer at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF), the women’s prison in Wilsonville, operated by DOC. While a correctional officer, the defendant began to have inappropriate and illegal interactions with an incarcerated woman. Alberts unlawfully smuggled multiple cell phones into the prison, so that the woman could secretly use them to communicate with him and others outside the institution.  Alberts had sexual intercourse with this woman, which is the basis for defendant’s guilty plea to Custodial Sexual Misconduct in the First Degree, in the Washington County Circuit Court.

Additionally, defendant unlawfully smuggled OxyContin pills, methamphetamine, and heroin into CCCF. The defendant knew the smuggled drugs were not for the adult in custody’s personal use, but, instead, intended for distribution to other women incarcerated at CCCF.  In particular, as relevant to the Conspiracy to Distribute Controlled Substances conviction, on the evening of June 3, 2019, defendant Alberts and his co-defendant Joseph Jimenez planned to meet in the parking lot in Portland, so that Jimenez could provide Alberts with heroin, for Alberts to then smuggle into CCCF.  The two defendants did not know each other, so the incarcerated woman at CCCF helped to coordinate the meeting at Emmanuel by using her contraband cell phone.  She sent text messages and Snapchat photos to help Alberts and Jimenez find each other.  Then, after Jimenez and Alberts met, Jimenez provided the heroin to Alberts.

The next day, on June 4, 2019, Alberts smuggled that heroin into CCCF, and later provided it to an incarcerated woman. Just a few days later, a DOC investigator seized a small amount of methamphetamine and over 6 grams heroin from the incarcerated woman. An investigation by the DOC and FBI revealed that the seized heroin was, in fact, the same heroin that Alberts had obtained from Jimenez and smuggled into CCCF. Alberts was then immediately placed on administrative leave without pay from DOC.

“This corrections officer selfishly abused his position of trust and in doing so, endangered the lives of vulnerable inmates fighting for their own sobriety” said United States Attorney Billy J. Williams. “Instead of protecting the inmates, he exploited them.  The excellent investigative work of the Oregon Department of Corrections, the Oregon State Police, and the FBI now ensures that a man who once guarded inmates will become one himself.”

"Alberts abused his position of power over the Coffee Creek inmates with the trafficking of meth and heroin," said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. "Instead of ensuring a safe environment for these women as he should have been, he exploited addiction and targeted a vulnerable population for his own gain. We can't let such behavior stand."

DOC strictly adheres to the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) of 2003. Every state corrections department, juvenile corrections agency, private prison, federal prison, and jail has an obligation to comply with PREA standards, which seek to detect, prevent, and eliminate sexual abuse and sexual harassment in correctional settings.

Alberts began his career as a Correctional Officer at CCCF in April 2017.


YWCA Clark County Selects Otero-Serrano as New Executive Director (Photo)
YWCA Clark County - 11/23/20 1:13 PM
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VANCOUVER, WA--YWCA Clark County is pleased to announce that Dunetchka Otero-Serrano will become Executive Director effective Dec. 28, 2020. Her career in nonprofit management spans 20 years and includes roles in case management, community outreach, executive leadership, and board service.

Since 2015, Otero-Serrano has served as Executive Director of Community Warehouse, a nonprofit that provides donated household furnishings to neighbors in need. She led the organization’s transformation by providing leadership for change  in the critical areas of marketing, resource development, equity, inclusion and staff retention. With a development team, she doubled the organization’s operating budget, with dramatic increases in major donor contributions, private and public funding, and an annual gala.

At Catholic Charities’ El Programa Hispano, Otero-Serrano served as Domestic Violence Program Coordinator from 2000-2003. Her responsibilities included recruiting, training and supervising case managers and volunteers; educating clients about immigration laws and their rights; and writing and managing local, state and federal grants for sexual assault prevention services.

At Portland Parks and Recreation from 2003-2008, she led Latinx outreach and youth development. Among her accomplishments: She established bilingual outreach programs and created culturally specific programs in partnership with Portland Public Schools and community organizations in Portland and Gresham.

Otero-Serrano worked to elevate the voices of undocumented children and young adults as Associate Producer of the acclaimed documentary “Papers. She advanced digital equity for under-served communities as Program and Development Director at Open Signal (formerly Portland Community Media) from 2008-2015.

In reflecting on her new position, Otero-Serrano said: “I am passionate about bringing tools and resources to the community to create resilience and overcome systemic oppression. Joining the outstanding team at YWCA Clark County is a dream come true! It will be my honor to work with the team and community partners to advance racial justice and the empowerment of women and youth.”

Otero-Serrano’s recent board experience includes Raphael House and the City of Portland’s Budget Advisory Committee. She earned a Master’s Degree in Public Administration (MPA) from the University of Ohio in Akron, OH, and a Bachelor in Business Administration degree from the Inter American University, Bayamon, Puerto Rico. She is also a Certified Fundraising Executive (CFRE).

Board President Holly Jacobs praised Otero-Serrano’s selection as the new YWCA Clark County leader.

“We are thrilled to welcome Dunetchka to Clark County and the YWCA,” she said. “Her long-term commitment to social justice, combined with her leadership and nonprofit management track record, convinced the Board to select her in what turned out to be a truly outstanding pool of candidates.”

She will succeed Interim Executive Director Robyn Steely, who, Jacobs said, “has led YWCA Clark County for the past nine months with grace, skill and heart through a difficult chapter involving reorganizing services in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.”




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/642/140292/Dunetchka_Otero-3.jpg

K9 Nato Joins Lincoln City Police Department (Photo)
Lincoln City Police - 11/23/20 1:03 PM
K9 Nato with K9 Handler Wehrley
K9 Nato with K9 Handler Wehrley
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LCPD is excited to introduce the newest member of our agency: K9 Nato vom Bullerjahn, a.k.a. Nato!    

K9 Nato is an 18-month-old, male German Shepherd who was born and raised in Wardenburg, Germany, where he received IPO training, which is a popular dog sport in Germany where dogs are tested for their skills in Tracking, Obedience and Protection. He was then brought to Adlerhorst International in Riverside, CA and hand-picked by Officer Molly Wehrley out of a large group of Belgian Malinois and German Shepherds.

As our city's first K9 and Handler team, Ofcr Wehrley felt it was important to choose a K9 that met the criteria set by our agency in regards to our deployment needs (track and bite), and that presented itself as a compatible partner, and K9 Nato quickly rose to the top of the large selection of available K9s with his friendly demeanor and great work-drive that she believes will translate into a K9 that is simultaneously community-friendly and apprehension-ready. 

K9 Nato spent his first week getting settled and doing some ride-along time with Ofcr Wehrley. Although K9 Nato's initial week in Oregon brought some very unwelcoming weather, he was still happy and ready to go to work every day, which she feels is great for a K9 working on the coast.

Over the next few months, Ofcr Wehrley and K9 Nato will be building their bond and extensively training to achieve their state certification before moving to a regular patrol shift.

LCPD would again like to express our gratitude to the community for their generous donations to help us achieve our goal for a K9 Program.




Attached Media Files: K9 Nato with K9 Handler Wehrley , K9 Nato

Oregon reports 1,174 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 11/23/20 1:01 PM

November 23, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 826, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,174 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 66,333.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (10), Clackamas (116), Clatsop (2), Columbia (18), Coos (7), Crook (8), Curry (1), Deschutes (44), Douglas (18), Grant (1), Harney (1), Hood River (6), Jackson (80), Jefferson (8), Josephine (11), Lake (3), Lane (71), Lincoln (3), Linn (15), Malheur (10), Marion (120), Morrow (7), Multnomah (254), Polk (25), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (56), Union (26), Wasco (7), Washington (225), Wheeler (1), and Yamhill (17).

NOTE: On Saturday and Sunday we noted those days as having second and third consecutive record high cases. However, it was third and fourth consecutive record high cases. OHA regrets the error.

Oregon’s 821st COVID-19 death is a 57-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 13 and died Nov. 21 at Portland VA Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 822nd COVID-19 death is a 40-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Oct. 11 and died Nov. 20 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 823rd COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died Nov. 19 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 824th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died Nov. 19. Place of death and underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 825th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died Nov. 22 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 826th COVID-19 death is a 60-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died Nov. 16 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to rise

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon increased to 456, which is 44 more than Friday.

There are 109 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, 18 more than Friday.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

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Public Health COVID-19 response times impacted by surge of cases
Clark Co. WA Communications - 11/23/20 12:52 PM

Vancouver, Wash. – Clark County Public Health continues to work through an influx of COVID-19 cases. Last week, more than 1,100 COVID-19 cases were reported in Clark County.

Last week, Public Health announced it was modifying its COVID-19 response to prioritize interviewing cases and identifying priority locations where exposures may have occurred. Public Health continues to work closely with priority locations, which include schools, long-term care facilities, the jail and food processing facilities, to prevent and mitigate outbreaks. Public Health is no longer identifying, notifying and monitoring individual close contacts of confirmed cases.

Public Health is working to train staff previously performing contact notification and monitoring to now conduct case interviews. However, the rapid increase in cases has made it difficult for Public Health staff to keep up.

Public Health is still striving to call every person who tests positive. However, given the increasing case numbers, not all cases will be reached for an interview. Public Health has begun prioritizing the most recent cases. Those cases who are not reached within two days of the positive test result will not likely receive a call from Public Health.

“We’re working with our local health care providers to ensure everyone who tests positive receives the appropriate information, even if Public Health is unable to reach them,” said Dr. Alan Melnick, Clark County Public Health director and county health officer. “The Public Health website also contains information for COVID-19 cases and their close contacts, as well as links to additional resources.”

Public Health has asked local health care providers to give everyone who tests positive for COVID-19 instructions for isolation and a handout for close contacts that details quarantine recommendations. All cases should isolate at home until they are no longer contagious and notify anyone they were in close contact with that they may have been exposed to COVID-19.

Public Health is also receiving an influx of calls from the community regarding COVID-19. Staff is working diligently to respond to all calls, however, response times may be longer than normal.

Here are some resources that can address the questions and concerns Public Health is hearing from the community:

  • Clark County Public Health novel coronavirus website – Information about COVID-19 symptoms and testing, recommendations for preventing illnesses, guidance for cases and close contacts, and the latest local data.
  • Washington State Department of Health COVID-19 assistance hotline, 800.525.0127 – Available 6 am to 10 pm Monday through Friday, 8 am to 6 pm weekends and holidays.
  • COVID-19 reopening guidance for businesses and workers website – Requirements for businesses and details about Gov. Inslee’s statewide restrictions.
  • Report a Safe Start Violation website – File a complaint about a business or organization not following masking or other Safe Start reopening requirements. Complaints are directed to the appropriate oversight agency for follow up.

Christmas Ships Parade designated an Oregon Heritage Tradition
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 11/23/20 12:46 PM

Portland, OR - The Christmas Ships Parade, a long-standing Oregon event, marks its upcoming 66th year with an Oregon Heritage Tradition designation by the Oregon Heritage Commission. 

Other Oregon Heritage Traditions include the Oregon State Fair, Medford’s Pear Blossom Festival, the Pendleton Round-Up, and the Woodburn Fiesta Mexicana. 

“The designation recognizes those traditions that have helped define the character of the state,” said Chelsea Rose, the commission’s chair. “The Christmas Ships Parade ties into the importance of the river to Oregon’s Heritage and Oregon’s identity. It is an event enjoyed by many as the ships travel the Willamette and Columbia Rivers and is a long standing tradition for those who view it each year.”

The Christmas Ships Parade began with one decorated sailboat in 1954 and has since grown to over 70 participating boats. The entirely volunteer operated event runs for 15 nights during December and travels the Willamette and Columbia Rivers in the Portland Metro area providing opportunities for communities to view it from the river front, restaurants, parks, neighborhoods and waysides along the rivers. Several cities along the rivers have tied their holiday events to the parade schedule.  

“The Christmas Ships Parade is a treasured tradition for many families and community members.  For 66 years Christmas Ships small and large have paraded with brightly lit, colorful, and thematically decorated displays to celebrate the holiday season.  A 100% volunteer run organization, Christmas Shippers spend countless hours on the chilly river waters to bring smiles to young and old alike.  Excited each year to launch the season, we look forward to carrying on the tradition.  Once you participate in the Christmas Ships Parade, whether as a Captain or a spectator, you will make it a tradition of your own,” says Kelly Marks, Christmas Ships Parade Board and Fleet Member.  “The Parade is about more than Christmas.  It represents family, community, celebration and hope.  It is a positive and uplifting experience unlike any other.”

Volunteers dedicate over 3,000 hours in trainings, meetings, outreach, logistics, and the actual time in the parade. They host up to three meet and greet events at different locations where community members can see the boats up close, meet the boat owners, and learn about boat safety. Parade volunteers also partner with various charities throughout the year such as Fallen Firefighters, Ronald McDonald House, William Temple House, Portland Fire & Rescue Toy and Joy Makers, and Columbia River Fire & Rescue Toy N Joy and Holiday Hope. 

This is an unusual year for Heritage Traditions. COVID-19 has forced many events to cancel or restructure for the first time in their 50+ year history. The only other time Oregon Heritage events have canceled has been due to WWI and WWII. This may be one of the few designated events that can safely proceed with their regular events with some minor safety modifications per state guidelines. While the parade will run as normal, all Meet & Greet events and open house activities are canceled for the 2020 parade season.  As always, it is possible that individual parade night cancellations may occur due to unsafe weather conditions.  This is unrelated to the pandemic.  Notification of any cancellations will be posted at www.chistmas ships.org and social media channels.

More information can be found on their website at: www.christmasships.org

An Oregon Heritage Tradition must have been in continuous operation for more than 50 years, demonstrate a public profile and reputation that distinguishes it from more routine events, and add to the livability and identity of the state. A list of Tradition designations is available at https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/OH/pages/heritage-designations.aspx.

The Oregon Heritage Commission coordinates efforts to solve statewide heritage issues through grants, education, and advocacy, and also promotes heritage tourism efforts.

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UPDATE -- Oregon Department of Human Services announces that Mataya Gearhart found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 11/23/20 12:25 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – Mataya Gearhart, a child foster child who went missing from Portland, Ore. on Sept. 8, 2020 has been found. Mataya was found Sunday, Nov. 22. The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division is thankful for the community support to find her.

A small number of children in foster care may be in significant danger when they run away or have gone missing. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and ensure their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. You can also report child abuse by calling a local police department, county sheriff, county juvenile department, or Oregon State Police.

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Sherwood Corrections Officer Pleads Guilty to Smuggling Drugs into Coffee Creek Women's Prison
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/23/20 11:55 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Sherwood, Oregon man pleaded guilty today for smuggling drugs into the Coffee Creek Correctional Facility, announced U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams.

Richard Steven Alberts II, 32, pleaded guilty to the charge of Conspiracy to Distribute Controlled Substances, in violation of 21 U.S.C. §§841(a)(1), 841 (b)(1)(C), and 846. He will be sentenced on February 22, 2021 by the Honorable Michael H. Simon.           

According to court records, in 2019, Alberts was a Correctional Officer at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility, a women’s prison in Wilsonville, operated by the Oregon Department of Corrections.  While employed there, defendant began an inappropriate and illegal sexual relationship with an inmate.

To foster the relationship, Alberts agreed to smuggle drugs, including OxyContin pills, methamphetamine, and heroin into the prison and to provide them to the inmate. In addition, Alberts smuggled multiple cell phones into the facility that the inmate used to communicate with Alberts and others outside the prison.  Defendant knew that the smuggled methamphetamine and heroin were not for the inmate’s personal use, but, instead, were intended for distribution to other women incarcerated at Coffee Creek. 

On the evening of June 3, 2019, defendant met co-defendant Joseph Jimenez in a parking lot in Portland, where Jimenez provided Alberts with heroin.  The next day, on June 4, 2019, Alberts smuggled that heroin into Coffee Creek, and later provided it to the inmate.  Just a few days later, an Oregon Department of Corrections investigator seized a small amount of methamphetamine and over 6 grams heroin from the inmate.  An investigation by the ODOC and FBI revealed that the seized heroin was, in fact, the same heroin that Alberts had obtained from Jimenez and smuggled into Coffee Creek. Alberts was immediately placed on administrative leave from ODOC.

“This corrections officer selfishly abused his position of trust and in doing so, endangered the lives of vulnerable inmates fighting for their own sobriety” said United States Attorney Billy J. Williams. “Instead of protecting the inmates, he exploited them.  The excellent investigative work of the Oregon Department of Corrections, the Oregon State Police, and the FBI now ensures that a man who once guarded inmates will become one himself.”

DOC Director Colette S. Peters said, “The Oregon Department of Corrections is committed to preventing sexual activity involving employees and the people in our care and custody; and take decisive action when allegations are brought forward. When DOC’s Inspector General’s Office and the leadership at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility received a tip about Alberts’s criminal behavior, the agency immediately acted by launching an internal investigation and contacting state and federal law enforcement. Our goal was to ensure a thorough investigation, a fair process, and prosecution, if warranted. We have thousands of employees who provide outstanding public service each and every day. I would like to thank our partners at the US Attorney General’s Office, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Oregon State Police, and the Washington County District Attorney’s office for their cooperation and seeing Alberts sentenced for his illegal and dishonorable behavior.”

"Alberts abused his position of power over the Coffee Creek inmates with the trafficking of meth and heroin," said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. "Instead of ensuring a safe environment for these women as he should have been, he exploited addiction and targeted a vulnerable population for his own gain. We can't let such behavior stand."

Alberts faces a maximum sentence of is 20 years of imprisonment, three years of supervised release and a fine of $1,000,000. As part of the plea agreement, defendant agreed to immediately resign from the Oregon Department of Corrections, where he is currently on unpaid administrative leave. Defendant also agreed to immediately and permanently decertify as a law enforcement officer with the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training. So long as defendant demonstrates an acceptance of responsibility, the parties will jointly recommend a sentence of 12 months and 1 day of imprisonment, to be followed by a three-year term of supervised release.

In addition, Alberts has agreed with the Washington County District Attorney’s Office to waive indictment and plead guilty to the offense of Custodial Sexual Misconduct in the First Degree under ORS 163.452 (a Class C felony). At sentencing, both parties will recommend that Alberts receives a sentence of three years of formal probation, including conditions that Alberts will participate in an evaluation, and if indicated, participate in sex treatment. 

 The Oregon Department of Corrections, Oregon State Police and the FBI investigated this case. It is being prosecuted by Craig Gabriel and Scott Bradford, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

 The U.S. Department of Justice and U.S. Attorney’s Office are committed to enforcing the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA). PREA requires the development and promulgation of “national standards for the detection, prevention, reduction, and punishment of prison rape.” These standards, like the law mandating them, are intended to address a serious public safety, public health, and human rights problem—the incidence of sexual violence in our nation’s confinement facilities. To learn more about PREA, please visit:  https://bja.ojp.gov/program/prison-rape-elimination-act-prea/overview.




Attached Media Files: Sherwood Corrections Officer Pleads Guilty to Smuggling Drugs into Coffee Creek Women's Prison

Oregon Latinx Leadership Network distributes needed PPE to Latino and indigenous communities (Photo)
Legacy Health - 11/23/20 11:55 AM
2020-11/419/140280/11.19.OLLN.PPE.Delivery2.jpg
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November 23, 2020

For Immediate Release

                                                                                                            Contact: Anthony Veliz, 503-953-2128                   Aveliz@izomarketing.com                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

 Oregon Latinx Leadership Network distributes needed PPE to Latino and indigenous communities

WOODBURN, Ore. – The Oregon Latinx Leadership Network (OLLN) recently launched a health and safety campaign, “Por Mi Familia,” to encourage Oregon’s Latino and indigenous populations to be safe during the coronavirus pandemic. They followed the launch with a purchase of five million pieces of personal protection equipment, or PPE,  to distribute throughout Oregon to vulnerable Latino and indigenous communities to prevent the spread of COVID-19. 

“We know wearing a mask can prevent the spread of the virus. However, purchasing much needed PPE can create a financial strain, and we are committed to helping people protect themselves from the virus,” said OLLN founder, Anthony Veliz. “Many of Oregon’s Latinos and indigenous are essential workers who are lacking new or proper PPE which puts them at a higher risk for contracting COVID-19.” The Oregon Latinx Leadership Network has partnered with the Oregon Child Development Coalition (OCDC) and the Oregon Human Development Corporation (OHDC) to distribute the PPE to many rural parts of Oregon.

The OCDC serves families and children in 12 counties in Oregon. They offer services to support migrant and seasonal farmworkers and young children. Many of their clients are at or below the federal poverty level.  “OCDC is pleased to partner with OLLN to get PPE to our families,” said Donalda Dodson, R.N., MPH, OCDC executive director.  “Families are often responsible for purchasing these items and being able to provide them at no cost is helping to ensure people have masks and other items to keep them safe.”

The OHDC provides services for farm workers and disadvantaged individuals throughout Oregon. OLLN has partnered with this nonprofit human service organization to help distribute PPE to small businesses and over 50 community-based organizations that serve Latino communities. “OHDC is honored to partner with the Oregon Latinx Leadership Network to serve Oregon’s farm working community,” said Silvia Muñoz Lozano with OHDC’s National Farmworkers Program. “During this time of COVID, our farmworkers remain vulnerable to the spread of the virus.  OHDC will ensure PPE is visible and accessible for one of Oregon’s most vulnerable essential workers.”

Veliz says the costs of masks, gloves, and other forms of PPE can created added stress on families, small business owners, and community-based organizations that serve the Latino community. “It is critical that we break down any barriers to help people get proper PPE. In Oregon, thirty-five percent of the people who contracted COVID-19 have been Latino. Affordability cannot be a reason for people not being able to protect themselves and their loved ones at home. This is what we should be doing during this unprecedented time: working together to solve problems and taking care of our communities.”

Photo credit: Jorge Rodriguez, OLLN

About the Oregon Latinx Leadership Network - The Oregon Latinx Leadership Network exists to build and strengthen community and resilience among our Latinx community, to organize and advocate around a strategic budget and policy agenda, and to partner with leaders and public officials to advance change to enhance the wellbeing of all Oregonians.

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/419/140280/OLLN.purchases.PPE.11.19.2020.docx , 2020-11/419/140280/11.19.OLLN.PPE.Delivery2.jpg , 2020-11/419/140280/11.19.OLLN.PPE.Delivery1.jpg

UPDATE -- AGE-PROGRESSED SKETCH: Decades-old skull identified as belonging to young woman who died in 1970s; detectives seek tips (Photo)
Clackamas Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/23/20 11:32 AM
2020-10/624/139379/86-025724-WandaHerr-Age12.jpg
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UPDATE (Monday, Nov. 23) -- AGE-PROGRESSED DRAWING OF WANDA HERR

Detectives working with a forensic artist have produced the attached age-progressed sketch of Wanda Herr.

The drawing approximates how Wanda might have looked at age 19 in 1976, when she disappeared.

Our October release on this cold case is below. Anyone who knew Wanda Ann Herr, her associates or her whereabouts in the 1970s  is urged to contact the Sheriff’s Office Tip Line — by phone at 503-723-4949 or by using the online email form at https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/tip. Please reference CCSO Case # 86-025724.


EARLIER (Oct. 22, 2020) -- Decades-old skull identified as belonging to young woman who died in 1970s; detectives seek tips

Please reference CCSO Case # 86-025724

In 1986, two U.S. Forest Service workers found a partial human skull near Government Camp, Oregon.

Earlier this year, genetic and genealogical investigators finally identified the skull as belonging to 19-year-old Wanda Ann Herr. Today, the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office is asking for the public's help as it resurrects a decades-old cold case -- and investigates Wanda's mysterious disappearance and death in the late 1970s.


A mysterious skull

The case began on Aug. 2, 1986. Two Forest Service workers discovered a partial skull, several bone fragments, and a single human tooth on Still Creek Road 2612 and Road 145, near Government Camp off Highway 26.

Eleven days later, an Oregon State Police forensic examiner determined the skull likely belonged to a twentysomething woman or small man. He also estimated the skull had been in the woods approximately 10 years -- putting the subject's death on or around 1976.

In 2005, the remains were re-inventoried and re-curated at the Clackamas County Medical Examiner's Office. But the case otherwise lay dormant until 2008, nearly 22 years after the initial find, when Dr. Nici Vance -- the State Forensic Anthropologist with the Oregon State Police -- re-examined the skull. This, combined with DNA analysis of the skull at the University of North Texas, allowed for a refined victim description: The skull belonged to a female in her late teens to early 20s.

That same year, 2008, Sheriff's Office Forensic Imaging Specialist Joyce Nagy completed a facial reconstruction from the skull, in clay. The task was complicated by the partial remains: The lower half of the skull was missing. The reconstruction nevertheless generated a number of tips, but no solid leads.

The DNA profile of the skull was then uploaded into the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) and the case was entered into the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs). But the trail remained cold.

Until last year.


A genetic breakthrough

In January 2019, the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office received National Institute of Justice (NIJ) grant funds to perform forensic genetic genealogy and DNA phenotyping on 100 unidentified human skeletal remains cases. This combination of intensive genetic analysis and in-depth genealogical legwork was made famous as the process used to track down the Golden State Killer in 2018.

DNA phenotyping predicts the physical appearance and ancestry of an unknown person from their DNA; genetic genealogy can help identify an unknown person by searching for relatives in public databases and building family trees.

The Government Camp skull was among those sent out for the grant-funded investigation. It was also the first to produce a major finding.

First, the University of North Texas flagged the skull as having an existing DNA extract with extensive genetic information. Then, in December 2019, Parabon Nanolabs received the DNA extract and subjected it to in-depth genetic genealogy and DNA phenotyping.

The intensive genetic analysis revealed far more detail about the subject: The skull belonged to a female of Northern European descent with fair skin, hazel/brown eyes, brown hair, and some freckles.

This new info, combined with extensive genealogical research, soon revealed a likely name for the young woman: Wanda Ann Herr, born in 1957.

Detectives obtained Wanda's birth certificate and contacted her surviving sisters. Further DNA testing with the cooperation of the sisters confirmed it: The partial skull was that of Wanda Herr.


Detectives seek info on Wanda from mid-1970s

Based on interviews with the sisters, Wanda is believed to have disappeared sometime after June 1976, when she was 19 years old. At the time she may have been living in a group home in the Gresham area.

Info about Wanda is scarce. She was raised in a different household than her sisters. Though detectives believe she was a chronic runaway based on interviews, there are no records of Wanda as a runaway or missing person. She had no DMV record, no bank account, and there are no police reports that mention her. Attached is a photo of Wanda taken when she was just 12 years old -- seven years before her disappearance.

Detectives are working to discover more of her story -- and learn what led to her disappearance and death. If you knew or met Wanda in the 1970s, detectives want to hear from you.

Anyone who knew Wanda Ann Herr, her associates or her whereabouts in the 1970s  is urged to contact the Sheriff’s Office Tip Line — by phone at 503-723-4949 or by using the online email form at https://www.clackamas.us/sheriff/tip . Please reference CCSO Case # 86-025724.

INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITY: Dr. Vance and Sheriff's Office detectives are available to speak about the case. Contact PIO Sgt. Mendoza for details.

[END]




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/624/139379/86-025724-WandaHerr-Age12.jpg , 2020-10/624/139379/PartialSkull.jpg , 2020-11/624/139379/86-85724-AgeProgressionSketch.jpg

ODF seeks public comment on revisions to Santiam State Forest Implementation Plan through Dec. 23
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 11/23/20 11:29 AM

SALEM, Ore. – With about 24,700 acres of the 47,000-acre Santiam State Forest in 2020 wildfire perimeters, the Oregon Department of Forestry is accepting public comment through December 23 on a revised implementation plan for ODF’s North Cascade District focused on forest restoration. This covers aspects of forest restoration such as replanting, salvage harvesting, and public safety.

A 30-day public comment period on the draft Implementation Plan opens Monday, Nov. 23 and ends at 5 p.m. December 23. Implementation Plans provide guidance on how to enact management strategies described in the Northwest Oregon State Forest Management Plan, including timber harvest, road construction and maintenance, reforestation and young stand management, recreation, aquatic habitat restoration, and protection for species of concern. You can find the draft Implementation Plan and other information on the Santiam State Forest restoration by visiting https://www.oregon.gov/odf/recreation/Pages/santiam-state-forest.aspx.

This revised plan would replace the current Implementation Plan for the Santiam State Forest and extend through June 30, 2023. It provides a broad overview of strategies and activities with the aim of re-establishing a healthy, productive forest that provides the economic, environmental, and social benefits required by law on state forests.

ODF will host a virtual public forum via Zoom at 1:30-3:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 8 to provide an overview of damage to the forest post-fire, ODF’s initial plans for forest restoration, and take public input. The link to view or participate in the meeting will be posted at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/recreation/Pages/santiam-state-forest.aspx. Public comment can be submitted using this form, by emailing ODF.SFComments@oregon.gov or mailing comment to ODF Public Affairs, 2600 State St., Salem OR 97310.

Most aspects of state forest activities are funded through the sale of timber. In this case, revenue from salvage harvesting will help pay for mitigating environmental impacts from the fire, replanting, and restoring and enhancing popular recreation areas. Most developed recreation trails and facilities were impacted by the fire, and this plan outlines initial steps for repair and restoration.

About the Santiam State Forest: The Santiam State Forest is a 47,465-acre forest managed by the Oregon Department of Forestry spread across Marion, Linn and Clackamas counties in the Cascade Mountain foothills. About 98% is owned by the Board of Forestry, with a small amount of Common School Forest Lands. Board of Forestry lands by law must be managed to be healthy, productive and provide sustainable economic, environmental and social benefits to Oregonians. About 24,700 acres of the forest were in the footprint of the 2020 Beachie Creek, Lionshead and Riverside fires.


Oregon State Correctional Institution reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 11/23/20 11:27 AM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died November 23, 2020. He was incarcerated at the Oregon State Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19. He was between 50 and 60 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the seventeenth AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 13,100 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state.

Anyone entering DOC property is required to wear a mask or face covering in any indoor work setting or other indoor premises regardless of distance from others unless they are in a private, individual office not shared by anyone else; or they are actively eating or drinking AND at least six (6) feet of distance can be maintained between other people. Wearing masks is mandatory at all times in health services areas, some work areas, and in food services areas. Face coverings have been provided to AICs and staff. If an AIC becomes ill and exhibits flu-like symptoms, CDC and OHA guidance for supportive care are followed.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. This screening includes a temperature check and a screening questionnaire. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC is working with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.

####


System of Care Advisory Council meets December 1
Oregon Health Authority - 11/23/20 11:03 AM

November 23, 2020

Program contact: Hilary Harrison, 503-209-1949, y.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us">hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us

What: A regular public meeting of the System of Care Advisory Council.

When: December 1, 12:30-4:30 p.m.

Where: By webinar at https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/706039269 or by teleconference at 872-240-3212, access code 706-039-269. Please note only council members may speak until the public comment time.

Agenda: The full agenda can be found on the advisory council's webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HSD/BH-Child-Family/Pages/SOCAC.aspx. The meeting will include time for public comment.

Details: Senate Bill 1 (2019) established a Governor-appointed System of Care Advisory Council to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of the state and local continuum of care that provides services to youth and young adults. The council's immediate work is to develop and maintain a state System of Care and a comprehensive long-range plan for a coordinated state system.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Hilary Harrison at 503-209-1949, 711 TTY, or y.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us">hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us at least two business days before the meeting.


Oregon Safeway and Albertsons Shoppers Register Support for Schools and Hunger (Photo)
Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council - 11/23/20 11:00 AM
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Generous Safeway and Albertsons shoppers in communities throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington are making a substantial impact for local schools – at a time when students need it the most. As part of the Nourishing Neighbors program and the “Help Feed Families During the Crisis” campaign, $450,000 in emergency grant funding is supporting 159 local schools.

In Oregon, there are more than half a million people who do not get enough to eat, and more than 194,000 of them are children. An estimated 1 in 6 kids nationally lived with food insecurity heading into the pandemic, and now it is expected to be closer to 1 in 4 as more households are struggling with declining income or unemployment.

In partnership with GENYOUth, a national nonprofit that creates healthier school communities, Safeway and Albertsons and other contributors are funding grants to supply much-needed resources for meal distribution and delivery. Nationally, more than $10 million has been deployed in emergency funding supporting more than 8,600 schools.

From soft-sided coolers, bags and containers for individual servings, to protective gear for food service sanitation and safety, this equipment will ensure that children continue to receive the nutritious meals they need.

“Our meal program has provided nearly 200,000 meals free of charge to the children in our community over the last 6 months,” said Alex Singer, Nutrition Services Director for Central School District in Independence/Monmouth. “The support from Safeway and Albertsons has shown how communities can rise up and come together to support the needs of children.”

Through donations at the cash register, the Nourishing Neighbors program raises awareness, engages volunteers and raises funds to support innovative and effective programs throughout the country. The program ensures every child in America has access to nutritious food. It is part of the Albertsons Companies Foundation, which has invested over $1 billion in communities nationwide since 2001.

“I truly hope our customers know that when they say yes at the PIN pad, they are helping children in their very neighborhood receive immediate and much needed hunger relief,” said Gineal Davidson, President, Portland Division of Safeway Albertsons.

Amidst the tumultuous and unpredictable year this has been, the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council is sharing positive and inspiring stories like this one as part of their "Thanks4Giving" campaign this week. New stories will be featured on their social media channels every day through Thanksgiving using the hashtag #Thanks4Giving.


About Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council
The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council (ODNC) works on behalf of all dairy farm families and dairy processors throughout the state of Oregon. Building trust and demand for Oregon dairy products and support for those who make them is accomplished through efforts and involvement in schools, health and wellness, communications and industry development.

About Albertsons Companies
Albertsons Companies is a leading food and drug retailer in the United States. The company operates stores across 34 states and the District of Columbia under 20 well-known banners including Albertsons, Safeway, Vons, Jewel-Osco, Shaw's, Acme, Tom Thumb, Randalls, United Supermarkets, Pavilions, Star Market, Haggen and Carrs. Albertsons Cos. is committed to helping people across the country live better lives by making a meaningful difference, neighborhood by neighborhood. In 2019 alone, along with the Albertsons Companies Foundation, the company gave $225 million in food and financial support. In 2020, Albertsons Cos. made a $53 million commitment to community hunger relief efforts and a $5 million commitment to organizations supporting social justice. These efforts have helped millions of people in the areas of hunger relief, education, cancer research and treatment, social justice and programs for people with disabilities and veterans' outreach.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/4131/140277/Central_School_District_grant_recipients_5.jpg , Grant recipients from Central School District , Grant recipients from Central School District , Grant recipients from Central School District , Grant recipients from Central School District , Nourishing Neighbors graphic

Oregon Employment Department Begins Issuing Waiting Week; Benefits 246,300 Oregonians to receive a combined total of $176 million in benefits in initial payment run
Oregon Employment Department - 11/23/20 10:59 AM

Nov. 23, 2020 (Salem, OR)--Today the Oregon Employment Department announced it has begun paying the ‘waiting week’ for eligible Oregonians who received regular unemployment insurance (UI) benefits since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Today’s announcement comes one week ahead of the Employment Department’s end of November goal to begin paying the waiting week.

“We are very pleased to announce that many Oregonians will now start seeing the waiting week benefits they have been waiting for,” said David Gerstenfeld, acting director of the Oregon Employment Department. “Our IT and Unemployment Insurance teams have worked incredibly hard to implement programming changes that allow us to issue payments at this scale. Oregonians have been patient with us, and we thank them.”

The waiting week is the first week of a regular UI claim when a person meets all eligibility requirements. Traditionally, claimants do not receive benefits that week. The waiting week has been waived for regular UI initial claims filed March 8, 2020 through Jan. 2, 2021. Eligible initial claims for regular UI filed by Jan. 2, 2021 will receive a waiting week payment. Oregonians who received Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) or Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) will not receive a waiting week payment, as those programs pay claimants' first eligible week.

The Department esimates 246,300 Oregonians have been issued payments today totaling $176 million. Most claimants can expect to receive their waiting week benefit by their typical method of payment within three business days.

“We know some claimants still have to wait to receive their payments, and we want them to know that we’re working hard to get them their funds as quickly as possible,” Gerstenfeld said.

Payments for an estimated 170,000 people will be delayed because they have to be manually processed. The Department estimates that while most will people will receive their waiting week benefit by the end of December, it may take until the end of January for claimants receiving Pandemic Unemployment Emergency Compensation (PEUC), Extended Benefits (EB), or benefits through Workshare to receive their waiting week payment.

Eligible claimants will receive the same weekly amount as their regular unemployment benefit amount. However, state law restricts claimants from receiving more than the maximum benefit amount for their claim. For most claims, the maximum benefit amount is 26 times the weekly benefit amount or 26 weeks of benefits. The waiting week does not add any more benefits to a claim balance or the maximum benefit amount.

Eligible claimants whose waiting week falls between March 29, 2020 and July 25, 2020 also will receive the $600 Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation payment in addition to their weekly benefit amount.

Eligible claimants whose waiting week falls between July 26, 2020 and Sept. 5, 2020 and who have certified that they are COVID impacted will receive the $300 LWA payment in addition to their weekly benefit amount.

The waiting week is taxable under federal and state law like other unemployment benefits. If a claimant has taxes withheld from their benefits, they also will be withheld from the waiting week. Child support will be withheld from the waiting week and $600 FPUC payment. It will not be withheld from LWA.

To see if they have served a waiting week, claimants can review the weeks they have claimed and those that have been paid in the Online Claim System. Claimants can log in to the Online Claims System and select ‘Where is my check?’ Claimants, including those whose waiting week payment will be manually processed, do NOT need to contact the Employment Department to receive their payment.

More information about the waiting week can be found in this FAQ.

###

 

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/930/140274/11_23__Waiting_Week_PR_FINAL_.pdf

TVF&R receives Medtronic Foundation grant for Lucas mechanical CPR devices in Yamhill County
Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue - 11/23/20 10:50 AM

As part of a COVID-19 global relief effort, Medtronic and the Medtronic Foundation contributed
$1.2 million in February to support immediate response efforts and ensure the safety and well-being of frontline healthcare workers.

TVF&R applied for and received a $50,000 grant to purchase three mechanical chest compression devices, which will help minimize responders’ risk for COVID-19 exposure or injury while attempting resuscitation efforts on a patient in cardiac arrest. These devices take the place of a responder performing high-performance chest compressions during a cardiac arrest emergency.

TVF&R’s Medical Director Dr. Mohamud Daya stated, “We are currently closely monitoring the use of these devices and surveying our line personnel who have these devices, as well as those who do not, with regard to the physical and emotional stress encountered when resuscitating patients.”

These devices were placed into service on August 18, 2020 on two advanced life support (ALS) transport ambulances in Newberg and one ALS medic unit in King City.

As part of the grant, TVF&R will initiate an EMS research project to study the use of mechanical chest compressions as it relates to the well-being of emergency responders and patients in cases where resuscitation efforts were performed.

Associate Medical Director Matthew Neth added, “These devices are essential when transporting patients who need ongoing CPR in the back of a moving ambulance since they help to ensure CPR quality and enhance crew safety.”

On-camera interviews about the devices and B-roll of crews using the device in a simulated cardiac event can be arranged by contacting Capt. Nokes at 503-849-6546.

####


Second quarter provider, carrier finances show rebound in revenue after shock of COVID-19 utilization decline
Oregon Health Authority - 11/23/20 10:13 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

November 23, 2020

Second quarter provider, carrier finances show rebound in revenue after shock of COVID-19 utilization decline

Today the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) released new data analysis showing how COVID-19 impacted the health care system during the first half of 2020.  

Data show that hospitals and other providers saw a large decline in utilization during the late spring, which led to significant drops in revenue. Drops in utilization led to fewer payouts for coordinated care organizations (CCOs) and commercial insurers, both of which ended the quarter with increased revenue compared to 2019.

For providers, federal CARES Act, Paycheck Protection Program and other funding helped offset lost revenue. Hospitals’ revenues were stabilized with an estimated $436 million in CARES Act funding in Q2. Other providers, including behavioral health and primary care, indicated in a survey that their financial difficulties were only partially addressed by federal funding programs.

"Federal funding cushioned the financial shock of the first part of the COVID-19 crisis, allowing the health care system to weather that part of the storm," said OHA Director Patrick Allen. "As we face a new wave of COVID-19 cases, the urgency of the need for further federal support for our health care system is clear."

Utilization data on the number of health care services provided show that in March and April, hospitals and other health care providers were facing a difficult set of circumstances, with many clinics closed, elective procedures on hold and Oregonians largely delaying or forgoing care. For instance, compared with the first two quarters of 2019 hospitals saw:

  • 23,721 (-13.8%) fewer inpatient discharges.
  • 125,859 (-17.5%) fewer emergency room visits.
  • 26,034 (-23.8%) fewer outpatient surgeries.

And according to a survey conducted by the Larry A. Green Center in partnership with the Primary Care Collaborative that has been fielded weekly since March 2020, roughly 70% of primary care providers in Oregon saw a decrease in patient volume by more than half. CCOs and commercial insurers noted these decreases in member utilizations as well.

But after hitting lows in April, utilization largely rebounded toward more normal levels in May and June across providers and hospitals.

Due to the utilization drops, providers’ revenues dropped sharply in March and April before federal funding along with state-led stabilization efforts took hold and utilization rebounded. Federal funding supports derived from both the CARES Act and the Paycheck Protection Program, along with state-led stabilization, efforts filled the breach for providers.

Hospitals received substantial federal financial support – largely through the CARES Act. Oregon data shows CARES Act funds contributed to an increase in other operating revenue of $436 million (+237%) from the first quarter. And answers to a a detailed question in the primary care provider survey indicated that "half of Oregon primary care providers received support from the Payroll Protection Program, and more than 40% reported 'other' financial support, which may reflect Provider Relief Funds from the CARES Act."

At the same time OHA released nearly $100 million in quality payments to CCOs for provider support as well as suspending the 2020 quality pool withhold. These boosts, along with the subcapitation and other value-based payment arrangements between CCOs and providers, gave additional stability to provider finances.

CCOs themselves were affected by the postponement of elective medical procedures and members’ delaying care. In April CCOs’ total payments for services decreased 25%, but by June the decline in payments rebounded to within 10% of the pre-COVID-19 average. CCOs' finances were also impacted as membership increased approximately 7% in Q2, as members were no longer allowed to be disenrolled from OHP in most circumstances and as more individuals became eligible for Medicaid. Increased enrollment resulted in CCOs’ increased operating revenue and played a role in increased member service expenditures.

According to DCBS reports, commercial carriers’ net premium income increased 6% and medical spending decreased nearly 4% as compared to January to June 2019.

It is possible that if more individuals access health care in the second half of 2020, carriers will see an uptick in hospital and medical spending.

"We are closely tracking the financial health and viability of our health care system as we move through this pandemic," said Jeremy Vandehey, OHA’s director of health policy and analytics. "Across the system, our health care partners performed admirably in a crisis with the help they received from the federal government, CCOs, and other partners.

"While hospitals received significant aid, primary care, behavioral health and other smaller provider groups received less help and we remain concerned about providers on the front lines of this crisis. This data shows the need for ongoing federal support as cases increase, especially for providers who couldn’t easily access previous support. It also further illustrates the need to move to value-based payment models that are not tied to the number of visits to a providers office."

Further resources:

 

# # #

 


Home of Elderly Person Struck Multiple Times by Gunfire
Portland Police Bureau - 11/23/20 10:13 AM
On November 22, 2020, 8:58 p.m., officers from North Precinct responded to the 12600 block of Northeast Fremont Street on reports of shots being fired in the area. When officers arrived they discovered a residence in the area had been struck multiple times by gunfire.

Several of the bullets traveled through two different bedrooms, broke a window, went through walls, and the ceiling. The residence was occupied at the time by an elderly resident and a care giver, neither of which were injured.

No arrests have been made.

Anyone with information about this shooting is asked to call Portland Police at 503 823-3333. Please reference case number 20-349009.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 cash for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Crime Stoppers of Oregon is funded 100% by community donations. To support Crime Stoppers with a donation, please visit http://www.crimestoppersoforegon.com/

###PPB###

Silver Falls State Park Christmas Festival canceled for 2020
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 11/23/20 9:58 AM

SILVERTON, Oregon – The annual Christmas Festival at Silver Falls State Park is canceled for the safety of visitors, volunteers and park staff during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The festival is a well-loved and well-attended tradition for many Oregonians,” said Guy Rodrigue, park manager for Silver Falls State Park. “Many of the crafts and other family events are held indoors and this year there was no practical way to maintain physical distancing and public gathering requirements.”

Rodrigue added that everyone is looking forward to hosting the festival in 2021.

The park and the Friends of Silver Falls Nature Store remain open, although some trails and roads in the southeast corner of the park are closed because of the wildfires earlier this fall. For the latest information, visit the Silver Falls State Park web page.

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Deputies Investigating House Fire Caused by Suspected Speed Racing Crash (Photo)
Washington Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/23/20 7:35 AM
Scene Photo 2
Scene Photo 2
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/1128/140265/thumb_Division_Scene_2.JPG

Deputies Investigating House Fire Caused by Suspected Speed Racing Crash

November 23, 2020

On Monday, November 23, 2020, at 1:14 a.m., Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to assist officers with the Beaverton Police Department near SW 167th Avenue and SW Division Street in Aloha. An officer in the area reported that he had observed two vehicles speed racing but was unable to stop the vehicles. Deputies responded to investigate after learning that both vehicles had crashed into a home in the area, causing a fire.

Investigators and personnel from Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue (TVF&R) worked together to quickly evacuate two people from inside the home.

During the investigation, deputies learned that the vehicles involved were a silver 2009 Honda Accord and a black 2010 Lexus 250. The vehicles were traveling west on SW Division Street toward SW 167th Avenue. The Lexus crashed into the front of a home at 5375 SW 167th Avenue. The Honda then crashed into the garage of the house, hitting an SUV that was parked in the garage. The impact of this second crash is believed to have started the fire, which quickly spread to the house.

Deputies arrested the driver of the Honda, 23-year-old Andrez Velasquez, of Beaverton. A passenger in the vehicle, a 23-year-old female, sustained non-life threatening injuries. Mr. Velasquez was booked into the Washington County Jail on the following charges:

  • Driving under the influence of intoxicants (DUII)
  • Reckless driving
  • Assault in the third degree
  • Criminal mischief in the second degree
  • Reckless Endangering (3x)

The driver of the Lexus, a 21-year-old female was transported to a local hospital with serious injuries. Deputies issued her a criminal citation for the following charges:

  • Driving under the influence of intoxicants
  • Reckless driving
  • Criminal mischief in the second degree
  • Reckless endangering (2x)

An arson investigator from the sheriff’s office responded to the scene, along with investigators from TVF&R. Investigators believe that the quick actions of responders tonight likely saved the lives of the occupants inside the home. Thankfully, no one in the home was injured. A cat was found deceased in the residence and a dog was transported to a local animal hospital.

The inter-agency Crash Analysis and Resconstruction Team (CART) responded to assist with the investigation.




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1128/140265/MR201123_Deputies_Investigating_House_Fire_Caused_by_Suspected_Speed_Racing_Crash_94.pdf , Scene Photo 2 , Scene Photo , Scene Photo 3

Include a visit to OregonHealthCare.gov this Thanksgiving holiday | As gatherings go virtual, families and friends can help each other access health insurance
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 11/23/20 5:00 AM

(Salem) – Parents, grandparents, and concerned friends across Oregon: Use this year’s unorthodox virtual holiday gatherings to your advantage.

To help slow the spread of the novel coronavirus, families and friends are encouraged to gather virtually this year. With access to the internet, and the ability to share screens, some individuals are seeing this as the perfect time to walk an uninsured person through signing up for health insurance.

“We are hearing that many Oregonians are getting really creative this year,” said Chiqui Flowers, administrator of the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace. “They’re planning to watch a movie on Teleparty and others may play trivia. Signing up for health insurance could be part of the mix. Please consider signing yourself up and also take advantage of these unique virtual gatherings to offer to help a loved one get insured by going to OregonHealthCare.gov.”

Consumers can peruse plans and find out how much of a subsidy they are eligible for by going to OregonHealthCare.gov/windowshop.

Oregonians who do not get health insurance through their job or a program such as the Oregon Health Plan or Medicare can go to OregonHealthCare.gov to see if they may qualify for help paying for 2021 coverage. Even if people are temporarily uninsured, they can sign up for help. The deadline to sign up to get health insurance for next year is Tuesday, Dec. 15.

“You can get help paying for health insurance based on your income,” said Flowers. “Don’t assume you make too much to be eligible.”

Individuals making up to $51,040 per year and families of four making up to $104,800 may get help paying for coverage. In 2020, more than seven in 10 Oregonians who chose plans through HealthCare.gov got financial help for monthly premiums and out-of-pocket costs. These savings lowered the average premium to just $145 per month.

To apply, people should go to OregonHealthCare.gov before Dec. 15 and answer a few Oregon-specific questions to get to the right application for them. Also, they can search the “get help” directory on the site to find an insurance agent or community partner organization that can help them complete the application and enroll. Insurance agents and community partners provide local, one-on-one assistance at no charge to the client. This help is available virtually and over the phone.

###

The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov, and a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.


Missing Person, Richard Mcclory (Photo)
Vancouver Police Dept. - 11/23/20 1:12 AM
2020-11/385/140257/Richard_Mcclory_.png
2020-11/385/140257/Richard_Mcclory_.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/385/140257/thumb_Richard_Mcclory_.png

UPDATE

Missing person has been located safe.  Thank you for your assistance. 

 

 

 

The Vancouver Police Department is asking for assistance in locating, Richard T Mcclory. Richard is a 28 year old, Caucasian male, 5'11, 190lbs, Brown Hair, and Hazel eyes. Richard was last seen wearing a burgundy hoody, blue jeans and black shoes. Richard is driving a white 2017 Kia Soul, WA plates BSD0771. 

Richard left home and did not take his prescribed medications which he needs to take on a daily basis. 

Anyone with information is asked to call 911 or 311. 




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/385/140257/Richard_Mcclory_.png

Sun. 11/22/20
Fatal Crash on SE Division St, Major Crash Team Responding (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/22/20 10:36 PM
SE Division Street Crash
SE Division Street Crash
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/3056/140263/thumb_SE_Division_Crash_2.jpg
A fatal crash has closed Southeast Division Street near Southeast 136th Avenue.

On Sunday, November 22, 2020 at 8:07p.m., East Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a crash on Southeast Division Street near Southeast 136th Avenue. When officers and paramedics arrived, they found occupants of two cars with severe injuries. The patients were transported to the hospital by ambulance.

Officers later learned that despite lifesaving efforts of medical professionals, one of the occupants died.

The Portland Police Traffic Division Major Crash Team (photo) is on scene and investigating. Southeast Division Street will remain closed at Southeast 136th Avenue for several hours.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be released after investigators learn more.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: SE Division Street Crash

Clackamas Fire District Responds to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Clackamas Fire Dist. #1 - 11/22/20 9:34 PM

Just after 6:00pm Clackamas Fire District # 1 was dispatched to Frog Pond Lane in Estacada for a report of carbon monoxide poisoning.  

Crews arrived on scene and found the source of the poisoning to be propane powered equipment being used in an enclosed structure without proper ventilation.

Crews quickly went to work performing patient care on four victims while securing the source of the carbon monoxide poisoning, ventilating the structure and monitoring carbon monoxide levels.

One person was transported to Randall Children’s Hospital for observation.

Crews on scene included Engine 330, Hazmat 303, Truck 319, BC 301, three AMR units, an AMR Supervisor and Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office.

Clackamas Fire District would like to remind you that when using propane powered equipment you should have proper ventilation. In addition, carbon monoxide alarms should be installed in a central location outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home and in other locations where required by applicable laws, codes or standards.

If the carbon monoxide alarm sounds, immediately move to a fresh air location outdoors or by an open window or door. Make sure everyone inside the home is accounted for. Call for help from a fresh air location and stay there until emergency personnel declare that it is safe to re-enter the home.

 


Oregon reports 1,517 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 11/22/20 1:03 PM

Nov. 22, 2020

Contact: OHA External Relations, 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us 

Oregon reports 1,517 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — For the third straight day, the Oregon Health Authority reported a record-breaking high -- 1,517 -- of new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 in Oregon, bringing the state total to 65,170.

COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 820, OHA reported as of 12:01 a.m. today.

“Oregon is on a steep and stark slope of rising Coronavirus cases,” OHA Director Patrick Allen said. “But we aren’t powerless in the face of this virus. Because it depends on us to slow the spread. Your choices make a difference.

“Local health officials in every part of the state have investigated outbreaks that started with get-togethers that seemed innocent at the time, but led to many people getting sick, and in some cases, hospitalizations and deaths.

“This Thanksgiving, cancel any plans you have to celebrate indoors with large groups of family and friends. The safest, wisest and most caring way to protect the people you love is to keep your Thanksgiving dinner small and limited to no more than one other household beside your own. Keep the holidays a time to remember, not a time to regret.”

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (7), Clackamas (207), Clatsop (7), Columbia (8), Coos (9), Crook (6), Deschutes (38), Douglas (12), Grant (15), Hood River (6), Jackson (55), Jefferson (8), Josephine (14), Klamath (53), Lake (6), Lane (64), Lincoln (1), Linn (27), Malheur (16), Marion (183), Morrow (7), Multnomah (516), Polk (26), Umatilla (47), Union (5), Wasco (11), Washington (128), and Yamhill (35).

Oregon’s 820th COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 15 and died on Nov. 15. Place of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

County

Cases (1)

Total deaths (2)

Negative tests (3)

Baker

257

3

2,762

Benton

709

7

21,746

Clackamas

5,353

76

90,277

Clatsop

333

0

7,985

Columbia

422

3

10,104

Coos

383

1

10,731

Crook

190

6

3,893

Curry

105

2

2,706

Deschutes

1,911

14

46,678

Douglas

804

15

18,130

Gilliam

21

0

430

Grant

122

1

1,372

Harney

86

1

1,127

Hood River

361

1

6,681

Jackson

3,356

23

49,176

Jefferson

765

11

6,563

Josephine

431

4

17,204

Klamath

685

4

13,392

Lake

98

0

1,212

Lane

3,820

37

93,714

Lincoln

563

13

11,599

Linn

1260

18

24,230

Malheur

2,308

39

7,235

Marion

8,321

127

72,521

Morrow

619

7

2,405

Multnomah

14,988

210

209,670

Polk

1,051

15

14,771

Sherman

23

0

445

Tillamook

111

0

4,150

Umatilla

4,099

48

17,647

Union

691

2

6,007

Wallowa

70

2

1,435

Wasco

472

18

6,853

Washington

8,815

96

133,636

Wheeler

2

0

210

Yamhill

1,565

16

25,747

Total

65,170

820

944,444

1 - This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2 - For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3 - This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.


Two Takeover-Style Armed Robberies Being Investigated (Photo)
Portland Police Bureau - 11/22/20 11:52 AM
Windshied damage to vehicle 2
Windshied damage to vehicle 2
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/3056/140260/thumb_Bullet_Into_Vehicle_2_20348339.JPG
Two takeover-style armed robberies overnight, one where gunshots were fired, are being investigated by Portland Police robbery detectives.

On Sunday November 22, 2020 at 1:29a.m., North Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of an armed robbery at a convenience store in the 4500 block of Northeast 60th Avenue. Two suspects, who were armed with guns and stole cash, left the area before police were called.

Then at 1:51a.m., officers got another armed robbery call, this one at a convenience store in the 7300 block of North St. Louis Avenue, and that a shot was fired. Officers responded and learned that at least one of the two suspects fired shots at two vehicles outside the store as they left the area (photos). One victim was injured by shattered glass. Cash and merchandise were stolen.

Robbery detectives responded and are currently investigating the crimes. They are looking into whether the robberies are related.

If anyone has any information about these robberies, please contact Detective Brett Hawkinson at Brett.Hawkinson@portlandoregon.gov or Crime Stoppers.

Tips may be submitted safely and securely to Crime Stoppers of Oregon online at http://crimestoppersoforegon.com/ .

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards of up to $2,500 for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips from your smart phone.

###PPB###



Attached Media Files: Windshied damage to vehicle 2 , Bullet damage to vehicle 1

Wrong Way Commercial Motor Vehicle Crashes on Interstate 5 - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 11/22/20 8:46 AM
2020-11/1002/140258/SP20329033_picture.jpg
2020-11/1002/140258/SP20329033_picture.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-11/1002/140258/thumb_SP20329033_picture.jpg

On Sunday, November 22, 2020 at approximately 1:37 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers received reports of a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) driving northbound in the southbound lanes on Interstate 5 near milepost 163. 

An officer from the Cottage Grove Police Department located and attempted to stop the CMV.  The CMV drove onto the shoulder and continued northbound in an attempt to elude the officer. 

Near milepost 173 the CMV (2020 International), operated by Tylor Stafford (53) of Shelbyville, Texas, crashed into a southbound CMV (2019 Volvo) operated by Daryl Rickman (53) of Portland, Oregon. 

Stafford's CMV (2020 International) then crashed into the concrete barrier and burst into flames. 

Stafford attempted to run on foot however he was captured by an officer from the Cottage Grove Police Department. 

Stafford was arrested for multiple charges including DUII, Reckless Driving, and Reckless Endangering. 

Stafford nor Rickman were injured. 

The northbound lanes were closed for approximately 30 minutes and the southbound lanes for approximately 3 hours. 

OSP was assisted by Cottage Grove Police Department, Lane County Sheriff's Office, South Lane Fire and Rescue, and ODOT.  




Attached Media Files: 2020-11/1002/140258/SP20329033_picture.jpg